Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
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United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
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Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
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Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00043
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00043

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text

SILOR/04

SUPPLEMENT TO M
SMR 1955 M

COMMERCE REP TS j
SI DAILY CONSUL\R AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF rOR.EIN AND DOlMI.ATIC COM':.IEl *
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHItNGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 52g July 31, 1918

CHINA.
SWATOW.
By Consul 'Mlyrl S. Myers, MIay 14.
The trade of Swtow for 1'17 was more than C6.1'V.000 hail;wa.vn
taels less than that of the year previous and in fact rearlicd the lowest
figure since 1913. Thi-; ls was due to a number of caui.es, both l1.d 1
and foreign, the chief among which, however,. was: political dis-
turbances.
A shortage in the autumnn ri,.e and sugar crops diminished the
purchasing power of the upconintry buyers.. Ohlier factors, such as
the increased value of silver with its diminishing effect on rciiiitta c,.-e.
from the. South Seas, high freight rates, diminis-hedt tolnnage, and
the restrictions and embarnges at so1rlces of production, have ad-
versely influenced the trade of this port.
Financial Conditions.
Business, generally speaking, was carried on along cmens'rv'(l ve
lines, although there was sonK, speculation in cotton goods in July
and August. High freight rai i-, prevented overtrading and destruc-
tive competition and tended to maintain a healthy state of trade.
No failures of consequence lhad occurred at the end of the Chinese
calendar year (February, 101S), when final setllenment-i are mude.
Business nma be said to have ,l-en fairly satisfactory for foreign' and
native merchants, except during the last quailct, when military op-
erations brought it almost to a standstill. Since the new year the
state of the trade has improved.
A still further decline, occurred in the remittances from Chinese
emigrants in Siam and Straits Settlements, due principally to the
increased value of silver. IThis is a serious loss to this region, as
these remittances represent, a fair portion of the ready money avail-
able for the purchase of imports. They are handled by money-packet
hongs which send drafts on Hongkong banks to their agents at
Swatow, where they are disposed of to the local banks for Mexiran
dollars. It is estimated that. the amount of these remnitt hnc-es has
been reduced at least by half since the beginning of the war.
The embargo on silver from Honongkong exchange continue against
that port throughout the year, the Hongkong dollar ranging between
5 and 10 per cent discount as compared to the Mexican dollar. Thel
Shanghai dollar was generally at a slight lpremiuim..
The local money market was as a rule easy and interest rates ruled
low, the average bank rate for deposits being b1etwo.n 7 and 8 per'
cent, as compared with about 12 per cent in i916. The deman-ld for
loans was relatively small as a result of conservative business.
67077D-18-52g '


