Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00053
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00053

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text

"" S


SUPPLEMENT TO


COMMERCE REPORTS
y I DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINIGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 15c March 15, 1919

SPAIN.
CANARY ISLANDS.
By Consul George IC. SLil e. Frenriifr.
The inhabited islands of the Canary Arch-ip'lago (T,. nerill'i Grannd
Canary; Palma, Lanzaro(e. Fiuerteventur;i. aml H ievro) have experi-
enced great, economic and financial u1epres-icin during 19i17 as a re.'ull
of the wmr. Tho withdrawal of all but Spanish ve.-els frimin Ca;Lni;i'
Island ports was confirmed inl Jalnuary, 19 17, and cut off !I( per (cent
of the staple exports-bulannlna, winter tomatoes, and lpo1~ toes-t'i
British and French markets. The bunker-coal trade ,lioed doW\vI ah-
ruptly and threw a mostt important indiitril (i.lnit into idlnt'S.
The suffering and distress whliich followed led to a great inc'rea-e in
emigration. So strongly didt the ride fhiw to\vard Ctu11 a;1nd South
America that westbound Spani.sli hteanmers Ilhft C&narvy -la;nd )poir
with temporary accoinnodations hastily con-,trutcted olet een deck-
after the intended occupants w\vere alreadyy on i oard. The total
amount of emigration from the islands for the year l)17 is ronn-
servatively estimated at 18 per cent of-the male population.
Financial Conditions Stable-Relative Commerce of Canary Islands Ports.
That failures were .scai!r so. ;o\v.ld the -c onser nativee I't.iiuin-. mnet hod,
of the conunercial clas-ts. No iiupertaint fill wa forced olut (-
business, altholigh nearly y a1l of Ihtlem det-rc'':c I td ie )n illKlel' of 0111-
ployees, ant paid the irenii'idler ridumed w;igec.
The leading ports of the. i.-la nd,. ,-ix in nitlnle'r. show by clc;ir-
ances and entrances of forticii fn .munierreI dun iinllg 1!1.5 :aind 191i
that foreign trade continued limring the hitter vo; r with little dimiinl-
tion as compared with pre vr fignis. T'Ie 1S17 oflicial figures, how\-
ever. when available, will sh- \\ r-tirtlliii reld iiti*i ns. Tli tive figures for 1915 an;d 191. ;s ',mpilehd frtiom tle E"-t:tdi.ti ica (Ghn-
eral del Colnulerio Exterior dlt I'-); ana fir 19016. (;i\1;i!;ible ill ()to--
ber, 1918), were:

Poris. __ i
Inm '. j li .'-. Illipni l .; ]' [inri :.
anta ('ruz dr 'en ririfle ................................. i;, ....22i '... 9 Mt. 'i. 0 .i ; .i 1, 112
Arreriife de Lanzarote .................................. 1.7. I' 2 ) j7, I9 I.'. 3'71
Puerto Cniz ide 'Teneriffe................................ 2 7.I.24 II 71 117,. 1'J 1 7,7
Santa Cruz de La Palm a............................... 443. I :.2..- 4 312.71' ,'.*'4-1
Las Palmas, Grand Canary............................ 7.3 't. 0 2.fr7., 777 7. !i,Ji-2 2.7 iN. 672
Total....... ......... .......... ................. 14. .h' .32. : ,.1 .- 4 1 I ,I. -, 426 4., ,,:3 N'
Banking and Exchange.
The banking sitiuait in tlle i-Iand, -,1owQEld an incL't-inig value.
of the gold peseta as aga inst tlhe dollar, (the fra;'it, aind th', pound.
A1JT198-19-15g

lW..


