Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00048
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00048

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text







SUPPLEMENT TO


COMMERCE RE
h DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 78a February 7, 1918

ZANZIBAR.
By Consul Henry P. Starrett, Mombasa.
Although possessing a relatively small area hnd population, tl.i
British Protectorate of Zanzibar does a comparatively large foreign
trade. This is due to its geographical position, which favors a large
dhow trade with a considerable portion of the coast of East Africa
between Mozambique on the south and Kismayu on the north.
Previous to the recent development of the modern ports of Mombasa
in British East Africa and Dar-es-Salaam in German East Africa.
the port of Zanzibar probably accounted for fully 90 per cent of the
trade of this coast. Within the last few years its foreign trade ha:
steadily declined, owing to its inability to compete with the more
modern and accessible ports mentioned.
Owing to the opening up to trade of certain portions of the con-
quered territory of German East Africa and the great need in thai
country for food, clothing, and various other necessities, Zanzibar
has been able to regain, to some extent, its former prestige as the
entrepot of commerce on the east coast of Africa. Its total for-
eign trade during 1916 was larger by nearly 50 per cent than for
1915 and considerably larger than the total for any one year within
the last decade.
Foreign Trade for Five Years-Countries of Origin and Destination.
The imports during 1916 were valued at $6,174,773 compared with
$3,912,067 for 1915, and the exports increased from $3,849,481 for
1915 to $5,213,452 for 1916.
The statistics of this trade for the five calendar years ended in 1916
are as follows:

Items. 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916

Imports................................ $5,017,353 $5,369,440 $3,715,110 $3,912,067 56,174,773
Exports.................. ............. 5,042,271 5,104,307 3,965,964 3,849,481 5,213,452
Total................................ 10,0 9,624 10,473,747 7,681,074 7,761,548 11,388,223

The following table shows the value of the imports from and the
exports to the different countries of the world for the calendar year
1916, as compared with 1915:
38329-18-78a









2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Imports from. Exports to.
Countries.
1915 1910 1915 1916

Europe:
A ustria................................ ........... 2,20 .... ..... ............
France ........... .......................... 26,217 $44,524 $740,730 $524,011
Ital-'. ............................... ............. 2,666 37,369 6,121 199,792
N etherl.n, ls ........................................ 172, 130 242,967 ........... ............
Scan alr n% Il ....... ...................... (a) 38,588 (a) ............
Ulni .l Kingdom................................... 772,654 1,270,147 735,518 982,108
Other ....................................... (a) 41,7 1 (a)........
Uni,-d Sles .......................................... 92,744 228,832 401,517 204,676
SAsia:
In'lia............................................. 518,325 1,749,530 1,053 939 1,089,964
li rmA .......................................... ( 726,656 ...........
'evlon ........................................... (b 31,101 b) 97
Aden ............................................. ( 71,115 a 55,641
Arabia............................................ (a) 92,642 ) 36,545
Other ........................................... (a) 433,593 a 11,630
A frici:
British Ea.t Africn.............................. 541,360 334,395 275,311 326,557
German Eust Africa ........................... .............. ....... ................... 72,043
Ital.in East .\frica ............................... (a) 42,219 () 14,287
Madagascar aud Comoro:........................... (a) 102,904 (a 415,368
Portuguese East Africa............................. (a) 214, 90 (a 51,386
Other................................................... (a) 341,010 ( 1,229,338
Allother .... ........................................ 1,783,768 ............ 636,345 ...........
Total............................................. 3,912,067 6,174,773 3,849,481 5,213,452

a Included with "All other countries" in 1915. b Included with "India" in 1915.
Fluctuations in Trade by Countries.
The imports from the United States were more than double those
of the previous year and represented an increase of nearly 65 per
cent over those for 1914. India and Great Britain together, how-
ever, had nearly 50 per cent of the total import trade of the Pro-
tectorate. This is explained by the close affiliations between India
and the importers of Zanzibar and the zeal with which British ex-
porters have pushed their trade campaign in that market.
The exports from Zanzibar to the United States decreased ma-
terially, owing largely to the increasing difficulty of obtaining ship-
ping space to New York and to the export restrictions that have
had their effect upon all export trade from here to countries other
than British. The direct steamer service between Zanzibar and Italy
explains the increase in the exports to that country. The exports
to South Africa are included with Other Africa" and represent
most of the value under that item. Probably these goods were not
imported for consumption in South Africa, but were sent there for
transshipment to other countries-mostly to England and the United
States-at indefinite future dates.
Increased Import Trade.
The value of imports into the Protectorate in 1915 and 1916 is
given in the following table:

Art icles. 1915 1910 Articles. 1915 1916

Bags and bagging........... 33,171 $20,360 Crockery and glassware..... () $27,358
eer....................... ( ...........(5 Des ............... () 31,905
Cement..................... (a) 1S, 36' Fish, dried.................. ( 40,039
Coal.. ................... 110,480 82,009 Furniture................... () 11,548
Coins: Grain:
Silver................... 3 345,218 Pulse................. ( 28,809
Gold..................... 17 \ 93,17 Lentils.................. () 15,286
Copra.... ................. 131.C01 215,781 Maize................... () 19,971
a Included in "All other articles."











