Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00047
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00047

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text





SUPPLEMENT TO

COMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 66a July 12, 1918

BRITISH SOUTH AFRICA.

DURBAN.
By Consul W'illiam W. Masterson.
It is doubtful if another section of country in the world so closely
connected with the present war shows as little effects on the surface
as South Africa. Particularly is this true of the district of Natal
and the city of Durban. Buying and selling, planning and building
go on about as usual. The stores along the principal street present
nearly the same appearance as in pre-war times, although the mate-
rials sold are hardly as good. The butcher shops are filled with meats
of all kinds, and the groceries show the usual array of eatables.
Residences are being built throughout the city as never before,
and the Government has just completed a $200,000 addition to its
hospital. Many new office buildings, storerooms, garages, and hotels
have been constructed.
Railroad accommodation was limited during the latter part of
1917, in that excursion trains were stopped, and steamship travel
has been curtailed considerably, particularly toward European ports.
Increased Production of Foodstuffs-Wattle-Extract Factories.
The country is increasing the area under cultivation and the vari-
ety of crops. Departures are continually being made by the farm-
ing element in starting new lines of industry to fill up the deficiencies
occasioned by the stoppage of certain imports of foodstuffs. New
dairies are being built over the country, and cheese ;and butter fac-
tories are multiplying so rapidly that South Africa will soon be
independent of other countries for these commodities. Several bacon
factories that have been organized recently for the curing of pork
of all kinds have proved good investments from the -tart.
Wattle-extract factories have been opened up. for the purpose of
extracting the tannin properties of the wattle bark in the country where
the tree grows, rather than sending the bark in bulk to other coun-
tries for making the extract there. Several firms have under con-
struction wool-washing plants, equipped partly with American ma-
chinery. Space will be saved in shipping clean wool rather than
grease wool as heretofore.
Other Industries of the District.
A glass factory has recently been established for the manufacture
of bottles of all kinds. Several smelting works have been started for
the manufacture of simpler and more easily made castings. Many
recently organized shoe factories are at work, and one in the city of
67977--18--6a--1


--,


*-.











2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

Pietermaritzburg has enough orders ahead to keep it busy until well
along in i91. Soap is also being turned out In such quantities that
foreign supplies can almost be dipensed with; this is also the ase
with furniture making, spring and mattress making, and rope mak-
ing. A company is being organized at Pietermaritzburg for the pur-
pose of manufacturing paper out of the Tambuti grass, which is
found not only in Natal but also in the Transvaal and the Portuguese
Province of Mozambique. The proposal to locate the mill at Maritz-
burg combines the advantages of a central position and easy access
to waterfalls available for motive force.
Import Statistics for 1917 and 1916.
The following table shows the details of the import of merchandise
into Durban for the past two years. The falling off in the import
of foodstuffs is striking:

