Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

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Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00067
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00067

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text



SUPPLEMENT TO

COMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
]ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 55d July 14, 1915

JAPAN.
KOBE.
By Consul George N. West, March 31.
The foreign trade of Kobe for 1914 was as follows: Imports,
$140,160,036; exports, $83,426,273; total, $223,586,309. For 1913
the figures were: Imports, $172,611,271; exports, $84,894,079; total,
$257,505,350. The decrease in 1914 was therefore $33,919,041. This
decrease occurred almost entirely in imports, which showed a falling
off of $32,451,235, while exports decreased only $1,467,806.
Only Four Lines of Imports Showed Increase.
Of the imports only four lines-beans, rapeseed, wool, and pe-
troleum-showed an increase. The increased importation of wool
was accounted for by the augmented demand created by the suspen-
sion of the import of worsted yarn and by the formation of the
Japan Worsted Yarn Co. The increased importation of beans was
ascribed to :. decline in the market in Manchuria. Petroleum was
largely imported late in the year. Coming now to a consideration
of the lines that decreased, it may be said that the falling off in rice
was due to the failure of speculation in the preceding year and to the
low price prevailing in Japan. A depression in exportation of
white sugar to China reduced the purchase of crude sugar, resulting
in decreased imports of that commodity. The decrease in raw cotton
was due to a falling off in the purchase of Indian cotton because of
the suspension of exchange business. The decreased importation of
sulphate of ammonia was a consequence of the depression in the
fertilizer trade and the decreased shipments from England. The de-
pression in the fertilizer trade also decreased the imports of bean-
cake. The importation of artificial indigo from Germany and Swit-
zerland stopped almost entirely after September. The decreased
importation of pig, bar, rod, and sheet iron was caused, in the main,
by the suspension of shipments of German products.
Gray shirtings and cotton prints were crowded out by the home
products, owing to the development in the industry in Japan. A
large stock brought over from the preceding year caused dealers in
woolen, cloths to keep down orders. This, together with the suspen-
sion of the importation of common qualities from Germany. resulted
in a decrease in imports. The economic depression which stopped
construction of new factories reduced the importation of machinery.
Conditions Affecting Export Trade.
Of the principal lines of export rice, tea, camphor, cotton-yarn
fabrics, and copper showed an increase over the figures for the pre-
99019-55d-15----1









2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

ceding year, while straw and other braids, cotton knitted underwear,
porcelain, matting, and matches fell off. The increased shipment of
rice is attributed to the larger demand in America and to orders
received from Europe late in the year as a result of the low prices
ruling in Japan. The iiini.reia-d export of black tea is accounted
for by the _'li.it activity shown in the American marlk't. The
shipm .iint of camphor to Europe fell off, but the increase in the
demand in Amiierica and India more than coii.~ !-:ited for the
diminished d.-iin,;;d in Europe. The low pri,'--. of cotton y..ri and
fabrics in.-n'...i the demand in China and India.
Copper was l: .v-ly sol-I to England, Russia, and America after
the reopening of the copper mail :t in London, and every -tv.inmrr
carried shipments of the metal. Lower prices stil.,ilu,:1 the export
of habutai to An-tr.ili:i. and the value of the silk shipped thither
was double that of the pr.,-colw'g year. The decrea-,rd1 exportation
of braids was due to the total -n.-t,.'ni,,n of shipnn.;it to Germany-
the best market-and also to a temporary suspension of shipiiielit. to
England and France. The braid trade is the one that has suffered
worst from the war, the great decline in exports rt'.:-iting in a heavy
slump in market value. Owing to the change_ of fashion in .inerica.
the demand for matting has been gradually dcliniiig of late, and
the war temporarily stopped exports to Europe. In October the
price of mnattclu- advanced very high in anticipation of the suspen-
sion of importation of supplies of chlorate of potash and other mate-
rials. Large shipments were made to IHongkong and large orders
came in frmin India because of the expected amendment of the law
rc.ga.rding matches, but owing to the depression in export to China
the total shipment showed a decrease.
Foreign Trade of Kobe by Countries.

The value of the imports from and exports to the various countries
is shown in the following table for 1913 and 1914:

Imports from. Exports to.
Countries.
1913 1914 1913 1914


A rTentin n. ....................................
-. c'r 'i-1 .. ...................................
Austria-IlI r- ir;.................................
Asiatic Russie................................
Belgium ........ ..............................
British America.................................
British India ..................................
British Straits Settlements.....................
China.............. ...........................
Chile................ ..........................
Cape Colony and Natal........................
Denmark......................................
Dutch India...................................
F nvpt..........................................
I rt ni-h Indo-China.............................
France......... ...............................
Great Britain..................................
Germany......................................
Il.-i.i *- .............................. ......
Hawaii........................................
Italy............. .............................
K'.. i~r't r.' Province..........................
M .- '. .. ......................................
Netherlands ...................................
Norway ........................................
Peru..........................................
I Ifiliit[:.' Islands .............................
Portugal .......................................
Russia.........................................


.5'.,1
'., 24 1
92. 10n
2, ( .-., -,'1
269,874
54,000,618
1, 673,009
12,102,729
702. 3,
-' .;, 1. .'
5t'i,, .l
2,405,937
1,217,746
6, 028,377
1, .0. ??22
28, 'l 1, ".
15,306,573
164,618
11,069
303,463
3,406,140
2,295
2n-.1?9
**', .,
674, 681
6,547
2,549


3. II 5 4
3 1 4 r,.5
8,170
,1,211.'.!
48,832, 768
1,417,133
9,752,157
512,060
23,377
1,624,246
1,402, 560
3,045,235
1.217.450
21, 'I1,745
11,103,148
68,019
<>, 5M
1>7,*.' 0
3, 288,664
..............
154,410
87,050
91
893,287
1,234
5,717


82, 707
1, '.., ',90
135,870
1,071,162
992,204
6,947,098
1,965, 820
27,668,166
22,444
173,086
114,437
1,556,454
280,400
91,734
2,163,409
6,673,027
4,035,838
9,936,161
1,888,717
688,649
2,717,432
30,388
170,184
805
22,756
1,592,833
4,209
83,276


$35,958
2,540,444
217,649
1,013,486
770,590
935,726
7,486,410
1,696,768
27,513,692
14,248
172,521
78,621
1,523,478
501,606
115,649
1,606,108
6,078,205
3,181,543
9,498,947
1,852,444
414,572
2,632,818
8,796
81,429
2,091
19,660
1,855,718
7,716
75,550










JAPAN-KOBE.


Imports from. Exports to.
Countries.
1913 1914 1913 1914


Spain.......................................... $46,654 526,090 $115,091 554, 806
Sam ........................................... 2,492,707 1,705,251 349,057 123,748
Switzerland.................................... 403,913 JS2,991 6, S28 17,120
Sweden........................................ 1,330,929 1,360,548 23,359 11,852
Turkey ........................................ 5 1 68,058 75,598
United States................................. 31,301,257 25,258,0.37 10,812,7S9 10,945,25;
Other countries................................ 1,674,028 1,464,984 150, 67S 205,430
Total................................... 172,611,271 140,160,036 81,894,079 83,146,273


Principal Imports and Exports at Kobe.

The table below shows the value of the chief imports and exports
at Kobe for 1913 and 1914:
Li, j


Articles.


IM PORTS.

Alpacas, etc..............
Aluminum, ingots........
Aniline dyes..............
Beans, soya...............
Beans, peas, and pulse....
Bicycles, and parts of.....
Condensed milk ..........
Cotton:
In seed...............
Ginned ..............
Yarns...............
Satins...............
Velvets and plushes..
Copper pipes and tubes...
Celuloid.................
Eggs,fresh ..............
Flour, whest.............
Fats, animal..............
Glass, plates and sheets...
Bides, ox, cow. and buffalo
Hemp, jute. flax, etc.....
Hats, caps, and bonnets..
India rubber.............
Indigo, artificial..........
Iron:
Pigs...: ..............
Bars and rods........
Galvanized wire......
Tinned, plated, or
sheets..............
Plates and sheets...
R ai!s.................
Pipes and tubes......
Nails. ...............
Insulated electric wire....
Leather:
Sole..................
Other ...............
Linen yarms..............
Lead, mngots and slabs....
Machinery............
Nitrate of soda, crude.....
Nickel, grains, blockks,
and ingots..............
Oil cake ........... .......
Oil, kerosene or petro-
leum .............. .....
Phosohor ite..............
Phosphorus:
SYellow...............
Red..................
Potash, chlorate of........
Paraffin wax:
Free.................
Other...............
Pencils..................
Pulp for paper manufac-
ture....................


$172,296
92,319
1,465,042
580,561
763, 653
757,344
531,998

098,579
79,665,438
147,763
1,100,440
405,961
105,530
72,449
356, 44
282,029
425,419
6.37, RO0
549, i812
1,208,019
61,734
S58 ,9(83
956,542

3,339,371
3,276,552
391,470

69S,362
2,680,231
401,850
914, 207
227,771
1533,264
5S,7.51
293,320
S, 546
(Sl. 144
6, Of 0,770
702, 830

46S,360
5, 87, E'31

707, 0OS
964, 840
122, 07
192,543
.199,744

358,313
269,168
77,871

1,122,746


$106,576
168,256
898,802
1,012, S05
708,928
310,906
415,252

317,400
70,441,367
81,378
705, 383
177,042
50,594
9,986
310,05.5
204,731
235,338
385,768
293,950
1,232,193
42,076
564,559
716, 277

1,643,530
2,149,140)
481,650

481, 657
1,S21,137
257,0S6
501,427
l1,, 71



58,."'2
602,531
4,778,561
515,005

649,807
5, 10s, 09

939, 99Y2
707, 258

71,301
202,549
415,898

299,7356
347,018
60,511

1,154, 498


Articles.


IMPORTS-cont inued.

Paper:
Printing.............
Packing.............
Other................
R ice......................
Rosin ...................
Rapeseed ..................
Sugar.....................
Sesame seed..............
Shells of mollusca.........
Sulphate of ammonia.....
Soda, caustic.............
Soda ash .................
Sheetiugs. gray............
Shirt ings, white..........
Spinning ma'.hinery......
Tin, ingots and slabs.....
Timber, lumber and
boards.................
Toilet or perfumed water
and oils.................
W heat....................
Wool.....................
Woolen yarns............
W ild silk ..............
Woolen cloths and seres..
Wool and cotton cloths
and .erges ..............
W at-hes ..................
Zinr-:
Incot. and slabs......
Plates and sheeTs-
Free...............
Other ............
All other .............. ..

Total. .............

EXPORTS.

Beans, peas, and pulse...
Bam boos .................
Bamboo, manulIfactures of.
Boards for tea boxes.....
Buttons. shell............
Bronze. manufactures of..
Brushes:
Tooth ................
All other..............
Colle or isinglass, vege-
table .... ..............
Comestibles..............
Cigarettes................
Camphor.................
Camphor oil..............
Colza oil..................
Copper, ingots and slabs..