- -- I ----








2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

sterling, enabling Canary Island buyers to make advantageous set-
tlements on foreign balances. The gold peseta had its lowest value
on February 12, 917, when the dollar was worth 4.77 pesetas; the
franc, 0.82 peseta; and the pound sterling, 22.71 pesetas. Exchange
rates decreased steadily as the year progressed until on December
19, 1917. the dollar was worth only 4.13 pesetas; the franc, 0.72
peseta: and the pound sterling, 19.64 pesetas. Spanish gold
throughout the 12 months remained steady at 2 per cent over silver
and paper currency. This appreciation of gold withdrew it from
circulation, whilh the scarcity of bank notes forced a much larger
quantity of silver into circulation.
An important feature of the local market was the arrival of large
quantities of American paper money brought by the thousands of
laborers returning from Cuba after the zafra, or sugar harvest.
The absence of an American bank produced a situation in which
American bank notes were refused any banking exchange whatso-
ever, and as, a result they became a mere speculation during the latter
half of the year, bringing about 70 per cent of their face value.
Credits were very much constricted, the banks frequently netting
as high as 10 per cent owing to additional charges granted by busi-
ness men for financial accommodation. Call money ranged from 4
per cent during the first six months, to 5 per cent during July,
August, and September, while during the last. three months of 1917,
the rate reached 6 per cent. 6S great was the money stringency that
several attempts to float municipal securities in the islands ended in
failure, whereas in 1916 a large issue of city stock for Santa Cruz
de Teneriffe, brought 98 to 99.
American Markets Much Sought.
From January until the entry of the United States into the war in
April. 1917. American merchandise of every kind. despite the extraor-
dinary tran ilsportation difficulties to be overcome, was imported into
the Canary Islands in noticeably increased quantities. Credits from
American firms, narrowed sharply during the first few months of
1917 and practically disappeared from the market during the latter
half of the year. Supplies of American canned goods, hams, lard,
flour, and automobiles, which had dominated the market. ceased in
May, and all of the above-mentioned goods, except flour, disappeared
from the market. Inferior flour continued to arrive from Argentina
or Spain.
The superior quality of American merchandise imported directly,
enabled the general trade of the islands to become thoroughly ac-
quainted, for the first time, with the capabilities of the American
exporters and prepared the Canary Island market for heavy pur-
chases of the above-mentioned lines of American goods as soon as
the resumption of normal conditions shall give buyers access to the
United States market.
From the Canary Islands to the United States and possessions,
there were sent in 1917 declared exports amounting in value to
$321,251, an increase of nearly 100 per cent over 1916 figures. The
greater part of this gain was due to a record export of onion seed,
amounting to $139,927, and to the appearance of two new exports
to America-almonds and tomatoes-which had not figured in the
1916 business to any extent.









SPAIN-CANARY ISLANDS. 3

American puIrehase of Tenerif'lf drawn-thread work and em-
broidery remained praelically stationary, as was also tI e cae witil
cochineall. The following table contains the declared valeic. of ex-
ports from the Canary Islands t ttie UnLite.d States- a1n Porto Rico
during 1916 and 1917.
Article-. 191' 1917 I A rtic s. 19 1917

TO TlF .NITED .*TI rt. I Ptr'.o ).
Sllllonils ........................ $1 c,! ',I t I h.1 1 li -dl ..................... ." (13 ,
la niias ......................... ......... I 1.0( I lr:r avanr :es ...................... $ _2 ......
Chee..s........................... ..... ..... I t. :Trl ................... .......... 371
Cochiinpl. ........................ 17,;4 1 .N 1 1:3'4 li luio ...................... 30,491 .31,250
rai i w ork ..................... I I 1 a on ................. 1,255. ,
nbroiery..................... I. I 0ll, 0 11. '27 olI o1e ............. ......... 5,150 ...
i ri ...................... ......... o ....................545
ish ri. . . I : I . 54
Fruit. driedl ............ ...... I l'lm.r I .m r ....... ................ 12 ........
I ides ............. .............. <1 ........ iW .A Irpr. ofi ..................... 3359 ........
M incial waj er ................... 1.:ilJ ........ I\nm e............................ ......... 12-
N etw ork ........................r Il 1 .........
niu u ........................... .... T ..................... 4. l, 4)2 41, T2
Oniou edJ ...................... 1. 1.2 1: 2 4 I -
P'umiri S one.................... 4 ,1.7 I .',l 1 ri ll I ............... ... 5. .j. ',l
SdIiriflcwielc s~ ............... 374
Scionl i a I iri s ................ 't74 '....... "
T'smatoc...................... 1.. .1 ; l ,
T'om alo piste .................... .... .. I;i
W i e......................... .. I 1:I I .l
W ool ............................ ......... .
Tot l. ....... ............... 1

