Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00057
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00057

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text



19 MR1955 j-
SUPPLEMENT T C?


COMMERCE R
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPO
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMEk COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 79a December 7, 1918

TUNIS.
By Congul Edvin C. Kemp, Tunis, October 1.

The year 1917. although in general one of prosperity for the French
Protectorate of Tunis. was not uniformly so. owing to increased
prices and the increased cost and difficulty of production.
The effort made to increase the agricultural production over that
of 1916 was fairly successful as will bI: seen from the following table,
giving the production in round figures:

Products. 1916 1917 Products. 1916 1917

Wheat: Tnnq. Trn.. i Tcn.. Tons .
Hard ................ 131. (00 1 o), i0 ) Potato ;. ................. 2,W1 ) 2,.0)
Soft ............... 19.000 .11, I10 .Almoads ................ I, 'l10 2, 50)
Barlt-y................... 107,00' 170, i l Date. .................... 23, 200 27. 31h
Oats................... 36, 000 .5', ( range. ............. ... 1 ,2*10 7I i
Maize and sorgo ........ 3,300 9,iYitr Olive oil................. I,5, .i1: I. ,I1NI
Beans ................... 5, I b, I Wiues .................... a 1 1,S,6,uO a ll ,30u,0o0
Chick-peas ............... 1,)0 2,OO.J
a Gallons.
Lack of labor and material were the great difficulties met with in
this production, andt the recquisitioning of ships for the more im-
portant needs of France prevented even the normal imports of agri-
cultural machinery, which would have been so valuable in developing
the country's resources, particularly in counterbalancing the drain
of the country's labor for military purposes and war work in
France. Land rents were double pre-war prices, and there was a-
lively market for farm properties. While part of this demand arose
from the increased profit-, it was also ldue in part to tlie native's
distrust of paper \values and his preference for real e-tate or mer-
chandise as a medium of investment.
Good Yield of Cereals, Wine, and Olives.
The cereal crop was of good quality and the price remunerative.
The crop was placed under a general requisition by the State, a.- in
1916, and the prices fixed by tlie Gov\ernment were 43.50 franc,, per
100 kilos ($3.81 per 100 pounds) of wheat. 30.50 francs ($2.('7) for
barley, and 30 francs ($2.63) for oats. The production of wheat
permitted only small exports to France, although oats, which ar
not largely consumed in Tunis, were exported to France and Saloniki,
as was barley to Tripoli, by an arrangement with the Italian Gov-
ernment.
The wine crop was generally good, although the alcoholic e degree
was less than the normal of 11 to 12 degrees, running from 91 to 10
9420S0-18-79a--1






SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


degrees with 11 degrees as a maximum. Certain growers reported
diseases in their vineyards and others had their vines burned by
the sirocco, with the result, that the grapes did not mature normally.
A third of the wine crop was requisitioned, for the navy. A shortage
of casks created considerable difficulty in handling the crop.
In 1916 the olive crop was an exceptionally abundant one, and the
trees rested in 1917. A persistent drought caused a mediocre fruiting
and the result was only a fair crop. The exportation was controlled
by the State, regulations requiring that an amount equal to one-
quarter of the amount exported be held at the disposition of the Gov-
ernment at a price of 123.50 francs per 100 kilos ($10.81 per 100
pounds) at Tunis. This was to assure to the native population a
suppl)ly of oil at a price they could afford to pay. The large exports,
both to France and to Algeria, consisted- principally of high grade
oil, of which Tunis is an important producer. Superfine" oil was
quoted in January at 270 to 273 francs per 100 kilos ($23.64 to $23.90
per 100 pounds).
Soap Industry-The Fruit Crop.
Soap lxiaking, which is dependent on the olive-oil production, is a
considerable industry in Tunis. and a decrease in imports of soap
from Marseille resulted in increased prices for the Tunisian product.
Soap makers also were required to hold an amount equal to one-
fourth of their exports at the Government's disposition at a fixed
price (1.20 francs per kilo. equivalent to 10 cents per pound). Both
oil and soap were sold to the public at Government shops opened for
the purpose.
The fruit crop-dates, figs, almonds. oranges, etc.-was abundant
and prices were high. (wing lo the difficulty of importing the
cheaper grades of dates. largely consumed by the native population,
the exportation of dates. except the "deglas." destined for the fancy
trade, was prohibited. The prices paid to the native growers were
the highest evcr known, .95 to 100 francs per 100 kilos ($8.32 to $8.80
per 100 pounds) for "deglas." and even the "- ftimi." or white
dates," were quoted at 45 to 50 francs per 100 kilos ($3.94 to $1.38
per 100 pounds). Shipments of alfa, which grows wild, fell off on
account of the lack of transportation and high freights. The poor
sale of the cork harvest was also due to these causes.
An effort was made during the year to develop the cultivation of
the castor bean and Manitoba wheat, seeds for both being distributed
by the Government.
Animal Products-Fishing.
Normally the country's production of hides was about 50,000 cow-
hides. two-thirds of vlwhich weighed from 11 to 20 kilos (1 kilo =
2.2046 pounds) and the remainder from 2 to 10 kilos; 150.000 sheep-
skins, mostly broad tail with few merinos; 12,000 dozen lambskins,
Iroadl tail. dried in the ,hade and treated with arsenate; and 30,000
to, 3,,000 dozen goatskins, two-thirds of which run in weight from
10 to 11 kilos per dozen. The wool prodded averaged 17,000 quintals
(1 quintal 000.46 pounds) annually, 7,000 quintals being con-
sunied in the native manufacture of burnoose, blankets, and rugs,
and the remainder exported to France and Algeria. Since the war,
both wool and hides have been requisitioned for the army such as
were not accepted being exported to France and Algeria exclusively.







TUNIS. 3
The 10 fleets licensed to fish for sponges with divers reported a
satisfactory season for 1916(-17; about G2,,sG4 kilos, worth $I",i;:';4,
were exported in 1917, chiefly to France and Italy.
Before the war the normal catch of tunny amounted to 25.(i0i)
annually. whereas only 4,439 were taken in 1917. The restriction of
certain areas for naval purposes was partly the cause of this. Tunny
in oil was quoted in Tunis in 1917 at C00) to (,0 francs per 100 kilos
($15.53 to $5.;.!0 per 100 pounds), 400 to 500 franc., (:$35.02 to $30.40)
more than before the war.
Mineral Output.
Next to agriculltre, mining is the most important of Tunisian
inldu-tries. The aiinuial production of the 26 mines in operation
during the last two years is given as follows:

Ores. 191 1917 Ores. 191; 1917

Tnnq. TTon". Tnse Tr:I
Iro :......................... i o,93. 0I., i M anTneris .................. ",:
L.ead ................... I 63, sM U 41. 4l .1 1 .i nii ...................... I 620 :32,i ;, :
Zinc ......................... ........... 1L,00) lllo phate................... 1, 'u 93 1 ,nm, I i J

