Supplement to Commerce reports

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00064
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00064

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text



SUPPLEMENT TO


COMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 48b December 27, 1915


VENEZUELA.'
By Vice Consul Edward B. Ciplrani, La Gnaira.
There was a considerable decrease in the value of the foreign trade
of Venezuela during 1914 compared with the preceding year. This
decrease was not due entirely to the war in Europe, as the trade for
the first six months of the year showed a considerable decrease com-
pared with the same period in 1913. The total value of the imports
for the whole of 1914 was $13,987,457, compared with $18,J23,103 for
1913 and $20,568,939 for 1912. The exports from the country de-
creased in value from $29,483,789 for 1913 and $25,260.908 for 1912
to $21,518,592 for 1914.
SCountries Participating in the Trade of Venezuela.
SThe following table shows the principal countries engaged in tle -e'
import and export trade of Venezuela for the past three years: /

Country. 1912 1913 1914 Country. 1912 1913 1914

S IMPORTS FROM- FXPORT3 TO-
United! States...... 16,832,716 6. 944,131 86,015,441 United States...... 9,91.,779 8., 175,521 ;9,373,655
Germnnny......... 3,199,36F, 2,5;f,9%6 1,5$9,965 Germany......... 3,012,708 5,.563,7TS 1.929,661
Great Britain...... 4,473.472 4,299,294 2,893,05 Franre.......... 6,911,175, 9,9,S .0-1:1 ,01.,,2
Franre............. 2,626,400 1,093,t,55 777,t637 Great Blritain...... 1,G36,iMl 2,207,,3, 1,426,945
Netherlands........ 1,671,002 1,56,206 1,456,493 N therlands ....... 712,3-0 709,ti3 90 7,ti35
Sp n .............. 1,4i,4,3:7 1,3O.6 120 1 ,I 1.:40S

As shown by the foregoing table the United States is far in the
lead in both the sales to and the purchases from Venezuela, ant al-
though there was a decrease of nearly $8,000,000 in the total value of
the exports from the country during 1914 the shipments to the United
States showed a gain of nearly $900,000.
Value of Principal Exports.
The following table shows the principal exports from Venezuela
and their value during the past three years:

Articles. 1012 1913 1914 Articles. 1912 1013 1914

Asphalt............ 7303,589 &571,155 $989,255 Feathers........... $257,4q S626fi.40l 31.462
Balata............. 1,767,259 2,032,6t7 69.,623 Hides.............. 1,272, 610 1,: 3", 191 1,340,932
Cocoa.............. 2.317,&4: 4,I51,733: 3,918,253 Peirls ............. 32,577 21,75 1 I<,727
Coffee.......... .15, 189,578 16,196,6150 12,312,910 Rubberlc............ 6 157 20:1,63: 126,679
S,Goatskins.......... 786,001 335,534 411,819 iattle.............. 2', I,0 274,148
Gold .............. ,1S3,349 392,581 612,7;

24 1 Complete statistics of the Veneuzuelan trade for 1014 are not yet available. The fol-
S lowing figures, and those published in Supplement to CoMMERtEE IREIORIT. No. IS;I, July 2,
S 1915, represent the preliminary statistics.
S1644'-48b-15


I.:.








2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

MARACAIBO.1
By Consul George K. Donald.
Compared with that of the whole country, Maracaibo's foreign
trade for the year 1914 may be considered fairly satisfactory. Vene-
zuela's total trade showed a decrease in 1914 of 25.2 per cent, com-
pared with 201 per cent for Maracaibo. The country's imports de-
cr(eased by "-3 per cent, while the imports to Maracaibo show a de-
crease of but 10.9 per cent. Venezuela's exports decreased 27 per cent,
while those from Maracaibo declined but 23.0 per cent.

Foreign Trade of Maracaibo-Imports by Classes.

Below is a table showing the value of the imports into Maracaibo
and the exports from the port by countries for two years:


Country.


A. lria ....................... .................. ...
Belgium ..............................................
(.'lomtnlbia ...........................................
J- r"nce ........... ...................................
ermfl lny. ............................... ........ .
] 3ly.. ...............................................
N t. retlain .is........... ............................
Ne': heI linis \\ We Indie.; ..............................
S pain . . . ... . .. .
S naiued i.....ig o ......................................
I 'nirtel i\ i .lo. ......................................
. II olh er cuo ntrie ....................................
Total. ................................


