Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00045
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00045

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text















i.fl rSIAM.
iiY ,Vi C9onal: Clrl C. Hanuen, Bangkok, September 2.
eAtly published official customs returns for Bangkok for
q y erided a arch 31,.1918, show that the value of Siam's
trde at this port amounted to $85,918,730 in the imports
and to $45,804,168 in the exports to foreign countries during
Sipe io. As compared with the previous fiscal year, there was a
I: i. 0of $8,416,243 in the imports and of $855,171 in the exports.
Sisatisfactory condition of the foreign trade during the year under
i w is further confirmed by the fact that the last five years'
I v g was exceeded by $12,504,835.
S *Jctlpajtiaon in the Trade by Leading Countries.
S.:he effect of the war on the distribution of Bangkok's foreign
; a 4si ring the fiscal years ended March 31, 1917 and 1918, as
lastedd with the pre-war fiscal twelvemonth- ended March 31,
i s shown in the table following:

imports from- Exports to-

i '- : 1913-14 1916-17 1917-18 1913-14 1916-11 1917-15

.' 0I4Stt............. ..... ,00,171 51, 27, 10ie 1,775,a29 155,450 $112 .76 5 148,819
.................. ,357 64,600 102,787 807 2,839 10,640
i............... 1 6 410 2,231 609,421 ....................
..0*- -.. .......... .. 112 14,29 5, M 83 779 .......... ...
...... .- 3 50, 684 3, 171,990 3,158422 123,22 203, 303, 43
B .,..... .... ... 311, 38 27,016 332. 590 40,609 13,903 191,028
'.. ............ 219,953 101, 145 47,107 61,123 321,795 93, 25
97.............. 8 1, 279.000 1,568,982 444,758 747,170 1,317, 2)
.............. 428 2n3,00B 28, 0810 155, 60 11,021 4,007
............... 2,458,889 15, 0 ............ 2,747,00 ......................
7...5..... 5,3 5, 974747 6,45,5 1 13,771592 11,719,479 14,81, 2J8
............. 3,451,617 4, 06, 127 5,760, 893 72,45L 1,078,12 1,43635
.......... 176. D) 1.... W .......
.... 304, I.056 18&,%91 56,M549 170.I,) 1.023 .........
............... 2, 10,1 2,767,72 22 1,007 101,076t 202,22
............. m, s52 3 401,18 271, 3,08019 15 ..........
l .. ...-. .- 9104 1,53 20 3,950 ........... .. 4,33
.t ..... 65 5,41.94 5,12 ,836 10,530.75 24,704,977 2, 572,33

.*............ 218,010 312.90 132,897 1,015,713 793,300 M58, 7
ri.. r,.,, 3i3,1 2, W a2,s0,4 se5,9i1,M 42,i 44,s0 ,7 45, S4P,3 16


I ..:':. .giv.. g ves. the principal articles imported into
tr dba red values during the last two fiscal years.
't f:trade before an since the war began, the
mrM" "' it .twelvenonth ended Marchl 31, 1914,








2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMECRO REPORTS.