Char-acteristic of the year 1917 was the development of the mining
industry of the country, which had fallen much below normal .dur-
ing the first two years of the war. The need of ores for war pur-
poses, however, brought about an increased production. The S'ocie6t
des Fonderies de M&grine increased its production of lead pig to 50
or 5.5 tons per day, and the shortage of English coal resulted in
doubling the output. of the lignite mines of Cap Bon, which are
now largely relied upon for fuel.
The cutting off of the markets of Germany and Austria, shortage
of labor, and particularly shortage of transportation, caused a large
decrease, in the export of pho-phlte. Shortage of sulphuric acid,
and the burning of the sulperplhosphate plant of the Compagnio
Tuniioenne des Produits Chimiques resulted in a decreased prodhuc-
tion of superphosphates. The Co i)algnie des Phosphates et du
Chemin de Fer de Gafsa, by far the mo-t iniportant of the phos-
phate operators. reported a falling off in gross profits from
$1,059.,61 in 1916 to $'00,114 in 1917. Tile mines are still operalcd,
however, and the stock is being held for shipment when conditions
improve. The stupe phoslphate, phint will probably also resiiie
operations w-hen the ncece-ary machinery and acid can more easily
be obtained. Some of the difficulties of opLer'til may be jiudgdl
from the repl'rt of the phosphate company, which states that the
cost of coal has rien from $I0.76 per ton before the war to $5..04;
d(lnanite, from $0.87 to $1.'3 per kilo; mine timber from $0.14 to
$0.'29 per meter; carbide, from s0.07 to $0.55 per kilo; and labor,
from 30 to 50 per cent.
Transportation-Exports from Tunis.
The Compagnie des Phosphates et du Chemin de Fer de Gafsa
and the Compagnic de Cheminii de Fer de PBol Guelm:i et Pro-
longements, which operate 1.944 kilomtcetrr of track in Tunis, both
reported a delicit in their railway business, due to increased operat-
ing costs, as the Government had allowed an incree;ie of 30 per cent
on passenger rates and 30 per cent on freight rates to cover increase








4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

of salaries necessitated by the advanced cost of living. The deficit
is the first experienced by either road since its organization, and
though naturally regretted, is in no way considered as evidence of
deteriorated values in the properties themselves, which should, on
the contrary, rapidly increase with the development of the country.
Only a portion of the usual pre-war shipping called at Tunisian
ports, causing considerable inconvenience and hardship, both in the
import and export trade of the country.
Sea transportation is the keystone of Tunisian commerce, as both
export and import transactions are carried on mainly with Europe.
The fairly considerable trade with the adjoining colony of Algeria
is by railway and caravan, and is confined principally to native
products, live stock, and ores from the mines on the frontier. Trade
with the Italian colony of Tripoli, which adjoins Tunis on the east,
is also carried on by caravan and by a few small sailing coasters.
The bulk of the export trade is with France, Italy, and England,
and is confined to the raw products of the regency, as will be seen
from the following table giving the exports for the last two years,
the value being given in francs (tlhe normal exchange rate of 1
franc is $0.193) :

1916 1917
Articles.
Quantity. Francs. Quantity. Francs.

Animals, live.................................. ............... 4,372,526 ............ 3,558,943
Bread-_tiiT-s:
Barley.......... ............. ... ton .. 21,795 4,576.971 7,044 1,479,240
Oats...................................... do.... 30,1986 6, 39,740 54,C 1 10.930,200
W heat...................... ...... .. ....d .. 11,293 3,387.990 141 42.3t0
Cork ...........................................kilos.. 2,734,720 957,152 1,020,2G.;3 357,103
Date. ........... .......... ............... do.... 3,424,121 1.434,073 1,9-12, 17 807,370
Esp.rlo............... ...................... ons.. 26,122 1,959. 157 1,709 128,213
Fish......... ........ ....... .......... ....kilo.. 73S,213 1,20, 039 591, 71 1,14.6480
Hides;... ............................ .........do.... 1,957,2-.7 3, 73,662 1,531,972 2,997,908
W ool ........... ........... ......... ... .... do.... 1, 1.13,367 1,776,355 796,754 1,06S,474
Oil, olive...................................... tons.. 4,541 11,126,541 22,195 28,854,138
Ores:
Iron.................... ...............do.... 462,669 A, 477,360 580, 23 8,123,412
Lead ......................................do.... 3.0,l13 4,9-16.74S 16,062 2,631,184
Lead. pig........... ........ ... ..... do.... 14 ,50 13,502.165 15,712 15,791,785
Pho phases ....... ...... ........ do. .. 1,034, 73s 23,7V8,933 612,441 14,0:6,150
Zinc ............................... .....do.... 12,66R 1,304,680 10,060 1.0335,222
Sponges...... .............................. .....k ios.. 11S,442 3.56,, 554 62,864 1,535,048
Superphosplite ........................... tons.. 17,5' 1,231,097 7,463 522,410
\W in s.................. ............... be toliters.. 51,365 1,62-2,055 9,591 2,715,120
.\A1 other articles .... ....... ........................... ....... 21,63,22 .......... 27,855,319
Total...................................... .......... I 11S,791,946 ........... 125,672,079

