Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00066
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00066

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text




SUPPLEMENT TO


COMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY TEIE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 56a January 19, 1915
NorT.-The annual reports from consular officers, formerly published in Daily Consular
and Trade Reports, will hereafter be issued as supplement to ('ouinimcn REroars and
will le mailed to all persons receiving that publication. dEach supptc ent will be so nam-
bored that at the end of the year they may easily be assembled bIy countries and boanud.
lach country will be assigned a definite number (fir example, Anstria-llungr-y, No. 1)
and the rvporls from the various consular districts in that country will be distinguished
by the addition of a letter (la, lb, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.

MALAYSIA."
STRAITS SETTLEMENTS.
By Vice Consul General Caspar L. Dreier, Singapore.
The colonies of the Straits Settlements are made up of the princi-
pal settlements of Singapore, Penang, Malacca, Labuan, and Christ-
mas Island. Of these, Singapore and Malacca are the chief Prov-
inces, and Penang is a municipality of considerable importance in
trade and shipping.
The Island of Singapore.
The island of Singapore is the principal settlement of the col-
onies. It covers an area of 350 square miles and has a population
of about 305,000, made up of mixed races such as Malay, Chinese,
and various tribes of Indians.
The city of Singapore is the chief seaport of the Straits Settle-
ments colonies, as well as the chief port of entry to the Federated
Malay States and the interior, where the rich mining and rubber
districts of the southern part of the peninsula are found.
The population of the island of Singapore is almost entirely con-
fined to the city itself. Outside the city the island is covered with
rubber plantations, coconut groves, and pineapple gardens. The
acreage of the different plantings are: Para rubler, 20,000; coconut
groves and pineapple gardens, 25,500. (;ambier, pepper, gutta-
percha, tapioca, sugar cane, as well as a small amount of lemon grass
and indigo, are found in small patches only.
The total acreage in crops is 65,000 and the total under cultivation
80,000. Land rentals are about as follows: Fruit trees, $6 per acre
per annum; garden land, $17 near town, $2 in the country. Coco-
nuts average in price $17 per thousand. Coconut land rentals are
$84 per acre.
The number of ships entering the port of Singapore, exclusive of
native craft under 50 tons, during 1913 was 6,09s, with a tonnage
of 8,636,467, and the clearings were 6,084 vessels of 8,618,486 tons.
According to official statistics recently made available the imports
into the port of Singapore alone during 1913 were valued at
$181,493,690, and the exports amounted to $136,077,690.
SSee Daily Consular and Trade Reports for August 22, 1914, for a review of the trade
of Malaysia for the first three months of 1914.
77086--15


vrvw~


"' -- """"l~"llr~i;;;~:~







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Development of Malacca.
The settlement of Malacca has an area of 720 square miles and a
population of 124,081. The port and chief town is Malacca, with a
population of 21,000. It is about 118 miles by sea from Singapore,
on the east coast of the peninsula. The settlement is wholly agri-
cultural, a small number of tin-mining leases being found. About
80,000 acres are planted in rubber, and the area in this product is
being rapidly extended. There are 38 registered companies owning
estates in the settlement. The cultivation of tapioca, which was at
one time important, is diminishing, and only a few thousand acres
remain under cultivation. The settlement is well opened up with
roads, allowing considerable freedom in traversing the country, and
quite a considerable progress is apparent throughout the district.
The railway service extends from Malacca via Tampin to Seremban,
also to Kuala Lumpur; thence to Penang, Johore, and Singapore.
There is a growing activity in trade and shipping in Malacca, and
statistics show that during 1913 the number of ships entering (ex-
cluding native craft under 50 tons) totaled 939, with a tonnage of
270,499. The imports into Malacca during 1913 were valued at
$1,135,400, and the exports $5,166,070, made up principally of rubber.
Importance of Penang-Imports into Labuan and Christmas Island.
The settlement of Penang is increasing in importance, as is shown
by shipping and trade statistics. The commerce for 1913, including
interport trade, shows imports amounting to $79,554,697 and exports
$68,894,067, an increase over 1912 amounting to $2,000,317 in imports
and $1,332,751 in exports. The number of ships arriving at the port
of Penang during 1913 was 3,035, of 4,019,092 tons. These figures
exclude native craft under 50 tons. The imports of American goods
into Penang during 1913 amounted to $177,569.
American trade with the settlement of Pennng is in its initial
stage and needs attention to bring it to what it is believed is possible.
It is apparent that diligent work among the merchants in this thriv-
ing little settlement would reap good results, although the volume
of business is not particularly large nor of a class of goods that
produce large results. Fair orders can always be had for provisions,
riuits, perfumery, small tools, and goods for which there is a general
sale, and the business could be retained and developed by proper
attention. The market for specialties, such as agricultural ma-
chinery, typewriters, guns, etc., is limited.
Exports to America from Penang are almost always financed by
draft on London, the American buyer opening credit with London
banks. A few cnses of direct drawing on New York against, export
have come to notice recently, the draft heing discounted by the bank
at the direct rate of exchange between American and Straits dollars.
This practice, however, is not so general, as the banks can not always
quote such a rate. and in most cases it is not as favorable as the
exchange via London.
The imports into Labuan for 1913 were valued at $393,983, and to
Christmas Island $95,373.
Commercial Conditions Toward the Close of 1914.
As to local commercial conditions at the time of writing [Nov.
12, 1914], little change is noticeable in securing the usual supplies
or in prices of goods sold throughout this section. In many in-