-A







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


There were two hank failures with a total liability of about
$900.000 Swatow : inrrenc during the. year.
Agricultural Conditions-Industrial Progress.
The priiicipIl ,i .~uip (of thi- region are rice, sugar, and oranges. The
midsumn ll in' iT ir'p w\:as excellent, but the autumn one was below
norm;i I,'. i : plrt)troa' tled drought. Suga r cane, also an autumn
crop, ,;i- :0 ili '."n-i not only by the drought hbut also by frost in certain
p;art -, :..ii'... a ti l'lllt the hliarvest was about 20 per cent below normal.
r'll ;'.i: i-roip wa.; an average one. but the market wa;( dull.
.\A iniij. tl' crops of lesser importance are peanuts, indigo, and to-
I,"0..1. T'II p)ianut crops (two) were slightly below the average,
I'.' U.n. t ii advelr-e weather conditions, and the same is true for the
in li.., rop. Tlhe tobacco crop was a good one.
A. im ,,l the principal industries of this district are the manufac-
O1n.. Iy native methods, of cloth (cotton and grass), shoes (native),
fan--. ,.itlluware. bamboo ware, paper, joss paper, and pewter ware.
Sli'e iii-' up-to-date cotton-cloth factories have hand-power iron
Inil,,. o'f IJapaines.e make, and their output includes a cheap grade of
Iii R .l;1in and fancy cloth. The principal cloth manufacture is in
Inln!i en ., for making which the native wooden loom is used. The
wa.v;r ii1g industry had a bad year, and some factories were forced to
clo-c down, owing to the increased cost of yarn. No expansion in this
indii-trv occurred.
T1r., Li Kiang Knitting Factory. using steam machinery, had an
(oitput of 5.-l.00 dozen pairs of sock-- but had not so profitable a year
ais; 191. The addition of more knil t ing machines is contemplated.
The new rice mill, established in 1916. has a capacity of 3- tons of
paddy per day. Its equipment is of Japanese manufacture. Its opera-
lion was not very successful from the financial standpoint.
Local canning factories had difficulty in obtaining the necessary tin
plate for cans and were forced to use kerosene tins during part of the
time. Since the end of the Chinese year (February, 1918) they have
been closed for want of materials for making cans. The high cost of
thes-e materials considerably reduced profits. The local bean mills did
not operate.
.Miinng has become a more important industry as a result of the
discovery of wolfram ore about Swabue during the summer of 1917.
Since tlen this ore has been found in other parts of the district, and
now many thousands of Chinese are digging for this valuable min-
eral, which undoubtedly exists in large quantities. Much of the out-
put has been sent to Canton via Waichow for export, but its free
movement is now being interfered with by recently established official
restrictions. The people of this region are beginning to display an
interest in their mineral resources, and it is hoped that the develop-
ment of other valuable deposits known to exist in this region will
result.
Some anthracite cal mined in the Hakka region, in the northern
part Iif this district. wais placed on the market. The coal is said to
be of giod al i:v. atid v.itli the high price- of the imported article
the time is cipjpoturtoun to undertake its mining on a larger scale.
Public Utilities.
'The Swatfw-(l'ioh.-l!vfu Railway, 26 .t miles in length, had a
slightly better year and \as frequently used in moving troops. Pas-








SI
*CHITNTA-SWATOWr

singers receipts increased slightly, lht frei2ht r:iate-, wlich are rolta-
tiv\ely unimportant, were ii:,lilat thl' same. No inlproeniitcil to the
road nor adtlitionis to the rollin .stI-k wre iniole. At tihe ndl of the
war, when ,nuiori:il r;in le Whlitinl, the tr.,.k \ ill be ,'x(idd to ilie
water f'roln at Sat atow.
1 The Swatow-Chiainliin LliTI I Raivlay, a pn-hI-car line fm carrying, :
passenlgers. started Opelr:ilin ov11r 6 i nilll- of tr:'wk on Nm vumilr 5,
1917. Th'lre is still 14 mil'c of caoin tru.iri. .i wvrk tobe l1 ie. but the
enlterpri.-l' is IlleIlinill %illi -oliev opposition o\\"iilL to the ali-c'iI-v of
(,overnDni.iit snj:l ion.
There are there electric-li-li plants in !!li- distriLt and a frt!h
'(at Cli ochowfu) is 1ii.iia inst:l I le(l. The w\vatow Ki iiiin Electri,
Light Co. had a proiiti;lil, y,.Ir and declared a divi,!,nll of 8 per
cent., DuriniL the year the iiumbrn of L:ps furnished with light
,was increased from 13.'1;11 to 15,000. Stitll plants are located at,
Kayling and IIinliuiiu,, the one at the fi elni'r place furnishing li_.1i
to more than 2,U00 lap;.
The. S\\;tow waterworks had aniotll-'r profill: v-r. An 1miule-
cessful effort was mnade to -ll1 shares at half their f;ce v:iliue to pay
off borrow ed c;p1ital.
Shipping at Swatow Declines.
Shippinig at the pi't of S~\.itow in 1917 decrc i;.i by 21;ti -f,:im'Trs
of 3 ll,l: ti.;i-. or mri'~e than 2'i per cent, as compar,1d with 1916, and
1. 3b:', -ta;iil-'s of 408,;501 toi.-. or more than 15 pl.I'cent, as corn-
pared with 1915. In this loss BIitisli shipping i1-:ne reached .',::.,13
tons; N.l'rwe'.:irn and Chinese shipping dropped 37,108 and 12,498
tons. re-pi.c'tively. The only ,nsidi rable in, rte:'-o was in Jnapanell
shlipipjn'g, which ad'A:ncel :'_',,2I tons. Ainr :ri.-m toniii:'e euit'ring
this port was confined to a tank -te-.i~er and two visits from a (c,';t--
incg es.-'1 on charter i.\ice 1.etweon Holl!,'l mlng and S:lg;,,n. It
may be ol-er\-.el here that the regular shipping of the port is c,.n-
fined to China, c' :i- i;l:' lines and direct -. 'r.-- to I1nglkk, Singa-
pore, SaCierln. and Deli, Sumatra.
Thie followi .l table gives the nrii!ilh-r and tonnage of -i,;.i!.rs
entered and '.lv'ired at S\\:,tbw during 1916 and 1917, as well as the
1 un.ches. steam and motor, ..i f ring and clI .ri:;. under inland mavi-
gation rules:
1916 1917
Flag.
Number. Tons. Number. Tons.