The decidedly increase( in VexportS to the United States is the more
remarkable as the ad\nial e was lil;.de dc(l)pite restricti)os caus-ed by
the introduction of illpo.rt li. enues and decrea'-ed transportation.
Exports to United States in 1917-American Methods Improved.
The official figures -sho\wing only a slight increase in Ameri,-nn
exports fail to giv e the true st;alt of this trade. Actually important
gains were made during the I rfirt six months of 1917, but. as American
exports to the islands were shippld via 'ailiz, Spain, a largo pro-
porti on was credited as Spa;ni. exports to tlhe Canary Islands
and no through bills of ladin ug I:eing obtainable, these 'Canary Island
imports from lie United Sr;at,.s were declined 'iy the Am, rican ex-
porter to be for tihe Splnili Pnin-ula.
Wheat flour approxiinantel o .u Ileld in; value: total exports to,
the islands incrac:siing Sl.301.0,; in fth fi r-t six months collimpared with
those of 1910. Amrie_;n canned iiieits. lard. hardware, and enameled
merchandise showed notewortlhy gains. Lubriei ting oils, gasoline,
kerosene, and greasCs cam1e ex'cl.-i'\ ly from l Te United States but
in reduced quaMntities-. Highe ir lri'ci'e prevailed in eacll of the fore-
going lines for 1917. Lumber totaled s23:.4ti>, a net gaain of 8R
per cent. The bulk was soft pine, uindr.-,,ed, untrimnlc-l. 10 to 15
feet in length, .. to ; inches in thliikness, aind S to 11 inclies in width.
Virginia leaf 11nd il .cral t(olimcco diet. from I i e I lnitd States was
valueId at $21.),360, a gain of si,; ,035, and Porto "ico tolbaco at
$45,400.
The tobacco trade was the singlee indui.-tryA that flouri -lrd in the
Canary Islands in 1917. Large factories in Santa Cruz dle Tencrif'e,
1and I supplying low-grade cigarettes to the Frenhli Army. and to French
possessions in Africa.
Efforts made by American exporters to gain the Canary Tbland
jnarket continued with increasing energy up to the entry of the








4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

United States into the war, and the results were very gratifying.
Although sales were not equal to the high record of 1916, owing
to the increasing inability of American firms to fill orders already
accepted, valuable connections were made. Widespread distribution
of catalogues and business literature, in the Spanish language, has
performed a much needed educational service and has left the ground
well prepared for the introduction of numerous lines of American
merchandise, once international trade has resumed its normal
channels.
Bunker-Coal Trade Disappears-Road Building-Banana Acreage.
The bIunker-coal trade, which in 1914 was valued at $10,000,000,
ceased'during 1917. No collier entered these ports during the year
except small coastwise steamers carrying 300 to 400 tons of low-grade
Spanish dust coal. In 1917 there were no imports of American coal,
which in 1916 .showed a landed value of $167,840.
Road building, under the direction of the Spanish Government,
brought about an expenditure in the Canary Islands of approxi-
mately $350,000. The construction was of extremely low grade, and
the bulk of the surface laid is already in poor condition. The im-
portant projected impnlovement of an east and west highroad across
Teneriffe Island was not touched. This construction calls for high-
grade road-making machinery and a number of bridges, for which
necessary material was entirely lacking.
The cutting off of the principal markets for the Canary Island
bnannas-Liverpool and Marseille-had a disastrous effect.. A total
decrease in acreage. estimated by the Canary Island Agricultural
Department at 40 per cent, was joined to a general cutting down of
adult plants, which toward the end of 1917 had reduced the monthly
output of even low-standard banana bunches to about 25 per cent of
1916 records. Millions of dollars worth of banana plantations were
turned into wheat lands. It will probably be a year and a half after
the resumption of normal transportation facilities before the banana
industry can approach its export records of 1915 and 1916.
Vast quantities of mineral fertilizers must be transported and
applied to that section usually devoted to banana production before
it will be worth while to go to tile expense of putting in new banana
acreage. Ordinary banana bunches in 1917 were sold on the planta-
tions at $0.10 per bunch as compared with $1.20 to $1.50 in the
second half of 1916.
Import Trade for 1916 and 1917.
During 1916 the islands paid exceedingly high prices for all
classes of imports. As a result, the value of imports increased
$9,100 out of a total of $14.659,426, while the quantities involved de-
creased at least 30 per cent.
The big decreases in imports in 1917 occurred principally in
mineral fertilizers, coal, and breadstuffs, while packing materials.
including cotton, wadding, banana shook, and wire nails, showed
even greater losses. Textiles increased in value but decreased in
quantity.
The following table shows the quantities and values of the im-
ports for 1916 and 1917, the former being official figures, while the
latter are based on quantities checked at the customhouses in the