5 22,292
216,237
685,074
9,626, 92
167,3M9
555, 883
1,277,439
171,123
438,244
5, 023,101
274, 714
399,240
312,214
259. 189
2,217,529
SG, 693

522,855

60, 224
1, 97S. 967
2,279,640
2,236,594
133,647
1,u 76, 4 11)

1,734,104
c7, 131

443,256

4 S, 829
1 ,, 193
15, $01,911


1911




1454,289
153,-720
571,333
4,632,560
S1, 3013
864,305
776,390
217,090
378,496
4,331, 6.S1
265,278
419,300
75,299
113,043
2,079, 64S
6t24, 268

272,2:9

51,S49
1,5-49,297
2,357,077
1,116,4f,3
195,179
629,000

1,408,290
62, 159

222,240

322,899
28,15.2
12, 720, 404


172,611,271 140,416,036


341,080
24-i, 789
(5 3.736'
203,0: 12
1,309, 5S
118,933

33, 277
089,026

570,785
471,701
54, 7S9
1,112,467
204,537
1)39,669
7,114,112


528,465
228,182
07,S42
299,132
1, 1t3,078
85,839

470, 85
773,424

C45,040
408,743
15,591
1,327,733
107,720
640,313
7,309,779


I~










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles.


L X PR-RI-CjII In led.0
( ', i r.nr:
'l I .. .. ..





( worl. ~ ............. .
C' I f, hanging and stand-
igl .................
Coral.... ............... ... .
Cuttle ..................
od ..... ..............
Fish and whale oil..........
F i rs.................. .....
Fans and roiun fans........
Groundnuts.................
ir pr, driod................
S.- manufa tures of......
Hemp brai.ls...............
1 .II...-chi fs..............
Hats, caps, an.l bonnets....
Imitation nankeens.........
Japanese toweling..........
Leather.....................
Lamps, and parts of........
Lanterns, Japanese.........
Lacquered ware............
T.i, i ii. if of scallops.......
Mushrooms, d-ied..........
Mineral water...............
Menthol crystal.............
Match sticks or splints......
Machinery..................
Mattings for floor, in piece..


@',1


1.








1.




1,
2,


1913 1914 Art icles.


i, L .11 -- cl.in i i XI.ioil.

,. ,' 1 l \ .. .. ......
." .i4 'i4 i .'C l ** :: i ,i .. ... .. .. ... ....
",17._. -' 4 1, 11 l o', [l ,| ir U ll l i l ....... .. ..
'' -' ," i 4.I l'it ,,:r
l2.- ;;' _.. .- i r C'l ... . .

373,000 0 .. +',4S7 Pea chccse misoo) .........
217,502 170.284 Seawe '.ls..............
445, 0C4 167,872 Shrimpso an prawns........
Suzar, refined ...............
9il, 420 811,3 1l Sal:e...... ................
148,477 14,t5,i31 Sulphur....................
30oi, ( 1 1,021,894 ,-. .i., i n oil ..... .........
177,777 1 2,4A!4 ': spun ...........
377.545 '; ,1 ii ,,.| Il. braids ......
47.012 Si!k tissues, habutai........
17S, 297 103,013 Shirtings and sheetings, gray
987,973 843,2S5 Socks and stockings....
742,370 1,776,041 Screens ....................
95,219 61, 852 Timber, lumber, and boards
185,274 1,786,951 Toys .......................
166,917 202,667 Tea:
41,513 433 Green..................
123,911 132,712 Black..................
4. ,087 311,012 Dust...................
" ,,956 61,853 Other..................
11i. '7 96,427 Umbrellas, European.......
290,812 'I'. I-".' Waste silk and kibiso......
3 1,. ',i 4, 7.l Waste cotton yarns ........
11i. I".' 120,613 Wax, vegetable............
.',l...,. 545,401 Zinc, ore...................
11.1, 1I.2 131,881 All other...................
502,251 189, .87
921,547 611,378 Total.................


I


Shipping Statistics of Xobe.

The table below shows the tonnage entered and cleared at the port
of Kobe during 1914:

Entered. Cleared.
Nationality. Description.
Number. Tonnage. Number. Tonnage.


American............................ Steamers ......... 57 396, 629 56 387,879
Austrian............... ................do............ 8 29,754 9 32,201
British...................................do............ 509 1,845,650 490 1, 806, 606
Do.............................. Sailing vessels..... 2 4,346 2 4,.30.
Chinese.............................. Steamers .......... 3 1, q, 3 1, 5
Danish.................................... do............ 12 3-", -1,.J 12 35, 803
Dutch............... ....................do............ 20 .1, '44 18 46,475
French.................................... do............ 49 185,729 49 185,729
German................................... do............ 123 467,090 123 467,119
Italian................................ .....do............ 1 1,907 .......... ............
Japanese.............................. .....do ............ 1,897 3,529,125 1,884 3,493,757
Do............................. Sjilin .--el; ..... 5 725 2 366
Norwegian............................ Stl ,erlI .......... 9 18,937 8 17,418
Russian....................................do............ 8 16,774 7 14,155
Swedish....................................do............ 8 21,696 8 21,696
Total............................ .................... 2,711 6,607,974 2,671 6,515,415


Cotton-Spinning Industry.

The first half of 1914 was a prosperous one for the cotton-spinning
industry, both the shipments of yarns and piece goods showing in-
creases over the corresponding period of 1913. In July the demand
commenced to fall off and in August the trade was completely demor-
alized by the outbreak of war. Prices fell rapidly, and the Osaka
Yarn Exchange had to be closed for a while.


1913 1914



:!I. 7t ', 112' K -,, 3.
1 -., 2 ii 4.412, !ilN
2-". 21 l -'A "' _
1') ;7 20 1, ll'J

.'..'- "1 2!' 1

1 .: i 114,889
1,5S2,853 2," 1. .',
341,773 -.", .,
1' '. l;. 167,518
692,475 506, 078
(.(, ,i 606,070
S" 73,419
l, li.1i, 'i.l
1- *l 'n, l .'1
2,692,370 1,572,427
382,665 767,208
2,181,138 2,351,277
472,573 357,737
134,782 93,017
201,218 1 :. 13
i..-' 149 :.;1 ...

518,542 511,861
77,952 235,275
31,116 43,973
11., i17 6,912
54<, 716 579,225
185,670 206,161
1-: -*'1 445,256
4,., 27. 441,485
370,995 181,568
10,034,423 10,711,483

84,894,079 83,426,273




- w w w a


JAPAN-KOBE. 5

The unfavorable prospects in July caused the Japan Cotton Spin-
ners' Association to decide to curtail their production 10 per cent for
six months from August 1 and to stop all spindles two days in each
month, in addition to the usual two days per month stoppage. Mills
that export 60 per cent of their product and those that operate looms
and consume their entire production of yarn are excepted, but these
last are very few.
Notwithstanding the general depression of business, the cotton-
spinning industry attained very satisfactory results from the past
year's work, the total outturn of yarn amounting to 1,663,699 bales,
an increase of about 147,717 bales over 1913. Exports of yarn
amounted to 568,281 bales, an increase of 99,545 bales. On the whole
the demand from China has continued firm and has been the direct
cause of this increase. Apart from questions of price, increased ex-
ports were witnessed in spite of the war. The increase in outturn,
however, was not proportionate to the increase in the number of spin-
dles, since there was a short-time agreement among spinners during
the latter part of the year. An additional 110,000 spindles are shortly
to be put into operation-40,000 by the Settsu Spinning Co., 30,000 by
the Osako Kanegafuchi mill, and 40,000 by the Fuji Spinning Co.
As regards the export of cotton yarn during 1914, there was a
marked decrease in August and September on account of the war, but
generally speaking the demand for this purpose continued to be
strong. The exports during the year reached 508,281 bales, or about
two-thirds of the amount of production. The following table shows
the exports and the home consumption, in bales, for five years:

Years. Export. Home con-
sumption.

1910............................................................................. 374,633 787,147
1911............................................................................... 2 5,009 844,238
1912............................................................................... 374,932 977,277
1913............................................................................. 468,736 1,049,246
1914....................... .......................... ..... .... ...... ............. 568,281 1, 97,41S

Thus it may be observed that, despite the war, the exports in 1914
were far larger than in any of the preceding four years. It may also
be pointed out that the amount shown above as the home consumption
includes the yarn consumed by the spinning mills themselves (about
25,000 bales a month) and by the other weavers (about 20,000 bales
a month) for the weaving of cotton textiles intended for export. It
can therefore safely be said that the amount of cotton yarn for real
home consumption was about 500,000 bales.
Machinery and Metals.
The market for machinery has been dull, few new orders being
placed, in spite of the fact that American machinery is being sought
to take the place of the supply from Germany. The rise in the price
of the raw material hindered the execution of old orders and the
placing of new ones.
Exports of copper received a severe setback on the outbreak of war,
the price dropping to about $17.50, and the mines worked by the Furu-
kawa Co., of Tokyo, and the Sumitomo & Kuhara Co., of Osaka, had
to shut down temporarily. Toward the close of the year exports from
Kobe revived again, and the year showed a small increase over 1913.







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


The exports of zinc ore in 1913 amounted to over 30,000 tons, but
the outlirc.ik of war almost entirely stopped this trade for a time.
The finm.- for 1914 were only about one-half those of the previous
year. Lately the increased d,-manid for the ore in Englih refineries,
caused by the use of the metal in cartridl_ -,. has in.re:i.-ed the price,
and large ordtr.' have been sent to this country. The O-:i1ka and
Mitsui zinc refin-'ri,'-. whose production is not 1mor than 600 tons
per month, have little to spare :it'fir supplying the needs of the
Osaka ar-en 1l. and prices for sheet zinc have ii--ii, nearly 50 per cent
hi 'Le than the lowest quotation since the war broke oiit.
Galvanized iron, both sheet and wire, naturally rn -. in sympathy,
and, with the exception of l-:i all metals have shown a substantial
advance. Speculators who cvr- in an awkward p,.-ition at one time
were able to dispose of their g ,,s at a profit.
Kfanchhirian Cereals-Ag:'ic..'ltural Products Exported f.:om Ja, .an.
Up to 1914 only occasional shipniL.nt- of Minchourian cereals had
I: .vn made to the United States through the port of Kobe, but after
the outbreak of war fer...l up the price of grain these exports as-
sumed large proportions. This was especially true in the case of
linnize, of which about 80,000 tons were shipped by the close of the
year. The quality of this grain is not so g,,od as American, but on
account of its cheapness it is cracke, and used for stock feed on the
Pacific coast. Other cervalh exported w\vre kaoliang, or millet, and
buckwheat.
The exportation of agricultural products from Japan has much
increased of late years, the principal lines b'ing onions and potatoes.
In Senslin (Osaka prefecture) alone onions were produced to the
amount of 24,845,100 pounds in 1913, and the production increased
to 33,126,800 pounds last year, without co igc-ting the market. Now
onions produced in the Hokkaido are being shipped, and prices are
said to be about 25 per cent higher in Japan than last vyor. The
onions are cent to Manila, Hongkong, Shanghai, Vladivostok,
Australia, and the South Sea Islands.
During the past two or three years the area under potatoes in
Osaka prefecture was not more than 750 atcr',, 500 acres in Kvoto
prefecture, and 400 acres in Hyogo prefecture. Lately the demand
for potatoes has considerably increased,, since they are utilized as a
foo, stuff for the troops, for distilling alcohol, for making brea,1, and
also as an article of the popular diet. Since the outbreak of war in
Europe potatoes have begun to be largely exported to Russia. In
1914 the ara of land under potatoes increased to about three times
the figure for the preceding year in the prefectures mentioned, and
it is expected that a further increase will be seen this yvar. The
potatoes mature quickly, and rice can be raised on the same field
after they are gathered. Thus the potato creates an extra revenue,
and is fast gaining in popularity.
Apples and Peanuts-Fertilizer Market.
The demand for apples produced in Japan is rapidly increasing
abroad. In the past five or six years the foreign markets for Japa-
nese fruits and vegetables have been much extended, and their expor-
tation is now beco-iiiing a promising business.
Owing to the heavy crop of peanuts in 1914 and the fact that the
market in America was overstockedl, the price fell markedly toward