STEAMERS.
American ............................................. .... 6 ". ? i 6 1 4.9
British............. ..................................... 1 'n 1, I 1,134 1,37 .470
Chinse ................................................. II 11i 108 ", 110
Danish........................................ ........ 2 ......... ....
T n th .................................................. :. 52 '. ii
F rench .................................................... 2 ,1 I ......................
J Nor' ..nc ............................................... 13. 2 402, 4 102 111. '..
Norwe ,n .... ............ ................... .............. 137, 102 "
u I tuguies ... .. ............ ....................... ........ ..... ............ 16 8,321
T otal ............................................. ... 2 I 2.'* ,, ,11 1,-.1 2, 1..' ,1
LAUNCHES. I ---
B ritish................................. ................... 1.I 4'1.I,. ,,2 'I 79, t.1 l
linetse.................................. ................ I .. i .F, I 22 i.tj
1 rce ch ........................ ...... ......... ..... ...... I 2,442 1. ',. ; 2. 1.llI 7.,lj00
Total ................... ........ ................ ,u '., 1 1 lU,I;9 371,026
. _______________________ 1 ___ I ___ 1 ___








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Inland Navigation-New Launch Service.
Tihe nlliii.-r of junk,, engaged principally in local trade, increased
frllm 2.I115 in 191i to 2.,154 in 1917, and tonnage increased from
-i I'.- (, .' I -' 7,024.
1ie launches under inland navigation rules are used on river and
-!:>rt coast runs. and tiho-,e under foreign lag. are devoted exclu-
s.i.ly to tl(h passenger trade. The loss in the Chinese tonnage as
C'll i:lued with i191( was largely ldue to the commandeering of the
vessels lby the military Swatiw-Ungklllung alnd Swatow-Swabue
-,. ices unia"' ill'itr i t nd tier the naii of tlI Sie Yak Co. A British
cilzilny a ldd'd a nI-w crlde-,il launch on its S\watow-Kityang run.
A Ir..w motor launchl \was placed on the upriver service (Chaochow-
fu-Kaying) diii iniin the yiar. These river serl'-ies are confined to the

'ie lcui.st'1.- rt l, returns 4hw tH at there were 11 new reg-istrations and
5 withdrawals ul-r inland naviai tion rules during the year and
that the total num'.il~ir c.-f l., at's lreii-'tered ;t the end of the year was
48, as conplire.] wilh 4'2- at the end of 1016. Ten of these boats fly
for.Vn flash and 'S ,he Chinese.
Value of Trade?-Imipot anld Export 5 tatistics.
The value of the Mariti.e Cu'ti,-lt i U:I. tl'rd expressed in gold at the
rates of conve-vron for the past tw yVear.- ( IU.b2-.; to the tael in 1916
;:'An. $1.02, in 1917), is niisleadinL,, anid i-Ilows a .'ain of 9 per cent, or
,4. -.,8,4"1, -whiif: the sil, er val]u-. -.-how a d'c'rea e of approxiuiately
11 pr cent, the decrease being ciolfirnmed hy a comparison of the
quiaiti iies. In thi. connection it i. well to reilniirber, l that. owing to
a .-b :idy increase in prices of foreignl iiimports and wmost native
lrnducts, higher values do not. no-essarily indi':ate increas-:jd trade.
The following talle givis a uIliiniari of thle iliJor't and export
trade of Swatow through the Chinesew Maritime Ciist4oIs in 1916
and 1917:


Item-.


