Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00056
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00056

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text







SUPPLEMENT TO



COMMERCE REP


Annual S(


DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS N
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.


series


No. 70a


FRENCH EAST AFRICA.

By 'nnsunl J. carter. Taunuiarito. October 22. 1917.

MADAGASCAR.

Notwithstanding the lack of freight facilities and the scarcity of
labor, industrial and commercial activities in Madagascar and its
dependencies in 1916 showed a continued increase over those of the
very favorable year of 1915. The total trade for the year amounted
to 243,63-1 ton,, valued at $36,085.373, against 208,599 tons, valued at
$21,197,858, for 1915, an increase in value of $14,887,515, or 7O per
cent. The imports mounted to 77.794 tons, valued at $19,677,438,
compared with 73,253 tons. valued at $S,447,010,s, in 1915. an increase
of $11,230,340. Exports amounted to 105,840 tons, valued at $10,-
407,935, against 135.346 tons. valued at $12,750.760, showing an in-
crease of $3,657.175 in value.
Import Trade of Madagascar.
Cotton piece goods imported in 1016 amounted to 6,007 metric tons,
or about 40,000 bales, valued at $7,810,418, compared with 3,426 tons,
or about 23,000 bales, valued at $2,658,149, in 1915. Unbleached
sheetings make up about three-fourths of the cotton piece goods im-
ported into Madagascar and are used as the principal native gar-
ment. Imports of clothing for troops account for the increase in
this item.
The quantity and value of the principal articles imported into
Madagascar and its dependencies in 1915 and 1916 are shown in the
following table:


.Article?


1915

Metric tons. valuee


Arms and ammunition............................
Bags jute... ........ ...... .... ................. .........
Beverages .......................................... ... a
Breadst uffs-
Flour............................. .................
Potatoes ..... ... ..................................
Rice...............................................
Other ..........................................
Cement ..............................................
Chemia.als ..........................................
Clothing....... .................... ....................
Coal, etc................................. .......
Cotton piece oods......................................I
Household effects................................
Lime, hydrated...................................
M achinery................. .............................
a Gallons.
88329*-18-70n


30
1,1.70
1,091,032
68
57
303
5,641
2.120
b 201,504
5, 372
.1,4'26
I, 104
3,920
448


R19,331
2'3. 141
b90, 125
112,147
11.5 119
1, 2'i7
'.'. 71,
17, 777
1i5N. 5t,9
24-5. 197
702,20.3
2, 6S, 149
3S5, 419
60,522
194,619


Metric tons. Value.

.) $I51,332
:3,l10 9.6,935
a i, 0., 102 1,031,697


173
103
.1,S01
1,613
b 633,6S6
3S,31'4
6,007
977
1,095
41'S


106, 793
10,029
6,05,i
22,736
129,733
161,812
2, 1, MSlJ4
1, 15j, P9s
7,S10, 11
56,, 367
25,3.5S
41 412


b Pounds


March 4, 1918




*.





2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


1915 1916
Articles.
Metric tons. Value. Metric tons. Value.

Meal and dairy prudluct: I
Dairy product I............ ........................ 297 $57,353 117 $55,633
Margarin .and :imilnrntry greases ................... GS 1,1,442 73 19,675
Meats, salifd iand preserved ........................ 35 21, 872 25 18,064
Medicinal compounds.................................. 56 41,190 84 69,615
Metal:
Majnira(c ured, other than machinery-
C'ul ler ........................... ............ 8,004 8 12,755
Ironmongery.................................. 313 122,914 310 222 715
Loc-k ........................................ 33 7 745 32 12,925
N-iil ........................................... 132 17,9.34 252 74,580
Screws, binges, etc ............................. 60 13,795 72 28,996
Tool........................................... 66 22,883 132 76,609
Other........................................ 2.24-l 554 314 2,272 917,555
Other .............................................. 1, t07 242,443 2,902 709,790
Oils:
Oilie....... ..................................... 91 36,4r5 85 41,436
Petrolmiiii and other miurall....................... 2,439 332,191 1,153 156,003
Paiils anil dye' .................................... 170 39,24S 248 83,847
Paper and aIppliances................................. 533 26),t0O2 519 512,246
Pollter. ........................................... 112 16,708 105 25,929
Shoes ............................................... 20,864 60, !04 a 26,945 130,010
Silk goods......................................... b 12,515 56,009 b 1b, SS7 130,535
Soap, unsentedd........................................ 944 91,118 1.042 150,757
S.ugar................................................. .13 115,953 915 lt4,576
Textilh s ni t s....... ................................ 326 43,792 631 439,319
Tobacco, m.inuractired............................... 5- 83,682 56 146,601
'Wood:
Manuftcet lire ...................................... 599 59, 1 IS 663 104,539
U n un m i l fact turd ................................... 1,026 39,., 2 S39 32,373
Yarns............................................... 98 61,916 150 149,203
All other ........................................... ... 343,21.... ...... 3.. 531,429
Total........................................................ 8,447,098 ............ 19,677,438

a Piirs. b Pounds.