JAPAN-KOBE. 7

the close of the year but recovered soon after, with the clearing of
stocks, and the year closed with prices about 15 per cent higher than
at the end of the previous year.
Toward the end of 1914 great depression prevailed in the fertilizer
market, caused by the low price of rice and raw silk in the last half
of the year, which affected the purchasing power of the farmers. The
demand was estimated to be less than one-half that in ordinary seasons.
Dyes, Drugs, and Chemicals.
As was to be expected, the market for all German-made, aniline
dyes went up considerably on the outbreak of war, holders here keep-
ing back their stocks in anticipation of even higher prices. But after
a time market rates declined, as some of these stocks were realized on;
consignments shipped before the war also commenced to arrive, as
well as supplies for America and China, diverted here on account of
the higher prices obtainable. The market was also affected by the de-
creased demand resulting from the prevailing inactivity of the weav-
ing industry in Japan.
This decline, however, was only temporary. In consequence of the
importation of German dyes through neutral countries being entirely
shut off and prices in Ameiica and China becoming higher than in
Japan, together with a larger demand from abroad for European
paper, woolen goods, and other articles requiring dyes, the scarcity
became further accentuated.
Stocks of dyes in Japan are scarcely sufficient for the 1915 demand.
Indian indigo is not available, the exportation being prohibited by
the British Government. Farmers in Awa Province are therefore
making preparations to plant indigo extensively, and the 1915 sow-
ings are expected to be about three times as large as in 1914.
The shortage of dyes having caused such a rise in prices that the
weaving trade is seriously affected, the Government is investigating
the question of manufacturing dyes in Japan, but is still undecided
whether to make it a Government business or leave it to private
enterprise.
The annual outturn of coal tar in Japan is said to be about 12,000,-
000 gallons, about 30 per cent of which is already taken up indus-
trially, leaving only 8,000,000 gallons for dye manufacture-an insfiftti-
eient supply, necessitating the importation of tar to supply the
deficiency. The manufacture in Japan is estimated to cost about 20
per cent more than in Germany, so an increase in the import duty by
at least this amount will be necessary, in addition to a subsidy to help
start the industry.
Salicylic Acid Supply Will be Sufficient.
The suspension of the supply of salicylic acid from Germany has
caused alarm to the sake brewers, who demand the drug as the indis-
pensable antiseptic for the Japanese wine. The authorities have
therefore been conducting investigations as to the amount of existing
stock of the imported drug in the country. This is considered suffi-
cient for another year's consumption. The Government and other
drug factories have also commenced to manufacture, so there is little
anxiety as to the future supply.
The prohibition of reexport of imported chemicals has checked the
advance of prices, but exports of those produced in Japan have in-







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


cr,; :1d. Among these are iodide of potassium and acetic acid, which
are largely shipped to India, the South Sea Islands, and Russia.
Japanese Make Progress in Paper Manufacture.
Hitherto European paper has been imported to the value of about
:,..00,000 annually, according to the O'-ik;i Maini-chi. Local manu-
i';atire has made sudden pr-,igres since the outbreak of war in
Europe, and art" paper and account-book paper, which it had
been considered impossible to produce in Japan, are now m-.iking
their appearance from Japanese mills. Double-elephant, tra,'ing
paper, and glazed paper (tsuya gami) can not yet be produced in
,Japan. The annual value of imports of these papers is about
S1,0()0,000. The annual value of pulp imported has hitherto
amounted to about $3.000,000, and now it is produced in Japan to
the value of about $1,000,000. The annual value of paper and pulp
together to be imported hereafter is not expe'tid to exceed
$3,000.000-half the amount of the imports before the outbreak of
war. By the great efforts of the Japanese paper mills, stimulated by
the inero';'a-d price of European p:ipeir, the inconvenience cau-eol by
the cutting off of the supply was minimized, and the paper market,
which had advanced abnormally, lias now become settled.
The total outturn of European paper at the end of 1914 was about
30,000,000 pounds per month, an increase of 4,000,000 over the pre-
vious year, about one-half of which represents an increase in produc-
tion of newspaper printing paper. Japane-e-madle newspaper print-
ing paper is being shipped all over the East on account of the check
o'c:i-ioned by the war in the trade with England and Gerni;ny.
Japinese news printings, are of very poor quality, and find a market
only on account of their cheapness.
There is also a demand for Japanese strawboard in India and
the Far East, caused by the scarcity of stock, and the paper mills
have agreed to pay a bounty of $6 per ton on exported board paper.
Glassware Industry Recovers from Effects of War.
The outbreak of war caii,ed the manufacture of glassware to
become quite di.morgai2ized, and exports to China, India, and, other
c:i,:tern countries were suspended for awhile. Soda ash rose in price
from $2.50 to $i. per bale of 2241 pounds.
However, the demand from neighboring oriental countries soon
increased with the diminution of stocks and the cessation of the
usual supply from Belgium and Germany. Orders were also received
from England and the United States. The increased demand,
together with the recommencement of importation of soda ash, which
had been temporarily suspended, caused a more favorable outlook
for the trade, and the year closed with all the factories working at
their full capacity.
The manufacture of sheet glass in Japan has not advanced very
far, and the output of the factories is usually not sufficient for the
home demand. The thicker plate glass for roofing, showroom win-
dows, and mirrors can not be turned out as yet. The war having
stopped the supply of sheet glass from Belgium and Germany and
the Engli.sh factories being short-handed, a demand has arisen from
China, India, and other Eastern countries, and the companies have
been able to make some shipments abroad.






JAPAN-KOBE. 9

Matehes-Shell Buttons.
The match trade in the early part of 1911 was dull, because of
an oversupply of stock. The companies had greatly increased their
plants and output during the previous prosperous years. Another
cause was decreased demand from China, on account of internal
troubles and currency depreciation.
The war, however, brought about a change in the situation by
checking the importation of hydrochlorate of potash and yellow
and red phosphorus. The former, which usually rules about $11
per case, rose to $60 about the end of October, and phosphorus in
proportion. They have since declined somewhat. The increased
cost of matches-from $2.50 to $6.50 per case-hlas checked the ex-
port trade, the China market still having considerable stocks on
hand, and the total export for 1914 shows a certain decrease from
the previous year.
- The shell-button business was temporarily deranged by the out-
break of war, but soon resumed its normal condition and toward
the close of the year was quite brisk. The import of Takase shells
was stopped for a while, but toward the close of the year there were
a few shipments from Manila and Australia. Although stocks were
scarce and prices high, prospects at the close of the year were good,
owing to the large foreign demand.
Exports of Fish Oil-Japanese Ship Paint to China.
The export of fish oil, being mostly to countries engaged in the
war, has been affected accordingly. The quantity of fish oil exported
from Kobe in 1914 amounted to 29,348.544 pounds, valued at $1.021,-
894, showing a decrease of 11,405,764 pounds in quantity and of
$284,767 in value as compared with the preceding year. The values
of shipments according to countries in 1914 were as follows: Bel-
gium, $329,366; Germany, $243,890; England, $189,095; Australia,
$90,498; Italy, $58,017; Austria-Hungary, $51,225; America, $40,506;
France, $14,403; other countries, $4,894.
The value of oil shipped to Germany in 1914 showed a decrease of
$197,517; to England, $139,261; to France. $47,497; and to other
countries, $512; but shipments to Belgium, Australia, Italy, Austria-
Hungary, and America increased by amounts ranging from $6,843
to $46,264. The market price has been advancing, but it is still much
below the rates obtaining before the outbreak of war.
Hitherto Japanese manufacturers of paint have made only the
cheaper grades, while better-quality paints have had to be imported.
Stocks of paint in China and other Eastern countries that are sup-
plied from Europe ran short on account of the war, and this has en-
abled paint manufacturers to make some shipments to Hongkong and
Shanghai in spite of an increase in price from 25 to 50 per cent. Of
the materials used, the lead is imported from Australia and the zinc
is mined in Japan.
Serge Weaving-Government Manufacture of Condensed Milk.
With the development of the serge-weaving industry in recent
years, Japan has been able to supply its own needs in the coarser
qualities, although the finer grades suited for foreign-style clothes
have still to be imported. Woolen yarns for series are imported
990190-55d-15----2






SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


from Aist ria, Germany, France, and England, and naturally the
outbreak of war, by checking importation, has rendered the position
of these faculries very difficult. Some mills have been obliged to
stop and otliher to curtail production, and the probability is that 1915
will not see half the output of serge.-s of 1914.
The Hyogo Prefc''tural Experiment Farm at Awaji has completed
preparations for the manufacture of condensed milk. The quality
is to be standardized on the American Eagle" brand, and the fac-
tory will take over the ,inrplus milk of all the dairies in the prefec-
ture and conduct the industry on a large ca:e. The product is ex-
pected to be on the market early this year (1915). Imports during
1914 decreased considerably.
Celluloid-Rubber-French Nails.
The outbreak of war has been advantageous for the two cellu-
loid factories in this district. These companies, because their com-
1,ined. output is in excet-- of the demand, have been in financial diffi-
culties since their start, and iinegtiations were in progrc.-s in 1914
for an a imlg;oi(l:in. Since the war started the Nippon Celluloid
Co. stopped the manufacture of celluloid and devoted itself to making
guncotton for the Russian Governmeniit at remuiinenrative rate-. The
Sakai Co., having the field to itself for celluloid and beifig favored
by a rise in prices of from 10 to 20 per cent, is also doing well.
The prohibition on the outbreak of war of the export of raw or
manufactured rubber from the Straits Settleimeints (whence the i a-
terial used in the factories in this conii'nlar districts obtained) to
any except British ports threatened to affect seriously the rubber
industry here, but arrangements were made between the two Gov-
ernments by which Japan could obtain its suppliet;'of rubber.
The manuf.icttre of French nails was started by nail factories
here, with the effect of nearly stopping the importation from for-
eign countries. Hopes are entertained of entering the market in
China and neighboring countries.
Japanese Shipbuilding Industry.
During 1915, in addition to war vessels, 11 steaminrs, with an ag-
gregatte tonnage of 67,000, are to be completed in Japan, including
4 Nippon Yusen Kaisha ships, each of 7,500 tons; 2 Osaka Sho-sen
Kaisha ships, each of 9,400 tons, and another of 5,300 tons; and 1
Japan-China Steamship Co. vessel of 3,700 tons.
Japan has experience. in building warships of over 30,000 tons,
and steamers aggregating more than 100,000 tons can be turned out
in a year without diffici1lty. An independent supply of materials,
however, is not yet in sight. The supply of steel for shipbuilding
is largely obtained from England, Germnany, and Belgium.
Of all non-British shipbuilding districts (according to Lloyds
classification), Kobe is exceeded only by four in its output of mer-
chant tonnage. Those doing bigger bu.incss are the River Weser,
Hamburg and the Elbe, Rotterdam (with Dordrecht and Flushing),
and Maryland and Virginia. The Netherlands, Japan, and Norway
were the only shipbuilding countries that launched more tonnage in
1914 than in 1913.