.'MALAYSIA-STRA.ITS SETTLEMENTS.


stances retail firms have discontinued the usual 5 or 10 per cent dis-
count on cash sales, and in some cases-one particularly-notice has
been given of advanced prices, due to difficulty.in obtaining wares,
advanced freight. rates, and war-risk insurance.
The only specific case that can be reported at this time is that of
the largest and lending department .tore of this city, which has
branches at different towns throughout the Federat'ed Malay States.
There is forwarded the general catalogue of this firm, with a sup-
plem'nnt showing its lines of wines, b,'l.--, tobaccos, etc.. with price
list, also its smaller catalogue for the s.:r--on of 1914-15. [When re-
ceived these may be seen on application to the Bureiaii of Foreign
and Domestic Conum erce, Wa hiington, D. C.]
On these catalogues will be found the notice of advance in prices
on all the commodities handled by this firm. The notice is being
circulated with any literature, receipts, or bills sent out by the
firm, and it shows that on all articles an advance of 10 per cent is
announced.
Assistance Rendered by the Consulate General for Extension of American Trade.
The Singapore consulate general is making every effort to further
American commerce in Malaysia. We re..--ntly prepared a letter to
the leading firms throughout this cmi-iar district calling their at-
tention to tlh facilities at hand, such as catalogues, price ]i-ts, itrad
journals, and trade directories, from which n: ln.es of manufa,'tiiers
of any article made in the United St;ic. could be ',.-!iered, inviting
them to utilize the conveniences at hand, to .:,1:,iit lists of articles
they are now or may in the future be in the market for, owing to
former sources of supplies being cut off, and offering, in emierlg.L-ncy
cases, to utilize the cable in bringing ,ab ),it the desi:.l1 end. There
have been responses in some cases, although the g';ieri:l indication is
that most of the leading firms are already repric'-nteil in the United
States by purchasing agents or commission houses, or the-y mlkoe
purchases from the London oclces of American manufacturers. It is
rinticipated, however, that ,imine inuiri-nes for names of American
manufacturers and exporters of various cormmoditis will result in
favorable connections being estalbli -ed.
Foreign and Colonial Interport Trade of Straits Settlements.
The following statistics, which wore rc-,mtly made avail-,ble, rep-
resent the trade of the Straits Settlements for 1912 and 1913:

Items. 1912 1913

FOREIGN TRADE.
Imports:
Mercundie. ........................................................ $243,210,281 $260,615,742
Treasure............................ ................................. 12,277,080 14,237,348
Exports:
Merchandise ..................................................... .......... 202, 22, 211,719,741
T'reasure.............................. .......................0.., 43, ~'~ 9,075,352
Total foreign trade:
Merchandise.................................................... 445,732,714 47-2,3..483
Treasure........................................................ 22,715,380 i,312,700
COLONIAL INTERPORT TRADE.
Merchandise.............................................................. 29,907,571 29, 685,608
Treasure.................................................................. 1,021,860 1,548,117
Total.............. ............................................... 30,929,431 31,233,717
Grand total.......................................................... 499,377,525 620,881, 90










4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

List of Principal Imports.

The following table gives a list of the principal articles of import
and their value into the Straits Settlements for 1912 and 1913:


Articles.