Artlels. 1913-34 Ma -IT #IT-

Ammunition and explodrvei .......................................... W1641 4-5, 18
Arms ......................................................-... ..... 19,M0 8
Art works .....................................*....................... 81
Belting, machine ..................................................... S 4
Bolesoe and parts..................................................- .. 6
Blealte.....*.....................................................- 121,96 1
Braie manuJaCtur. .................................................. 28,2 1, R
Carr g, etc................................................ ... 0I
Cneo........................................... .......... 25B,8B5 8,44?
Chemicals and med.idnes........................................... .... 1S f4 I
China and earthenware 457"01s CAM,
China and earthenware.................. .:......................... 5016 2M
Clocks and watches, et .............................................. 77,117 81,96
Clothing, articles or .................................................. 72,000
Coaland coke..................................................... 158,c6 367,
Copper and copperware.............................................. C,9 39,01
Cordage, twine, et............................................. ... 140,119 281,
Cotton good......................................................... 0,762,86 0, $ 8,
Cutol xopt tools)................................................ .6 76
t ............................................................. 42 i
gloioalood aad apparatu ....................................... 415,1 B,
Embroiderles, lace, etc........................................... 07 132 Tw
Enamel ware....................................................... 104,075 I
Irish:
Canned ......................................................... 11,067 alI, 4i
A othr....................................................... 21,738 30,m6
Flour........................................................ 106,800 8W 1 3I
Glass and crystal ware............................................. 1030,3 2=,1 i,
Gold leaf............................................................. I,68 3 1,0 85 2r U
Gunny bgs................ ..................................... 1,711 124 1, 01g03
Hats and caps....................................................... 2M,555 2SM Si
Hemp manufactures, other than cordago............................. 122,479 67,41
Iron and steel manufactures:
Bars, sections, etc............................................... 194,861 341,
Galvanized sheets, plain or corrugated.......................... 306,378 04,9
Iron or steel sheets and plates................................... 33,109 2, 407
Machinery-
Marin................................................... 110,801 78,23
Millkng...................................................... 89,78881
Other, and parts........................................ 554, 022 43W,
Nails, rivets, etc.............................................. 113,884 17 ? s,
Railway material.............................................. 500,404 1,,1M l,
Railway cars, trucks, etc....................................... 84,873 1I2, 4
Wire, and manufactures of...................................... 37,430 183,750 10
Other......................................................... 503,963 390,620 371
Jewelry:
Gold and silver ware (Including plated ware)................ .... 215,953 18t8,34 46,
I'recious stones:
Set....................................................... 37,770 40,344 38,
Unset .......................................................... 303, 228,m 0,
Lamps and parts................................................... 145,999 140,2m -,
Leather manuiacturos:
Boots and shoes............................................... 55, 82 ,14
Other ............................................................ 181,099 2,3
Matches............................................................. 0627 301.004
Matting and rattan goods........................................... 426,922 4
Meat, preserved...................................................... 51, ,373 I82
Milk, canned....................................................... 12,302 118,42
Motor cars and parts............................................... 244,639 211 0m
Motor cycles...................................................9...40 ? os
Musical instruments.................................................. 31.49 2
Oils:
Mineral........................................................ 874,123 1,312W 12,
Lubricating........................................................ 47,,63 1 T
Oilcloth, etc........................................................ 41,379 J2
Opium ............................. ....................... ...... 827 ,30 1,0 040
Painter's colors.................................................. 12T 06 ;1,7
Paper and manufactures of: Bcoks, etc............................ 424,306 5I,W
Perfnmery and cosmetics............... ........................... 1I 5,605 2901
Rubber goods..................................................... 119, 508 E 81
Silk and manufactures:
Piece goods................................................... 1,251,204 1,11512
Raw................................... ............. ....... 60, 11 45,
Other.......................................................... 107,30 12, I
Soap............................................................... 110,456 16
Spices and condiments............................................... 203,866 25i
Sporting goods and games .......................................... 24,437 9
Stationery other than paper........................................ ,300 10d so
uar and molasses.8.................................................. 1,280 32 42
Tea..................., .......................................o 7WI i
'Tils.................................................................
Tobacco and manufactures.......................................... 68077 a l
Treasure, gold con, et.......................................... 1, IR, SI
Umbrellas.. 8ss, 36
mbrellas............................................................ 188,3 1
Varnish............................................ .......... ...... 14,914 :i
Vegetables, dried............................................. 338, 8m 414
Wax........................................ ................... 51, 24 0,
Wine, beer, spirits, etc........................................ 714, 254 87,8












ei.v .................................................. P32,821 5235,751 $176, 451
:t1 9 4 tumt......0................................................... 12,495 49,721 22,400
OtbenuarCts .............................................. 4.1, 65 59,702 R2, 89
i l oods .. ........ ......."...................... .................. 4873 130, 339 112,492
... .. ................................ 38 543 30, 9C 0 1, 409
TJ ................................................ 130,29 61,595 89,767
O.:.. '........................ ............................ 350. 02 262,18 3 C06,33S
i :l atdin msi tures...... .......... ........ ................. ..... 0, 103 32,830 37,331
tbrir W hie. ..................................................... 2772,016 3,93,833 4,01,579
1 I*:a.t........................... ......................... 33,591,870 32,502,487 15,918,730