JAPAN-KOBE. 11

Labor Conditions-Reduction of Wages.
Returns compiled by the Osaka prefectural government showed
the number of operatives at the end of December, 1914, employed
in making knitted goods, shell buttons, glassware, brushes, matches,
celluloid goods, paper, rugs, towels, wooden pipes, cast-metal work,
and medicines, all for export, to be 26.182. Of the 12 industries
named, the hands employed on all except glassware, rugs, and cast-
metal work showed an increase. Iron, silk reeling, leather, toys, en--
ameled ironware, rubber, and weaving are recovering activity.
Returns of wages paid in Osaka in the second half of 1914, which
have been published by the Osaka Chamber of Commerce, show that
the wages of laborers generally have declined materially, though in a
few instances they have shown an extraordinary increase. Com-
pared with the corresponding period of the preceding year, the
average rates of wages of 104 different classes of workers show
inibreases in 23 classes of less than 5 cents a day, the wages of printers
only increasing by as much as 6 cents, making the rate 50 cents.
Decreases are recorded in 47 trades, the largest decrease being 20
cents in the case of leather-trunk makers, and a decrease of over 5
cents occurring in more than half these trades.
As a result of the heavy decline in the price of rice, accompanied
by a decline in many other commodities, manufacturers made the
outbreak of war the occasion of an all-around reduction of wages.
The match factories were among the first, with a reduction of 10 per
cent,in the wages of male operatives and 15 per cent in the wages
of feminale operatives. Coiresponding reductions have been made in
practically all branches of industry.
Trade of Osaka by Countries.
In the following table the value of Osaka's trade with each
important country during 1913 and 1914 is shown separately:

Imports from. Exports to.
Countries.
1913 1914 1913 1914

Australia............................................... 52,592 $53,513 13,370 1397
Asiatic Russia .......................................... 1,342 3u6,,03 1.834 153, 439
British India ......................................... 8,370,444 9,312,325 98G, 15b 1,320,552
British Straits Settlements ............................. 17 4,5.6i 151,9S7 173,9(i
Belgium ............................................... 31,033 4S,i.30) 864 221
China.................................................. 2,859,917 3,604, 08 20,602,6.32 28,847,2.S7
Dutch India.......................................... 3,447,247 1,9534,519 3,791 2, 13
French Indo-China................................... 417,144 392,919 12S 71
France ........... .... .................................. 28, 1S (65,670 1,519 1,531
Great Britain........................................ 2, 286, 251 1,561,I910 116,759 133,319
Germany............................................ 744,175 652,215 ....................
Hongkong............................................ 27,924 5,511 1,074,216 1,5s8,535
Kwangtung Province.................................. 430,013 73t6, jS0 7, 3S0,K 70 4,787,61.5
Italy .............................. ............ .. 15, 830 19,01)3 167 339
Netberlands .......................................... S, .18 26, 66.) ........... ............
Philippine Islands................................... 188, 873 149, S64 5,194 9,389'
Siam ................................................... 3260 22'3 .50
Sweden and Norway.................................. 36, 26.13 23,229 .................
United States ....................................... 679,474 1,147,194 7,615 4,972
Other countries...................................... 1,17S,062 520, -30 41,798 16,8.7
Total........................................... 20,754,413 20,620,213 36,579,320 37,022,069








12 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS. ,


Imports and Exports at Osaka.

The values of the principal imports and exports at Osaka during
the past two years have been:


Articles.


IMPORTS.

Beans:
Red and white, small ..
'. I. ................ .
Borate of soda ..............
Ir il-. pigorhog.........
Bones, animal..............
Cotton and manufactures of:
Ginned.................
Seed....................
VY. .I i. plush, and other
pile rissues..... .....
Slit l.I ini, .1 lirtings-
ill '. .. .. ... .... .
White..............
Prints................
Satins and italians......
Caustic soda (crude) ........
Cakes..... ............
Copper, ingots and slabs....
Cycles ..............
Dynamite..................
Detonators.............
Dry plates for photographs,
undeveloped.............
Electric machinery, and
parts of.... ..........
Flours, meals, and groats
of .-r liu- and starch.......
Fl i li grass, ramie, etc.
Fat, animal............
Furs........................
Flannel...............
Gypsum.................
Goat's and camel's hair....
Glass, sheets and plates.....
Hides and skins:
iall, ox, cow, and buf-
lalo...............
Deer.................
Hemp, jute, and manila
hemp...... ..........
Iron:
Pi: ..............
lI,,.21 and slabs........
] a rods, T, angle, etc.
1, I.i-: and sheets-
Galvanized-
Corrugated....
Other..........
Tinned............
Other..............
Wire..................
Pipes and tubes........
Boots' protection.......
Insulated electric wire......
Incandescent electric lamps.
Kwarmnn, i 11, .- l, Isuge,
ebony v i... it ..........
K iri.........................
Lacquer....................
Licorice....... ........
Morphine, hydrochlorate
and sulphate ..........
Machinery, and parts of ....
Manures...............
Ni. 1.- 1. ingots and grains....
,.,,I rivets, screws, bolts,
nuts, etc..................
Phosphorite................
Pencils .....................
P ri lin, i : ................
1 I. C i 1.. i .. ............
Photographic papers.......
Potteries ...................
Paris of cycles:
Tires...................
Others.................


1913


20,757

41., 17tj

8,440,058
356,336
2,417

1? 132
-'"., i.
11,678
72, 210

1,273
15, 474
134,654
132,496
8,178

55,423

10,718

1,907
375,075
1-, 172
1 11
8,712
12,465
18,728

202,972
9,002

77,233

2., 11|
121,555

114,686
1"'.. I :I
2".,077
',-,783
27,422
136,959
644
20,104
2,642

-12.164
:.",096
145,140
29,595

168,334
190,623
15,554
119
60,356
1, s -i...7
10,697
89
31,166


131,346
51,605


$33,956
14i l, 1.11,
1,, I 12
121,880
35,608

9,819,146
341,356

874
l ., fill,.
7, ',J

53,579
119,492
7,084
1. -2-'
71,-""'
124,467
9,360

44,134

1,911

4,934
377,662
203,558
12,731
945
8,866

11,050

21r,034
17,839

96,584
.,VI, ca2
14 l'",
117,513

77,238
70,471
31,705
127,916
27,782
196,484
3,444
210
15

1 .113
:,079
117,742
48,373

157,651
105,175
20,581
2,105

1,1l..,7 .1
6,835
98
26,313
20,644
5,284

55,112
32,335


Articles.


IMPORTS-continued.

Pumps......................
Rice and paddy............
Rails....... ..........
Railway carriages, and parts
of.... ...........
Rhubarb...................
Sugar......................
Sugar, refined..............
Soap, washing..............
Soda ash ...................
Straw plaits................
Soap, toilet................
Si,.'iid-l or orthopedic in-
struments, and i..irl of..
Tea............ .......
Vegetable fiber.............
Vessels, steam or 1l 11;....
Wines...... ...........
W ool.......................
Waste yarns and waste
thread..................
W ild ilk.. ... ............
Woolen or worsted yarns...
Waste or old metal:
Zinc............. .......
Iron ....................
Brass and bronze.......
All other ...............
Woolen cloths and series:
W ool ..................
\v,,,.! and cotton-......
\\W, t.:.r meters...............
Zinc .....................
All other................


Total ............... 20,754,413


EXPORTS.

Beans and peas.............
Beer, in bottles.........
Bleaching powder..........
Brass and yellow metal:
Plates and sheets.......
W ire...................
Buttons ....................
Brushes....................
B.;s sacks, and portfolios..
c.-il. or isinglass, vegetable.
Confectioneries and sweet-
meats ...............
Corn',.iilie., in tins and
,,, rr o I ..................
Cigarettes..................
Colza oil ....................
Copper:
Ingots and slabs ........
Plates and sheets.......
W ire..................
Candles....................
C(",tlT r I .. ...........

Flannel...............
l' in:g :aiid slirtings,
gray .............-
T clotlhs ..............
Other tissues........
Blankets and blanket-
ing ....... .......
Threads...............
Wadding...............
Yarns...............
Towels, Turkish and
huckaback or honey-
comb................
Undershirts and draw-
ers, knit..............


1913



$11,375
1,626
513,774

48,333
7,142
3, 1V'., .7
121,512
1,015
25,715
30,027
2,820

374
3,655
65,923
............
21,492
1,801

4,159
281,722
25,775

14,421
5,187
53.971
33,899

81,427
90,816
1,749
13,233
2,258,334


1914



$8,392
54
73,044

6,904
2,035,744
65,656
44
40,450
25,080
1,032

1U1,550
a, 835
97,719
84,660
12, 21
2 1, N.J

12,397
S.51,674
I 105

15,226
2.432
2'", %-74
17,018

106,032
177,864
1,619
3,625
2,,1-..062

20,620,215


16,690
143,422
15,891

112,646
49,427
1111l.469
5i,314
98,108
117,308

6,843

76,864
66,050
15,527
1, "74,, 013
4'.. 'to, n
47,161
1,910
115,407

91,939
2,578,380
387,896
335,731

67,791
21,971
29,186
12,337,612


220,116

633,979


17,320
154, 642
33,230

103,925
51,470
140,236
65,419
147,158
115,925

8,889

89,566
130,078
3,957

1,827,863
109,999
13,857
1,327
153,203

109,883

2,506,638
514,064
444,528

62,579
33,331
32,860
10,791,290

295,097

761,028







JAPAN-KOBE.


Articles. 1913 1914 Articles. 1913 1914


EXPORTS-continued.
Cement, Portland..........
Clocks, hanging and stand-
ing .......................
Cotton gin, and parts of.....
Clothing, European.........
Fish, dried and salted.......
Flours, meals, or groats of
grains and starches.......
Fans and round fans........
Glass bottles and flasks......
Gloves......................
Hats, caps, and bonnets.....
Iron manufactures:
Tubes... ............
Pans and rice ket ties....
Other manufactures,
n.e.s .................
Inks and paints.............
Imitation nankeen..........
Imitation nankeen, dyed....
Insulated electric wire......
Implements and tools.......
Japanese towels.............
Katsuobushi or bonito fish,
dried aud boiled..........
Leather.....................
Looking-glasses.............
Lacquered ware............
Lamps, and parts of........
Mushrooms, dried..........
Mandarins.................
Manure....................
Matches....................
Mousseline de laine.........
Machinery, and parts of....
Pet cheese (misi)..........
Prepared medicine.........