Principal Articles Imported.
No manufacturing is carried on in Tunis except the soap-making
industry, which is dependent upon the olive-oil industry. one or two
canning iestablishllents of little importance, and the native shoemak-
erm. rug and textile weavers, saddle makers, etc. The result is that
the country has to rely upon Europe and America for its manu-
factured goods, for which, like other countries of the Near East, it
offers a double marketl-the native and the European. The native
market is the more cons-iderable, but is limited to textiles, sugar, to-
bacco (controlled by the Tunisian R6gie), petroleum products. knit
goods, and other bull staples. The market for the European colony
includes the above, and also offers a demand for agricultural and min-











TUNIS. 0


ing machinery, binder twine and other agricultural material. auto-
mobiles, hardware, house furnishings. jewelry. a;1 otlir arti.1s.
The following table will give an idea of the kind andl q(Inllltity of
imports during the years 1916 and 1917:


Articles.


A alcohol .............. ......... .. iter ..
Automobiles..............................---- .. klos..
Baketry ............... ................................ ..
Bean and peas, dry........... .......... .... ...--do....
Beer ....................... .......... ....... liters.
Binder twii ......... ............ ......... .. kilo.;.
Blankets:
Coton ............ ...... ....................... o...
W oolin. ................... ....... ..--.... ... ....
Botl le .......................................do....
B utter .... .... ........................... .. d ...
Calscue carbide............................... o..
Candl ............ ................... o...
Caustic soia ..................................do....
Cement .........................................tons..
Chbe,-:e..... ............................ ... os..
Chocila e .... ................... ..... .........do....
Clothing. men's .................................do....
Cloths. wuoaleu. ............................do ...
Coal.................... ................... tons..
Coal brillPltes.................................do ...
Coal :ir. ............................. ... .........d..
Coffee ..... ..... ... .. ..... ................ .... do ....
Coe .............................................do....
Cord .... ..................................k... lo$..
D vynamit' i..i rmn n ..............................do....
Fish:
ed......................... ........... do....
Dry ...........................................do....
Fruits:
Dried ... .................................. do....
Fresh .... ............ .............. ..'o....


Iron
Bars. .......................................do....
Cast ........................ ..............do....
Sheets.............. .......................do....
Ore........................................do....
Jewelry. .................. .................. grans.. .
Knit Ioods:
C'olil on...................................... kilos. .
W ool .......................................do....
Lead.
'igs and hbars.......................... do..
Ore ................ .................... tns..
Leather ........................................... kilo...
Lime, h dra lic .................. ............. .Ion. .
Li n.ed hl I ................................... kils..
Liquors, distilled ............................. it r .
Lurmenimr
Fir..........................................tons..
Pine.........................................do....
W alnut ..................... ................. u ...
Oak .................................... do....
Other................... ............. .. do...
MUachinery:
Agririituril ............. ................ ..ilo.:..
(Oiher, -nd parlts.............................do....
Mar:iriine .........................................
Matches........... ..... ....... .. .......... ....d ..
M e.t pr!dJul ts................................ do....
Meat, salt .......................................do....
Medicines ........................ ............do....
Milk, condensed:
ur ............. ....... ........ ... ..... .. ... do....
Swoeten led ............... ........... .... ..... ....
Mineral ware.rs............. ... ... ............. ii r: ..
Nails ~ 'r.: etc ..................... .. .... .kilo. s..
OliveC Il .................. ... ................... 1 ....
Parcel< post ............................ ......... d ....
Papp.- 3aud1 cardlb or. ............................. ....
Pe.in !s ............................................do....