i ststical information is not yet available for Siam's trans-
er trade or for other ports than Bangkok. An official state-
i admits, however, that imports and exports in the aggregate
aunt to about 20 per cent of those passing through Bangkok.
i? ^During the year under review the aggregate value of all the
sportsts was considerably the best on record, but taken separately the
.iallms that showed marked increase were comparatively few, and
Advance in value rather than increase in volume accounted for the
adi: addition in import value. The chief articles showing increase were:
: cotton goods, a gain of $2,470,875; cutlery, $39,236; gold leaf,
41 902,455; gunny bags, $321,376; machine belting, $31,022; mineral
:'obil, $268,715; opium, $987,775; yarn, $629.774. The imports of
iron and steel manufactures dechned from $521,521 in 1916-17 to
4 288,219 in 1917-18 in machinery, and from $1,638,815 to $1,368,281,
m,.iespectively, in other metal goods. The decline in both instances was
S~ue to difficulty in getting shipment from abroad.
I' 2Tncipal Exports.
The following table gives the principal exports from Siam for
1913-14, 1916-17, and 1917-18:
Articles. 1913-14 1916-17 1917-18
A." W 0llo skins...................................................... $11,315 $12,066 $11,605
"5............................................................... 5.901 8.990 6,648
Srdmon. .......................................................... 44,128 82, 42 73,988
a............................................................. 2, 68 581 352
r ttn............................ ............................... 116,283 32,589 31,342
.. ......................................................... 2.889 15.71 5,077
................................................................ 666,173 557,530 426,343
............................................................. 3.147 38,210 81,172
m boezoln......................................................... 11,888 1,687 3,857
laand skins................................................. 908.617 960,979 915.123
r g ...;.. ......................................................... 56.670 31.786 22.990
SStc or carde ................................................ 173.907 273,161 171,105
.... w.. .............................................................. 313,378 177,000 229,916
............................................................ 318.7 221,677 368,610
stones (includingreexport)............... ............... 177.139 218.265 185,651
Si nd p .iddy....3...................................... 36,518.687 36,987.188 36,208,813
33.431 12,671 13,228
.. ........................................................ 43,253 83,065 118,228
and mnuml ctures:
Y J oda.................................................... 345.102 439.422 557,189
S....t ................................................. 130, 68, 211.212 225,154
( n) o............................................... i395 59,961 16,487

: i.: .i I O.::::::::::::::::............................. 278.313 539.805 '40.973
S...................... ........... 517,631 2,103.792 3,602,961
.... .............. ................................... 42,712,523 44,948,997 45,804,168

,i, .IVb. the total value of Siam's exports to foreign countries dur-
1 .1-18 exceeded that of the previous year, there was, however, a
..la i the export of rice, the leading product of the country,
altounting to 1,039,448 piculs, although the average of the last five
:: ..








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


years of 17,813,725 piculs was exceeded by 1,431,419 piculs (1
equals 133. pounds). The teakwood exports increased from lW
tons, valued at $1,879,174, in 1916-17, to 44,825 tons, value (!
in 1917-18. :
Trade in oodstuffs.
Siam's imports from foreign countries of foodstuffs and nanaie
holic beverages were valued at $4,305,611 in 1917-18 and $4,197,86 in
1916-17, as compared with $4,488,272 in the pre-war year 1018-146
Very few of the food products represented by these figures are pro.
duced locally, and under normal conditions the demand for such food-
stuffs will be much augmented, especially those given in the table
which follows. In return this country is able to furnish for the
world's market large quantities of an excellent quality of rice which
may be grown in practically unlimited amounts when the systems of
irrigation now under construction are completed.
The quantities of the principal foodstuffs imported into and ex-
ported from Siam were as follows for the years given:

Foodstufs. 19#-14 Jl1647 IlH -u

Bi uits......................................................kils.. 885,26 3 W ,W .4M
Butter......................................................do.... 41,469 30,454 49
Cereal...................................... ............do.... IW,42 129, 1 KW
Cheese...................................................... do.... 11,893 ,0O 4a g
Fish:
Sqrdines, anned............. ..................... do.... 96,681 U,16 eld
Salmon, canned...................................... do... 481,7 5 I@u2 ia
Flour.................................................. ...do.... 3, 90.186 3,h 2.6 2-m1
Meat, preserved ... ................... ................ do.... 98,947 78,779 41,
Milk, canned...............................................do.... 808,W2 610 4,
Molasses................. ............................do.... 6,384,051 10,I .QI 9,1K40
Spices and condiments.......................................do.... 3,498,815 8,7 ,6 'S 38
Sugar..................................................... do.... 20,545,101 10,5 ~0 4 O S9
Tea.. ..........................................do.... 619,454 8",0 An n
Vegetables, dried....................... ..................do... 4,981,767 ,8l 4l4 4, 7,574
EXPORTS..
Carda oms................................................. tons.. 136 18 Ile
Copra................... ..................................... do.... 41 i i
Fsh ....... ................. ..................do.... 15,262 12,880 18.2 B
Mussels, dried....................................... do.... 2,169 1,765 22
Pepper................ ..................... .........do.... 1,284 wg I
Rice and paddy..................................... do....do 1,314,88 1,318,9O 1, iW,

Articles Imported from the United States.
The direct, imports into Siam from the United States and their
value during the fiscal years ended March 31, 1916 and 1917, re
shown in the following table:


Articles.


Bicycles..............:. ......
Biscuits....................
Boots and shoes.............
Chemials and medicines.....
Cigarettes........... ..
Clocks, "atlhes, and parts....
Cotton goods.............
Cullery ............
Electr a I goods and apparatus
Fish, tanned................
Flour ........................
Foodstuffs n. e. s............
Glass manufactures ...........
Instruments, scientific........
Lamps and parts............
Leather and dressed skins....
Lubricating oil..............
Machinery..................
Machine belting.............
Metal manufact uts.........


1916-17


1"9o
2
2,931
37,338
330,503
8,378
14,225
4,103
64,592
3,791
9,387
16,582
7,128
3,830
9,514
384
41,18W
224,795
12,280
223.214


1917-18


2545
2,317
3,942
43,20O
46, 098
10,562
8,335
8,710
58,104
1,470
4,378
21,259
4,288
3,799
13.110
2,136
38,0 6
8g, zi1
4.209
346,015


Articles.


Milk, canned................
Mineral oil................
Motor cars and parts..........
Motor cycles.................
Paints.......................
Paper and manufactures......
Perfumery and cosmetics.....
Photographic goods..........
Railroad material and trucks.
Rubber goods..............
Sewing machines............
Soap.......................
Sporting goods and games....
Stationery.................
Tools other than machine....
Wood manufactures........
Zine........... ..............
All other article............
Total..................


1016M-


19,1;