A nim als, live ............
Apparel, hoilery, mil-
liner ...............
Dr.ilery, towels, ani na-
pery ....................
Cement................
Ci .o .......... ... .........
(ottqp and silk. raw3......
Cycles, motor ears, and
accessory ie. .............
Drugs and mlilk ines.....
F iE h ......................
Glunlies, jute.............
BIardwaie and ironware,
including cooking uten-
sils ....................
ll tes, raw.............
Iron and steel, including
bar corrucaited, hoop,
tools and instruments,
wire rope, nails, anid
anchors and chains.....
Liquors...................
Machinery...............


1912

$3,057,065


3, ol,-,20;






73,00U,12
41,1. 1,;110


3,105, 6003
6, Gri, 9:J3
97, ,Ut21

2,512,72,S
2,370,715



1,537,332
3,05.7,6 t2
1,6.-4,UJJ4


1913


$3,5.'5,984
2,915,139
2,905,437
1,2117,497
V,"n ;,19 I
(,41t,GCU'J
11,,158

1,73j0.6:14
7,341, '-20
1, 3-1, 6-0

3,130,297
2, 3 0, 043



1,983,543
3, 3sS, 033
2,032, 933


Articles.


Mathe ....................
(iil;, roconut and peauul .
O puni ..................
Paper nnd stationery.....
Petroletir ....... .... ....
Piece goods and sarongs,
cottn ......... .......
Piece poods, sill:..........
Provisions, including Ir -h
and saltel land pro-
visions, milk, Lutier,
Lbscuits, cheese, lard,
and curry stuifs .......
Rlice and other grains.....
Sugar ....................
Te ...... ............
Tin and tin ore..........
To, acco..............
Veetral les, fruits, onions,
and garlic... ..........
Wood ..................
Yarns and threads of cot-
ton..................


Gain in Imports of American Goods.

Cigars and cigarettes head the list of articles of import from the
United States, and their value was over $1,200,000 in 1913, showing
an increase of $150,000 over 1912. Next on the list come motor
cars and motor cycles, etc., amounting to $727,484 for 1913 against
$274,200 in 1912, a satisfactory rate of increase considering the
mail territory.
Another gratifying feature is the increase, though slight, in the
imports of manufactured goods such as hosiery, canvas, and fancy
goods, which, while the volume of business in these articles is not
large, indicates a gradual entering into the market of these goods.
Another item showing satisfactory increase is that of boots and
shoes, increasing from $9,226 to $14,235. Paints and varnishes in-
creased from $2,137 to $10,503.
Imports from United States and Other Countries.

A detailed list of imports and their value from tile ITnited States
into tle Straits Settlements and some of tle principal imports from
other countries for 10'13 compared with 1912 are given in the follow-
ing table:


Arlitl antnl countries
whence imported.


FROM UN'TrrI STATES.
App:-irel, hosiery, etc .....
L, I.. ;w ; lr [, ................
Books and ni ..'........
Boots anll !he;..........
Beer aol I.'. ..1............
a(..i rl'Lis, mi et.al ........
Cig ira andl cvr .iietlt.s......
(.' 1 ii. s ..................
Cotton cu- ls .............
Cabinet wore.............


1912




S711
9, '-'m
1. ''2
1, 142
1,0 ,*.'
4. 1"G
21. '27


if.. i-,re,
.'5*, "11I
2,570
14,3 j
3.771
2, -i 'J
1.221 ,W721
], '70 l, '-J'll
.5,,.1-1
19. tU
15, 65"


Articler; and coi;utrics
n Iieiiie ilmplortd.

FROM UNITED STATES-
tuOntinud.
Clieniic Is...............
Clocks Jndl wateircs......
)Inru; and mc'lli.nsl.....
lried prcser\od froils....
Dy es ....................
Fnzines, I oilers, etc......
1'ncn y ponr .............
;.is m aterials............
(;lasi and glassi\\are.......


1912

5371'. 77
1 ,.50.. 72
3, 10, 275
1,3'0, 209
1,361,345
15, 071, R67
1,517,462



7.&685,523
41,665,342
6,.'"aJ.738
1, 1,66i
69, ,.01.476
6, 4GS,b54
3,307, 596
wjl, 116
1,693,449


S 1913


$550,433
1,794,499
4,090,581
1,0 27,395
1,533,357
16,449,675
1,663,064



9,134,428
39,12 8,722
6, 0.5, 494
1.399, 380
61,634,621
6,457,019
3,686,643
1,046,271
1,S12,089


14,0.35
6 325
12, 4 1
22,511
42. 74
2,660
1, 703
573


$5,398
68.903
1S,454
31,173
33,177
20,406
5,021
1,734
1,200











MALAYSIA-STRAITS SETTLEMENTS.