Principal Articles Exported.
The colony's export trade was considerably interfered with during
191(; on account of the lack of freight space. Thousands of tons of
merchandise could not be shipped, and preference of the limited
space available was given to products shipped to France and con-
sidered most necessary for the national defense. As in previous
years, hides was (he leading article of export, amounting to 8,522
tons, worth $2,.s ,2i2. compared with 7,86- tons, valued at $2,578,-
695, in 1015. The greatest increase in exports, however, was in
graphite, of which 2 ,209 tons, valued at $2,276,225, were shipped,
compared with 12,189 tons, valued at $705,718, in 1915, and 7,940 tons,
\worth $612,964, in 1914.
Below are given the quantity and value of the principal articles
exported from Madagascar and its dependencies in 1015 and 1916:

1915 1916
Articles.
Metric tons. Value. Metric tons. Value.

Animals. live.
Beeves ............................................. a 9,618 $139,129 a8,427 $121,932
O r .. ............................................ ........ .... ,270 ............ 12,18
Bark, mangrjve ...................................... 2,953 .34,200 4,349 50,365
Beeswa .............................................. 27 3M2,947 839 485,900
Caco................................................. 11 53,340 85 39,427
Clovs ................................................ q0 30,815 204 78,903
Coffee................................................ 443 154,069 600 231,778
Corundum .............................................. 334 19,318 1,532 88,713
N Number.










FRENCH EAST AFRICA-MADACASCAL'.


A articles.


Breadstuffs:
C orn .............................................
Manioc-
FT cula .... ........................ .. .... ...
Flour................................ .......
Raw or dried ..................................
T pioca ........................................
Rice...............................................
Gold dust .................. ............................
G raphite............................ ....................
H ides... ............................ ...............
Meat products:
Lard .. .............................. ...
Meats-
Canned....................................
Fruzen, Njlltrd, smoked, etc ...................
Tallow........................................
Minerals, n. e. s ......................................
Oil fruils arnd seeds.... ...........................
Oils. ,vo tile or essential............................
Raffia:
Fiber.. .................................. .....
Ralbarur (woven lbecr) .........................
R ull, er ..............................................
Timber:
Ehu, .........................................
O her. ............................................
Yanilln ............... ............................
Vegetable-. dried:
L ni i jian.' .........................................
Other... .....................................
All other.............................................
To .al............. .................... .......

a Troy ounces.


Uetric tNnm. Value. Metric tons. \alue.


1,150 $33,261 1,491 ?43, 173
1,726 .3, 2901 2,583 149,697
1,255 3,,..3 3,067 88,788
15,351 -N. 2,' 15,020 2,9.S.t.5
531 ., ," 3 590 :1.),
19. 32 740,982 31,143 1, 201),,ai7
l.7-, N.J 1,211,'42 a 46,618 839,719
12. ', 703,71 26,209 2 27.,.225
7,4,, 2,578,695 8,522 2) ,.,24r

1,839 tio. 217 1,785 430,718
5,034 1,462,686 5.112 1,481,404
4,141 865,749 5, 92 s72, 815
791 122,140 845 1.131, 5-9
12,525 523,129 20, 663 I.. t01
1,625 52.3391 364 20,663
b21,819 11, 5.; b21,978 65,449
4,713 500,262 4,729 :11,.-4
22 9.0111 42 32.' -34
40 23,213 100 l7, 2ri
948 32,614 785 29,254
2,558 29,020 3,940 45,777
b 514,966 901,646 b 477,620 836,257
7,257 645,208 11,572 868,378
1,497 67,365 2,774 574,761
........... 551,763 ............ ..S, 255
............ 12,753,760 ........... 16,407,935

b Pounds.