16


19





227,573

571.3fj4,
1,3'7, 31i:
1. 27 'J2.
33j ,: .:..

101, .'
42,610
400, -133
137.234
.'.1 ,0*)0
871,754
700,179
6,514
3 4, 0M3
21.5-47
57', 190
113. 197
.I7,.,C31
7,3'17
3,771
1,368
5. 626;
361,.s.9
71,575

276,034
213,222

1. I.3,TI7
1,21.. ".n,
9 I'), A73
.12,II '
71.' 1 1")
332,1-20

243,334
74,186
399. 745
. 2?, 441r
724,452

169,419
3,888

4 ,0"29
'1. 15,'.
13. '-3
11;, !9.
32,169

2,952
85
707
25.060
6.267

6n,lf716i
1,0u49. 1112
25.. RG6

70,826
59 IS')
t1 2, 3J4

123 .3"11

424. r.I
3, l: :P.

3,11,22. -2
3, ill


Francs.


324,483
:.77,710
.-.; 17
J!49, 2'-'.
5196. 152

257,489
164.55.
146, 26.3j
545,868
361,743
0I.t '17
447.747
305, 912
1,116,735
604,160
2, 4 q7, 27
1, 12,2321
9, 7.q, 332
'17,942
677,306
1,987,286
448,869
487,606
347,. F00
471,-. r1
235. 6,77

774,:54 :
37..910
3= >. .01
.9;, .,
26'4,4116

121,444
33.001
92. C.f,
4.9. lIt)
-517, 141

943.3.50
51,I42
.3'. 2n
1. A669, 2
2, 79 1. )
4.3r.. 2i
17A..'00
117..:11
13,.511

699,30
21,750)
233, 1121
380,703
1, Ih7. 171

969,266
2,2i15, 19. 1
.;'s, 1.
1 09 i 2-4
2t.2,7-
1,4), I1I
344, 174

2-111, .66

232.91.
4!0, 952
46, 526
5., '~ .)r. 4
2,21'J,2ri3
17, 172


I'iianliiy.


q9,2n?2
,nt 2
42-', '3
9.1 ti:. i 1
72r.. ;i,i.i
:33 .2o .

59,763
6'), 2' .',
3.'l, 124


".5i.t, 407
4, 91.
21J1, 194
119.4 1'
142,330
92.615
23, f69
40.252
2,647
1,722
313:
112,937
57,900
". f165.
222,207

791.1,
9'2. 434
3417. -..-,
46.?, .7-,
23S. 612
1.3.73
12,190
2 6,'r.
1. 1 2.'.(E i
I,11,.242

If', 027
11, 4.'0

12,909


2. G7.
527,421



2,11
71
61
.3. 175
2, '7M


21 W-
-6' ;-2
2'1. 1 4


2 '1, .lr;
3! '1r7


349,015
716,513
213 ,9S0
L. 3,:!-.17

97.', *ti
,l2f,717
3, 171


Sr. i t :.


2.42. 125


27.
1 11-.,U37
.3'9.'J42

163,925
270,731
1'7, -10u
396,322
!40',n72
6. 14-l. r.)
3 11.1, ~31

.3 ;.r,
2 17, -q24l
.7 i, C.:11

1. 762.2'.1
2,752.,2s.



A2s2. 2'i



141.1o1
2321. 701

803,17,906
443, 903
520,410
772. l,2
.33. '15


21. 24



.i2.'33
161. v22

11,312
602.953
2.9 3. 11
)3.-, 1'.
21 i,57
117, 63

1.1119. 721
21 f1%
in.1, il0
621, 06')

285,823
I. 200, '7

F9 1, 001
954, 711:
132, 2.3
270, 77".
131.321
1, .17,; 1 4
94. Q102
91:3,1 ilj
1 'i. 3 ')
I. ', .t'2
2, .I'J i, w33
15, 7H.S








6 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


1916 1917
Articles.
Quantity. Francs. Quantity. Francs.