Articles and countries 2 1913 Articles and countries 1912 191
whence imported. whence imported.


FROM UNITED STATES-
continued.

nrains....................
Hardware and cutller'...
India ii.Ler .............
Iron ware ..............
Iron I ar and nai rods.....
Iron hoop.................
Iron n::il ................
Leather ware............
Lamps and lampware....
Lard.....................
Motar cars, motor cycles,
and parts............
Mulical inrtrijmenLt .....
Machinery, electricfal.....
Mu;ket rifles, etc.........
Oils and greases:
Lubricating oil.......
Greases ..............
Petrolrum'..........
Naphtha.............
Other oils............
Ollman's stores..........
Paraffn wax.............
Pains, varnishes, etc.....
Paper and paper ware...
P'erfurnery and co-metics.
Pistols and revolvers.....
Playing cards......... ..
Sewing machines........
Steel..................
Stationery..............
Tin ore.......................
Timber .................
Tinplates..............
Tool and implements....
Tobacco.................
Woilet soao...-...........
Tram and railway mate-
rial....................
Vegetable_, preserved .....
WheaL tiour............
Wooden planks..........
Wooden ware............
All other articles...........

Total..............

FROM UNITED KINGDOM.

A pp:rc I. hosiery, and mil-
linerv. ..... ............
B i.sciuit ..................
Cigars and cigarettes....
Coiton piecogoods.......
Corrug:at. d iron...........
Cycles, motor cars, and
ace-e: ories.............
Ilardwarc and iron, in-
cludil.2ini 1 oo i11 ut.'usils.
Machinci:y and elecrrical
gounds..................
Malt liquors..............
Sarongs, slendincs, and
kain- .................
Tohacco..................
Telegraph and telephone
mat,"rijl; ...............
Stationerv and paper......
Steel .....................
Tinplates................
Yarns ................

FROM GERMANY.

Apparel, hosiery, milli-
nery.................
Boor and ale.............
Chemicals ............
Earthenware and crock-
ery.................
Fancy goods and toys....


$33,832
28
414,S40

50, n17
1,585
8,899
98,127

274,206
13.,63
!, 41..
14,583

488,426
24,081
256,950
6,851.
707
150,240
28,881
2,137
2,837
65,444
2,232
6,380
6,433
5,010
10,222
oo..........
28,242
41,362
32,601
37,100
1,731

3,257
............
3,768
53,379
3,025,263



1,105,312
480,274
850,415
8,911,187
395,119

700, 542

1,170, 030

1,329,553
441,103
479,70l7
3b2,.30

469,488
............

398,525



919,674
470,056

116,916
............


$6,354
32,649
22,927
61,432
5,355
1,049
51,928
1,267
16,034
144,940

727,484
10,623
3,830
19,978

282,884
9, 866
417, 4-S1
6,032
1,924
138,376
11,665
10,563
2,174
21,039
1,353
878
10,522
11,407
11,223
36,900
19,824
48,084
51,222
32,739
3,605

1,419
2,062
11,921
16,11
3,3:0
68,828

3,762,703



945,064
447,915
616 ..:5
8,922,935
464,946

933,475

1,600,429

1,444,228
601,807
82.? 170


439,836
669,931
401, *11l
55, (l 6
573,944



907,184
644,992
44,280

162,362
32,358


FROM GERMANY-contd.

Glass and glassware......
H j r' \war rr, ironware P.....
Cooking utensils.........
India rubber goods.......
LI.n:jm 9p11 l-~ n pware .....
Piab hinr-mry :.n e-le,:tri' al
goods ..................
Leatherware ............
Cloth, woolen............
Nuils, w ire...............
(ilm jn's stores ..........
Piece goods, cotton.......

FROM HONGKONG AND
CHINA.

Beans and peas...........
Cor ton piece goods........
Fruit..................
Medicines...............
Hides, raw...............
Flour, wheat ............
Oil, peanut...............
Lard....................
Tobacco.................
Provisions and oilman's
stores..................
Piece goods, silk..........
Tea......................
Vegetables...............

FROM JAPAN.

Apparel, hosiery, etc.....
Carriages and materials...
Coal.....................
Fish, dry and salted......
Matches .................
Piece goods, silk..........