ZANZIBAR.


Articles.


Grain -Cent inued.
Matama..................
Rice....................
Wheat.................
Groceries:
Butter .................
Coffee....................
Flour ................
(;hie. ....................
Molasses .................
Sugar....................
Tea................... ..
Groundnuts .................
Hardware ..................
Hides and skins.............
Iron sheets ..................
Ivory, raw ..................
Live stock:
Cattle ...................
Coats and sheep .........
Machinery. .................
Mat bags eLc ................
Musical instruments .........
Paints, oils, and turpentine..
Petroleum ..................


V8, 118
714,0S3I
(al

(a)
79,772
109, ,2
(0)
191,057

71.247



(a)
(a)
(0)

(a)
(")


aIncluded in "All other articles."

In 1916, as in former years, cotton piece goods and foodstuffs made
up the largest items in the import trade, the first-named having
increased nearly 200 per cent over the preceding year. These goods
form the bulk of the trade with the natives; less important items in-
tended for that trade are cheap lines of hardware, brass and copper
wire, hoes, trinkets, etc.

Growth of Exports.

The value of the exports from Zanzibar in 1915 and 1916 was as
follows:


Articles.


Bags........................
Chillies.....................
Cloves.......................
Clove stems................
Coins:
Silver...................
Gold...................
Copra......................
Fish, dried ................
Grain:
Maize...................
Matam .................
Rice....................
Groceries:
Flour..................
Ghee...................
Coconut oil.............
Sugar..................
Tea...................
Groundnut s................
Gum copal.................
Hardware..................
Hides and skins...........
Ivory, raw.................


(a)
(a)
$2, 239, 730
20,978

S 46, 82
796,621
(a)
(a)
(a)
57,422

(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)

(a)
13,410
10,969


1916


$13,341
21,439
2, 187,024
21,093
( 137, 01
S 22,547
751,943
27,730

8,432
19,296
120,011
25,004
33,718
35,564
52,092
12,910
17,291
11,603
26,519
3S, 460
50,315


Articles.


Pet rolcum ...................
Piece goods:
Sheetings, gray..........
Shirlings-
G ra .................
White..............
Hosiery................
Kaniki................
Khangas................
Prints...................
Other..................
Rubber....................
Soap.....................
Splits ......................
Tobacco:
European................
Eastern.................
Tortoiseshell..............
Twist and thread...........
Vegetables..................
Wax... ..................
All other .... ...............


Total................. 3,849,451


a Included in "All other articles."

Of the products indigenous to Zanzibar cloves far surpass all
others in export value. Although the quantity exported during the
year was about 20 per cent less than that for the previous year. the


1916


1916



8S.A, S9
17, 40

22, 41
17, 17.
117, 0)91




79,017
It), i;'j
17,027
Ijl, 1i.2

117,9355
45,431
13,232
31,261
47. S14
14,107
72,4S7


(a)




s23, 495



7,366
(a)


S20,624
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
378,294


1916


$33,522
174,697

137,905
41,707
34,832
81,110
202,573
66, 104
410,724
16,953
45,251
12,097

38,010
15,369
15,255
11,502
11,928
14,987
211,973

5,213,452


191,;


Articles. 1915


Piece goods:
Sheet ings, gray.........
Shirtings-
I;ra ...............
W hite..............
loicr ................ f,,3
Kank....................
K hK in g.A ................


ET t ier ... ..... .... .


1 auL r era. ................. i)3,37
rt .......i s. ........... .... a i )
Tw t and ..................... 31,0
S Vegetable .... .......... ........ I a I
.pirit ....................... (1)
All i.ter ......a ............. '03
Tol nr-Tot.:
European ............... G
E.sl c n .... .... ....... 93,37
TortoLse shell............. 'a)
Twist and Ihrjead .......... 1)
Vegetables .................. 'a)
\W ax ........................ 0,)
All other art iles ........... 1,3W9, C03
Total. ................ 3,912,0A7


$300,011
201,333
129,917
93,936
115,393
327,5S1
6'1, 791
20, "5

31,535
3S, 621,
56,109
15,072

94,615
16,923
15,321
35,EOS
41:1, 4 .7
50,710
724,414

6,171,773


" ?


i


I




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

l l i IIIIIfIII Illll li ll IIIl lil11111 IlWI ll
3 1262 08485 1814
4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

decrease in export value was only about 2j per cent, owing to the
increased price that obtained for this product in the world's market.
The United States is one of the largest buyers of this product; many
of the purchases, however, are not made until the cloves reach the
London market.
[A detailed report on the clove industry uf Zanzibar was published in COM-
MnrCE REPORTS for June 11, 1917.]


WASHINCTON : COVC.TNMENT PRINTINC OFFICE : 191I


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