Imports of foreign goods:
From f'r;;. n countries...................................................
From h ,liinti ports..................................................... ...
'1 ] foreign im ports. ..................................................
Reexports of foreign goods:
To i.,!, i n 'lnlllrils............................... ..... ..................
T o linirr. : p orts............... ..........................................
Total reexports of f,,re n c ."rd : ........................................
Net total foreign impo t ........................................ .........
Imports of native produce................................... ...... ....
Reex-ports l niitI'. produce:
T"o f'r.rei u countries......................... ......... ................
To: hLn: '. ports ................................. .........................
'i'. .1 reexports of na"i; r ir :...: .......................................
Net total C'lr :,- im p;., ....................................
'T i' rr it- il. l i.
To I irul- ports..... .... ... .......... ... ..........
Total exports of native i. il '. .........................................
Gross value of trade of port ..................................................
Net value of trade of port..................................................


712, 9 I
12,711, 117


$13, 41, 3 ,
'2, 400
11,"'-N ,7.3'.


28'.9 222,361
.:'3, ;75 ir, 2-7
597 : 7.3 392, 629
12, 11t,,774 14,304,111
21, 1:1, .;7 24,900,00 7

11, 21,218 1,19q-.?i0
". 161 ,093
1. ".l,S16 1:,.5. 5,9"3
-2.I:t;l,0 1. I ? .544, 1.!4

7,'5, 13 S, 720,92S
5 :. ." '-.; i,?..69, 171
13., L.'.1 15, 19 102
50, 9, 115 5 M, 686,938
4S, 479,936t 52,93S,347









CH I N A-SWATOW.


Hongkong Leads in Foreign Trade.
In divret trade. with foreign countries HLii.gkng is iniii;i;iininm
its po.-ition as the premier d I.tribiting center for forei-n imports.
Its proportion w\\ approximii:tely T2 per cent for both 1916 and
1!17. All. goo's of whatever origin l minl fiolin Honkong ;a're
credited by the ci.'-tOtiins to that place J:ip:tn Ili.1 the Unitned .Star.
follow in the order inill:edl. the latter's share bc.ig entire.ly in kl'eo-
sene. A very small port in of foreign imp rt.- coII.s from Clhinei.
sports. principally S.11:iiliai, the values of whih.l for 1916 and 1917
were -119.219 and 42,S,.14_', rt'..pe actively. The bulk of Swatow's ex-
port.s- to foreign countries -. ,tes to those conlltfii-, where th i' o arT
large1 Cliinese, comlm ninie which ('dj:Ianill the Chiin.-e foods and
hou:-eii1d articles to which they are accu-.tiiivd. Exports to western
countries are generally -ent to Hongkong for tr;aii-.:lipilinit to trans-
oceanic steamers and are chiefly in f.aithl r-, hides, drawn work, and
wolfram ore. Hongkong also receive., some cargo for trniii--lil Iiiiiit,
to the. South Seas.
The following table shows the value of the direct trza, de of Swatow
with foreign countries for 1916 and 1917:
Gross i'mp,-irt of foreign Exports and reexports of
Cg u native goods.
Countries.
1916 1917 1916 1917