$2,032
10J, 053
............
77,744
781, 798
117,709
82,959
9,117
10, 864
7S2, 11
1,51S,270

3,613,057


$1,436 $3,547
51,809 6, 963
............ 39,196
62,1S9 661,269
486,611 2,891,265
127,369 149,334
111,117 31,378
8,782 153,509
91,303 8,613
490,339 53,352
1,7S81,862 4, 96A, 270
201 17,756
3,219,018 8,981,4'56


In 1914 the imports decreased by $394,000, or 10.9 per cent, but
Maracaibo had 23 per cent of the total imports into Venezuela, com-
pared with 20 per cent in 1913, and was the second port in value of
imports for both years, being, however, a poor second to La Guaira.
The United States in 1914 supplied 55.4 per cent of the total im-
ports into Maracaibo, as against 43 per cent in 1913.
The following table shows the import trade by classes, from the
United States, United Kingdom, and Germany, for two years.


Classes.


Foodstuffs ...................
Textiles .... .................
Chemicals ...................
Metals........................
Miscellaneous................


United States.


1 1


3262.33-
170, 6S9
179,162
551.272
72.169


Total .................. 1.35,630
Gold can .................... 312.640
Grand total .............. 1,54S, 270


i- I


1914


United Kingdom.


1913 1914


5256,455 S42,793 529,605
272,594 527,296 349,469
1S1,020 20,691 15,656
560,P30 175,320 86,727
99,5 0 16,411 8,822
1,370.479 782,511 490,339
414,3.3 .............. .......
1,7A,862- 782,511 490,339


1192.401
244,921
62,.90
139,9,s7
141,799
781,79Q

7S1.798


Review of the Import Trade from United States.

Metals were the principal imports from the United States during
1914 and represented 40.9 per cent of the total import trade, not in-
cluding specie, from that source cornpared with 44.6 per cent for 1913;

'A preliminary review of conditions in the Maracaibo consular district was published in
Supplement to COMMERCE REPORSrs No. 48a, July 2, 1915.


510,425
7,933
68,445
51,433
709,217
176,223
55,301
187,654
18,327
65,322
5,497,584
7,613
6,858,477


Germany.


$134,458
159,112
44,147
65,259
83.665
486,641
.........486,641
486,641







VENEZUELA-MARACAIBO. 3

followed by textiles, which represented 19.9 per cent against 13.8 per
cent for 1913; foodstuffs, 18.7 per cent against 21.2 per cent; chemi-
cals, 13.2 per cent against 14.5 per cent; and miscellaneous articles,
7.3 per cent against 5.9 pe recent for 1913.
The percentages remained fairly stationary, textiles showing the
greatest change from 13.8 per cent for 1913 to 19.9 per cent for 1914.
Imports of textiles from the United Kingdom decreased by $177,827
or 33.7 per cent, and from Germany by $85,809, or 35 per cent, a de-
crease for the two countries of $2t63,636, while the United States in-
creased its shipments of textiles by $101,905. However, the United
States did not make a corresponding gain in the imports of metals,
which show a decline in value of $88,533 from the United Kingdom
and $74,728 from Germany, a total of $163,261. Imports of foodstuffs
fell off all around, the largest decrease being $57,943 from Germany.
Imports of gold coin were in both years entirely from the United
States. There was an increase of over 32 per cent in this item.
Imports from United States, United Kingdom, and Germany.
The following table gives the imports and their value for 1913 and
1914 and the amounts from the United States, United Kingdom, and
Germany:

United States. United Kingdom. Germany. Total.
Items.
1913 1914 1913 1914 1913 1914 1913 1914