ISiiB
4,ggi
11,002
8,4192
5,256
m



1,627,3U
730


iB i
Z3







Ut.
:1^
mm0

a--


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el


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55g| t8| J fHWjmUCiiruA yVLJu'u J iJ a X 4AlAJ jfLAA 4 |, qxs U1 UzIncu I1L&t,
;: railway materials and trucks, $7,775. Decrease in the im-
at a number of other articles, however, reduced the aggregate
to $148,368 for the year.
IWL rae with Siam ruereaslng.
lrint g the fiscal year 1918-14 the value of the American goods im-
direct into Siam passed for the first time the million-dollar
reaching $1,066,171, as compared with $746,062 in the pre-
year. The figures for the next three years were $1,041,893 in
; $1,135888 in 1815-16 $1,627,166 in 1916-17. During the
under review, however, all previous record were exceeded by a
.of $1,775,529 worth of imports, and this result may be regarded
Isatisfactory inasmuch as the same drawbacks, to which attention
called in last year's report, continued to operate throughout the
The commercial reading room attached to the consulate was
d by a great many Siamese merchants and other inquirers for
ican manufactures, and further interest was also shown during
nl year by the sending of a number of Siamese students to the
ted States for the purpose of completing their education in the
E 'chanical arts, especially those relating to engineering and rail-
wi ays. On the other hand American manufacturers and exporters,
as welt as importers of oriental products showed their continued in-
I:!terest in entering into closer trade relations with this country by
aliading experienced commercial representatives and by the making
i'tn extended trade inquiries through letters sent to the consulate.
T!ine future development of the United States trade with Siam,
h'iwever, will be dependent largely on the progress made in securing
i:: ie shipping facilities. Direct sailings between the United States
ai d Sianu may not be practical, but shipments for Siam might be
i::Iied by American liners to Manila for transshipment to Bangkok
in. ira ller vessels. It is likely that a line of steamers of about 1,500
bs:: each for the run between Manila and Bangkok could be operated
4 a paying basis. Starting from Manila, calls would be made at
oingong and Saigon, while at Bangkok a full cargo might easily
: bteoured for the direct return to Manila. More than 1,000,000 tons
I-Ei:: c about 46,000 tons of teakwood, and an unknown quantity of
otier native products are shipped yearly from Bangkok, and the
I.I4: ter portion of this cargo goes to Hongkong and Singapore and
1ii6 r oriental ports for tranahipment to the United States, to
i. tral and South America, and to Europe. A full share of this
IL:. eight could readily be secured for shipment to Manila, and finally
~:nj ncarried by other American ships to its ultimate destination.
!il;i 4 U rts to VatteU States.
t~j quantity and declared value of the exports invoiced at the
I'p!txaite at Dangkok for shipment to the United States for the fiscal
|i 1916-17 and 1917-18 are shown in the following table:





I.







6 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMEBCB BEPOBTS.

1916-17 1917-1
Articles.
Pounds. Value. Pounds Val"t

;ambore............... .. ....................................---- .. ........ 9, .,0
;;:: henzoin ........................................... ......... 593 504 ......... .......
di um damar ........................................ .. ........ ........-- -4, 800. 1,019
Ildes ...................................... .......... ...... 79,695 19,997 3,25 913
a.e, st ick or rud...................................... .......... 117,756 17,249 208,007 46,215
Pepper, white ............................... ................. 78,549 15,095 .............. ....
R eo ........................................................... .......... .......... 302,400 1,
stnore................................................ ... 131,040 69,462 44,0 2 100n
Wood:
Cedar ls. ....................................... ........ .. ..... ....... ....... ......... 2
Rosewood, plam ks.......................................................... .. .. ...... 161
Yang. planks.............................................. ............................ 373
Teak squares and plinks ............................. .......... 45,166 .......... 95,226
All other articles........................................... ......... 1,547 .......... 7,207
Total......................... .............. ... ...... 1 00 9 .......... 00,146

It is understood that the shipments of Siamese products to the
United States during the year under review were much curtailed
owing to the lack of cargo space, and also to war-time transship-
ment difficulties at the British ports of Hongkong and Singapore.
The shipments of wood to the United States during last year
should be of considerable interest to American makers of art furni-
ture. Besides, there are a number of woods of exceptional value
available, the export of which has hitherto been confined to China
and Japan.
There were no shipments from Siam to the American insular pos-
sessions for the fiscal year 1917-18.
Progress in Railway Traffic.
Beginning with July 1 of this year through passenger service
was begun between Bangkok and Penang in the British Federated
Malay States, so that now the latter place may be reached from
Banrgkok in three days and Bangkok from Penang in four days.
This new passenger route is of considerable interest to commercial
travelers not only because of the quicker transit afforded to Bang-
kok but also for the opportunity given for visiting new commercial
centers in the now rapidly developing Siamese Malay Peninsula.
During the year under review great shortage of rolling stock and
of construction material was reported on both the Southern and the
Northern State Railway lines. On each of these lines the rate on
passenger traffic was raised 20 per cent owing to the advance in price
of railway material received from abroad and to increased mainte-
nance expenses.
Of the private railroads, the Paknam Railway Co. (Ltd.) reported
a dividend of 22 per cent and the Meklong Railway Co. (Ltd.) of 4
per cent for 1917.
Financial Conditions-Opportunity for American Bank.
In the budget estimates for the Kingdom of Siam for 1918-19 the
ordinary revenue has been placed at 73,125,896 ticals ($27,056,581)
and the estimated expenditures are covered by the same figures. To
meet the extraordinary expenditures 18,011,935 ticals ($6,664,416)
will be provided from the treasury reserve, and from loan and sink-
ing funds.