87, 403
119,244
47,839
15,059
16,221
18,961
81,876t
166,.382
86,434
362,575
14,370
12.319
210,844
29,615
2,304,194
7,703
2S,00
18, 45
41,551
13,705
310,111
231,3'97
14,238
243,922
89.235
246,467
926
1,324,200
48,266
290,533
16,072
654,194


$17, C01
106,179
7, 419
7,581
20,743
26,209
f.-1,413
154,45.5
79,857
163, 488
12,205
7,065
200,227
39, 865
1,923,750
21,836
42,395
IS, c08
13,142
17, 080
209,417
197, 694
15.090
177,744
80, 042
120, 67 5
1,073, 751
51, 450
318, .8
15,4q1
4,8tl, 266


EXPORTS-continued.
Plaited cords, braids, etc...
Paper:
European,printing .....
O ther..................
Renshi .................
Potteries.................
Ropes, bags, and mats, of
straw .................. .
Seaweeds and cut seaweeds.
Sugar, refined ..............
Sake.......................
Soy.........................
Sulphuri' a'.id.............
Soap, toilet.................
Satins, silk and cotton......
Silk tissues and cotton
mix ture ..................
Striped tissues.............
Socks and stockings........
Shoes, boots,clogs, sandals,
etc........ ....... ....
Scientific articles...........
Sashes......................
Tea.......................
Timbers... ...........
Toilet or perfumed water
and hair oil...............
Toilet powder..............
Twilled tissues..............
Toys.......................
Umbrellas and parasols,
European................
Vessels, steam and other....
Wood, manufactures ot.....
All other ...................


5175, 655
94,559
17,271
156,131
134,890
10,64-14
63,722
613. 959
365, 511
30,931
9, 636
230,95fh
202, "'i4
77,056
25, i23
344,935
64,736
6.-, 342
14,035
48, 24
37,296
90,342
5'1, S74
3, 653,922
110,3 33
2.30,5?1
22
56, 404
3, 73. 5.53


$193,4'33
S6, 033
22, 500
105, 103
124,001
11,S)7
5.;, 605
4,, 305
363, OU
32,341
3,2.54
204.4-02
155,U01
60,406
46, 412
442,U17
51,344
51,941
7,487
42.907
'J, U:33
63,8S34
54,067
4,24 .',t l3
131, 14I
195,167
114,159
417, 95b
3,606,655


Total................. 36, 579,320 :37,022,669


The number of vessels cleared at Osaka during 1914 was 685, of
798,614 tons, of which 647 vessels of 699,726 tons were Japanese, and
30 vessels of 88,704 tons British.
The imports into the supports of Kobe for 1914 amounted to
$951,355, a decrease of $680,515 over the previous year. The exports
from these ports are trifling.
The trade of the subports of Osaka, among which are the ports of
the Yokkaichi consular agency, amounted in 1914 to $25,140,352, an
increase of $3,232,953 over 1913. Both imports and exports gained,
the former $1,154,564 and the latter $2,078,389.

Slight Opportunity for Investment-Foreigners at Disadvantage.
Opportunities for investment in business enterprises in this district
are negligible, as it is the aim and ambition of the Japanese to con-
trol all classes of manufactures. This they are succeeding in doing,
even going to the extent of selling goods without profit and at times
even at a loss, in competition with foreign goods, to enable them to
control the market in Japan and in the northern part of China. As
no real estate can be owned by a foreigner, and it is therefore neces-
sary to lease it or to form a company under Japanese laws, foreigners
are at a great disadvantage. The large Japanese manufacturers in
cotton and wool receive a drawback on all foreign sales of their
goods, which enables them to compete advantageously in prices with
foreign-made goods.

Banking Situation-Problem of Exchange.
There appear to be adequate banking facilities for carrying on
business, as there are four foreign banks, with branches, and all the


1






SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


large Japanese buiinks are represented here by branches. The credits
and exchanges are, however, a'lnt, entirely through London, and
since the war coiminen.cedi in Europe this has made the rates of ex-
change very high and dilatory.
As a very large proportion of the products of Japan are sold in
the United States and its imports of cotton and machinery are pur-
chased in the United States, business would be facilitated if the
exchange could in a gre-it measure be transferred from London to
New York. It is believed that American trade between Japan and
the United States would be largely increased in all branches if this
plan could be carried into effect and a system of credits established.
Shortage of Tonnage is Being Overcome.
Transportation facilities up to the fall of 1914 were ample to ac-
commodate without delay all conluere existing between the two
countries. Peginnin-g with November, 1914, hlNwever, there has not
been sufficient available tonnage, as two lines of steamships have
been withdrawn. This state of affairs is being overcome by addi-
tional ste-iiners being added to two of the Japanese lines, the placing
of several large English steamers on a regular route between Ilnng-
kong and Puget Sound ports, and the chartering of some Japanese
steamers other than the regular line ones. One serious drawback
in the chartering of steamers other than those belonging to regular
established lines is the fact that they are unable to e-,c iice return
charges from Pacific coast ports and are obliged to return pr:ntically
in ballast.
Since the opening of the Panama Canal four lines of te.:imn'ips
are -eii'ling one steainer each per month, carrying freight and a
limited number of first-class passengers direct from Japan to
Atlantic coast ports. These steamers have all ,se'ired full cargoes.
The same lines also send a steamer each month via the Suez Canal
to Atlantic ports of the United States. There have been a few
steamers coming to the East with full cargoes of cotton from Gulf
ports and a few with a partial general cargo from Atlantic ports, call-
ing at Gulf ports and securing cotton to make a full cargo for the East.
Japan Supplies Own Needs in Certain Lines-Introduction of American Products.
Japan is rapidly becoming able to supply its markets with ma-
chinery, engines for the use of petroleum and gasoline, electrical
apparatus, drawn tubes, and other manufacture- of iron, steel, and
copper by bringing out skilled worklien from England, Germany,
and the United States on contracts of from three to five years to teach
the workmen here the methods of the various trades.
For a successful introduction of American manufactures and
products into Japan it is considered highly important that reliable
representatives of the various products should be sent to Japan to
canvass the trade and explain the advantage and superiority of
their goods, having. with them, so far as possible, samples for a
proper demonstration. While every endeavor is being made to call
the attention of the Ja-panese trade to the catalogues received, by
having notices inserted in the leading Japanese newspapers that
they are on file in the cnsii lte and will be explained to all desiring
information, the re-sults have been less encouraging than expected.
Quite a number of Japanese, however, have reported that they have
established sat isfactry connections with American merchants.








JAPAN-KOBE.


There would seem to be, if the opportunity is seized at once, a
chance of establishing and increasing American trade with Japan,
as goods of various kinds formerly purchased in Germany and Eng-
land are nearly consumed.

Exports to United States and Island Possessions.

The following table shows the value of the exports to the United
States, the Philippine Islands, and Hawaii during 1913 and 1914,
according to invoices certified at the Kobe consulate:


Articles. 1913 1914 Articles.


TO UNITED STATES.
Bamboo poles.............
Bamboo and wood ware.. -.
Bean and bean oil..........
raids, chip, strvw, and
hem p................. ....
Brushes............ .........
Camphor and camphor oil..
Chillies and ginger..........
Cotton goods ...............
Curios (over 100 years old)..
Drugs and medicines.......
Fans.......................
Glassware..................
Gold bullion................
GuL string..................
Hats.......................
Isinglass (agar-agar)........
Metals .......................
Metal were........ ,........
Menthol crystals............
Matches....................
Mineral water.............
Paper and paper ware......
Peanuts....................
Personal and household
goods............:."-, ....
Porcelain and earthenware.
Provisions ..................
Rice .................. .....
Rag rugs...................
Sake.......................
Siuphur ....................
Silk goods ...................
Straw matting and mats....
Screens.......... ..........
Tea........... ...........
Toys .......... ........
Wax, vegetable.............
Miscellaneous...............
Charges....................
Total ................

TO PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.
Bamboo and wood ware...
Braids, chip, straw, and
hemp.....................
Brushes....................
Cotton goods...............
Camphor and camphor oil..
Drugs and medicines.......
Fans.......................
Glassware..................


586,398
339,314
266,315
1,360,271
515,592
282,415
40,671
98,619
96,672
8,789
42,761
848
63,673
1,520,255
45,675
664,326
25,896
197,474
9,604
408
126,35S
45,268

-4,687
244,187
26, 198
452,990
121,817
16,714
181,653
1,500,095
6,2.57
510,174
155,070
89,008
363,1s59
1,180,866
10,924,511


20,122
40,372)
2,962
733,034
624
1,854
18,441
74,431


182,937
401,882
186,544
1,314,284
677,135
388,104
18,J.43
45,794
90,606
9,427
43,794
3,580
2,913,300
62, 261
1,263,929
82,242
699,250
38,168
210,758
11,961
1,003
105,580
61,190
4,463
258,236
61, 770
443,256
41,226
126,287
41,686.
45,470
1,102,3r'9
S,4118
60S, 410
202,921
136,215
829,810
1,381,410
14,591,289


8,422

22,397
4,474
716,023
1,418
1,218
12,363
93,447


TO PHILIPPINE ISLANDS--
continued.

Isinglass (agar-agar)........
Leather goods..............
Metal ware.................
Mineral water..............
Matches ....................
Paper and paper ware......
Porcelain and earthenware..
Provisions.................
Rice........................
Sake.......................
Silk goods.................
Straw mattings.............
Sulphur...................
Tea........................
Toys.......................
Vegetables and fruits.......
Wax, vegetable.............
Yarns (cotton and silken) ..
M iscellaneous..............
Charges...................
Total.................
TO HAWAIID.

Bamboo poles..............
Bamboo and wood ware.....
Braids, chip, straw, and
hem p................ ....
Brushes....................
Camphor and camphor oil..
Cotton goods ...............
Drugs and medicines.......
Fans .......................
Footwear ...................
Classware...................
Metal ware.................
Matches...................
Paper and paper ware......
Peanuts ........... .........
Porcelain and earthenware..
Provisions.................
Rice......................
Sake........................
Silk goods..................
Straw mattings.............
Screens................. ...
Tea.........................
T oys .......................
Miscellaneous...............
Charges.....................
Total .................


$1,854
33,747
10,029
14,576
28,923
8,303
13. 493
35,9 9s
1, 656
747
52,295
1,.3..3
493
144
7,027
155,452
1,457
336,894
66, 648
219,906

1, 882,848


97
15,174

418
1,048
487
60,656
4,873
425
17,71S
451
3,446
1,515
5,574
35
8,309
252,791
1,0010,499
73,595
47,735
14,3.6
238
4,096
1,503
60,566SS
217,566


$3,374
33,255
2,285
21,014
32,993
10,630
11,416
33,551
89)
847
40,4_9
1,260
402
.22
10,629
183,554
7,629
263,812
11),950
240,881

1,966,400


44
11,598

302
467
6.57
18,233
2,332
52
13, .90
67
2,334
6,752
6,520
185
6,423
243,829
761,937
39,686
31,624
9,749
270
4,305
1,218
67, 575
199,248


1,793,926 1,459,651


YOKKAICHI AGENCY.