FROM JOHORE, KELANTAN,
TRINGNAU, AND KEDAH.

Areca nuts.............
Black pepper.............
Cattle ...................
Copra .................
F i- h dried and salted....
Gambier ...............
Para rubber.............
Poultry.................
Rice and paddy .........
S.:;o...................
IT pi,',,-a .................
Tim nad ire .............

FROM rF.FLITI NOPTH BOR-
NEO AND SARAWAK.

Borneo and India rubber.
Gums, rcopal and dammar.
Gutta jelutong..........
Pepper..................
Rattans............-.....
Sago flour...............

FROM FRENCH INDO-CHINA.

Coal......................
Fish, dry and salted......
Raw silk.............
ice.....................
Swine ...................

FROM SIAM.


$87,426
316,209
............

137,383

132, 274
72, u'1s
78,910






899,805
508,859

1,192,170
1,317,064
1,009,038
1,352,261
766,936
1,544,712

1,663,361
979,283
1,093,390
706,787


304,855
238,434
2,457,224

490,493
191,315



978,715
959,413

1, 348, 136

1,393,136
799,322

958,845
............







178,826
1,003,126

867, 446



2,377,528
3,"037,'i95
...o.......


Bran........................ ........
Cattle................. 454, 728
Fish, dry and salted...... 1, 20., t."'
Pad y ............. ..... ...........
Rice.................... 10,410,483
Tin and ore.............. 5,854,122


$64,150
480,274
172,580
212,319
172, 80

98,779
52,796
56,770
198,778
131,706
63,582



698,838
82-, 59
1, 3 ,'3.4 4
885,634
1,379,533
1,101,905
1,572,546
788,893
1,718,193

1,908,039
982,121
1,111,556
801,024


344,026
239,001
3,008,810
667,047
483,112
261,709



1,091,687
732,378
170,877
1, '56,424
5, 11203
857, 2 f6
1, 20, 33
136,815
874,303
118,649
382,629
1,058,722



149,872
172,013
223,106
820,894
161,226
649,44S


134,544
2,389,449
172,580
4,952,614
40;, 634


917,403
630,147
1,399,948
722,682
1.3, 11, 222
6, 17U, S09











SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Article and countries
wheilce imported.

FRO&M AUSTRALIA AND
NCrW C.AL. ND.
Bilter and ( cl 'se ........
('Co ............ .......
Flour........... ..
Sf i -.*p ....................
Tin or ....................
Meat, fresh.............
FROM BRITISH INDIA AND
BURMA.
Bran...................
Coal....................
G; h .....................
Cilnr.s and ( igrrl e.......
( u nni s .................
Opium ..............
Onions and garlic.........
R ice .. . .. .. .
Suronsp,, an]d .lllinpl ll...
Slai.*p, cattle, a.nd ojls...
Yarn....................
FROM DUTCH EAST INDIES.
Areca nuts..............
Copra.................


9[.51,9143
411, 5.'1

2, 0il, 40l7
S- 4, 3.J 3



W,., -1.A_

I..l 2,I
3, ,91,422

" ..,*', 786
1,717,S60

60, 568


$182,799
1, 1, 463
925,385
137.., I

2,3, :13

lI', 3.. 0

II11. .522
1, f'-1l. 677
5'. I, 14A.
340.f I
3, :1'.5, I
3,5l. .971
12, 2.' li ]I
2, ..", '
573, W26
49*-, 195

1,50.fii67
7,771, S13


Articles anti countries
whence imported.

FROM PDUTCH F.AST IN-
uIEs-continued.
Filh. dry and sallcl ......
C.uinli-,-r .................
I;um copal.............. .
Co oee ..................
Penuts ................
JIlulong ..................
Rattans...............
Raw rol on ...............
i.;ul l.-r..r- ia .............
PS rul .u ............ ..
Sr, roirs Jni shI n.liri.-;. .1
Swii' .....................
I'cppvi rs........... .... .
'i in an! or ...............
;'ob ae o. ............

FROM f rEcrlr.nTF MALAY
1T. 7 I Sd.

Coee....... ...........
Copra. ..................
SPri rul I .i.. ..............
1 in und ore .............


............'ii


&1,211.472
1, I i .5-'

7'41, 7:3
1,U0j, I.8
............

.3.0'4. 4i 1
2, 6?2,774
. .. ... ..