FOODSTUFFS.
Barley malt......... ......... S45- ........... ......... $1,;149 tl. .421 $19,160 $18,209
Beer .......................... 3 .................... 3,656 4,087 3,650 4,679
Butter. ......... .. S4 .......... ...... 11,536 6,228 28,790 16,183
Candy............... 1,-417 16,193 81,106 $2,502 793 420 22,421 20, 99
Cannel goods........ 16,173 o0,503 4,098 3,209 9,183 4,381 42,872 36,180
Crackers ........... 20,516 22, 273 373 1,189 3,709 4,186 24,846 27,792
Flour........ .... 14........140.75 1.......... ....... 35 ......... 140,812 143,081
Grits and sago ........ 3,624 1, 49- ....... ........... 1,136 980 4,760 2,485
Lard ....... ........ 14, 58 6.70 .......... ............... ........... 14, \ 5, 6,790
Liquors............. 9,32 2,826 35,062 19,127 2,959 6,108 5,,2S 44,830
Olive oil............. 440 -40 295 397 63 62 19,509 32,564
Rice................ 394 13,079 ..................... 31,i21 29,312 52,436 66,827
Sardines ............. 529 79 152 106 75, 66 39.34 101,282 51,773
Spices............... 8,857 8,377 70 776 1,118 640 10,265 10,655
Wines................ 867 952 743 1.530 22,900 17,516 .?,511 50,582
Other............... 10,912 10.978 894 7.9 8,857 5,772 21,812 20,040
Total........... 262,338 256,455 42,793 29,605 192.401 134,458 615,251 553,569
TEXTILES.
Bagging.............. .................... ......... ...... .... 175 .......... ..
Cordage and yarn.... 14,469 13,414 1,033 549 11,520 4,100 2., 29J 19,911
Cotton goods......... 152,573 253,525 460, 22 312,971 101,177 70, 635 521, 39 745, 352
Hats........................... .... .... 132 4. 49,345 21,934 52,214 27,432
Hats,stuff for ....... .................... 3,702 1,0.O 5 13,698 11,423 18,172 16,255
Linen goods.......... ......... 13 368 1,314 63 265 4.31 2,090
Silk roods............ 255 134 1, 646 1S6 5,771 3.115 S, 324 4,023
Silk, mixed.......... 321 509 2, 15I 1,3,4 8,'27 7, 75 10,775 12,759
Thread............... 207 985 18, 17 16, 20 12, 735 13,09 32, 932 35, 706
Umbrellas..................... .......... 384 450 3,890 1,555 7, 503 5,180
Underwear and ho-
siery.............. ......... 507 5,564 3,8.4 14,297 9,430 41,631 41,923
Woolens............ 320 15 10, 94 9,039 22,027 12,913 3S. 77 31,260
Other................ 2,544 3,462 22.477 2,329 1,026 2,158 27,014 10,839
Total.......... 170,689 272,594 527,296 349,469 244,921 159,112 1,0S9,916 951,730
CHE MICALS.
Calcium carbide...... 12,110 12,2 ...48 .................. 12,110 12,315
Cement.............. 2,244 22,816 ..........11,257 3,192 13,553 26,008
Drugs and medicines. 99,55 68,017 8,989 6,191 27,452 24,053 181,203 128,937
Disinfectants.......... 1,487 1,22 .......... 19 3,755 3,975 5,280 5,308
Gasoline and kero-
sene ............... 27,690 32, 144 ................. 603 761 29,532 35,782


r








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Items.


CHEM1CALS-Contd.

Lubricant ............
Paints and oil .......
Perfumery...........
Rosin ................
Stearine..........
Toilet art icle ........
O ther...............
l')to l .. ........

METALS AND MAiNli-
PACrURES.

Ammunition .........
Arms...............
Autos and carriages..
< 'oip.'" ........
'I lh i;, ..............
Fle-trial eoors. .
nip!.-.: riw i 1 ;, La.ri, uil-
tural.............
Iron and steel........
Iron, Je ell..............
Ma hi.liinerv ........-. .
Motors and boats.....
Nails................
Railroad material....
Pumps..............
Safes................
Scale.. ... .. .......
Tin..................
Tools ................
Tubil-i ...........
Wire ............
Other................


United Stales. United Kingdom.


IL- I I I -j I- I -


54,590
13, 100
1,11. I
10, 513
1.i,32
2,053
2,707

179,162


$7, 1910
16,154
5,149
6,875
2,531
99
6,525

1 '1,020


51,724
3,281


5,489"
1,208

20, 6 I


51,16fi0
'"si;t
4, 790
..........