Trade by Ports.
As in previIous venrl the bulk of the trade of MI;adagiawI ar in 1916
was handled at the three principal ports--T:matave, M:ljunga, and
Diego Suarez-which together received 78 per cent of the. total im-
ports and shipped 71 per cent of the exports, compared with 70 per
cent and 75 per cent, respectively, in 1915. More than 37 per cent of
the imports and 38 per cent of the exports pa-.ed through Tatnatave.
Tile comparative values of the trade of the different ports of the
colony, including those of the Comoro Island, in 1915 and 1916 are
shown in the following table:

Imports from. Ex port to.
Ports.
1915 1916 1915 1916

Tamatave........................................... 2,41 -,30 $7,31.2,201 $3,919,421 $6,300,2.
M ajunga ........................................ ..... 2,I 112,333 ,957, 17 2, .5 2,5i59,.019 2,l,370
Diego Suarez.......................................... 1, 777,595 3,601,351 2, 111, 10S 2, 414, 15
Manaujara........................................... 420,012 1, 05, 0 5 .2 oj,712 -.3,9 97
Tananarnavo........................................... 851,178 1, 602,923 37,1 83,174
Nossi Be.............................................. 298,654 t.1 .743 4 4. 103 005,815
Tullear ............................................... 213,090 i4l1, 110 (131,2%3 i,- 4,312
Vatomandry.......................................... 3,1 2 1.-4,571 429, 527 ('45,547
Morondava ............................................ 1, ) 112, 51' 3J 1, 932 .T3. fr;
A m bohibe ...................................... ....... 13,7%7 12, '7< 21 7.6. 327,? -14
Analalava .......................................... & 52, 98 1'9,39'S 193,827 88,854
Fort Da'iphio............... .......... ............... 7,22 177,21 130,276 136,252
Farafang ....................... .............. 1., 2 .5, 29 t, 4 194,222
Vobemar...... .......... ............................. 2i, ,17 30,204 155,826 131,395
Other Mad-igasc-an ports............................ 31,7, I 61 203,897 378,281
Comoro Islands:
Moroni.... .......................... 49,068 86,333 174,217 67,501
Mutsauniidu......................................... 24,742 49,595 179,461 119,99
Dzaoudzi.......................................... 3 ,337 77,237 150,427 s'0,991
Moheli............... ........... ..................... 8,738 7,998 3o.'4i 55,591
Total ............................................. I, 417, Wl li..77. N, 12 7..51 .7i II6 .07,935


19








4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

Distribution of Trade by Countries.
The following table shows the value of the direct imports from and
the exports to the countries sharing the colony's trade in 1915 and
1016:

Imports from. Exports to.
Countries.
1915 1916 1915 1916

United States....................................... $395, S32 84120,353 5111,569 8172,331
United Kingdom ..................................... 993,.99 1,697,306 986,522 1,920,516
British colonies.............................. .... 14,654I 2. ,Sx,705 798,976 1,175,189
France .......................................... 4,779,S93 11,S42,704 9,974,633 11,855,236
French coloimez ................................... 996, F. 1,918,967 636,542 1,121,950
Sweden nnd Nurway................................. M,258 64,513 126 3,674
All other............................................... 2S1,S95 844,890 242,092 159,03v
Total............................................ 8,447,09 19,77,438 12,730,760 16,407,935


The figures in the foregoing table refer to merchandise of every
origin imported direct from the countries mentioned, and quantities
of exports accredited to France and intended for other countries are
billed to Marseille or Havre for various reasons. The value of the
import, into the colony in 1915 and 1910, according to the countries
of origin, was as follows:

Countries. 1915 1916 Countries. 1915 1916

United States............ $550,017 $1,075,731 Sweden and Norway..... 897, 53 559,034
United Kingdumin......... 1.16I1,S2 2,51..4,,; Allother ................ 926,4&3 1,407,786
British roloni.'s........ 361, 913 1,0'fls, .
France.................. 1,336,916 11,501,413 Total................ 8,447,09 19,677,439
French colonies....... 1, tl0, 31.1 2, 026, 3h*


As will be -een from the foregoing tables, the greater portion of
the colony's trade continues to be controlled by France, whose share
of the imports in 1916 amounted to $11,501,413, or 58 per cent, and
of the exports, $11,855,236, or 72 per cent.

Origin and Destination of Articles.
The value of the articles imported direct from and exported to
the principal countries in 1916 is given in the following table:

articles Franc. French United British United Other
colonies. Kingdom. colonies. States. countries.