Petroleum produels:
Garolino .............................. he2toliters.. 21,011 905,P57 8,305 750,08
l.ric l Iirti; oil........................... kilos.. 2,493, I4') 1,4211,520 1,962,878 2,026.547
hliinel ...............................he:tolite:s.. 105,594 2,33',762 49,078 1,839),53)
Prlatoces......................................k..kilus.. 8,109,579 1,694,392 5,562,271 2,091,847
]i re ....................................... .....do .. 997,72 6000,663 1,294,144 ],241,757
hloc ........................................pairs.. 63,176 571,402 34, 33j 3661 539
Silk:
Raw......................................kilos.. 58,446 1,112,190 45,500 1,468,513
'Tihrid .......................................... 11,724 14,2S 10,432 272, 3J
S"P-'.... ....................................do.... 1,796,203 1,549,222 964,3 14 1,149,2x6
So, iiblu chlorjtl und uther cllorates.............do .... 240,41.3 20,2-4 196,006 235,112
Spi v .......................................do.... 12,735 43, 98; 21.1,507 1,691,677
Spi *'r.,. I" tp. prc ................................ o.... 3,-1,361 410, 141 13;7,0(9 233,941
Su:ar<......................................... do... 12,01i,275 10, 131,91. 9,337,MS 9,096,025
.Sir-l lb. -........................................ do.... 526,31S 316,633 274,S 73 235, 34
Sulphur..................................... ...... 993,979 252,ii6d2 1,64f6, 033 530,400
Sirupsandcandies.............................do.... 276,255 31,3 3),356 8,7i2
Tea............................................do.... 3S, 900 1,018,890 353,3'4 1,337,93S
'Fe% I I I n --:
Cul Inn-
IIlercheil ............................ do... 2,04-1,425. 7,922,389 1,..566, .-.1 8.86,5970
D'.e] ................................... do.... 1, 772,322 9. 1'3,-35S 1,3 1. 0',2 10,251,S13
I'rnts...................................o..... 220, 11l 1 ,200 ,707 224, 127 1,978,92L
rnbleachel' ........................ do.... 914,996 2,816,324 847,947 3.719,111.1
Jute.............. ...............do .. do.... 3 1,71 0 553, 757 473,477 1,249,634
Jute sacks................................... do.... 1, 7;39, 821 2,459, 179 2 172,547 5, 113,74
Linen and hemp...........................do.. 105,776 461,595 41,866 210,942
Woolen suitings.............................do.... 44,735 563,335 48,722 566,336
Tin plate.................................... do.... 497,783 357,940 267,289 3J3.427
Tire rubber ................................. do.... 90,768 5M, 898 24,821 155,808
TuI ieco:
Lealf......................................do.... 1,746,115 2, SfO, 14 532,409 1, 0-I, 193
Manu picture .............................. do.... l6t,6~2 744,S30 c6, 3 372,943
Tul'inm:
('C.t iron................... .............do.... 914,502 500,902 197.-17 107,946
Iron and steel...............................do.... 395,418 660,732 1.3,47> 3.5,402
Twine ordinary................................. do.... 34,463 63,908 116,203 31-1, 10
'V:rni ................................ .......do.... 82,268 178,118 51.3)5 15. t
W hi.tt ........................................tons.. 1,224 328,278 5,711 2,001,133
Wheat flour.................................... do.... 2,932 1,349,216 5,482 3,015,354
Yarn:
Cotton..................... .............ilos........... 1.311.108 ............ 1,31,129
Wool, pure anil m x I ........................ 46,979 643,661 6.5,5t3 1,U54,6ti