686
2,310

15,656


$514
5,845
5, 142
187
147
702
G,: w'


62,690


SI84
6,113
2,280


3,589


44,147


$5,104
21,369
14,359
10,700
66,013
12,471
12,826


384,520


I I I I I I 1I


27,437
26, .i:0
13,215
3,3 '1
2, 676
IS, S562

33,625:
11, 77
41, 3t ,
2,2A.3
2, 4 52
3, 60'



5,22
2, 77'

1.115:1

3 h,00


28,374
22, 512

5, 3.13
4, 12
10, 1.54

4 A, 5-2"
39. 465
8, .;3'

174.701
1.5,97.8
,, 179

5, 465.
3, ',.A
.3,732
6, 3A1
, il..l
r;0, fl03
42. .'y
3..132


Total...... ... .5 1.-72 5'10, 1)


lMISCELL\NEOL'U5 RTI-
CLES.

Bottle ..............
Butl on ............
Cormbs. ............
Cro.:kery ...... .....
Class, and manufa'-
tures oi ............
Leather ............
Musi. al in;irumenIt.
Ofli'e .llpples .......
Paper...............
Rubber and iellul id
goads.............
Statimnery and b:oks.
T o y s ................
Wood, and manufac-
ture, of ............
Other................

Total ..........


3,0;2
107

4,349
18,4701
1,221

7,155

2,347
2,421
S3S

6,551
25,416

72,11,9


30
173

201

3,657
21,%_'2
3,944
4, 30')
12,721

3,183
1,952
1,0-10

12,106
34,3t;2

99,540


17
923

7, 178
1,615
54

43,734
8,14.3
1,184

46,378
113
3, 8109


.10S
4,171
5,041
8, 1Q11
t. I
43. 797

I 17.,3.20




851
860
1,6G5

196
1,120
154

1.248

1,874
2,256
164

449
5,574

16,411


..........,


3,219
4,771
77

12, r.55
4,955
1. 032
226
15..595
3, 77'-
767
. .. .

q07
515
1,7.21
3.3,513

75.1

8\,7S7




553
180
2,330

132
251
290
117
lit
891

488
43S


427
2,662


3, 329
10,112
........ ..
1, 9S.
12, 067
94)

7,35.1
53,530
501
3.696
I N, 970)
2, n1)
1, '..il
... .... ...

192
1,915
4,5;66
II?7
1,941
114, 11

13), 987



44,157
6,061
4, 102
9,015

10,370
4,S65
2,454

17,015

3,996
3,269
6,029

9,125
21,341


8,S22 141,799


4,812
3,733

!,i223
4,531
316

4,095
24, .0
155
1,317
12,36q
100
2, C9 ,
311
........ ..
1.9
.50
686
1,751

1, 296
1, 67'S


30,808
78,182
13,215
15,773
Ib, 463
19,S65

85,11S
77, ,01
43,102
6,212
266, 824
7,20.5
9,611
4S.864


8,4%'2
19.9-7
1[5, 92
2S. ?t1
46,343
.10S,177


65,259 035, 96 761,255


12,829 44,57.
1,721 13,526
3,368 6,106
6,613 10,962

4,721 15,842
S,227 28,057
1,313 7,329J
1,627 ..........
12,064 30,626

4,330 9,257
1,604 10,546
3,819 7,261

9,S51 16,271
11,578 71,440

83,665 271,501


Imports of American Foodstuffs.

Almost one-half the imports of foodstuffs comes from the United
States, that country supplying all the flour, which is the largest indi-
vidual item. The decrease in imports of foodstuffs is accounted for
almost entirely by the decrease from $101,2S2 to $51,773 in sardines.
Several merchants endeavored to supply the demand with American
sardines, but they were not considered equal to the European product.
Other foodsltuffs to show losses are liquors, lard, butter, and canned
goods. Olive oil and rice are the only articles showing notable gains.
There is an increasing use of the former instead of lard. Rice was
imported from the United States in 1914 for the first time in any


Germany.

1913 1914


Total.