SPAIN-CANARY ISLANDS. 5


six principal ports of the islands, with values based on estimates
furnished by leading importers in the various lines of trade:

1916 1917 (estimated).
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

Alcohol..........................................qu.arls.. 867,524 $93,215 690,450 $75,460
Animals, live:
Horses....................................... number. 20 4,206 11 3,460
Mulesand bullocks.......... ......................do.... 40 5,193 30 3,255
Automobiles..........................................do.... 50 1,0!.3 35 43,200
Breadstuffs:
Barley and other cereals.................. metric tons.. 1,040 31,289 760 24.lnn
Corn................... ............... ....... do.... 26,362 843,201 19,700 *.,
W heat............. ............ .................. do.... 1.64.1 204,757 3,985 19R,400
Wheat flou..................................... ..o.. 7._-42 501,825 C.,.0 i,1,
Candles............................................. do.... 8N'l 341,480 ..ii 531,200
Cars and of hr vehicles.............................. io.... 15 26,125 3 7,900
Cement .............................................rlo.... 7,000 73,260 2,400 27,860
Chemicals and products:
Calcium carbide............................... do.... 263 19,485 175 22, 7O
Drugs.................................. ..... do.... 430 193,615 355 245, .riI
Insecticides....................................do..... 673 73,120 475 63,200
Mineral iertilizers................................... 12,971 495,365 7,200 325,660
Paints, varrihhes, and inks ......................do.... 224 67,108 189 55,300
Sulphur, refined.................................do.... 414 17,810 125 6,250
Allother......................................... o .... 38 29. 63 12 14,256
Coal, bunker.........................................d .... 110,; 70 573,102 42,000 281,450
Cocoa and chocolate..............................do.... 41 211, 111 32 19,200
Coffee..............................................do.... 251 .s7, 17 240 88,100
Confectionery and fine biscuits...................... do.... 715 462,106 410 335,210
Cotton and manufactures of:
Man ufwtures of.................................do.... 1,308 2,055,237 920 1,986,300
Unmanufacturcd............................... do.... 207 62,485 65 48,320
Fertilizers, animal................................. do.... 1,270 40,088 360 14,460
Fiber and fiber textiles...........................do.... 553 31s.C.7' 420 235,780
Forage and seeds ........................... do...... o... 7 694 214,621 5,100 160,375
Fruit and vegetables, dried.........................do.... 7947 337,405 4,280 239000
Glassware aud earthenware ..........................do.... 1,500 161,420 9,280 122,056
Hats and caps....................................d....... 42 106,375 31 90,265
Iron and steel, manufactures of:
Hardware and tinware...........................do.... 281 111,055 150 78,930
W ire............................................do.... 91 12,240 21 1,025
Wire n.ils.......................................do.... 633 54,382 212 39,160
Machinery-
Agricultural machibery......................do.... 52 11,250 14 4,255
Boilers ...................................do.... 84 8,200 35 5,200
Electric material.........................'lo.... 36 77,465 16 44,360
Gas and steam engines......................do.... 448 143,857 210 98,500
Piping....................................... do.... 678 29,583 125 5,825
T[ypewnters .............................. nunber.. 146 16,100 46 6,420
Unmanufactured iron..................... metric tons.. 705 30,100 308 19,400
Leather:
Bootr and shue ................................. do.... 34 147,553 21 120.1C.
Harness................................. ... ... .d... .. 17 51,466 8 32, 8U
Tanned skins ...................................do ... 364 384,256 280 325,700
Marble and tiles. ........ ......................do.... 748 49,209 612 41,856
Meat and dairy products:
Butter and margarine..........................do.... 3 7,423 1 2.980
Canned meats ................................ do... 383 312,150 215 2.5, 70i1
* Hams................................... ..... ......do.... 31 9,865 10 5,70u
Lard and bcou ...............................do.... 325 102,307 102 43.750
Meat and fifh, salted............................do.... 182 17,201 123 12,76.3
Milk, condensed...............................do... 76 24,317 21 10,061
Oils:
Olive............................ ...............do.... 1,970 531,826 1.62 482,703
Lubricating...................................do ... 328 31,251 201 45,106
Petroleum... .................................. do... 1,606 116,485 918 102,300
Paper:
Fruil wrappers ................................do... 1,590 222,146 790 149,800
All other................................d.. ..d.. 1,415 263,230 1,015 208,750
Perfumery... ..................................do.... 80 153, 110 62 102,491
Printed matter...................................do.... 51 75,620 32 60,270
Rice................................................. do... 1,548 68,260 1,135 62,705
Rubber ........ .. ...............................do.... 47 139,208 24 99 265
Sacks and empty bags ......................... umber.. (,S4,946 1:16,ri2u 280,465 48,750
Silk, and manufactures of .................... metric tons.. 42 663, 105 27 487,260
Soap ............. ........................... ... do.... 1,942 209,735 1,386 198, 420
Spirits, lines, etc.:
Beer :in] 'ider ............................... qart-.. 367,017 31,702 215,800 28,157
LiIqurs and brandies ......................... do.... 139,642 34,325 102,700 31,009
Winees........... ...................... .. do.... 479,133 130,876 362,000 128,400
Sugar ................ .... melri tons.. 1,796 154,305 1,105 167,900
Tea............... ...... ..................do.... 20 1.3,256 8 12,625
Tobacco, unmanuhctured ............................do. 616 332,8 07 520 301,800
Toys .................. ....................do ... 27 S,27:J 11 46,402












SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


191 1917 (OstimaLd).
Article'.
rt Quantiyr. Value. Quantity. Value.

WV ond:
Box and h1oolk l.lr .. .................. .mll ri c tons.. 241,299 S31i 5j0 8,75i $151,400
1 oo' l rI e n. ril ...... .. ............ 4..... ... 2;4 22, 'I '1 K4 JS,4tiO
lirnitu re ..... ..................... .. .. .. ...57 179, 412 16, 12 0, 2,00
]'l:ank' nd I.-o.nd I ..... ......... ... .. .. it ui Iill4ers .i. 1 1-2 IiI, 28 9 8,01-I
AU iher r .................................. m e ric to.) .. 5 I 9, 106 !) 4,000
Vo,1ulI,. i :a ufa.tilr-i. ........ ........ ..... .......... do.... 118 375,904 87 384, 70
A llo 1 l r rl icle ..... ..................................... .......... 1, ) I, 1 7 ......... 1.0100,000
T o, l l ........ .. .. ........ ... ... .. I 14," 1, 426 ........... 12, 18,

Trade by Countries.
Oftficial ligires covering imports i)t nto aind exports from the Canary
-lanIdls are i available only for 1'.16, and the changes relative to 191"5
are sLhowln in the following table:

Imports E export .
('Ciounlries.
191.5 1916 1915 1916

united States.......................................... S737,203 87-~,24-0 .1,-12 ?.,>57t
Porto Rico.......................................... Ib.jO 10,376 17,276 9,31
}1' lipl nii.. Islands ................................... .................... 1, 5 ..........
A. rni in i t................................................ 912,0,3 25,.5-1 17,S2'i) 033, 502
Au i n I ,-l -1111 n, Try 7'2