1910 1917
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

Aerated waters....................................................... ,9 ... 12, 161
Ale, beer, and stout.......................... allons.. 40,739 52,777 45,5.5 80,190
Animals, live............................. numlx r.. 2,421 131,75- 783 95.812
Antifrirtion grease............................ pounds.. 3,222,181 12h,310 2, 14, 183 133,785
Apparel and slops. ................................... ............ 3,156, 11 ............ 2, 199,969
Arm s and am munition............................................ 1,190, 794 ............ 977,130
Assay apparatus ................................. ............. 4,935 ............ 54,184
Bags inot leather or paper) ................. umber.. 21,690, I31 2,134,243 26,351,912 2,624,572
Baking powder............................pounds.. 190.27, 69,469 392,238 155,514
Basket ware and rattans........................ ............ 29,282 ........... 13,913
Beads........................................pounds.. 170 464 :6,0 144,572 37,384
Bi(kvels on,! tricycles................................... ............ ,7 ...... 60,938
Hinding twine and harvest yarn............................. .... 2.9 ............ 95,340
Biscuits ..... ...... ........... ..... .)ound.. 37',019 70,126 77,000 10,721
Brass and mauu[act'lres..............hindr'edyvicht.. 1.158 99,724 209 07,820
Brush ware................................ ... ..... .......... ... 133,342 ............ 108,946
Butter and substitutes.............. ..... pounds.. 1,012.59 205,'i.3 106,955 214.111
Canvas and duck ................................. .... 114,924 ............ 167,865
('art c(an iaces, and parts ................ ....... .......... ...... 56,247 ............ 29,734
Cmruent.....................................pounds.. 21,934,060 100,362 9, 17,000 53,376
Cheese .........................................do.... 600,411 140145 90,261 26,&05
Chicory aud substitutes .........................do.. 7,644 92,5-4G 109, 76b 17,870
Chocolate and ccwoa, unsweetened ..............d... 1H4.051 6-t.95 79.742 29,919
Clocks and watches ...................................... ... 3,173 ............ 37,4 7
aw. ....................................pounds.. G.357.4ES 619. S 7,204 14 704,187
Roasted, ground, or mixed ................. o.... 101 76 1., '89 20.015 3,110
Condiments:
Curry powder...............................do ... 44,2.5 14.563 14,5;97 5, 4~
M ustard.............................. ... .do ... 16 11 I ., 086 53,404 17,485
Other .............. ... ....... .......... .... do ... 123,710 12.001 376,603 36,231
Co l rctionery.................................. Jo.... 2,459.293 574,1i4 851,3.'3 197,541
Corn, grain, flour, and meal ... ........... ... ... S7,409,746 2,467,944 80,242,25&,3 2,515,293
Copper and manulacturcs ...........hundred\wig;ht.. 1,239 1, ,650 513 27.325
Cordage and rope ........................... .. do.... I ,171 149,835 9,863 176,824
Corks and bungs............................ gross. 12.3, 3 62,072 287.544 73,674
Cotton manufactures:
Piece goods .... ......................................... 3,100,778 ............ 3,975,468
Blankets, rugs, and sheeting ...................... ............ 915,503" ............ 1,340,054
Shawls. ... ............ ......9................ ............ 83,918 ............ 123,380
Hosiery and underwear.......................... ............ 1,619,651 ............ 1,397,552
O ther.............................. .......................... 1,2 2,566 ............ 1,263,275
Dripping and fats for food ...................pounds.. 119,494 15.140 63,954 9,460
Drugs, chemicals, and apoihecary ware............................. 2,39,294 ............ 1,525,312
Drestuffs and tanning substances................................... 41,82 ............ 34,791
Earthen and china ware ............................. ............ 460, 19 ............ 321,646
Eggs..........................................pounds.. 16.-,933 33,929 215,320 25,637
Electrical material ......... .................... ............... 1,362,G30 ............ 709,784
Enameled ware................................................. 170,376 ............ 80,069
Extracts and essences for food and flavoring ............ .......... 94,211 ............ 47,818
Farinaccous preparations...................pounds.. 2,179, 114 201,r'63 1,293,885 121,473
Felt ........................................ ..... .... ........ 4,575 ............ 64,437
Fish...................................... pounds.. 2, 539,338 4 49,095 2,032,027 370,998
Fodder and forage........................... do.... 350,887 10,142 332,780 6,643
Fruits:
Fresh ............................ ........ .......... 1541 ............ 4,657
Dried (including nuts).....................pounds.. 2,01'S,21 205,600 1,798,948 172,118