IMPOP.TR.
Animal prnd'rneeand by-products ....... S67.5.19 2V40 $5,186 521,506 377 $3,298
Armsand ammunition.................. 22.722 128 ....... 2S,4 ....................
Beverages............................... 7' .4' 2 24,144 7,278 2,931 .......... .1,896
Brpadstu ... ......................... 11.740 7.0,2 102 96,096 .......... 2,561
Chemicals.............................. WII 1.-;0 752 17,708 5,771 .......... 33,401
Colonial prode .......................... 157,012 222,542 13,020 15,067 144 295
Espartoand wicker ware ............... 35.66 2,215 .......... 301 ....................
Fabrics................................ 6 .s2..95I 1, 35S,6.1 87.3,111 2,200,697 201,571 31,638
Fish.................................. 17,46 1, 121 767 2,962 215 ..........
(lass andl ryltal ........................ !i, 27 101 97 4,14. 14 1,081
Leatherand liea hi rarl ii le.......... :01,7b3 10,319 2,466 20,052 .......... 508
Marble, ;lone, earths, and comlu tille
minals............................ .... 97,786 22,799 178,092 213,519 104,845 739,912









FRENCH EAST AFRICA-MADAGASCAR. 5


Articles. France. French United British United Other
colonies. Kingdom. colonies. States. countries.


I u POR TS-0on t inueP I
Metals:
Manufdac tued ....................... 51.2,7.7oi 52.',7 ifi0),659 $89,774 $v,2S1 213,5 63
Other ............... ................. 4N2. J' I, 4-l 1 92,928 32,933 ...................
Mi cellaneouiscom iiounds............... 2. 112 690 2.2l :2,2N ......... 737
Paint (l-ye;, etc ........................ 77, 1'i 130 7,r. 1I 2,653 19 25
I'aper and appliance .................... -1"i,1 10,981 7, ..11 20,077 61 20,086
Potter. .............................. 1.,91' 104 421 ,371 .......... 115
Vegetable oils and juies ................I W. 9Ad 31 462 23,.M1; 1,523 74
W r Iod:
Manifajtured ...................... 87,782 16 13,19S 812 102 2,629
Other............................. 1,604 9 1,611) 179 .......... 29,670
Yams................................... 126,355 1,338 5,;76 15,624 .......... 10
Allow th(r............................... 375,382 26,605 .:.;,271 48,805 23,498 253b72
T'otal...........................I.. 42, 11. ,919,12J 1. G67, 6 2, S.7iiI 420,353 90),403
EXPORTS.
Animinal produl c and by-prodiu i........ .5, 61 2. 11 238,254 157,877 141,65S 94,583 50,428
Animal, live.... .............. ......... 31,750 8 .......... 11,499
nB verap ';............. ...... ......... 7 194 212 .......... 5,329 .......... 17
1i'adirulTs ............................. 7-I1, 41 711, S 976,186 576,801 .......... 66,956
Colonial produce ......................1 1 '2, 14 2., 334 17,300 8,035 31,799 1, 37N
Des aud tanning material .............. 2.'. 1,'................ 4,099 2-. 12 .....
Esparto and wicker ware.................. 8,088 ......... 972 12,876 226
Fabries................................. 71,796 6,531 ......... 165,969 .......... 763
Fibers, stems, and fruits for manufactur-
ing Ipurpose;.......................... 408,090 101 17,782 64,751 22,492 1 ,28
Fish.................................... 409 720 .......... 19,569 .......... 706i
F uits and ed .................. ..... 18,582 1,715 .......... 2,598 .......... .........
Marble, stone, earths, and combustible
minerals............................. 2,236,901 66 727,742 34 1,310 1,088
Materials for carving ................. 644 .......... .7 13,970 ...................
Metals:
Manufactured..........-..-......-.. 29,991 188 6,148 21,533 ......... 4,001
Other............................. 893,988 591 .......... 525 ......... 812
Miicellaneiouscompounds ............... 191,084 7,923 6 534 .......... 1,498
Paperand applianLes ................... 4, 271' 29,928 .......... 216 ................
V\getabl. oils ind jtltiit :s................ 139,100 275 6,570 .......... ..........
Wood:
Manufactured ..................... 3,957 r 43 3 1,829 .... ........
Other............................. 13,513 4, Ol) 97 44,470 9,271 3,622
All other............................... 23,885 14, 883 811 8, 815 .......... 9,840
Total............................. 11,855,236 1,121,950 1,920,516 1,73.159 I 172,331 162,713


Trade with United States.
The exports from M3ILadt ag calr declared at the ciis.tom, holunii for
direct exportation to the United States in 1916 were valued at $172,-
331, compared with $111,569 in 1915. Tih value of the merchandise
declared at the consulate for exportation direct, on through bills of
lading, and that exported through European and African ports
amounted to $236,435, compared with $97,134 in 1915. Of the
$1,075,731 worth of American merchandise imported into Madagascar
in 1916, $4-20,3,)3 worth caine direct, and $6,55.378 worth came throiughl
France. Zanzibar, the United Kingdo.m, and other countries.