Bly Consular Agent Willard de L. Kingsbury, March 31.

During the past three years there has been a great expansion of
electric railways in Aichiken. From Nagoya, with a population of
476,754, the electric lines are branching out in all directions. Al-
ready the lines have been extending to Inuyama, a distance of 18






16 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

mileh-. to Tunshima, a di-lance of 11 miles, and to Ono, a distance of
19 miles. A new line is contemplated from Naogoya to Okazaki, a
distance of 19 miled.
The porcelain industry has been most -everely injured by the Euro-
p :nil war. Many orders for Europe were left in the hands of the
mnwirifactilrers because of the war, but, on the other hand, it is re-
ported that there has been an increase in orders from America,
England, and the British Colonies.
The demand for clocks for exportation to China became active at the
end of the year, the reason given being the shortage of German clocks.
There has been an incru:,.-e in the demand for fishing nets, aind
orders are in hand for exportation to Manila, Vladivostok, and the
Caspian districts.
Experimentation in the manufacture of acetic acid has been in
progress, and w itli some success, the incentive being the lack of
imports resulting from the war.
The gla.s industry also has been more active, as the supply from
Germany and Austria for southern Asiatic countries has been cur-
tailed by the war. The increa ,ed demand, however, began to show
itself only at the end of the year.
New Municipal Library in Tsurumai Park.
A number of brick, stone, and concrete buildings have been erected
during the past year, Pnd others have been contemplated. In par-
ticular a municipal library will be built in the Tsurumai Park in
the two years of 1915 and 1916 in corninein'ration of the coronation
of the new Emperor. The cost of the building is e.-timated at
126,500 yen (.t-,9O97). The main building will be of brick. It will
be four stories high, will hold 50.000 volumes, and will contain more
than 30 rooms. There will also be a lecture hall which will have a
seating capacity of 600. The library will be opened to the public
in 1917. It is also planned to purclnhaie a menagerie and build a
municipal iiienagei'ie building in the same park at the expenditure of
30,000 yen ($14,940).
Trade of Yokkaichi, Nagoya, and Taketoyo.
The following table shows the imports and exports through the
ports of Yokkaichi, Nagoya. and Taketoyo. The totals for these
have bepn combined, since practically the same territory is supplied
through these ports.

Articles. 1913 1914 Articles. 1913 1914

IMPORTS. IMPORTS-continued.
Ammonium, sulphate of, Cotton, and manufactures
crude..................... ?7., r, $90, 457 of:
Bags, gunny................ 7,'.4 3,321 Ginned............................ $6,411
Beans: Raw................. ... .,', 247 8,F68,827
Soyva.................. 1, 460, 0F '1, 7,'.-7 Twines and thread..... ... .... 1,476
Small, red. and white... 49,212 r, I Dynamos................... 1,432 ........
P hli ih.. oven ... .......... ......... 3........ ....... ..... .. .. .... 3,370
L'.r, k... ......... ..... 22,558 2,623 Gas tanks, etc.............. 31,352 ..........
( ij.- i n.. ....... .... 1,207 .... ... Glass .............. ........ 42,994 19,529
Caustic soda, crude ......... 55,561 CO, 104 Indigo, artificial ........... ............ 2,951
Chestnuts .................. .......... 4,127 Iron:
Chlorate of potash .......... 12,S73 9,760 Bars ................... 167,793 141,798
Coal....................... 222, 9 7 469,305 Belts................ ............ 1,170
Cocoons ................... 1,051 S27 Cocks..................2,875......... .
Coke ...................... 5,225 1,324 Dog spikes............ .. .......... 1,605
Copra ..................... 1990 .......... Fishplates ............. 15,023 2,728
Corn, Indian .............. 8,491 1,364 Nails................... 29,700 1,929









JAPAN-YOKKAICHI.


Articles. 1913 1914


IMPORTS-continued.

Iron-Continued.
Pipes ..................
Pipes, east..........
Plates and sheets.....
Plate.;, not coatel......
W ire...................
Other..................
Liquid gold................
Machines., miscellaneous....
Manure ....................
Material for bridges........
Meters, gas.................
M illet ......................
M illet. Itilian...............
Naphtha...................
Oil:
Bein .................
Kerosene and petro-
leum ................
Machine................
Mineral, n. e. s..........
Paraffin ....................
Peanuts....................
R ails ............. .......
Rattan, unsplit............
Rice and paddy ............
Salt, table..................
Seeds:
Cotton .................
Hemp and Pcri.la nan-
kcrnsis............
Parilla ocymoidts.......
Rape...................
Sesame.................
Miscellaneous..........
Straw braid and Panama
straw ....................
Sugar......................
W heat.....................
Wheat bran and rice bran..
Worsted yarn..............
All other...................


5179
5.237
18, 22
2,107
18,723
49,51.5
2-1. 546
2,7 '0.393
20.152
2.8,.7
1,213
2. 53
23, 619

93.743

435., -,28

2,875
7,018
1.409
203. 509
9.812
1,771;..5,
17, 800


4,321
36. 50 i
22, (94
5, 01
2,039

5.032
111,181
98.S.86
21,116
94,341
8,5S7


Total ............... 14,720,517

EXPORTS.


Alcoholic liquors...........
Bags:
Gunny.................
Linen ..................
Bamboo ware..............
Boards for tea boxes........
Brocade thread.............
Calico and sheetings........
Clocks, hanging ard stand-
ing.......................
Clogs.......................


5,002

6, 506
1,236
2,492
219,934

120,"274

36,652
5,038


36,998
... ....
31.524
411
19.1. t2
42,.;.'6
i.2 S`5

2,419.1(10
7, 7-8


213.221

57,3S3

309,370
1,112
7, 94 11i
2, 432
43. V01L
7. 0iO
80 1, 43
24,230

4,179

17,671
7.476
8,279
3,873

5,229
100,191

6. 602
33.593
7,593

15,6960, 67


4,495

9,53.3
1,919
18. 987
209. R53
99, .51
267,964

22,941
3,576


Articles.


EXPORTS-con inued.
Comestibles, miscellar-eus.
Cotton cloth:
ColoreJ .... .......
Stripe:] ......... ... ..
Cotton gins... ........
Cotton undershirts and
dra.rs ....... ........
Cotton wjste.... ..........
Dre.ses arnd accesori(s......
Fabrics, miscellari(os......
Far;................ ..
Gliss an guinssware........
Hosiery shirts .............
Iron maLnufattures ..........
Jiririldh. as.................
L.anips and parits........ .
Lumber nr.d 1:oards ....
Machines and parts, miscdl-
laneo u ........ ..........
Mandarin.;s.... ........
Mats and roattre..es .......'.
Metal rmanula.-tures, mis-
ce llar.ce I s......... .... .
Nanke.pn-. Ima1'iati on........
Nap. in mnut'l.i tulres......
N' ts. fishing................
O il, coLa...................
Paper .....................
Papor war .................
Plants and roots............
Por-ri ............... .
Po cl ins ..................
rire, uunusked and un-
c Iaced ..... ...... ...
F i.?e, w hite............ .... .
Shirt ings gray ...........
Shos, misk-ellaneous ... ....
Sov ...... ....... ... .
Spinning machines and
looms..... .. ..........
Tea cloths ..................
Ten: ........................
Tissues:
Cotton .................
Manufactures...........
Mis-ellaneous............
Twill.,d ...............
Tobacco leaves .............
Toys.....................
Vegtatles. preserred......
W ine (sakri................
Wood:
Manufactures:...........
Miscellaneous..........
Yarns, col ton ..............
A ll other ...................

Total.................


1913 1914


V2, 75

21,591
10,421
11. 357

2,.01
3, vis
1,117
9.7435
7,15?
3,721
1, .720
12, 42
1,224
150
3, 2.31
3, 12..
21,s44

4,719
202,514
2.218
2.272
5,77S
.5.12S
12,4,3
1.'23
1, 220,, 2091
4.222

13,938
...........
237,126
2,697
3,957

7,972
42.631
269,811

460, f65
1,392
250
260,396
............
3,008
2,152
3,546
26,560
2.3,239
853,078
20,027

4,200,208


$1,167

11,823
496
9,327
1, 792
3,2 S
5,136
4,;14
(, 6b79
2,016

40,500
... 9
103

10, 145
47, GlI
2,206

458
2?. 796
98
4,183
15
107
16. ?89
319
1,214,S10

14,903
1,418
29S. 87
8. 761
2,704

11,633
27,579
352,132

631,687
18,161
259,365
1,378
21, O.
1,546
5,2,38
23.236
42,740
1, 390,726
26,360

5,290.150


Declared Exports to United States.

The value of the declared exports from Yokkaichi to the United
States and its insular possessions in the Pacific Ocean during 1913
and 1914 is shown in the following table:


Articles. 1913 1914 Articles. 1913 1914
Articles


TO UNITED STATES.

Bamboo ware...............
Basket ware................
Calendars...................
Cotton goods...............
Earthenware...............
Fans.......................
Flowers, artificial...........


$16,187
............

3,860
........... ..
4,192
1,817


527,504
2,875
...........
4,E52
1,007
........... i90
11790


TO UNITED STATES-Contd.

Lacquered ware............
Lamp shades...............
Matches ....................
Matting, porch seat.........
Mats........... ..........
Metal ware .................
Oranges....................


$883
188

2,763"
3,558
1,220
14,478


51,059
1,183
20,703
521

1,616
4,318







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles. 1913 1914 Articles. 1913 1914

TO UNITED STATES-COn. TO PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.
Paper ware ................. $14,137 $25,547 Cotton goods............... $4,283 $2,313
Porcelain................... 938,685 8601,019 Cinth. Niq.oun .............. 776 629
R ice................... ..... 14,252 8,853 l'.rL... iii. .............. ............ 770
Silk goods.................. 809 6,364
Plants ...................... 2,071 .......... Total ................. 5,059 3,712
Tea......................... 461,034 594,642
Toys....................... 13,279 24,636 TO HAWAII.
Vegetables, fresh............ 1,317 373
W ind bells................. $1,110 $3,119 Canned provisions.......... 105 ..........
Woodenware ............... 983 6, 036 Cotton goods................ 354 .....
All other................... 6,247 7,641 Porcelain................... 320 ..........
Charges..................... ............ 81,869 Tea ......................... 709 ..........
Total................. 1,504,160 1,687, 727 Total................. 1, 48 .........