non'kno ................................ $8,647,407 $10, .350 $1,993,411 $2,526, 00
Frru ch i no1u-c n.l ............................. 251,974 .-.,046 807,(55 950,175
Siam.......................................... 359,140 ;'-,.4: 2, 1 102 2., -" 192
St rat Settlements............................ 156,8341 3, .-. 432 ., 1. 032
Dutch Indies................................... 14, 847 136,691 34, 438 90, 446
British India................................ 266,709 12,982 65,2dS -.. 489
Great Britain.................................. 2,957 7,111 677 221
Jilpu Iin.ludirng Taiwan)....................... 1,479,920 2,120,813 326,990 201,839
P-hilirrpin l Island ................................ 11,066 ..8, 167 82
S1int1 i i atl.. itl1iililI Hawaii) .............. 766,738 695,189 4,830 5,073
All other countries .............................. 3,945 143 2,022 199
Toitl -gro.; valie. ................ ...... 11,961,553 12 1.. 1 9,318,393 9,'l1 '. 788
Ree"'ports. .......................... 263,998 -2.'. ,,1 : :7 1, '!.i, 860
Total net value.......................... 11,'.*J7, .;:,; 13,647,969 7,945, 175 8,720, 92

Movement of Treasure.
The mnovemeinnt of trea iiure is not included in the _-,,'nern trade
returns. The imports of treasure, expressed in gold. \\-vr about the
same for the two years, na e.ly, $1.231,453 and $1.2 ,7. for 1916
and 1917, respectively. The foreign imports for both years vi.-ere
principally in gold bullion and silver coins from ILi'nkoig and
Macao, 60 per cent of the 1917 import being in gold. Nati\e im-
ports were in Chinese coins and chiefly from Anioy and Slihanighai.
In exports there was a reduction from 3, 113,6 12 in 1916 to 63,178,516
in 1917. Exports in silver coin were chiefly to IHongkrong, foreign,
and to Amoy and Shanghai, Chinese. The excessq of exports over
imports decreased from 'n ,1'l,159 in 1916 to 81 ,914,727 in 1917.








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Figure., for the movemIent, of treasure in 1916> and 1917 are given
in the followinL' table:
Items. 1916 1917

Imports:
From ri-, .i. countries................................................... 520,951 Sf69, 891
From Ii, o. l .- ports........................................ ....... ....... 710, .4,2 563, 898
Total Imports ....................................................... .... 1,231,4.5& 1,233,789
E: p.rrt
To f..L i.n countries................................ ...................... 2,071,192 947,240
Tol I ,'iiur :-ports............... ............................................. 1,342,42 2,231,270
Total exports ............................................................ ,413, 612 3,17S,516

Foreign Imports-Cotton Goods.
The large incrcas.e in 1917 of foreign imports as compared with
1916 appears in terins of silver as a decrease. These values are not
entirely dependable on account of the general ri.s in prices at the
-ources of production during the year. Attention will, therefore,
be directed to quantities rather than values.
Compared with the whole foreign import trade, cotton goods rep-
resented 32 and 34 per cent of the total in 19.16 and 1917, respectively.
Yarn, shirtings, dyed cot tons, and thread on spools are the most im-
portant, items.
In spite of the greatly restricted trade in the :ltumrn, owing to the
political disturbances and the con-equent fallin.u off of the upcountry
demand, the piece goods merchants generally had a profitable year,
as there was a steady rise in prices. There was little or no indenting
and, generally speaking, the deal-rs bought in small quantities. The
buyers indulging in speculation during July and August lost money.
But for high silver exchange, piee goods at. present high prices
would be beyond the pilrch:-asing power of the average Chinese. The
difficulties of obtaining stocks from Great Britain, the country fur-
nishing the bulk of the trade, increased during the year. Japan's
share of this trade increased cioniiderably, owing to lhe absence. of
war restrictions and the fav.ii,;all' conditions under which her trade
was carried on. American cotton good-, are inot found in this market.
Shirtings and Japanese Goods.
Shirtings, both gray and white, decreased in quantity between 40
and 50 per cent. the loss being 45,274 and C:/."! pieces, respectively.
With the exception of about 2.0)00 Japanese pieces of each description
the import was British. Time bulk of the shirtings was in the 9 to 11
pound weights. Dyed cottons, next in importance, depreciated from
79,117 to 5r0,44 pi.ccv or more than 35 per cent. This description
includes italians, h.st in ~, venetians, and poplins; as shown by the
import table, the plain, colored articles, have the largest. demand.
The-lc, are :ils(, British products.
A mr!inli,.' of goods of minor importance. Irgely of Japanese
origin. enjoyed an adv:!-.' as yarn-:lyed cotton cloth, Japanese
crepe, flanneleti- ii t. plain i'if, print. Japanese cloth, a hand-
i ,.:iL- l': if. of n:.tl v cloth, dropped fironli 4-1,31S to 126.092
yards. Crimps and crpons increased from 90.-._.i, to 201,890 yards,
o\. iL' to i~r-1'i.' l ;: polarity. Tiie Ia':dkr'clif import, which de-
cliie.1 by 919 !: included a1",',t J-,000 dozen of Japanese mianu-