BRITISIH SOUTI AFRICA-DURBAN. 3


1916 1917
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


Fruit juiic .......... ................. .......... ... ........... S 6,971 ............ $
Footwear not leather)........................ pair.. 123,588 50 ,94. 70,836 36,148
Furniture ......... ................... ...... ...... ... ...... 869,512 ............ 555. 22
Glass and classware............................................ 674,147 ............ 4.5,M9
Giycerine...................................pninds. 6,884,628 1,332,014 5, 944,065 1, 2111 ,G
Haberdashery and millinery ..................................... 1.25, 65 ............ 944,865
Hardware and c-utlery........................... ........... 3, 12.. ............ 2,291.R53
Hats and caps ................................. .. 73,491 32, 507 3.3, 197 214, 14
slides and skins:
Cattle .................................pou nd;.. 530,414 71.04A 396,021 56,880
Sheep and goat........................... .. 4,013 691 63, 1o7 20,726
Other..................... ............... .. 2,214 ............ 2,365
Hops ............................... hundredwei-ht. 1,956 50,461 1,94 2,234
Hose, convym .................................................... 132,773 ............ 101,4--.3
Implements agiclltural ..............................07413 ............... ], ;-.7,7T7
India rubber and manufactures, inluding tires........ ........... 508,905 ........... 39, ,73;
Instruments:
Matlheymatical and scientific................................. 7,782 ........... 10,857
M uiCial................ ...................................... 1 3,954 ............ 182,348
Sumr er-al............................................ .... .--.. .- ?', -1 ............ 12,75.-,
Other...... .....................................10687............ 8,701
Iron and sitel manifaiietire tex.cept machinery, ....... ......-.... 2,902,648 ............ 2,360,564
Jute and hessian...................................... ......-...-- n..3 ........... 311,125
Lam p ware ................... .... ........ .......... 1 ............ 11, ; 4 7.
Lard and substitutes .......................pound.. 211,275 58,724 07, 91 24,133
Lead:
Iar, pi?, and .heet............. ..hndredweight.. 9,657 76,400 3,244 30,377
Pipe. and pipin ............. ............io... 2,211 19,344 433 4,341
Foiland acetat ............................. do.... 1,463 15,724 2,607 33,555
Lealher and leather mranifactures:
Bout. and shos. .............................pairs.. 927,0.;3 1,362,323 421,976 709,993
Sadldlerv and harneT,......... .......... .... ....... 15,738 ............ 21,495
Manufactures n ............... 91,393 ........... 71,898
Ilnmaniuifac tire, ,.'ather................. pounds.. 214,103 119,526 137,171 113,735
L inen m an.fact res .................. ............... ...........49,516
Machinery and parts(except locomotive i........... ....- 5,086,237 ........... 4,129,089
lanures and fertilizers........ .............pound.. 11,986,986 111,822 2.,5:..207 50,071
Meats ..................... ............ do.... 1,401,907 ..3- 416.9.2 121,156
Milk or cream, condenc.J .....................do.... 3,632,689 461. 4,61,.''4S 778,183
Motor cars and parts letxcept tures ...................................... 1,461.299
Motor cycles and parts .......................... ... ....... 424,456 22... 1, 29-)
Nitrates.......... .............. bundredweight.. 416,146 908,858 477,409 1,189,893
Oilman's stores ............................... .... ........ ...... 482,314 ............ 409,579
Oil seeds, nuts, and beans................. pounds.. .... 153,256 4,670,575 111,419
Oils...................................... gallons.. 5,220,325 1,99. 91 6,797,47 2, 3 321
Oil,salad.................. .....................do... 580,029 174,94 221,922 184,591
Prints and printers' goods........... ..................... ...... 592,642 ............ 40u5,j:5
Paper:
W all .... ...................................... .. .......... 51,030 ........... 26,921
Printing..................................... .. ..... 448,127 ............ 4l ,, 994
Wrapping ............ ................................. 462,819 ............ 301,514
B .............................................. ........... 128,734 ............ 140,944
Perlumedspirits............................. galluns 4,375 63,309 5,082 83,066
Perfumery and toilet rrepa-irat ions ........... ............ 180,615 ............ 209,055
Phonographs and acoer~ orieus .......................... .... 15597 ........... 14,298
Photographic rnmtriil.................... ...........16,337 .......... 18,863
Pickles and sluee .......................... pound;.. 606, 109 114.208 350,652 73,144
Plate, silver, and plated twai ..re ........................... ..., 921 71............ ,669
Printers' and bookbinders' materials n. e. s............ .. ....... 113,915 ........... 119,358
Quicksilver ............. .............. pound.. 177,796 185,784 97,741 129.702
Rails, light, for industrial purposes ............... ... ............ 16 ,3.: 3 ........... 62.204
Railway material ......................................... ..... ......... 54,057
Rice, including paddy....................... pound.s.. 47,442,929 1,153, 173 48,754,129 1,227,930
Saddlers' and shoemakers' materials ........... ................. 54,578 ............ 144, 12
alt .......................................... pounds. 5, 10 125 39,667 2,164,16] 24,634
Seeds................. ..........................do.. 610,249 69,786 40", ,754 60,753
Sheep and cattle dip ..................................... .. 114,085 ............ 8 ,619
Ship-chandlers' stores............................................ 10,989 ............ 10,3.x3
Silk manufactures............................................... 337,969 ............ 290,895
Soap..... ..........................pound .. 2,315,488 214,072 1, 131,2, 159,120
Solder...........................hundredweight. 1.182 'r, 975 '27 16,989
Spices .....................................pounds. 559,244 70,044 840,171 14. 25.1
Spirits, potable..............................gallons 374,617 1,057,505 267, 3.3 990,60.
Sport ing goods ......................................... ............ 74,092 5, 573
Stationery and books.................................. ............ 1,041,874 ............ 777,637
Stones, including marble.............................. ............. 14 000 ............ 13,728
Sugar........................................pounds.. 0 164 8,117 166,692 11, 56
Sugar products................................do.... 1,137,052 54,155 729,317 3., 803
Sulphur:
Rock.............................hundredweight. 418,977 108,460 275,715 212,875
Flowers of........................................ 44,620 88,186 16,028 37,740











SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Art it les.



SuirgiT1 and i nial appliances .........................
Tallow and grease..........................pounds..
Tapioca and ssgo ........................... do....
Tar, etc ................ ........................ do....
Tea................... ........ ................do....
Teleraphl and telephone material.....................
Tents an'l rarpajlini ................................
Tin and tinw"are.....................hundredweight..
Tob 'lco m.annfacturcs:
( irars and cigarlttes......................pounds..
Other .................................. do....
Tobaicconists' w areas. ...................... ............
Toys and fan y goods..................................
Tram vwav material ............ .....................
Vegetantles .................................. pounds..
Vehicles n. e. s ......................................
Vinegar ..................................... .gallorn..
Wax, paraffin and stearin ....................pounds..
W ir.e .... ......... ....................... galluns..
Wood aud timber:
U nnan i.ar-tured ......................... ubie feet..
Maniratcilred ...................................
Woolen manui'faciLureI1.......................... .......
Zinc and zinc ware.................. hundredweight..
Aloltir a rel ic ............. ...................
To i........................................ .
Go':crnm.nnt stores .................................
Specie... ...................... .................
Grand total......................................


1916 1917


Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


... .... .. $106. 1 ............ $79,801
2,356,151 227,970 322,813 31,700
359, C36 17,35 499,730 30,22
6,597,556 66,453 3, 904,29 52,018
2,028,728 408,922 1 897,762 350,685
............ 31,315 ............ 25,617
............ ~2 .889 ............ 14,843
642 155.169 1,664 184,333
77,1 Mi 17-4,0(0 63,076 154,594
22,221 10,492 21,851 12,293
..... 70,705 ........... 74,511
............ 249,336 ............ 155,032
............ 40,392 ............ 21,033
70,04 43,031 147,906 13,101
........... 73,442 ............ 36 479
4.3,75 3, ,767 20,091 20,775
12,302, S93 f6S, 725 8, ~7,084 646,422
29, 11 119,594 24,400 98,376
22,043 1,391,902 2,4 3, 593 1,286,143
3,170,515 934,144 ............ 1,010,212
... .... .. 977,291 ............ 1,061,773
.2, 031 1,53, 991 1,433 293,465
............ 7, 6 3 ............ 938,014
.......... .. 7,01.J,-i ............ 58,631,301
.... ... 3,410,972 ............ 3,384,558
.21,850 ............ 5,330,088
............ 70,273,8SO ............ 67,345,947