5-2.G.947
3, 002, 742
4 i, 3"5, 413


5S2R, 274
02, 329
744,S?22
700,541
003,465
G I, 240
2, 3, W1)02

1,075,791
1,24..94O
515,-954
64 1.Z.01
711, 328
2,697.142
2, 1 .lIS
556,246



1 .. .37
77:1. 1,
6, 7i 1. 346
47,904,796


Principal Exports and Their Value.
Tin, gums, coprn, spices, rattans, sago, tapioca, and tanned hides
represent some of the principal exports from the Straits Settlements.
The value of these and other important products exported during
1913, compared with 1912, is given in the following table:

Articles. 1912 1913 Articles. 1912 1913


Coffee ...................
Copra...................
l; sami ier..................
(;lm .................... .
Jlid'J s. ltinned ...........
O il, io onut .............
Ihu-,pLalte of lime ........


!.(19. 119
R..317, -161
_2, 5.13

1. 215.943
2, 0.3, 1'


,73'1. 171
11.2'?, .L'1

11. 31 2. 0l.i
2, .9'2. 2 4'7
1,3911, 1.32
],03',5t65


1'in-appleis preserved....
S.l1ttlii ..................
Sano .....................
SIh 1 1.; .. ...............
S i-i.- .....................
T.ipi ota. ..................
rT in .......................


51,7;3.713
2. :02. .50i
2, l11, 4 .4
'1u,ti627

2,77i 6.i21
5O0, Y.'j, 540


S1.77 4
2,. 49-1
2,210, 05

9,3t 2,503
24,092.1 .
04,092.702


The exports to the United States during 1013, according to invoices
certified at the American consulate general at Singapore, were valued
at $24,300,614, a gain of $2,51S.806 compared with 1912. This gain
was due principally to the greater shipments of tin and rubber, the
two principal items of export to the United States. The following
were the articles and their value destined for the United States:


Articles.


Bark, mangrove.......A
l i mn. .in ...............
ColTc .................
Cuhebs ................
Cut )ch ............. ... .
Gi n ln hier .................
Gamnliier. cube.........
.iiin enp:l............
GinIn d;l nir ...........
Gutta jolinontg:
E x I r.ci Ii ............
I.Ilrclle1.
.i n re-ilei .........
Gu I I-perelia...........
Gutla, reboiled ........
11I ide;:
BufTalo............
Ieer............
E lk ................
NIulme:s ............
Oil, coconut...........


s21I, 0nn

71:i. 9n;
140.973
'214 5.12
it;i., 274
9'J,699

22'1, 6f55
2,24.917
52,73.
2 ,354

52,' 62
27.3365
21i,2911
106,421


1913


S29. 61, )
4'4.2415
211. 32'
153, li-
100, Il.16
467 ,.522
11 U,3:1'5
, 21 '4,0t 6
133, 8.S

11,. 146
1,7Q2.4 4
6h,991
200,612

9,311
21,065
20,391
40,466
10,531


Articles.


Pepper:
lack ............
W'hirln.. ...........
Pineipp!, pre.ecrvedl...
Rattv s ................
Rubber:
riorneo.............
Para ..............
Shells:
Green snail........
Mother-or-pearl.....
Sao Hlour ............
Tapioca:
Flake..............
Pearl............ .
O ther.............
Tin.................
All other articles........


4..4, 0s3
4111. 8.i

577,696

544.018
3, 19, 01O

14,046
23,495
210,618

1.,49
16.713
4,140
11,474,7M8
126,298


$249, 820
334, 189
127,806
649,628

112,153
4,366,443

17,375

204,434

2,156

20,558
13,295,674
58, 99

24,300,614


Total............. 21,781,803










MALAYSIA-STRAITS SETTLEMENTS. 7


American Purchases from Penang-Shipments to Philippine Islands.

The articles invoiced at the American consular agency at Penang
for the United States during 1913 were valued at $.,798,407, of
which $5,949,612 represented tin; $33,9394 tapioca; $243,358, planta-
tion rubber; $131,71;9, black pepper; :ind $s !.136, white pepper.
The Straits Settlements import very little from the Philippine
Islands, but sell goods to the value of about $1.000,000 annually to
that. country. The articles invoiced at the American consulate gen-
eral at Singapore duinnpore llg 1913 were valued at ll.l!. The prin-
cipal items were as follows: Piece goods. $194,710; rice, $190,048;
cocoa, $160,300; coffee, $91,032; yarn, $55,705; and onion., $15,080.