6 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Below is given the value of the imports of American origin and
of the exports to the United States as recorded at the customs service
during 1!.15 and 1916:


Articles.


IM PO Tt.

Automoliles.... ..................
B icvcle -irts. ................. ..........
.Emlpt hnags jutel.............
Empty casks ................. I.....
Enameled ware.............. 357
Fabrics:
Col Ionl.................. 195,501
Liuen and hemp ...............
Household art icles............ 1,103
Jams........... .............. 254
Machinery:
ololers............... .............
I'lct rip ..... ......................
General................... 2,966
Hydraulic ................ ., 172
Machine tools............. 1,490
Sewing................... ..
Sther .............. ...... 1, '10
Meit, s-llted nd 1prI-ervrd ... 104
Metals, nil.nilcllimel, other
than mrn.chinery:
Brass.................... 20
Cable', chains, anchors,
etc.................... 2,720
Iron..................... 1578
Locks................... 1,112
Nails ...................
Nickel..................... 3
Piping...... ........... 17,657
Scr'w hin't,., il. It'le 442
Tin-
Plates............. ......
Other................ 4-1.54t.
Tools.................... 2v2


Articles.


IMPORTS-cont inued.
$26,412i Metals-Continued.
l5' Wire netting..............
......... O ther.... ..............
4,171 Motorcycles..................
1,277 Oils and essences:
Ieavy mineral..........
458, S74 Petroleum, gasoline, etc..
S50 Turpentine............
8,878 Optical goods.................
287 Paper and appliances..........
Parain......................
1,970 Rubber goods................
1,582 Wood:
6,918 Manufactured............
275 Unmanufactured.........
2,909I All other.....................
2,49S
1, 13 Total.................
294
EXPORTS.
775 Beeswax....................
Graphite.....................
5,203 Hides........................
111,755 Raffia:
1,329 Manufact urid-Rabahnnas
9,354 Unmanufactured.........
120 Straw hats..................
10(r,.... Vanilla .....................
1, o7; Wood.......................
SAll other....................
10. 1 i :
32, 1.1 To .al ...................
329


Declared Exports to United States.

The declared value of the articles
shipment to the United States during


invoiced at the consulate for
1915 and 1916 was as follows:


Articles.


1915


B tI r .3 X ..... ..... ....... ... ..
Filer iallhi:.
Manufactured-
Iabannas........ ... 9,102
Allother........... 194
Unmanufactured......... 23, 856
I;ji.lllhir .................... 2,327
lia9 i I.v .............. .............
Hu- t cattle.................. 1 .. i0


1913


$1, ~N2

20,900
30,319
37,.- :37
I,352
72,218


Articles.


Natural history and other
specimens............ .....
Preionlls stones ...............
Vanilla beans.................
1ood, ebony...............
All other.....................
Total. ................


1915 1916


SI,40S ........
2,799 ..........
39,853 5 66, G18
1,40.5 5,015
190 94
97,134 236,435


The grveat; r portion of the sportss to tle United States in 1916
was carried in a s-;iling ve\sel owned and ent, to the island by an
Amlierican firm, but tIli-, firm nhas since closed out its business in
MadIatgascar, largely on ;t'-.uiiint of its inability to continue purchases
of hides anId .iaphilte, due to the requisitioning of hides and the
(.nt,;t1ro? plgrted on ,igraphite. Shilnpments to the United States during
1917 have luln greatly ciili'iiled because of the lack of freight
facilities. Local .I,'.-ks of all cIas-es of goods are very low, except
c oI.i of pur'lV:l-ing on the .\nerican marlllket. but the absence of a
frt.ight ;seol ice between tlih United States and Madagascar and the


1916




$958
85
695
12,910
98,842
1,523
856
881
748
344
931
1,640
154,664
1,075,731


1,749
1,310
92,834
12,070
22,492
800
31,799

9,27,331
172,331


$65

8,998
260,880
1,113
8
327
408
49
1,083
32
238
550,017



25,019
17,632
2,767
1 ,326
10
46,023
1,5S1
208
111,569







FRENCH EAST AFRICA-MADAGASCAR.