1913 1914


$7,471
24,419
14,356
6,875
39,187
4,006
13,113


33,354
41,272
14,996
10,897
13,774
10,655

69,759
71,784
9,780
1,733
206,324
20,267
11,428
37,222
5,989
4,537
4,6S9
7,881
35,514
95, 71
46, 62
S6,937


13,040
4,208
4,204
9,494

8,813
30,914
6,787
6,167
30,077

8,727
6,107
5,038

23,326
63,432

220,334


I I-----I-----i






VENEZUELA-MARACAIBO.


quantity. The statistics for 1915 will probably show a large increase
in imports of this product from the United States. Wines, the
fourth largest item of foodstuffs, remained almost stationary.
Increased Receipts of American Cotton Goods and Chemicals.
Textiles are the most important group of imports into M:racaniho,
forming in 1914 over one-third of the total (excluding gold coin).
The imports of textiles decreased by $138,186, most of which can be
accounted for in the decrease of $76,587 in cotton goods. Imports
of cotton goods from the United Kingdom showed a loss of $148,000
in 1914, while those from the United States gained $101,000, or 66 per
cent. Underwear and hosiery are largely from Spain. The United
States seems unable to compete in this item.
Thread would seem to furnish another opening for American
manufacturers. Germany and the United Kingdom have been sup-
plying practically all of this article.
Drugs and medicines are the largest item under chemical products
and of these the United States supplied over 50 per cent in both 1913
and 1914. This is the result of an aggressive camnplign which has
been carried on here for several years by American drug and patent-
medicine manufacturers. Almost all the foreign advertisenll nts
appearing in the local press are of American and to a less degree
French patent medicines. American talcum powder, perfilll ery, etc.,
are also having an increasing sale. The United States supplies prac-
tically all the cement, resin, calcium carbide, gasoline, and luibrica.nts,
and two-thirds of the paints and oils. Stearin comes from Belgium
and the Netherlands."
Decrease in Imports of Metal Goods-Miscellaneous Imports.
Imports of metals and manufactures of metals decreased $174,041,
or 18.6 per cent, both Germany and the United Kingdom sending less
than half of what they did in 1913, and the United States only gained
$9,558. Tubing, tools, iron and steel, and agricultural implements
showed gains from the United States, while practically everything
else showed a decreased value or remained about the same. T he
increase of $67,055 in the total imports of tubing may perhaps be
attributed to the activities of the oil companies.
Barbed wire, an important item, comes almost entirely from the
United States. The tools imported from the United States showed
an increase from $7,988 in 1913 to $28,159 for 1914. This is 80 per
cent of the total imports and may be accounted for by the numerous
salesmen for American tools that have been in Maracaibo during the
past year. Although the total imports of agricultural implements
decreased by $15,000, those from the United States increased by
$13,000.
The total imports of miscellaneous articles decreased by about 20
per cent. There was a large decrease in the imports of bottles. pr;c-
tically all of which come from Germany. Imports from the United
States showed increases in leather, musical instruments, office sup-
plies, paper, rubber and celluloid manufactures, and wood and manu-
factures of wood.
One favorable point to be noticed in the foregoing table is that
in no case is there any appreciable decrease in the imports from the
United States in articles which do not show a proportional total
,'decrease.







6 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

Parcel-Post Business-Transshipments of Goods.
Packages weighing 29,240 kilos (64,462 pounds) were imported
by parcel post in 1913, and 21,637 kilos (47,700 pounds) in 1914.
Values are not given. The minimum charges-duty, cartage, etc.-
on parcel-post packages are about $0.60. For this reason, catalogues
and other advertising matter should not be sent by parcel post.
As mentioned in the preliminary report from this office [see Sup-
plement to COMMERCE REPORTS, No. 48a, July 2, 1915] the Province
of Saintander, in Colombia, is also commercially tributary to this
district. Goods for this Province in transit through Maracaibo were
imported in 1914 to the following values: From Germany, $119,745;
Italy, $75,610; United Kingdom, $78,305; United States, $241,540;
other countries, $41,600; making a total of $556,800.

The Export Trade of Maracaibo.

In the value of exports Maracaibo leads all other Venezuelan ports,
with only 30 per cent of Venezuela's total exports for 1913 and 1914.
Thus, although Maracaibo's exports showed a loss of $2,126,000, or 23
per cent, in 1914, it was not out of proportion to the decline in the
total exports for the whole country.
The total exports of coffee from Maracaibo during 1914 amounted
to 28,168,162 kilos, compared with 34,481,277 kilos for 1913 (1 kilo=
2.2 pounds). The exports of crude sugar amounted to 2,528,691 kilos
compared with 1,002,747 kilos; dividivi, 2,574,190 kilos, against
3,648,041 kilos; and cacao, 194,069 kilos, against 315,201 kilos. The
following table gives the total value of the exports and the principal
countries of destination:


Exports and countries'of
destination.