Exports to Other Countries.

The principal exports from the Straits Settlements to countries
other than the United States are given below:

Art icles and countries of 1912 1Article nnd countries o 1912
dest nation. 1 de9at i.. 19 1913


UNITED KINGDOM.

Copal gum...............
Copra...................
Gambler.................
Hides...................
Jelutong................
Pepper, black and white..
Pineapples, preserved...
R attans .. .............
Ste.el...................
Guttn-prcha ............
Rubber. Para...........
Tapioca..................
Win.......................

GERMANY.

Copra...................
Gambier.................
Gutta-percha............
Pepper, white and black.
Rattans..................
Phosphate of lime........
Ti.....................

FEDERATED MALAY
STATES.

Fish, dry and salted......
Piece goods cotton........
Provisions, fresh and
salted.......... ......
Oilman's stores, hams,
butter, cheese, and his-
cuits ...................
Rice ...................
ESine...................

JOre.RE, KELANTAN,
TRING.AN', ANtD KE-
DAH.

Cotton cood;...........
Opium..............
Provis Ions, including
hams, hacon, oilm.nns
stores, biscuits, and
m ilk.... .............
R ice ..... ......... .....

nONGKONG AND CHINA.

Bides, tanned............
Pepper, black............
Sugar, candy.............
Sugar....................
Rattans..................
Tin.......................


"289,527

38,60 I

1,110,989
............

3n0,.545
21, 906.104
807.267
33,149,138


3,461,067
............-
317,4.12
431.452
9.3. s66
594,949





1,339,204

849,279


10, 151,i11
............


310. 052
655. 126


20,1,710
2, 2Xi, 102


1,594,669
............,
895, F69
1,156,405
390, 578
............


$319,615
535.908
237,866
658.532
42,009
598, 823
1,237, 620
120, 4S7
223,106
2,064,1.57
9,675,878
512,065
34,253,314


5, 863,205
65.285
342,323
750. !92
942.3.2
469, 4S7
597,220



573.944
1,253,002


S.31,434
310. S17
6S8. 231


30n,926
455, 'J5


319,047
1,9RS, ti53


2, 0P0,620
457,5 56
841,3.31
899,236
502,414
442,806


BRTTISH NORTH RP.RNEO
AND SAIAWAK.

O pinm .................
Piece goods, cor ton.......
R ice .......... ......
Tobacco and ci-ars.......
AUSTR.ALIA AND NEW
ZEALAND.
Pepper.................
Phosphate of limp........
Pineapples, preserved....
Rattans..................
Tapioca .................
BRITISH INDIA AND BURMA.
Areca nuts ...............
Coffee................. ..
P lanks...................
Rice and paddy..........
FS w o......................
Tin......................
DUTCH EAST INDIES.
Apparel, etc............
nC oonut nil.............
Fish, dry and salte'd......
Provisi;oas, ihms,oilman's
Ftoie ', iuttLer, l.iscuits,
and m ilk...............
Piece goods, cotton .......
R ice..... .. .............
Sa. on,rI- ', etc..............
To'o aico and ci-ars.......
FRENCH INDO-CITNA.
Arena nuts ...........
G unnie- ..................
rro\ i'ionr etc...........
Fa3.. r arr ........... ..
Sui. ar............ ... .
JAPAN.
Cotton. rjw .............
Plho slphat of lime......
Rul.i.er:
Borneo...............
jra. .......... ..
Sli li. ...................
' in ... .. .. .. .
'Tin anda Linle Ware........
zI1AM.
Oil, coconut .............
Piecec goods, cotton .......
R ice......................
Sucar.....................
Yarn ...................


1321,318
397,390
1,427,198
418,963


223. 106
2-1, 191

418,395


2,610,285


4;r, 925
1,3s6,323



3,319,430


1, n3.015
10, 7S. 522

769,801

311,506
77,207

271,928

613,116

4:1'2,A57
5 .V2,503

62"3,353



1,444,797

1,012,865
369,005


3205,507
338,116
1,067,843
404,770


209,481
268,889
45,983
53,931
276,469


2,778,323
315,073
262,849
355,374
413,853
1,757,031

464,378
745.31S
8 38,3 S17

975,308
2,020,084
11,424 484
719,040
-879,935

499,576
413,173

47,686
156,685

5se4, 1t
231,'.*l

257,168
647,745
2?4,241
759, O i
58,473

317,344
1,30: 57j
511,197
800,457
3; 7,520




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

iinllilllllIIIII*i I IIlniH ii InllUilllll
3 1262 08491 1311
8 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE u a uaa.