Share of Each Country in Import Trade.
The total imports and exports for the port of Durban for 1916
(not including Government stores and specie) were valued at
$87,560.304, and the total trade for 1917 amounted to $88,581.533,
an increa:i of $1,021.2,29. Imports in 1917 amounted to $58,631,301
and exports to $29,950,232. A comparison of this import and export
trade for the two years shows the interesting fact that. there was a
decrease of $8.398,364 in imports in 1917 and an increase of $9.419,593
in the exports.
The following table shows the imports of merchandise into Durban,
by countries of origin, for the past two year-:


Countric::.


Argentina.............
Btnish Empire..........
Belgium................
Brazil...................
Chile...................
China...................
Cuba.....................
Denmark................
France and possessions...
Italy.....................
Japan....................
Netherlands and posses-
sions...................


191'


$10,551
47, 415, 994
45S028
553,291
92.3,506
306,419
49,619
213,533
9;9,452
389, 219
1,306,753
1,384,'208


1917


$101,222
38,741,345
21, 7;W
561, 5,.
1,112,214
192,1 s
4S, 718
73,703
791, S19
226, O03
1,961,5 6
1,065, 4S6


Conuntries.


Norway ................
l ortriwal andr possessions..
Ru.sia....................
Siam .....................
Spain 'including Canary
Islands) ..............
Swede....................
Switzerland...............
United States ...........
All other cointries.........
Total..............


From the British Empire there were imports in 1916 to the value
of $47,415,994, while for 1917 the imports fell off to $38,741,345. A
decided decrease in imports for this port, is also shown in the returns
from Belgium, France and dominians, Russia. Spain, Denmark,
Netherlands, Switzerland, and Italy, all being directly affected-by


1916


$477,618
164,620
227,499
79,562
331,326
2,129,469
392,775
9,475,368
156,258
67,015,058


1917

$495,852
188,991
9,801
23,335
115,696
2,113,020
271,293
10,412,208
40,529
58,631,301


---~-


--


--------


I










BRITISH SOUTH AFRICA-DURBAN. 5

the war. An increase is shown from Argentina, Brazil, Japan, Nor-
way, Portugal and possessions, and the United States. The coun-
tries of Argentina, Japan, and the United States show the greatest
increase Argentina, however, shows an increase in raw products,
principally grain, while. the largest incrcis.: from .Jalpan and the
United States is in manufactured articles. In 191 there was im-
ported from Japan through the port of Durban articles to the value
of $1,306,753, while for 1917 the figures are $1,G1.560, a gain of more
than $600,000. It, must be remembered that. Japan's trade with South
Africa practically was negligible before the war: now the trade of
that country with South Africa may be counted on to increase
indefinitely.
Declared Exports to United States.
The following table shows the declared exports from Durban to
the United States for 1916 and 1917:

1916 1017
Articles.
Quantity. Val,.. Quantity. Value.