NAGASAKI.
By Consul Carl F. Deichman, March 25.
Both the commerce and industries of this consular district have
suffered from the depression in financial circles caused by the war
and the curtailment of credits, and, with the exception of the coal,
shipbuilding, and iron industries, business was very dull and unsatis-
factory throughout 1914. It showed, however, a tendency to improve
toward the close of the year.
The exports of coal from this district to China, Hongkong, Philip-
pine Islands, and Straits Settlements increased materially the second
half of the year as a result of the war, while foodstuffs, cotton yarns,
cotton tissues, and cement show increases to Chinese ports. The
exports of coal to the United States and Hawaii show heavy de-
creases from the amounts for 1913, caused no doubt by the resump-
tion of coal shipments from the British Columbia mines.
The principal articles of export from this district to the United
States ports are coal, graphite, vegti:,ible wax, phosphates, porce-
lains, and Japanese novelties; to Hawaii, cement and coal; to the
Philippine Islands, coal, cement, beans and peas, potatoes, acids,
paper, porcelain.-., and toys.
Statistics for Various Classes of Trade.
The total value of the exports and imports of the 14 open ports
in the Nagasaki consular district to and from foreign countries dur-
ing 1914 amounted to $47,089,186, a decrease of :,,4-6,955 (over 10
per cent) from the amount for the preceding year. The total value of
the imports for 1914 was ."',-; ,292,304, a decrease of '1,.s .4,921. The
total value of the exports for 1914 was $20,796,882, a dccrcl-_e of
$512,034.
The above totals of exports and imports of merchandise do not
include the value of bunker coal and ship's provisior-s obtained in
these ports by foreign-going merchant vc'-els and men-of-war; the
catches of fish and otliel marine products by Jalpanesee fishing vessels
on the high seas and off the cu,-ls of Kwantung, Chosen (Korea),
and Siberia, and brought to these ports for disposal; the trans-
shipment trade to and from foreign countries and Chosen, nor the
trade with Chosen. These values are given in the following pa'ra-







JAPAN-NAGASAKI.


graphs and should be added to the totals given above when determin-
ing the whole volume of foreign trade of this district.
The total value of the bunker coal and ship's provisions taken at
the various ports in the Nagasaki consular district during 1914
amounted to $7,172,228. a decrease of $1,002,798 from 1913.
The total value of the fish and other marine products brought to
these ports for disposal during 1914 amounted to $1,938,367, an
increase of $256.799.
The total value of the transshipment trade at the ports of this
district to and from foreign countries during 1914 was $879.771
(including gold bullion valued at $131,089). a decrease of $)264.268.
The total value of the transshipment trade of the ports of this
district with Chosen during the year 1914 was $2,316.278 (including
gold bullion valued at $1.190), a decrease of $1,144.140.
The total value of the exports and imports between the ports of
this consular district and the ports of Chosen during 1914 was
$9.241.678, an increase of $549.4)4.
The total value of the gold bullion shipped from Chosen to
Shimonoseki and Moji in this consular district during 1914 was
$5,710,797, an increase of $1,693,986.
Total Value of Foreign Commerce.
The total value of the foreign commerce of this consular district
for 1914 therefore amounted to $71.152,256. including the commerce
with Chosen (Korea). valued at $14.952,475 (including the ship-
ments of gold bullion, $5,710,797), but not including the transship-
ment trade with either Chosen or foreign countries. The total valhi-
for 1913 was $75,001,820. The decrease of $3,849.564 for 1914 is
accounted for by the heavy falling off in trade from foreign coun-
tries. The trade with Chosen shows a fair increase for 1914, partly
due to the falling off in shipments from foreign countries on account
of the war, but mostly to the gradual displacement of foreign-made
goods by those made in Japan.
Shipping and Shipbuilding.
The total number of foreign-going vessels entered at the 14 ports
of this consular district during 1914 was 4,266, with a registered
net tonnage of 10,016,276.
The total number of foreign-going vessels that cleared from these
14 ports during 1914 was 4,356, with a registered net tonnage of
10,230,832.
The total number of vessels from the ports of Chosen (Korea)
entering at the ports of this consular district during 1914 was 3,999,
with a registered net tonnage of 1,773,303, and the number that
cleared for Chosen ports during the year was 3,899, with a registered
net tonnage of 1,711,003.
The shipbuilding industry of this district continues in a flourish-
ing condition and many rush orders for new work have been exe-
cuted promptly, with more on hand. The Mitsu Bishi dock yard
and engine works at Nagasaki have had a busy year with docking and
repair work and new merchant vessels and warships. The branch
repair yard and dry dock of the Mitsu Bishi Co. at Hikoshima, near
Shimonoseki, was completed toward the close of the year and opened







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


for work on Decemuber 1, 1914. The dry dock is 350 feet on keel
blocks, 56 feet wide at entrance on bottom, and the depth of water
over keel blocks is 26 feet at high water.
The number of Japamnee regi-.tered menrhant vessels docked at
the 1litoi Bishi dry docks at Nagasaki during 1914 was 135, with
a gross toinziige' of 168,417; the number of foreign merchant vessels
docked during the year was 51, with a gro(,, tonnage of 157,? 63; also
one foreign warship of 11,700 tons displacement.
The Imperial Japanese Navy Yard at Saseho, Nagasaki prefec-
ture, is making ext.snive improven-nts to yard and shops, and the
large basin with piers to accommodate 10 dreanlij;iaugts is practi-
cally completed and the water turned in. The navy yard is pre-
pared to build, as well as to repair, warships, a cruiser and a torpedo-
boat destroyer having already been built there.
The Matsuo Iron Works at Nagasaki and the Fukagawa Ship-
building & Iron Works at Wakatsu, Saga prefecture, in this district,
build and repair small coat ting steamers, steam trawlers, and other
fishing craft.
Importance of Fishing-the Pearl-culture Industry.
The fishing bii-lne-s of this consular district is one of its prin-
cipal industries, and gives employment to the population of prae-
tically all the villages along the coast, as well as the crews of the
steam fishing fleets in Nagasaki and Shimonoseki. A large amount
of capital is inv'.e.-td in these enterprises, especially steam trawling
and whaling, and good returns are obtained on the investments.
The coral fisheries of the Goto Islands, lying about 45 miles west
of Naga-:ki, are quite important, as are those off the .soutlhast coast
of Kyushu Island, the coral being of good quality and finding a
ready market in Italy.
The pearl-culture industry in Omura Bay, Nagasaki prefecture,
has had a steady development, and the pearls now obtained are of
a fair quality and size. The. ventiire is now on a paying basis and
is being extended.
The Mining Industry-Agriculture.
The mining industry, especially coal mining, is in a very pros-
pi *,us condition, although it did not enjoy as good a season as in
1913. Gold, silver, and zinc mines had a good yt:.ir, but copper had a
wt It:l.k on account of the war. The exporters of this metal have
been unable to ship to Germany, which has been in the past one of
their best customers. The prospects are good for all other metals the
present year, although large iiic'lcars are not anticipated.
The agricultural districts had a fair year, the rice crop especially
bein-m very large and resulting in lower pi ire for this >-taple. Other
grains experienced a shortage and fruits had a poor s.ani-.n in this
district.
Railways-Light and Pow-i- Enterprises.
The Imperial Government Railways had a good year in freight
and paenpger receipts. The work of extendiing the branch lines
in this district is progreinm-, although somewhat slowly on account
of the lack of sufficient funds for a construction program. The pri-







JAPAN~-NAGASAKI.


vately owned light railways are also making very slow progress in
new construction, owing to difficulty in raising funds for this purpose.
The electric light and power enterprises in this district have been
fairly successful, some companies amalgamating their interests and
extending their lines. This industry may be said to be on a sound
and paying basis, although there are still many concerns that have
not progressed beyond the promoting stage and are the result of the
hydroelectric boom experienced here about four or five years ago.
The Nagasaki Electric & Gas Co., the KyLshu Electric Lighting &
Railway Co. at Saga, the Kyushu Hydroelectric Co. at Hita, Oita-
ken, and the Kagoshima Electric Co. at Kagoshima, Japan, are the
most successful companies.
Industrial Conditions in Various Lines.
The Nagasaki Spinning Co. (Ltd.) has been quite successful. It
is now running full force, with 20,000 spindles, and a project is under
way to increase the size of the plant. The machinery for this plant
came from England.
A soap factory was started last year in Nagasaki for the manufac-
ture of soap for export. and to facilitate the import of the raw mate-
rial and the export of the finished product the company built the fac-
tory in the customs-free depot or zone. The soap is shipped to China.
A new glass factory for the manufacture of sheet glass was estab-
lished at Tobata, Fukuoka prefecture, by the Asahi Glass Manufac-
turing Co., of Osaka. It is now in successful operation and working
to full capacity to supply the demand for sheet glass heretofore sup-
plied by Belgium and Germany. The machinery for this plant was
obtained in the United States.
The flour mill at Dairi, Fukuoka prefecture, is also working to full
capacity at present and most of its product is exported to China and
Kwantung Province.
Transportation Facilities-Improvements.
The shipping facilities of this consular district are very good,
steamships from all parts of the world calling at the principal ports,
and the facilities offered shippers are much greater than the volume
of business requires.
A new harbor scheme has been planned for Hakata on the north-
west coast of Kyushu Island, to cost about $1,400,000, but it has not
as yet received the sanction of the central Government.
Many municipal improvements in the various cities have been
planned, and some are under construction already, such as the water-
works systems in the cities of Saga, Fukuoka, and Kagoshima, as well
as new parks in Moji and Nagasaki.
The new city hall of Nagasaki was completed at the end of the year
and opened for the transaction of business on January 18, 1915.
The population of the city of Nagasaki on December 31, 1914, ac-
cording to the police census, was 164,272 inhabitants.
The new cable to Shanghai from Nagasaki belonging to the Com-
munications Department of the Imperial Japanese Government was
laid during the latter part of 1914 and is now in operation.









SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Trade of Nagasaki Port by Countries.

The share taken by each of the principal countries
the port of Naga:iiki during 1913 and 1914 follows:


in the trade of


1913 1914
Countries.
Imports. Exports. Imports. Ex-ports.


United States.......................................... $888,261 .".. $832,315 $130,410
China................................................. 1,215,784 1. 121.-'. J 1,238,149 894,061
Kwangtung Province ................................. 540,02-1 44,050 574,251 33,679
It, I .II .... ......................................... r.r. .. 676,084 2,093 760,613
iro' i-l In iii ........................................... .. *'. 15,383 351,790 2,622
British Straits Settlements................................ 7I, 7 4,..:.:'. i 44,146 74,888
Philippine Islands ..................................... 2.184 51, "-12 593 73,800
French India.......................................... 2,211,767 2.. nf 581,599 1,262
Russia in Asia......................................... 12,367 :.'1, -", 1 l 33"' 45,990
Siam ................................................... 163,115 94 l', 12"-' 422
Great Britain......................................... 2,245,705 68,250 2,044,469 28,567
Germany.............................................. 204.080 24,450 280,167 22,805
Belgium............................................... 242, 606 17,074 374,934 627
Other countries........................................ 78,839 59,045 51,814 30,018

Total........................................... 8,036,179 2,363,318 6,474,681 2,099,764


Trade by Articles.

The principal imports and exports at Nagasaki in 1913 and 1914
are shown in the following table:


1913 1914
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


IMPORTS.