elgium........... ............ ............ ... 3 ............
Firazil .......................................... .... .. 273 N .-14 .'4
'olomb ia........ .................................. ...... 13. U2 15,760
I uhnt ..................................................... 317.21tI1 i 1, J
Jraiic ................................................... 1775, 32 7u. IS
FJrreiiK .\ Ii'a ....................................... 32, 01 'J
Germany..................... ........................ 7. 11 37. 116
Great Britain........................................... ,. 90,2 -,-1j, 43
Bri'isJi colume-:
Asia......................................... .... 52 1.062
Africa............................................ l ,-172 1.1137
Cilbrallar.......................................... 4,2u 2,317
1 aly .................................................... 411,7,*0) t ,9.13
Liberia................. ................................ 23 1,311
Mexico .............. ............. ....................... 9,.'1;5 1,70
Morocco.............................. .............. 3'.:l,,ti, 7i), ril
Netherla ............... .............................. l1,Oi2 .'2.i ,
N orway.................................................., 7 .9 7
'ortugal .............................................. 7 034 .j 1.i059
I1ussia..... ....... .. ................... .......... ,5 .... .....
Frain, ....................... ..................... 4, 41 U, ,.- .
1 l I -t a ................. ............................. ...... ............ r. 102.3
V' nezu'.' ................................................ 47.70S I6, I2
All pther (ou iii.s .............. ......................... 3lt.232 1ui,)OI'
Total........................... .... ....... 4,t0, 326 11,u3. 42.o


............ ..........
1'32ti "........
"".......... ....3 ......
227. 410 364,361
31,005 86,402
1,906,452 2, 401,116

............ ... ......
37,20.5 1.3,393,
............ 19
t', 40j I 20,024
6 712 19,591
............ ..........
9,0?.7 5;4.70t.
............ 14,1442
19b ,71"1
............ 16,117



............1 8 >
'-iV9.91 251.59sh
... j, 141 i 1,36.I5 346


Declared exports to the United States and Poro Rico as shown by
the American con.nllar records were $17T6.).), and ,nit S59,911i, as
indicated by the official figlurs above.

Origin of Canary Island Imports.
The principal countries of origin of the leading imports into the
Canary Islands are shown in the following table, the figures being
taken froii the official Itaudi-tion (General del Coinercio Exterior
de E.pana for 1916:


Arti. l'.


Automobiles .......................... ......
l lrta -t( tull':
C o in ...................................................
Whr\lt ........................................
Wh.at flou r.......................................
17 .in, ll( .s......................... ........................
Canned mal ...............................................
( ou .......... .................... ..... ...... .............
' lfte,............................ ..........................


I united
States.

$33, S11

2,113
55,400
5.512
52, %5
4,3215
4,3582


Airgen- in *;rot
tina. -'in. rri aiu.

.......... ~I, 17 $7,74U
I 2,1119 $2, 01 2.60.50
42. 10I fr'. 'N 07,3111
12,3Jl ,:'.,7,0 342, 565
.......... 17, 1.t 30 .,201
.......... .l,1 1.76n
.......... 7, 552,104
.......... .............. ..6










SPAIN-CANARY ISLANDS.


ArticlsUnited Argen- Great
Article. States. Uina. Britain.

Confectionery and fine biscuits .............................. 2.1S7 .......... $141.1.i0 $1S 707
Cotton piece goods...................................... 91,102 .......... 1,362,115 575,26
D rugs............. ........ ...... ........................ 1,104 .......... 111.246 31,2i
Fibers and fiber textiles...................................... ... 97, t0) 155,907
Forage and seeds.............................................. $6, 12 7', 210 21,751
Fruit and vegetables, dried............................. ....... ........... 21V4, 20 99.157
Greases, machinery ....................... ..... .......... 11.,255 .......... 19, 15
Leather: Tanned hides................................... 11.2s0 10,953 25'.,40i' 2.46.;
Machinery....................................... ........ 307 ...... ... w 124,36
Mineral fertilizers ............................... ... ...... ... ...... ........... .4 1' 353, 10o
Olive oil............................................. ..... ............. ......... .1 i 1
Paper and manufactures of................................. ,7 ..17t', 123 67,.20
Petroleum..................................... 116.4 ..................... ...... ..
Rice ...................................................... ..... ... ...... ... i3, 21 4,512
Sacks and bags, empty................................... 3.1S7 7., 756 251" 33, 407
Silk, manufactured......... ....... ...................... .......... ......... 2', .2 I
Soap ............. ......................................... 3,2 .......... ............ 2 2
Sugar.................................................. ................... i. i ',n ......
Tobacco .............................................. ... t.:. 463 1 .0.') 6, --7 :4.1 i
W ine, beer, and liquors ....................................................... I.', 16 21. 4'.
Wood:
Boxes and crates f I r fruit packing............. ..... ......... ............ .i 1 1. ,
Timber, construction......................... ......... .. 123. ........... .... 11 ,9 (63.
W ool, m anulcti u e ................................ .............. 1 77, 40 44,. '2'.
All other article ............... ................... .... 5 ,s ............ 1.171,
Total ............ ... ........ ........... .... 76S. 16 2 .4 1, 1