1



CHINA-SWATO W, 7'

facture. Towels dropped from 47,204 to 19.29!0 dozen. Of 1:st
year's import 4,:~30 dozen were Japanese. T cloths are chiefly
British, the J:apanese share, however, amnounti'ng to more than 2,700
pieces. Velvets and velveteens, principally Engli-h, showed a de-
crea-e of more than 13,00() yards, or 30 per cent.
Cotton Thread and Yarn-Dyes, Paints, Etc.
Thread on spoo:ls. both English and Japanl:e,. lightly increa-:d,
while thread in balls. principally a Japanese product, drn.at.d by
50 per cent. Tlread is largely used in the drawn-work industry and
in the growing filet-lace industry.
The most. important single item of import is cotton yarn, which
decreased by about 15 per cent, or from 13,667,600 pounds in 1916 to
11,(640(,.3'3 poluLnds in 1917, while its v alni, shows an increase of more
than 80 per cent, or from $1,890,021 in 1916 to $3,444,036 in 1917.
The figures for the prilnipal yarns are as follows: Indian yarn, 12,-
118,S00 pounds in 1916 and 8,:';,:,20 poii:und in 1917; Japa111-e yarn,
1,431,720 pounds in 1916 and 3,13,3"'0 pounds in 1917. While Indian
yarn suffered a deerea-e of 30 per cent, Japanese yarn increased by
120 per cent and was exceeded only by the 1914 import. Present
prospects would indicate an increased Japanese import during the
current year. English and o-,ngkong yarns reached this market in
very small quantities. The bulk of the yarn trade wa~. in the low
counts for the weaving industry, a very small amount being needl1i.
for the knitting industry.
Impnorts of dyes dropped from a value of $122,768 in 1916 to ',,-
570 in 1917. In 1914 the principal dye imports were in aniline and
synthetic indigo, but neither of these products was brought to this
market in 1917. This is undoubtedly an opportune time to introduce
these dyes from the United Sites. Paint and paint oil, placed under
this heading, are supplied through Hongkong, Britilh :adil American
paints pred:ominating. In flonr there was an increase from 266,400
to 4,920,,268 pounds, a new s.-uirce of supply having developed in
Japan. War conditions have driven American flour from this field,
where formerly it was supreme, and now the trade is divided between
the Ja pa nese and: Chinese, the latter's share being shown under native
imports. The ginseng import decreased from 25,748 to 16,532 pounds.
The demand was not strong, owing to poor harve-ts, and prices went
down, except that of Am eriran wild. This import is largely Ainir-
ican. Japanese and Korean ginsengs are also repr .enited.
Metals and Manufactures-Kerosene Oil.
The total metal import for the past two years was valued at 9rr4,-
512 (1,128,229 taels) and $1,083,923 (1,0'2,6;70 taels), respectively,
the quantities, however, indicating a considerable reduction in last
year's trade. In tin in slabs, which accounted for 75 per cent of the
total, there was an increase of nearly 200,000 pounds. This product
comes from Yunnan via IIongkong and is used in making tin foil and
in the manufacture of pewter ware. Tinned plate, used by the oil
companies and canneries, fell off by almost 2,000,000 pounds, owing
to the absence of available supplies. In iron and mild steel bars, nail
rods, nails and rivets, and plate cuttings decreases are shown, while
cobbles and shorts and sheets and plates slightly increased. All other
articles except manufactured tin declined. The market for these