Bark, mangrove.........
United States........
Porto Rico...........
Bark miscellaneous ......
dermany.... ........
Cabima ..................
United States........
Germany .............
Cacao....................
United States ........
Germany.............
France...............
Italy................
Coffee...................
United States........
Germany............
France ...............
Italy.................
Netherlands West In-
dies ...............
Spain................
etherlands.......
Copaiba.................
United States........
Germany............
Corn.....................
Netherlands West In-
dies ...............
Cotton .................
Spain...............
Germany............
Dividivi................
Germany............
Fiber, for hats..........
Netherlands West In-
dies................


1913


$1,934
...........
1,9 34 "
3,004
1,021
17,711
14, 690
2,021
100,439
73 150
21,992
1,636
8,165, 894
4,593,079
2,706,914
640,170
115,211
50,614
2,925
28,993
19, 868
14,7.32
5,136
2,185
2,1 R5
24,21S
794
23,424
76,311
75,936
38,272
38,272


1914


$,, 199
1, SS0
4,319
2,069
1,729
9,322
5,582
3,749
63,089
35,064
J4, 175
7,800
4,506
6,096,728
5,207, (SO
593,077
34,541
151,724
32,607
16,120
53,114
10,536
10,536
............
21,757
21,757


81,388
71,921
21,440
21,434


Exports and countries of
destination.

Fishso .nds...............
Uniiled Slates........
Netherlands West In-
dies ................
H ides....................
United States.........
Germany.............
Italy.................
A ustria-Hunear.....
Netherlands West In-
dies................
Leatl-er, sole..............
Netherlands West In-
d ie; ................
Merchandise, reexporred..
Colombia .............
O hercountries.......
Salt..... ............ ..
Colombia............
Skins, gcat..............
United States.........
Skins, miscellaneous......
United States.........
Sugar. crude.............
Netherlands West In-
dies................
Great Britan........
Wood:
Ebony..............
Great Britain.....
United States.....
Mora ...............
United States.....
Great Britain.....
France...........
Netherlands......


1913


$21,410
10,899
9,037
278,396
201,038
41,643
30,964

4,160
10,998
10,981
12,888
12,111
777
23, 829
23,828
41,762
41,762
3,033
3,017
52,072
31,498
20,574
7,785
1,520
1,364
11,879
3,314
2,558
2,809
270


1914


$14,494
7,710
6,672
207,035
154,775
17,084
19,824
10,425
2,492
13,861
12,095
42,685
37,360
5,325
27,460
27,460
43,268
43,236
2,862
2,535
117,476
77,482
39,994
8,087
3,130
1,620
7,317
1,644
1,844
1,028
1,287




VENEZUELA-PUERTO CABELLO.


Exports and countries of 1913 1914 Exports and countries of 13 1
destination. des iat 'on. 1913 1914
Wood-Continued. Woo'I-Cont inud.
Vera.................. $5t,687 S ,5-0 Z/apatero-- 'ontinucfd.
United States.... .l 3 1 Sinl. ",.-,., .!, 4.52
threat Britain..... 2.314 2..OL.- M ic( IlljIc0us ......... 6,002 4,370
Zapatero............. 44, 15 42, (113 Spain............. 2,187 l
Great Britain.... 17. 10.137 Nethe:landiWe.t In-
Germani y......... 6, 181) 6,S, dies................ 1, 23 1,662
United States..... 3,313 12,553