Other countries having a rather large share in the import trade
were Brazil with coffee amounting to $71,354; Cuba with confe-
tionery and fine biscuits valued at $99,86S, sugar, at $57,400, and
tobacco, at $64,109; Norway with paper and manufactures valuedd at
$220,108 and wood, at $78,2053; Portugal witl forage and seeds
totaling $73,O00; Morocco with silk manufactures valued it $530,465
and Sweden with wood amounting to $187,400.
Analysis of the imports demonstrates that petroleum. gasoline.
lumber, and tobacco form the bulk of the American export business
with the Canary Islands. Petroleum and gasoline as usual came
direct, owing to the enterprise of a single American firm.
The ccas of canned meats is strikingly significant a.s ,c wilng, Iw
actual American exports bought by Canary Island hlourzse are offi-
cially classified as of Spanish origin. Spain is credited ini the pre-
ceding table with exports of $234,150 worth of canned meat- Care-
ful checking by this consulate proved that over N)0 per' cent of thin;
merchandise was sent to Cadiz, Spain, for transshipiw) nt to mn1aller
steamers connecting the Spanish peninsula with the iland-,.
Comparative Figures of Exports.
The quantity and value of the principal Canary Island exports to
all countries during 1915 and 1916 (the latest. figure-' available) were
as follows:
19!5 191r'
Article..
Quantity. Value. Quintit y. Valu'.
Almonds.................................... metric tons.... 91 815, 47 149 $1,2.09
Bannas.............................................do.... 58,312 1,706,445 68,989 2.069i, 4l-,
Chbce .............................................do.... 26 7,920 35 10,457
Clhemiils ..........................................do.... 4 492 1,415 160,250
Cooperage inmeralc. .................. ..............do .... 600 -12,.55 472 33,(1i
Copper .......... ................ ...... ....... ...do.... 15 3,975 16 14,-37
Corn...................... ............................do.... 86 3,005 8 321
Drawn work and l.e ..................................do.... 16 1S7, 560 83 101,620
DyestmfT ................................ .............. do.... 31 2,130 396 24,126
Flour. ................. ................ ............ do .... .......... ............ 14S 9,17.3
Fish, salted nnd drid .............. ........... do.... 490 d7,305 1,I10 336,165
Fruit, preserved and cuntcrved.......................do.... 39 9, 54 14 3,109
Goldandsiler ................................. hectoerams.. 1,816 36.240 2,118 118,459
Hides and skins..............m..................metric tons. 451 185,864 329 152,400
Iron and stel ......................-................ do.... 377 14,30 418 19,207




DOCUDENTI DEPT.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORID

3 1262 08485 IIII i 11
3 1262 08485 191


8 .U.S a DCMPOgIO l: M1. T TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