Asbestos ................................... pounds.. ............ .........9 412
Bark:
Mr an rove.................................. tons.. 2 S4 159 ............ ............
W attle......................................do.... 0,3 260, 1 2,.75 14 ,755
Cloves........................ ..... oun.......... .......... 221,2)301 S, 067
Chilies........... .................... d............. do............................ 3,500
Ebony-wood stems ...................st..........stem ...... ........ ............ 074 1,2, 3
Extract, wattle........................ ....... oun ... ..... ........ ....... 10,473 1,251
Fertilizer......................................tons.. 7 2, 17 4 1,140
Fiber, hemp................ ............... pounds......................... 415,564 03, 9
Gum copal ......................................do.... ..... ...... .. 140 12
Hides, dried .................................... do.... 12, 99. 70, 43 6, -2.6 21,946
H orn ....... ................................. p ir ........ .. .......... 77 20.624
Mica, samples ............ ................. pounD s.. ........ ......... 2, .J 30 1,
Mohair................................... .......do.... 2t u : .72 65,370 22:,: ..3 77
Ore, corundum ............................... do.... ........................ 110,7 6,328
Raffia.................. ........... .......... tons.. 54 S,774 ........................
Skins, dried:
Goat ...................................... Po n .. 12-1,' 21,7 ;' 17. ;1o 21,415
Sheep....................................do.... 252, 1'6 37, 52 .', 523 13.3,109
Wool:
Unwathed..................................do.... 4, .3,717 1,0-12, 19 10, r.9. ,'7 3,830,957
Scoured.....................................do.... 32, 2,9 12,s 2 439,927 377, 751
All other article. ..................................... .. ........ ;S ............ 2,989
Total........................................................ 1,56, 4 91720

American trade with S.outh Africa shows gratifying results both
as to the imports and exports. The imports from the United States
for the year 1016 amounted to $9,475,308, and for 1917 they amounted
to $10,412.208, an increase of almost "1.000,000 for this'port alone.
The 1916 exports to the United States, as declared at this consulate,
amounted to $1,568,447, while those for 1917 amounted to $4,891,720,
a gain of more than $3,300,000. This increased trade has been caused
to a great extent by the necessities arising from the war, and the
permanence of the trade will be tested when Great Britain and other
European countries shall renew their commercial activities.
An opportunity to increase their trade with South Africa is now
offered American manufacturing industries, as they are so far the
only ones that can in any degree supply what is wanted in this coun-
try. Among the articles of American manufacture that may be
considered as firmly established in this market and that will likely
hold their own later may be mentioned motor cars and motor sup-











b SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS,


plies, motor cycles, pneumatic tires, typewriters, cash registers, sew-
ing machines, cameras, films and photographic supplies, agricultural
machinery, toilet articles, breakfast foods, aluminum ware, hard-
ware, druggists' sundries and proprietary articles, better grades of
men's hat-s and collars, footwear, toys, canned and tinned goods,
chewing gum, motion-picture films, talking machines and records,
corsets, fine hosiery, fountain pens, and clocks and cheap watches.

Export Trade With All Countries.


Exports from Durban to all countries in 1917 show
more. than $9,000,000 in value compared with 1916.
portant articles exported in the two years were:


an increase of
The more im-


Articles.


Anim als, live ................................. num ber.
A.. "Lstos, r w ........................... .. polunds..
ark, extract from ............................... do....
Biark......... .. ...............................d o ....
Blasting compotmd .............................. do...
Candle. ................... .................... do....
Coal. cuke, and p t nt fuel ............ .. .... ... on ..
copperr ore and re' z I l.. ......................long ions..
Corn, grain. ilour, aid mii.l .............. ... pound s.
(ot tl n, raw ... ................ :............ .. o ..
Fodder anid lora-e ...............................do....
Fi.h, di'rd and pri'served ............. ...... do ...
Fruit. freoi, including auts......................do....
Hair. A\ngra ................................. do....
Bide.s and skin;:
Ox and ow............. .................... do....
Goal ................................... .....do ....
S hecp ................ .... ............. ... d o .
Horns, ox and row....................... ....... do....
LeaIther and leAtlher good............................
Oil, wh le ................................... galon;..
Soap........................................ potuds. .
Spirits:
Potable................................. ...gallons..
Other...................................... do....
Siuar................. .................. ..... pounds. .
Sirlup and inolao es ............................do ....
T in ............................................ tons..
Tobacco ...................................... pound :..
V ehicles................................................
Wool:
Scoured..... .. ....... ................... pounds. .
IUnw. -hed................ ..................do....
All other article .................................... .