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


products iL, largely supplied through Hongkong importers, and dur-
ing the year Ameri,'an products were imported in larger quantities.
Althloilglh the inipt)it of kerosene oil increased by 675,000 gallons,
it w.q wvell lt'lw til. a) '.rage of a few years ago. The supplies were
dr:ai \\ frIlrn the follow, ing countries: United States, 2,997,102 gallons,
vahlc-d at ."-'.'.i1;0; B13r'no, 193,033 gallons, valued at, $32,243; Su-
nmai h..!;: .. lions, valued at $544,187; and Japan, 312,390 gal-
lon. valued a:t s.i,:>'92; making a total of 5,772,094 gallons, valued at
$1.:2n,1:.2. Each counntry shared in the increase. The import during
tli \u ;r apprnxiiu;ted deliveries to the market.
The 1i luminption of kerosone oil was nearly normal up to July but
later .ifcrcd from unfavorille conditions. The year as a whole
(.'nipared favorably with 1916. Prices advanced from 927 cents in
Uiti'cl States currency per gallon for first-grade case oil and 22 cents
prr gallon for oil in bulk to 341 and 27 cents per gallon, respectively.
The local market is supplied by two American importers, one Brit-
i-li, and several Japanese.
Sugar Imports Decreased-Woolen Goods.
SiiI(ports of sugar decreased from 9,696,401 pounds in 1916 to
8.'21-'7.-t pounds in 1917. A decrease of 2,500,000 pounds in refined
sU;iV' took place, and white sugar gained 1,000,000 pounds. As white
su.:'Ir is mixed with native brown for some. markets the increased
export of the native article explains this rise. The reduction in the
total imports is attributed to the absorption by the local market of
a greaer portion of native sugar of the 1916 crop. Java sugars from
HI-Igkongg refineries and Formosan sugars supply the market, the
latter's share for 1917 being 479,200 pounds of white and 1,523,600
Iu(nds of refined. The import of Formosan sugars is increasing.
Although the value of the woolen goods import increased from
$;2,:0t1 in 1916 to $82,859 in 1917. the quantities showed a decrease.
The principal item was yarns and cords, which accounted for 73 per
cenlt of the total import. There were smaller imports of yarns and
cords, Spanish stripes, and coatings and suitings. while blankets and
rugs and long ells showed increases of minor importance. Under
normal conditions imports of woolen goods are not important..
Other Important Imports.
Rice imports from foreign countries, principally French Indo-
China and Siam, and native ports (shown under native imports) de-
crease'l, owing to the excellent local summer crop and the regulation
of the trade according to requirements by the rice guild. In ciga-
rettes there was a promising advance. Clothing imports decreased by
more than 50 per cent, as locally-made ribbed underwear is success-
fully competing with the cheaper imported Japanese and British
articles. Decreased tonnage reduced the coal supply which resulted
in increased prices. This import, more than half of which was dust
coal, was supplied by French Indo-China (Hongay) and Japan.
About half of the fishery products, principally cuttlefish, is imported
from Taiwan. This large import shows that the near-by coast fish-
eries are entirely inadequate to supply local demands. The hosiery
.import dropped by 14,000 dozen pairs, for which increased prices
were largely responsible. Hongkong and Japanese products pre-
dominated. Leather imports, chiefly cheap sole leather from Hong-










CHINA-SWATOW.


kong and the Straits Settlmeints, fell off con-ildirably in 1917.
Matches from Japan dropped about 60 per Icint. for hliich over-
stocking in 1916 was partly responsible. Mehlicines were a glrwilng
import, in which Japle-:e dru-. obtained an inr'roa-in'g hliare.
American drugs were repre-.nt'd. A 111:rked1 ic re.e ncuiTred in
spirits of wine, which is supplied from Taiwan. This pr-nd et. is
used largely in making saiiislu.
The value of imported goods sent inland under rinsift. pa-s in-
creased from $250,(j84 in 1916 to '3;3.767 in 1917, and the nimli~ r
of passes issued increased from '0i91 to 1,*.'0. The bulk of this trade
is in kerosene, oil and Japanrese matches for south Fukien.
Principal Foreign Goods Impoited.
The following table shows the principal imports of foreign god-
through Maritime Customs for 1916 and 1917:

1916 1917
Artickls.
Quairitit. Value. Qnutity. Value.