Brass and bronze: Ingots and slabs............pounds.. 335,351
Cable, etc., submarine and telephone..... ......... ..........
Coal....... ............ ........................ tons.. 3,603
Cotton, raw, ginned..... ................ pounds.. 3,313,068S
F .--, fro- .......................................do.... 471,338
1 r l I .. r. :
Bone, animal................................do.... 51,761,725
Oil cakes................................... do.... .'-, 536
All other.......................................... ...... ...
Glass, sheet .......................... square meters.. 41 *.,i
Iron, and manufactures:
Blars, rods, etc...........................pounds.. 13,614,208
Pigs and i. ..i .................... ...do ...(10 14,991, t2
Pipes and tuibes ............... ......... do .... 2, 003, 051
Plates and sheets......................do.... 22,794,362
.'.11 ,.., 'ins, wire rope, nails, screws, .
.I ................... pounds.. 2, 696, 08
Machinery-
Muetal and woodworking........ ....... do.... 57,011
O ther........................................ ............
Materials for construction:
Railway chillyy rails).................... pounds.. 3,0cr3,R 40
l; .. tc ........................ .....do.... 1, 091
Oil: h erosene...... ......... .............. .. 2, '.115
Rice.........................................pounds.. 121,077,264
T'iml er:
Teak............................... cubic melers.. 978
Other.. ....... .......... .................... .......
Tin blocks, ingots, and slabs................ pounds.. 176,694
Vegetables:
Beans, peas, and pulse.......................do.... 9. .11. 104
M illet ................. .................... do .. ..., 017
A ll otter articles......................................... ............


Total ............... .............................

EXPORTS.
Charcoal...................................pounds..
Coal ........... ........................... tons..
Comestibles, in cans and bottles .....................
Fish:
Boiled and dried, small...................pounds..
Cuttle.......................................do....


13,794,562
144,264

862,998
7, ".1 -.1il


$66, 709
25,598
39,459
515,160
30,697
550,919
648, 705
I .1., 1 ,
117. '0'-
251,414
189,356
116, 143
468,567
134,346
97,407
C34,3 63
44,369
79,141
251,708
2, .,:. 647

11 ,, ",
70,761
138, 080
102,410
547,973


67,151
499,543
38,626
26,024
521,418


268,241
9,526
6,588,516
665, 729
5'. ".1.949
54,342,420
338, 614

1 h. i,. .'
2. "2 -
27, 12'.,' .

1,700,971
1,032,152

C52,091
211,121
3, 318,662
35,215,356

729
89,045

16,161,552
2,056,428


11,687,362
159,161

1,100,827
5,006,727


$46,683
461,392
62,736
813,944
51,460
i 21, i.
577.,1177

97,795
2.1t 114 I

97,693
428,259
FS, 195

110,890
538,867
9,440
11,147
401,867
630,889
"2. 154
14,603
41,214

231,571
28,604
670,711
6,474,681


55,410
584,431
60,734
38,411
359,056









JAPAN-NAGASAKI.


Articles.


EXPORTS-co0nt inu.d.
Fish-Continued.
She'.-
.\ wabi or .iliboips.....................poUndL.
ru z ; ....... .......................... .
E: .2 r (l'I n ,' .............................. d ...
( t'-. ,, d r.- I ..... ...... .... ......... ..... i .
Shriri;is r'Jid i.rv n.; ........................ ..
S h.r. s' fir .. .............................. n .
[ .he ic m e.,-, cried ......................... .
Mushr )rna s. ti ed .................... .............
Paper.
To vuand l!ir ,int L ............................ )a....
A ll" other ..... ......... .... .. ............ .
Pott ......... .. ................. p). i;s.
Shells, awabi er al.ilonc3............. ..... .
Te.1 ...... ..............................r. ,r. .
All othLer art i,:le ....................................... ..


1913


Quantity. Value.





7,.677 $2,,'. 'I

4-1 4 -1 :


6 ".417
.:. uk .,, I
1 ., l 4I
In.3, 014 I


6,315',231
3:.1. ')
1^:1 .':i3


:4. ",,
30,.3 11
61. '. 7
5 l. I


I.' .
-1' ,-I .
I1, 11.


'Tot ll ......................................................... .. 2. 'J i ............ 1 2, 764


Commerce of Moji, by Countries.

Following are the imports and exports of Moji. by countries,
during 1913 and 1914:


Countries.


U united Stat- ..........................................
China.................................... .............
Kwangtung Pro'-inc ..................................
Hongkong..............................................
British India...........................................
Straits Settlem ents.....................................
Dutch East Indis......................................
French Indo-China.....................................
R ussia in A sia .........................................
Philippine Isands.....................................
Australia...............................................
Great Britian..........................................
Germ any............................. ................
Belgium ...............................................
Sweden ................................................
Norway................................................
All other countries.....................................


Imports.


82,734,592
1,514,4.37
1, 03 4-64
hl, 44s
5,012, IS
9.33
4,082,103J
169, 111
4,958
27,372
338,369
1,516,104
2,153,933
27s,8!31
223, 171
19,73.-i
440,229


Total............................................. 19,6 K7,966


Export;. I Imports. E xportl.


T2S7,160 I $2, 140,2-' 52 SI, q-
4, vO,'). J 1, 4534,1"I 4, ; ,s ;'
2,02/,; ) I ,')l,0 1,.150, 22
1,491,302 34,3.23 1,504,079
293, i7h 4, 196, 374 2%3, 101
252, 4910 5,i 2., 36i0, 772
103,349 I 2, 1'93,034 162,8 8
45,,i,; 121,04S 107,644
24,ls1 14,3.3 25,20)
517.39:N) 27,1 03 442,t836
112,6t7 6354,912 64,5S.
152,4.5 1,121,223 133,8S3
50 S20 1,441S,1)3 99,901
5,538 I 47,269 2,041
2 175,772 179
........... 44,257 35
149,457 i 1,011,592 203,866

10,406,112 16,072,626 9,942,163


Principal Imports and Exports at Moji.

The following table shows the value of the principal articles im-
ported and exported at the port of Moji during 1913 and 1914:


Articles. 1913 1914 Articles. 1913 1914


IMPORTS.

Boilers, steam, and parts...
Coal........................
Cotton, ginned.............
Crane......................
Dynamos, electric motors,
etc.......................
Eggs, fresh................
Flour, wheat...............
Iron:
Bar, rod, etc...........


3553,272
57,764
5,002,867
262,464

371,010
89,5.51
86,178

93,164


SS75,704
244,406
5,325,237
53,246

143,338
112,564
33,604

172,257


IMPORTS-continued.

Iron-Continued.
Lump, ingot, billet, etc.
N ails...................
Ore........ ..........
P ig .....................
Pipes and tubes........
Plates, tinned..........
Sheets and plates.......
Wire and wire rods.....
Wire rope.............


Quantity.


1 1, 5.*I




:-,. tr,<
222., 2.4I


"'76,,.;
=)H 13!

5.76 K ,1''
12,1,'1


Value.


i37. 23 3

2'-', 6 i7

7 .11)
2S, 653

;0, G}
h7,73?
I", 531
1.33l
4, 116
*4';, i'i)]


$147,414"
19,uL<
79,270
436,3; 1
127,534
62, 131
141,531
139,07s
41,762


$90.509
3.814
46, 743
112, t78
131,451
J7.077
143.217
84,450
3S,950


(




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


i 1ll 1111lil ll 1 illlltnlll11111111
3 1262 08491 1766
SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE R.,a, io.


Art icles.


IMPORTS-continued.
Machines and machinery:
Metal or N oodN\ orking..
Parts of................
Pumping ...............
Other ...............
Materials, .iiliin-., of met-
als................ ... .. ..
M ats, I. iL:L *n.i .............
Nickel, ingots and grains...
Oil, petroleum..............
Oil( ake:
eam ...................
Rapesecd...............
Ot:u r ..................
Ph( s )horite ................
Pulp.....................
Rails.......................
Rice... ....................
Soda ash ...................
Sugar:
Below Dutch Standard
N o. 15.............. ..
Dtutrh Standard No. 15
nmd above............
Sulphate of ammonia, crude.
Wheat..... ...........
All other ...................
Total.................


1913




$22, 93
330,094
54,493
902,900
405,571
61,294
89,183
214, 40
1, C:5, 662
281,307
44, 860
72,970
178, 198
330,341
825,446
70,292

4,211,182
12,150
T1 o, 93
1. 17., 059
1, :..;,772

19, C87, 966


$106, 889
22..."
74,528
r34,228
74,355
49,481
180, 203

1, 82,0?8
"06, t83
(3, 7(5
151, 11
'"I1. 117
1.1,7
1(8,335
84,578

2,923,921
63
217, 077
1,143,382
1,376,726
16, 072, 626


Articles.


EXPORTS.
Cement, Porl land..........
Charcoal.................
Coal.......................
Cords, braids, etc., plaited..
Fish:
Boiled and dried........
Dried..............
Fresh...................
Salted..................
Mandarins..................
Matches....................
Paper:
European..............
Hanshi and mino.......
Other...................
R ice........................
Sake........................
Shirtings and sheetings,
gray......................
CIu. ,, refined...............
1 inl.:r and lumber (except
railway ties) ............
Vegetables ..................
Wax, vegetable............
Yarns, (otton..............
All other..................
Total.................


Trade of Minor Ports.

The value of the total import and export trade of the minor ports
in the Nagasaki consular district during 1913 and 1914 is shown in
the following tl1le:


Pcrts.
Imports.


MOJI CUSTOMS DISTRICT.
Shim onoseki ...........................................
Wakomatsu ...........................................
Hakata.......... .............. ................
NAGASAKI CUSTOMS DISTRICT.
K aralsu ............ ..................................
8um inoye..............................................
M iike. ... ...........................................
Kuehinolsu............................................
is um ii ................................................
Idzuhtra.........................................
Shishimi...... ......................................
Naha (Leo Chloo)......................................
Total............................................


$379,879
1,676,350
383, 749


21,131
t68, 555
1. 857
..: 421
70,112
33,906

3,403,080


Exports.



f141,026
2, : 1, 595
31,015


1. 'r,.1.183
.-"., 400
3,312,367
93, 157
54,375
230
3,133


8,539,486


Imports.



$507,314
1,909,797
383,668


2,357
5S3,003
22,571
205,263
90,094
40,930


Exports.



$ 7O, 7 6
3, 072, 395
11,777


1,331,715
224,696
3,132,917
42,330
............
29,546
166
38,630


8,754,958


[This report included many additional tables, prn.enting the trade
of the district in g',r.a t detail. TI -. figiire, may be consulted at the
Bureau of Forei-Ln and D)._ocstit Commerce. A brief preliminary
report"ferr":g:l- ki. iinli ulin, tlle articles and their value invoiced
at the c.-'nsTiate fur th,. I nitiLd St tes and psse-li in Slppienilct ",5a tu C'.i T:cRE i'uin., issued on Apr. 5, 1915.]


I TO GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1915



'.. .-. .- -r .Y. i I NGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1915


$241,685
52,785
3,194,112
".;., syo

F8, 873
12', 44
75,031
,. 3 1'J,
S5,013
12,662
37, 238
17, :50)
56,370
44,734
156,194
3,391,638
61,549
39,765
1,569, 684
1,031,600
10,406,112


36,081
3,237,755

64,851
8,494
83,138
37,749
3, 198
13,034
11, *59
3T, '997
21,739
33,953
(.3, 7MS
83,251
2,762,117
67,497
27,583
71,832
1,700,989
1,206,899
9,942, 160





---~'~'--------