Total........................................
Articles in bond...... ........... ................... ..
Duty paid on articles through the post.................
Specie.............................................
Grand total.................................


Quantity.


82

902,154
13. 250,651
7, 99). 592
152,991
159,1116
148
1 0,300,322
93, 59'
7,769.370
172,705
7,571
66N, 490

8, S.27, 045
4,951. tH)2
65, 105
.. .. ........
663, Si2
364,932

299, 171
2,037
72., ,.5
8,534,011
1, 543
213i,51j9
............


Value.


$6,507

72, 057
1,231, 97
1,922,622
15,486
550,139
10, ci3
2,335, 782
17,304
96,969
20, 624
13, -s9
169,017

1,528,971
177,045
741,375
3, 170
3,402
192,913
27 ,7S

104,621
1,N0l
37,053
131, 516
653,59j5
42, 299
7,426


Quantity. Value.


2,S3
2,313,968
2, 7,;4, 1AS
92, 269,534
8, 908, 073
14U, 62
114,t 55

41 673
6,699,25 8

307,247

9,820,734
S73,917
3,941,,858
27t, 771
141, 533
789, 651

168, S~ 2


70, 992
............


$16,201
103,763
240,939
1,086,947
2, 255, 180
22,420
525,149
..... ... ....
19, 208
141,338
............
............
99,768
2,032,820
301,148
932,548
17,164
7,154
58,797
70,156

71,299

...... ....
33,340
8,794


75S.191 319,122 1,018.05 f55,917
33,150, S30 7,t 6,07 30,516,769 10,24-6,352
..2 .. ... 394,133 ............ 11,003,775

............ 20.50,639 ............ 29,950,232
............ 335,954 ............ 622,240
948.568
............ 1, 109,737 ............ 113, 68
............ 31-1,955 ............ 39,959

............ 22,291,235 ............ 31,674,262


Figures of the exports of articles of food and drink are not given
for 1917. These will not be published until the cessation of hostili-
ties.

Increased Cost of Living.
In this country, where practically everything in the manufactured
line is imported, the cost of commodities of all kinds has been stead-
ily going up since the beginning of the war. The trade has to bear
not only the increased cost of articles at their place of manufacture,
but also the increase in freight rates and war-risk insurance. The
increase in the prices of commodities extends not only to what is


I


1~1 _









BRITISH SOUTH AFRICA-DURBAN. 7

imported, but also to local products and articles of local a11:iuiiftctitire
an, to rent and wages generally.
At the outbreak of the war American shoes were ri.tailinii- for
about $5 to $10 for the best; now the cheaper American shoes arc
hardly to be found in the market, and the better grade of such I.-l
are selling at $14 to $18. Clothing that several years ago cost from
$17.50 to $22.50 in a tailor shop now costs about double the former
price, and it is said that the materials that go into the suits have
deteriorated in quality as the price has increased. A few ears ano
gasoline cost. less than $0.50 a gallon but it now sells at more than
$1 a gallon, purchases being limited to not more than 5 gallons. le-
low will be found a statement taken from the Government Gazette
of January 11, 1918, giving a return of the price of foodstuffs in the
various centers in the Union for the month of December. 1917, show-
ing the percentage of increase in total price of various articles of con-
sumption, excluding house rent: Cape Town, 38.SS; Port Elizabeth,
39.67; East London, 41.09; Kimberley, 3191; Pretoria, 30.13; Jo"han-
nesburg, 35.59; Pietermaritzburg, 50.03; Durban, 45.43; and Bloem-
fontein, 41.38. These figures were prepared by a commission ap-
pointed by the Government, which makes occasional statements of
the increases as the war progresses.
Shipping Statistics.
The following table shows the number and tonnage of vessels en-
tering and clearing at Durban for 1916 and 1917 and the tonnage of
cargo landed or ,-hipped:


I, i


WASHINGTON: GO\'lI:I:tN ENT PRINTING Ofi- ICE : 191S




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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