more recent export restrictions in the ITnited States would appear
to preclude any sensible increase in trade between the two countrie:-
in 1917.
Increase of Trade in 1917.
Notwithstanding the 133 per cent increase in the imports for 1916
compared with those of 1915, the imports for the first six months of
1917 have been valued at $15.(;26,499, against $8,48S,,_. in the cor-
responding period of 1916, an increase of 81 per cent. The exports
for the first six months of 1917, valued at $7,903,931, compared with
$6,325,524 in the first six months of 1916, .-how an increase of
$1,578,410. Of the $15,626,499 worth of imports in the first six
months of 1917, cotton piece goods alone are valued at $10,309,351
and manufactured and unianuifactured metals, $1,589,861. Of the
$7,903,934 worth of exports for the first six months of 1917, canned,
frozen, salted, and smoked meats are valued at $1,956,200; dried
vegetables (chiefly Lima beans), $1,040,009; graphite, $916,735;
hides; $700,301; and vanilln, $634,271.
The United States' share in the colony's trade for the first, six
months of 1917 amounted to $419,448 for the imports, compared with
$288,955 in the corresponding period of 1915; exports to the United
States were valued at $55.395, against $61,208 in the first six months
of 1915. Of the $419,448 worth of imports from the United States
in the first six months of 1917, there were 283 tons of ironmongery
and other manufactured and unmanufactured metals, worth $207, 661;
52 tons of cotton piece goods, valued at $65,778; 421 tons of pe-
troleum and other mineral oils, valued at $59,178; 34 tons of house-
hold articles, valued at $27,752; 4 tons of automobiles, valued at
$13,317; and 13 tons of machinery, valued at $9,442. The exports
to the United States, as declared at the consulate, during the first six
months of 1917, consisted of 23,292 pounds of vanilla, worth $27,321,
and 100 tons of graphite, valued at $12,057, or a total of $39,378.
compared with $55,395, as given by the Customs Service, to repre-
sent 31,638 pounds of vanilla shipped direct to the United States.
Meat Industry-Mining.
There were no noteworthy changes in industrial activities in
Madagascar during 1916. The handling of canned, frozen, and
salted meats continues to be the most important industry on the
island, as was reflected in the increased exports of meat products
and hides. Activities along this line were greater in 1916 than in
1915.
The greatest increase in industrial activities was in the graphite
workings. The quantity of this material produced in 1916 was
25,480 tons, compared with only 15,000 tons in 1915. The produc-
tion for 1917 is estimated at more than 30,000 tons. The number
of graphite claims on December 31, 1916, was 2,371, compared with
1,509 on December 31, 1915.
There was also increased activity in the production of corundum,
of which 1,532 tons were exported, compared with 334 tons in 1915.
The production of gold in 1916 amounted to 48,719 troy ounces,
compared with 66,823 ounces in 1915.
According to the chief of the Service of Mines the receipts and
expenditures of that service for the year 1916 were $146,100 and







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


$23,:J32. respectively, compared with $130,749 and $25,524 in 1915.
It is estimated that the amount of money distributed among natives
for labor in connection with mining in 1916 was approximately
$1,433,990, against $1,352,158 in 1915.
Agricultural and Live-Stock Industries.
Although there was no great activity in the agricultural industry
during 1916, as compared with the graphite industry, agriculture
is always the mainstay of the colony. Continued progress is being
made in nearly all of the crops, particularly those in which Euro-
peans have become interested during the last few years, such as
coffee, cocoa, cloves, vanilla, manioc, Lima beans, etc. There were
2,891,753 acres of land, valued at. $29,874,181, under cultivation in
1916, of which 2,634,410 acres, valued at $25,939,339, were owned by
natives, and 257,343 acres, valued at $3,934,842, by Europeans.
Notwithstanding the heavy demands made upon the Madagascar
cattle by the local meat industry, which consumes about 800 beeves a
day, the number of cattle on the island on December 31, 1916, is
officially estimated to have been 6,911,947, compared with 6,606,336
on December 31, 1915. In addition to the local consumption, com-
mercial statistics show that 8.427 head of cattle were exported in
1916. At the close of 1916 there were also 543,585 hogs in the
colony, compared with 606,175 in 1915; 308,751 sleep, against
299,315; 199,0)67 goats, against 173,926; 2,9130 lhorses, against 2,717;
and 680 ostriches, against 510 in 1915.
In 1916 the colony spent $97,7S2 for agricultural purposes, as com-
pared with $106,360 in 1915, and an expenditure of $163,070 was
estimated for 1917.
Railway Services.
There was no addition made to the colony's railway system in
1916, although thus far in 1917 the branch line between Mornamanga
and the Ambatondrazaka district has been extended about 10 miles
north from Andaingo, making in all about 62 miles of the proposed
line of 81 miles contemplated for this section of the railway system.
Over the main line of 229 miles between Tananarivo, in the interior,
and Tamiatave. on the east coast. 34,233 tons of merchandise were
transported up country and 71,163 tons taken down in 1916, com-
pared with 31,884 tons and 51,435 tons, respectively, in 1915. Over
the 52 miles of branch line between Moramangaz and Andaingo
2,251 tons of goods \ere, taken up country in 1916 and 3.973 tons
lbrouglht down, compared with 4,108 tons and 2,451 tons, respectively,
in 1915. Over the 11 miles of line between Tananarivo and Antsirabe
1,117 tons of goods were brought up country and 2,457 tons taken
down. This line was not open to traffic in 1915. The rolling stock of
the colony's railway service consists of 29 locomotivet. including 6
America;n machines i\ cciv during the first part of 1917. 21 passen-
ger coaclihv- and 2()7 freight cars. The colony also has in use 33 auto-
mobiles, principally in connection with its passenger and mail service
over abl)1ult 6U0 miles of the principal roads of the island. The six
locomotives received in 1917 from the United States are the first
other than French to be imported into Madagascar. The gross and
net revenues of the Madagascar railway service in 1916 were $731.700
and $322,724, compared with $559,548 and $205,319, respectively, in