1915 1916
., | i, ; s. -------- --------- -
Qantily. Value. Quantity. Value.
Sli inin' ...................... .. .... ... inc'rir tons.. 0 727 l1l1, R6 G,11i $102,370
* ni D.)n --d.r ................. .... .................... ..l 0 41,9J. 76 84,387
Pe'r ohiin ................... .................. ... d..... ... .r,O 31,1G. ...............
1'ull...O ................... ........... ..... .......... .. .. 4,961 117,930 10,228- 306,827
I)i,',. ...................o. 309 2% P) 102 8,279
*'wi.'. ,,ruii .\ .. ....... ........... .......... ......n m r.. 2 ,393 4,ST4 E51, 15 16,W04
I-ilk, i inal wIln.I ed. ............................. tD Lr;t lllus.. 2 31),2i0 9 170,]496
'I'oill n ................... ........................n... .. 19,270 4C:3,720 22,671 49, 327
I n1ilr ilr ........................................ n ull er.. 46, 3.50 46,373 ....................
WooI -
P inkl < ................................ ..Tiv'ri-- l.n.. 30 11,-225 196 4.016
Furii n' .......... ...... ............... ..... d .. 10 1,7' 107 22,750
All ',bi.i irtli I. ... .............. .. ........ ............ ... ]?,6.......... 247,0923
T I ................................. ......... .... .... 3, 3'G,- I .......... 4,5 8,31. 16

Trjli.. p)rece'dilln tale narks a distiinct. change from other records
given il this report. for here we find a larger volume of business,
with staple exports decidledly increased in both quantities and values.
In fact until D)ecember, 19!16. conditions stimulated Canary Island
export, l ndl I lien. ;is expll iinlc I previously in this report, the export
trado. sliilipedl 9!I pet cent. in a. single month, while imports de-
crecansd .0 per cent during the same period.
BIanin'.s, ilic chief export. showed a gain of $36-2.970 in 1916 com-
pared with 1015.: chemicals went from $-28 in 1915 to $100,250 the
following Illioitlis, and salted and dried fish advanced from $87,305
in 1915 to s35,165 in 1910. Canary Island potatoes, which brought
very high prices in England dilring 1916, totaled $306,827, as against
$147,930 in 1915. Foodstuff'- alone account for the net gain in exports
in 1910. Drawn work and la;I, and hides and skins showed decided
losses, and exports of ullilr-el]ias, valued at $10,:37i5 the preceding year,
ceased entirely du'ringl 1910.
Countries of Destination of Leading Exports.
In the following tale is sliown the values of the leading articles
exported to thl principal pIurchlasing countries in 1916:

Articles. rt. Spain. Cuba. France.

Almm init....... ................................... 379 S22, = 2,f13 F3, 002 85, 02
l-nianl ......... ........ .... ........ ......... ...... 1,55,4 i 1 ,20 .......... 341,298
'in:il ................. ................ ............... .. 1 43, It 1L,)2 .......... 4,520
I I, I ir .... ........................................... .......... ............ 14,7 .........
Dlrwn lnrk .inl lae'.-......................... 1,.141 34,71,; 1 4,Mi) 34,29" 17,010
, ii ...lilT ....... .......... ................ ..... ... 5. 0 11,2U.5 4Wll 320 4,900
I1.11, h ill il ......... ..... ... ............... ... ....... I ;. W i23 83, .-,iil I ,7.213 7,130
Sii l! .... ............ .. ...................... ,4.-7 111, 27 4, 6.2 82,932 li02
PI'olt .. ....... ........... ...... .................. 4,I2t; 27l.40 1, ,10(.) 4,2)G 12,307
4ar.Ik ;PIe Ji I... .......................... ..... ... .... 2,391 11,5,S2 216. 401
lSilks. ......... ........... ................. 4 ,lU.. 10,25I ... ...... .. 2,900 ........
Skui:. il I ... ...... ....... ............ ..... .. ...... .............. ] i, 9 ... ...........
Tnmai -nc ......... ... .............. .111 4, : 2., i .......... 2,01T0
A ll .illtheri arit ...................... ......... 3,9 93 1:.2,39J 147,901 5., 00G
Toual.......................................... 9,916 2,497,528 7 1, 330 3&4, 5 4.50,766

'I'le ,ticial ligilnur.e for exports to the United Statez. as said before,
are inrorreTt. Being $5!.,91 6 lis compared with actual declared value
oil coT'llll.i invoic'v (if 1:1,.1,8, Quantties shown 1vy official records
are practice Jly corr.ect Tlo 01rror comes from an assumed official
valuation for each commodity that never varies duringg the year and
frequently remains stationaryy two or more years, while actual market'
values imay vary 200 per cent. .0


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W ASHINGTON : COVER MEANT PRI NTING OFFICE: 1911