Shipping Statistics.
The four ports in the Straits Settlements are Singapore, Penang,
Malacca, and Labuan. The first two are important shipping points,
while the commerce of the ports of Malacca and Labuan is limited.
There were 64,92.) vessels of all kinds, having a total tonnage of *
_ 79,587,(34, entered and cleared at the four ports in 1913, or an in-
crease of 3,6000 vessels and 1,522,701 tons as compared with 1919.
Of this increase Singapore accounts for 991,719 tons and Penang
for 2,881,656 tons. :r
The following table shows, by nationalities, the tonnage of the
arrivals and clearances of merchant vessels at the four ports in
1913 and the rn I leases or decreases as compared with 1912:
Christ,- Total ton- Increa
mas (+) or de-
ionalily. 0 Singapore. Ponang. Malacca. Island nao -n croaso(-)
aC C and cld compares e
SILabuan. wih 1912.
A ... .. 1,448 ............ .......... 3,446 4,894 + 4,894
Au si L ........'.. ... 324,902 316,30 .......... 12,103 653,313 + 24,551
British J.. ............... -... 8,556,443 5,97~,940 558,488 157,126 15,250,047 + 306,736
'hinrso .. .. .. ..... ..... 1 43,838 ........... ........... ........ 43,838 + 34,456
IDanish. .-. .j...... ...... .. -,.n 163,103 115,966 .......... 9,501 288,572 + 37,648
2 16, 260 2593, &55 + 219,003
Duch.. ..,. ........ ... .l 2,116,731 460,304 60 16,260 2,593.855 + 219,002
Frnch. .. ... 760,705 ............ .......... ......... 700,705 + 125,796
rm 2,043,629 1,131,850 .......... 221530 3,397,003 + 71,994
Italian.. I.. ....... 69.550 27,642 .................... 97,192 99,120
Japanse .......... :. 1 726 .9 .......... 4,21 2,590943 + 398,365
Norwegit ,............ .. 42ti,2' 31,022.......... 15,612 472,887 + 137,686
Russian. ..... 450,504 44,750 495,254 128,640
Sarawa, k ........................ 10939 ............ :......... 27,100 127,10 + 37,039
Siamse. ....................... 12.,356 22,320 .......... .......... 145,076 26,239
Spanish. .......... 119,62 ............ ........ ... .... 119,28 ,270
Swodish.s ... ....................... 63,190 ......................... 977 ___ 72,908 + 1,464
Total........................ 1,25-1,963 8,834,101 558,9981 476,737 27,124,789 1+1,139,6(0
The Postal and Telegraph Service.
The number of postal articles (excluding parcels) mailed in the
Straits Settlements during 1913 was 9,147,653, as against 8,789,291
in 1912; the number delivered was 7,983,199, as compared with
7.429,488. The number received for transmission to other coun-
tries was 4,961,424, an increase of 950,230 over the previous year.
The parcels posted in the colonies numbered 92,128, those delivered
,75,374, and those received for onward transmission 61,403. The corre-
sponding figures for 1912 were 91,054, 65,743, and 40,109, respectively.
Thl number of telegrams forwarded increased from 244,301 in 1911-
to 26(3,816 during 1913, and the revenue increased from $27,260 to
$2.),29. The expenditures were $28,336, made up of salaries, $23,1744
annual recurrent charges, $3,313; and special expenditures, $1,849.
Telegraph offices were opened at Tanjong Pagar and Keppel Harbor.
Money-Order Business-Savings Bank.
rThe total money-order and postal-order transactions amounted to *
$2,273,68.1, an increase of $336,037 over 1912. More money was re-,
mitted to every country except China, Sarawak, Siam, Kelantan,
Brunei, and North Borneo.
SThe telegraph money-order service was extended to Kedah during.
the year.
The amount standing to the credit of depositors in the savings
bank on December 31, 1913, was $505,109, as compared with $466,658.
at the beginning of the year. The average balance per depositor.
was $90. The deposits amounted to $361,912, exceeding the with-.
drawals by $30,409. Savings-bank branches were opened at Labua *
Prai, and Seletar.
WASHINGTON : GOVERNmUArT rBraTIrn owP1C: M ..

'~ 'i "