Origin of Imports-Trade by Countries.
Imports from the United States remained at about. the Ilusal pro-
portion of 4 to 6 per cent of the total. British import-s, on the other
hand, have incrleased from 9.98 per cent of the'total imports in
1913 to 23.06 per cent in 1917, owing to the direct steamsship con-
nection between England and Tunis which has continued in spite of
war conditions. While bulk shipments of coal and machinery have
declraset'.c1 the -,hilpmen1ts of cotton textiles have doubled, both in
bulk and value, and there have also been large increases in shipment
of metal goodls, conldensed milk, etc.
The natii\ve desire to invest the profit from the sale of his cereals
in nlrch1adi-e rather than in stocks, bonds, etc., has caused an in-
creased demand for textiles, which is, probably, a discount of future
business. The efforts of the British merchants to meet this demand
is proof, however, both of the British interest in the Tunisian market
and of their desire to maintain uninterrupted business connections
with which to meet post-war competition under unknown circum-
stances. French trade, despite the close political and economic
bond between Tunis and the metropolis, has fallen from 52.S-1 per
cent of the total before the war to 3S.21 per cent in 1917.
The following tables give the totals of imports and exports by
country for tle last two years:









TUNIS.


Countries. 1916

IMPORTS FROM-
Franc-.
Algeria.................. 11,544,713
Austria (in bond, 1914)... 286,548
Brazil .................. 1,905,872
British India............ .J9, 572
China................... t;il,322
Egypt .................. .1, 22,90
England................ 29,444, 5 6
France ................. 54, 537,146
French colonies other
than Algeria).......... 208,484
Greece.................. 216,803
Italy .................. 14,13;,725
Japan....... ............ 77,037
Malta.................... 239,746
M orocco ................. 241,174
Nctherljnds.............. 21, t3
Nornwa ................ IT ., S
ParaS nua ...... .... ... .. .. ....
Portugal.............. ....... 2 '7
R u sia l ................... 21,37.
Spain.................... 2, 1% 10
Sweden ................. 1,(.01,039
Switzerlcadd............. 1, "-7,65 .
Tripoli. ................. 592, 632
Turkey (occupied tern-
tory, .................. 176,312
United States............ 8, S,961
All other countries....... 265,396
Total.............. 134,255,316


Francs.
12,240,036
3,194,265
4,013,352
1,523, 036
t;, S$9,443
32,756,565
51, 27, 971
1,427, S12
6, 1.31
12, 63,664
301,316
135, 051
178,462
41.:,, t -I
l111,1201
lL), (.K)
10,447
69,665
1,684,008
4 i3,9SSq
1,734,477
447, 5,j
9,279
7,110, .31
371,424
142,041,65


CoLntries.


EXPORTS TO-
Algeria..................
Denmark................
En-cland.................
Er pt ............. .....
France..................
French colonies (other
than .Al;gria ..........
Greece..................
Saloniki ............
Italy..................
M alta ....................
Morocco.................
Netherlands.............
Norway ................
Portu~l..................
Spain...................
Sw,'den.................
Switzerland---...........
Tripoli.................
United States...........
A l other countries.......
To al........ ......
Ship ..upplies ...........
Grand total........


American Trade-Declared Exports.

By the end of the year American trade with the Regency had
practically ceased owing to delays and difficulties in shipping goods.
The demand for American goods was, and is, keen. High freights
and cash in New York against documents will be paid gladly to any-
one fIurnishing .-rne sort of guaranty of reasonably prompt ship-
ment. The Tunisian market, though small, is of interest. particularly
when considered in connection with the similar adjoining markets
of Algeria and Morocco. The Tunisian customs tariff is lower than
the Algerian tariff, and although French goods are imported at a
lower rate, American goods are taxed at the same rate as all foreign
goods. The market is a diversified one, machinery, petroleum prod-
ucts. hardware, meat. products, coal, textiles, knit goods, boots and
shoes, paper, lumber, chemicals, dyes, drugs, jewelry, novelties' and
stationery supplies are among the principal articles in demand.
Exports to the United States, as invoiced at this consulate, for
1917 were as follows:


1917 1917
Articles. Articles.
Pounds. Value. Pounds. Value.