FRENCH EAST AFRICA-REUNION.


1915. The gross receipts of the automobile service amounted to
$83,006, showing a deficit. of $2,455, as against receipts aggregating
$56,805 in 1915. with a deficit of $9,706.
Dry Dock at Diego Suarez-Finances.
The dry dock at Diego Suarez, built. originally for the French
Marine Service, was taken over by the Madagascar administration
during the latter part of 1916 and is operated by the Public Works
Service. This dock, now open to the public, can accommodate vessels
with a displacement of 24,000 tons and under and measuring up to
175 meters (574 feet). By modifying the block line, vessels of 190
meters (295 feet) may be accommodated. The Public Works Service
does not undertake the repair of vessels. The workshops constructed
or being constructed near the dry dock by the colony are rented to
private concerns, with whom the. captains of vessels may arrange for
needed repairs.
As stated in a previous report the budgetary estimates of the colony
for 191 aggregated $7,095,671, the receipts and the expenditures
being estimated to balance. The estimates for 1917 have been fixed at
$8,735,61S for the receipts and $8,7T2(,100 for the expenditures. The
final accounts for the actual receipts and expenditures for 1916 are
not yet available.
The amounts estimated to be spent in 1917 for public improvements
and education aggregate $1,131,643 and $33(0,68S, as compared with
$1,172.S00 and $294,539, respectively, spent for these purposes in
1916. The amount collected in customs duties in 1916 was $700,979
and for consumption taxes. $82 1,198, as against $304.5 9 and $747.663,
respectively, in 1915.
Shipping Statistics.
Including both foreign and coastwise shipping, there were 4,147
vessels, registering 1,5463,533 tons. entered, and 4,191 vessels, of 1,546,-
493 tons, that cleared at the different ports in Madagascar and its
dependencies in 1916, compared with 4,050 vessels, of 1,706,293 tons,
entered, and 4,125 vessels, of 1,709,514 tons, cleared in 1915. One
American vessel, a three-nmasted barkentine, registering 777 tons,
entered and cleared at the ports of Tamatave and Malnanjary in 1916.
This vessel, with a crew of 10, came from the United States via Port-
Louis, Mauritius, and its landed cargo consisted of cotton piece
goods, soap, sewing machines. lanterns, etc., valued at $35,756. The
vessel's outward cargo, for the United States, consisted of hides,
rabannas, raffia fiber, ebony wood, vanilla beans, beeswax, and em-
broidery, valued at $81.103. As far as can be learned, this was the
second American vessel of any kind to call at a Malagasy port since
1898.
REUNION.