[A list of the articles and their value invoiced at the American con-
sulate at Maracaibo for the United States during 1914 was published
in Supplement to COM.MERCE REPORTs No. -1Sa, July 2, 1915.]
Opportunities for American Capital.
This country is still "new," as far as its development is concerned,
and there are many opportunities for the p-roperi utilization of Ameri-
can capital. Among these may be mentioned a" banks "; that is, chiefly
those called here bancos agricola," or those whose purpose is to loan
money on farms. Many of the German firms have branch ihliise. in
the coffee districts of the States of Trujillo, Me1rida, and Taichira,
through which they advance money to the planters at very high rates
of interest, only in exceptional cases as low as 1 per cent per month.
The writer believes that an American bank located at San Crist6bal
in Taichira, with branches in Trujillo and Merida, would be able to
do a satisfactory business. Perhaps a still better arrangement would
be to establish a large bank at La Guaira or Caracas for general bank-
ing business with a branch-not .an agency-at Maracaibo, aid
branches also in the interior specializing in advances't6 the coffee
growers.
It is not believed that a savings bank would pay, as those that would
deposit would want a rate of interest not compatible with sound
banking.
At the close of September, 1915, there were two American, one
British, and one Venezuelan company prospecting for petroleum.
The oil fields are located in several parts of the State of Zulia. Coal
is found in large quantities and of excellent quality to the north of
Maracaibo.
Maracaibo has poor hotel accommodations. The writer believes
that a small hotel kept in a modern way would pay large dividends.
In addition to the transient trade there are the numerous clerks of the
commercial houses for the permanent trade.
The opportunities for investment in sugar centrals are, of course,
unlimited. There is only one company here incorporated Iunder the
laws of the United States. It remains to be seen what will be the
actual cost of production on a large scale, but the general opinion
seems to be that it will compare favorably with Cuba.
PUERTO CABELLO.
By Consul Herbert R. 'Vright.
For the first time in the history of the Puerto Cabello consular
district the value of the exports invoiced from Puerto Cabello to the
United States were over $1,000.000, an increase over the year 1913 of
$436,514. The gains were principally in coffee, copper, goatskins,
and hides.




- 7
-.7


SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE RB


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ill iti3 12 4lllllll9I311111 11 U ll111111111111111111111
3 1262 08485 4933


The principal articles and their quantities and values for 1913 and
1914 were as follows:

1913 1914
Articles.
Quantities. Values. Quantities. Values.

Pounds. PoTund.e.
Bones ................................................ 11 229 5400 222,R44 $1,625
Coca.................................................... 1, 40, 401 219,527 1,047,855 147,977
Coconuts .............................................. 91,367 b24 225, 24 2,400
Coffee ..................................... ........-- 1,321,493 1S7,275 899,988 366,015
Copper ore......................................... 8,490,000 77,000 25,235,641 230,202
Deerskins ................................. : ...... 6S,3,2 11,414 61,982 11,598
Goatskins ........................................... 636,180 166,219 822,185 209,526
Gold ore .................... ........................ .......... ........ 165 16,895
Hats (Panama) ....................................... 401 2,724 ............ ..........
Hide ... .......................... .............. 435,674 108,000 1,047,092 216,811
Matte ot copper ....................................... ..................... 672,000 9,000
Orchids .............................................. 29,167 3,236 19,405 3,331
Rubber .............................................. 6,152 5,456 6,565 5,222
Tonka tean ........................................ ....................... 1,425 1,357
Wood ............................................. 257,243 3, 08 .......................
A.I ot her ar iles...................................... 29,749 646 7,626 874
Total .......................................... 12,943,438 786,319 30,269,997 1,222,833

There seems to be i general effort among the mer-hants ol this
district to do business with the United States, and the only reason
why more goods were not invoiced to the United States was that
there were no markets suitable for the same. The merchants would
like to send more coffee. hides, and wood, and would like a market
for dividivi.

Increased Imports from United States.
The United States was the only country to show an increase in
imports into the district over the preceding year, such increase
amounting to $17,597. The imports from .Great Britain declined by
$392,S48; from Germany, A157,050; France, $31,615; the Netherlands,
$43,560; Spain, $33,039; and Italy by $24,544.
The following tabular statement shows the total imports into
Puerto Cabello and the share of each country in the trade for 1913
and 1914:

Countries. 1913 1914 Countries. 1913 1914

ITniled States ................ 872. 104 $SS9.701 Italy ........................ 87,618 $63,174
Great Britain ................ 978,75. 5S5.908 France....................... 96,196 64,581
German..................... 419.114 262.0.94 Othtr countries .............. 66,875 11,651
Netherlands ................. 395,153 351,393
Spain........................ 136,418 103,379 Total................. 3, 02,234 2,332,051

The outlook for the extension of American trade is certainly encour-
aging, and if the markets of the United States can accommodate the
products of this district the merchants will not fail to purchase their
goods and wares in the United States.



,t
............ ...
/- ----S |





U.I | rr"er fT:vn WAS, I.CrTO: ("OVI[\70 ENT PiiISTINC OFFICE: 1915


--i