Chemicals, druis. etc.: Spon-es (not ad'anccd by
Cuttlefish hcne ............ 14,775 83,474 che-mi al pro ess i............. 42,044 8.1, S7
Hoarhouind............ ..... 4,2.5 542 Tiles. ceramic.................. a4,152 1,889
Marinramn................. 11,077 3,007
Fish- Octopus, dried ........... 45,05S 13,617 Tot'l..................... .... ... 27,716

a Square feet.
Parcel Post.

The lack of a parcel-post service from the United States to Tunis
is a real handicap, both in importing goods of small bulk, as drugs


Francs.
4.,9n,730
1, ,12, 354
21,341,49f6
1, 1;2,73:s
".1,994, 039
80,555
105,9.t9
6, 1.2, .0i
15,937,? 73
2, 512,04-16
"74,92:3
20, 4.5
3,. 1, I ,2c19
219,089
3,343,702
1,271,207
67,GG61
I18, I17, 992
617,9 4
118,794,946


Francs.
7, 42n, 2A7
242, 929
14,991,.'514
2, 64 S,26
80,743.170
3,025
39,597
5,099,200
09,317
1, 707, b70
131, 5.1
125
9.600
310, 011
419, 1.1.3
2,100
3,612
1, 52,270
I 4, 6tS2
11,353
124,696,558
975,521
125,672,079




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08485 1970
8 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

and stationery, and as an auxiliary to the regular trade for import-
ing1 repair parts, samples, and like articles. Retailers in several lines
state that they now rely entirely upon the parcel post from England
aindI France for receiving goods, and this is confirmed by the consid-
er;ible increase both in bulk and value of the parcel-post receipts.
Tlie quantity and value of the parcel-post trade, by countries, for
1!17, was:

Countries. Kilos. Francs. Countries. Kilos. Francs.

Fran"p ....................... S2,4 4 ,2'09,511 China ....................... 1,557 4,783
Akl:rui ...................... 5r. ri 28 l.115 1 I British India ................. 1,916 9,55')
i'n lian.l ..................... 10.,717 51,u) Other countries............... 1,126 5,667
likl .. ........................ 31, 9.'2 1 7,493
Slai ... .................... ll 4,57 Total................... 972,722 4.856.402
S iltz jrlan .l................. 5, 521 27,5 1

Trade Methods.
Until transportation facilities are improved, little can be done to
promoter trade with this district except to send correspondence and
ca;ta:l(riiles to firms which might be in a position to buy when condi-
tions are better. All correspondence and trade literature should be
in French if possible, otherwise in English. Spanish catalogues sent
to Tunis waste the money and advertise the ignorance or carelessness
of the sender. Note should be made of tlhe fact that Tunis is the
capital of Tunis, a distinct political unit, and is not located in
Algeria, France, or South AfriiCi, as letters are sometimes addressed.
American exporters are evidently learning the foreign postage rates,
as it is rare to receive a letter with less than the 5-cent postage per
letter ounce required.
Despite the proximity of Tripoli to Tunis. communication between
the two countries is poor, and the two territories should seldom, if
ever, be given to tlec same :gent. Neither should the territory of
Algeria or Morocco be given to' an agent in Tunis, except in special
cases, and after a close study of the situation. Packing of goods for
Tunis should be the same as for any other Mediterranean port.
Prices should be quoted in francs and c. i. f. Tunis whenever possible,
otherwise f. o. b. New York in dollars with freight estimate. Credit
information is hard to obtain, there being no credit agencies, and
bank reports are of a very general character. The business atmos-
phlre is distinctly Lvantine, except when dealing with the larger
ihotuses, sulnic of which are branches of French firms.


WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRITTIXG OFFICl : 1918