Reunion's total trade in 1916, valued at $10,918,314, compared with
$7,284,837 in 1915, showed an increase of $3,633,477, or 50 per cent.
The imports were valued at $4,515,634, against $2,730,369 in 1915,
and the exports, $6,402,680, against $4,554,468 in 1915.
Rice was the principal article imported into Reunion in 1916,
amounting to 20,475 metric tons, valued at $1,089,802, against 14,213
tons, valued at $699,656, in 1915. Cotton piece goods imported in







10 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

1916 amounted to 598 tons, valued at. $690.5S6, against 356 tons,
valued at $301,480, in 1915, and coal, chiefly for the use of calling
vessels, 15,681 tons, valued at $319.580, against 6.686 tons, valued at
$18S,050, in 1915.
The colony lives principally on its production and exportation of
-ugar, the quantity sliipped in 1916 having amounted to 42,152 tons,
valued at $4.615,s73. ori 72 per cent of the total exports, against.
-,5,249 tons, valued at $3,174,-571, in 1915. Other articles manufac-
tured and exported are rumi geCrnium and other volatile oils. tapi-
oca. and vanilla.
Articles of Import and Export.
The following table gives the quantity and value of the prin-
cipal articles imported into and exported from Reunion in 1915 and
1916:

1915 1916
Articles.
Metric Value. Metri Value.
tons. tons.

I1 P..I.TS .
I il ........ .................. ..... o, ili I0lO ,4 0i l 1 6'l $319, 5.')
I otton piece goods .................................... 356 301,480 598 C90,58r~
Flour................................... ........... 502 45,228 1,053 102,483
H wl ..............-----........................... 11. 213 699,656 20,475 1.0S9, 802
Lard........................... ..... ......... 641 1.31,153 733 187,529
1'Pc rrnlellmn ............................................. 1. 11 12',(54 ... ... ..... ....
ol. ............. ............... ............ .. 301 39,3.1 9'2 170,9 3
'i.lnih-i' (chiellv automobiles)......................... 12 15,047 2. 34,333
Wine. ordinary .--................................. a 238, 805 .J, T I a 163,922 114,901
ll( o ,r ........................ ............... ............ 1,107,709 i............ 1,796, 435
Total.............................................. .... .. 2,730,369 ............ 4,515,0 31
EXPORTS.
MIanioc I.I l oiJl IC,.
Fecula...................................... 473 17,024 264 11,441
Tapioca ......................... ............. .. 2,882 234,634 2,748 301, 6i6
4'i1, peraiiumn a nd oi her volatile.................... b195,890 :179, l 31 1 ,9s(I 417,979
mu-m ... ............................-...-- ........ a ~4U,660 212,709 967,604 424,047
S l ............................ .......... ......... 33,249 3,174,571 42, 152 4,615,873
Th ................................................. .. b307,711 119,455 b336,119 121,145
Vanilla.......................... ........... .. ...... b 134,468 210,247 b 144,968 2o,S72
All other............... .. ................................ 205,997 ............ 241,637
Total............................. ...................... 4,554,468 ............ 6,402,680

a Gallons. IPounds.
Distribution of Trade.
Of the total imlportk into Reunion in 1916, Frencl colonies sent
$1,421.504 worth, France $1.584.172 worth, and all other countries,
principally British colonies and England, $1.50.9958 worth. The
only imports recorded as coninig direct from the United States in
1916 were 7 tons of aitomnobiles, \ aled at $9,725, a.gainst. 6 tons,
valued at $,.164, in 1915. Of the total of 25 tons of vehicles, valued
at $34,333. imported into Reunion in 1916, 15 tons, valued at $20,835,
represented atutoi obiles. principally of American manufacture,
bIrought in from the neighboring British colony of Mauritius. Of
the total exports from the colony in 1916, France took $5,677,745
worth, French colonies $595,062 worth, and other countries. $129,873
worth, principally tobacco to Mauritius. There were no direct ex-
ports to the United States recorded either in 1916 or 1915, although







FRENCH EAST AFRICA-REUNION. 11

it is understood that small qiulntitie, of va;lilla. g'ereni''iin1 oil, 'tdl
canned pl lin hearts and other vegetables ;are -iilp)ipl t.h'iliirl Frante',
to Amiierinn ports.
Thlre ias a continued increase in Reinion"s 'oiiinr1 ce l'durinIg t
first three months of 1917, the total trade amoiiiintinr to 2.l19.,.5,
against $1.92I8.607 in the corresponding plriid of 191i. The i imports
were. valued at $802.)0-1 and the export-, at $1.3;92.90..0, a.s algain..t
$570.134 and $1,358,573, respectively, in the filrt three months of
1916.


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WASHnIN' TIn : i;:I\': 1'ir:\ PRINTING OFFICE : 1918




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIIIII l III lllll 1l 1ll 11111 1 I 1III IIH 111 II 1
3 1262 08485 1962






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