Jii




















:piMd with the previous year.
Th" e foreign banking interests in Bangkok are represented by two
British and one French bank and a number of agencies, all of which
*flear to be doing an excellent business. Up to the present time,
American banking facilities in this country have been limited to an
agency placed with one of the local banks, but this arrangement now
seems to be wholly inadequate ind view of the yearly increasing trade
between the respective countries, the prospective extension of Ameri-
can business interests in many directions and the possible American
:Ishpping connections with Bangkok. This consulate will be .glad
to secure any data relating to the subject that may be required by
interested American bankers.
.. fieatioa-Public Health.
.. progress has been made in the education of girls by opening
Schools for women teachers. The system of secondary education has
S'been remodeled so that Siamese students now may be admitted with-
i ot preliminary entrance examinations into many of the universities
?,i" of te United States and England, and the colleges in Bangkok have
Saiic been amalgamated into a university to provide instruction in
th: higher branches of education.
S: The- Aerican mission schools have been doing a splendid work in
: th education of Siam's' youth and are now crowded with students.
T:, wo of these schools-the Christian College at Bangkok and the
'h: r inee o Royal College at Chiengmai-are famous throughout the
SKingdom for the excellence of their educational work.
i:.Pblic health and welfare has been advanced during the year by
iieanading the operation of sanitary regulations to several towns in
S:the Provinces. Two American doctors are now in the Siamese sani-
i. tny service. Dr. M. E. Barnes, of the International Health Board
:of ter Rockefeller Foundation, has successfully continued his work
Si cooperation with the Siamese health office for the eradication and
Control of hookwormi. The American medical men serving in the
mission -hospitals throughout the country have worked earnestly
ring the year in the relief of suffering, and the Siamese people at
Severe opportunity show their high appreciation of these acts of
good will on the part of the American people.' The work for the
I relief of leers, which was begun some years ago by Dr. J. W.
M cKean, ofthe American mission in northern Siam, has been appre-


i .. : .. .




UNIVERI, R
..I..l l.i.. .... .. *: ::: .


8 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMEBBO
elated by the Siamese Gorernment, and ont i
running expenses have been made during the yient 1I
Agriculture--Xining.
Extensive flooding of the low-lying plains of ei
October of last year caused considerable damage io
but official figures giving the total decrease in r:e
the season have not yet been made public. A'
places the loss at about 30 per cent of an average
total yield of paddy for the fiscal year 1915-16 wa4i
tons, and represents a fair annual average. The
rice shipped to foreign countries during 1917-18 was.i
a decrease of 69,296 tons, as compared with the prev
work on the comprehensive scheme irrigation which
three years ago is proceeding satisfactorily, excava
on by American dredging machinery under the sup'
can engineers.
The completion of the Siamese Southern Railwy
directed considerable attention to the mineral-MEt j
ersed by this railway. The Siamese Royal Dep
issued 80 mining leases during the past year, and it i:
Australian, French, and Danish companies have .
concessions. The total output of metallic tin
amounted to about 142,000 piculs (9,466 short
piculs (800 tons) of tungsten ore were also recot
been no activity in the mining of other metals durii
Shipping Statistics.
Barring the entire elimination of German interesdi
at the port of Bangkok has undergone no marked ch
war. The number of vessels cleared inwards dut
1.009 of 796.232 tons, against 1,064 vessels of 855,621t
868 of 805,638 tons in 1914-15, and 914 of 895,204t40
war fiscal year 1913-14. Among the ships that cle~aed
ing 1913-14 were 261 German vessels, 321 Norwegia'M
7 Japanese, and 33 Dutch; while for the year under
man ships disappeared, Norwegian vessels decreased ft
number of British ships increased to 215, the Japafte~ft
Dutch to 45. Of the 1,009 vessels that called dugthg
Bangkok 833 came from Singapore and Hongkong, at
same number left Bangkok for those ports. There were'
of American ships between the United States and Sian"
year, but three calls were made at Bangkok by an me
ship trading at a local port.

UNIV. OF FL LI1.
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U.S. DEPOTTORY '
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