Animeed, star ............................. polund.. 24,133 $2,868 42,532 ,., i,
Arms and ammmniliou ....................... ............. 8,031 .............491
Bags............................................. i:. 2, 1..5, 02 41'. ~117 2,899,199 100,738
Bean, pea., etc............................. I ir: 7 Iu) 1,426 422,400 9,775
Bedlstcrtd, iron ............................... -' 418 5,190 163 2,914
B6rhe di mer...............................r. ir"11,1. 389,067 97.159 326,400 98, 88
Birds' u:t ...................................do.... 2,300 ...i4 2,512 11,
Bircui t ...... ................... ..... .... ..-- ............. 3,072 ............. i 1,:I
Book .................... ............. .. .. ........ ........ .. 7,631 ............ I
Bottle. eniprl-y ................................................. 16,361 ........... 16,751
Braid, llama ................................ -i I .. 1,332 1,559 1,332 2,193
Buttons, brass and fajn'y ..................... :r 45,843 7,525 ??.012 6,025
Candles................................P... pr.: 49.400 4,904 11., ti 13,360
Cardamon ...................................do.... 21,467 ",11 1 ,,_'-M 6,189
Casks, empty.................................................. n, 7 I .. 5,612
Cement................................... tons. 991 13,795 1,175 20,309
Cereals:
Rire and paddy.......................... f..d 20,405 74.3,3 7.3 15, 679,897
Other............ ..................... o .d 216 37,47C6 169 34,145
Chemical products n. e. s................................................. 13,413 ............. 7,481
China-ware..................................... .............. 10,475 ............. IT .,7
Cigarpete ................................ ttuuanr].. 42, oti 110,304 52. l).'.-
Cigar'~ ............ ............. .... ... .. .. 1,I,);i 25,048 2', 13 ,., 119
Cinnam on................... ............. fpo.-u 1.. 9,333 5,830 <, 411 6,019
Clocks and watched ..........................pl c es. 9,649 15,1.11 8,810 15,461
Clothing, liats et....................................... ..... .. .. '.",.) ............ 92, 08
CIove. and spice ......................... pcn s.. 1 00 2,424 22,688 3,033
Coal......................................... 56,106 328,264 42,550 519,947
Confe.'tionery...................... .. ............... 1,955 ............ 4,055
Cotton gocds:
Blanket;... ............................ i. 9,609 7, 97 10,637 10,716
Cambries, lawn?, and muslin..............d.. ... 4,286 ,. 2, 12,416
Cloth. 3apane............................. yards. 461,348 32,780 1-.,io2 11,841
(loth. varn-dred.............................. 179,57 21,469 .2, 61 46,465
Cr"i r' Iapane.se......................... .do .. 4,515 346 21,S,1 3,042
Crimps and crepons........................do... 90,. 10,284 201, M) 37,067
Drills ..................................... pilCS .. 547 2,265 1,415 7,060
Dved cottons-
Plain...................................d... 57,981 365,009 37, CS7 296,222
Finrod .............................. do.. 21,136 122,136 13,155 ll.1, ".;1
Flannelct res:
Plain, dyed or rinted.................do 7,729 27,727 9,340 47,886
Yarn, dyed ........................ 22. 1-; 3,.423 102,964 32,713
ITandkerchiefs........................... ..n...n. 27,092 8,658 26,173 12,746
Jec ....................................... 1 es.. 16,749 *.. 6,593 37,964
Lenos and bal-r"rines, wht.., -.,i' .r |i!', I, -
piec i ................................... ?.. .7'I .,r,2 1,804 5,389
Plain 'otton printl .................... pipee ',:-- 14-2 11, 7 15', 4
Sheertings............................. .......................... 1, 73
Sitrt ings --
Grav, plain ........................... ',. I. 276, 132 49,882 184,610
hite, rplain............... ........ ..;. l1i ,'i, 55, 84 77, 189 405,484
While. figured ....................... .... I ... :r 3, 64 20,273
Dyed, plain......................... ... 7 '. 1 9.W 9,800
Tcloths-
32nche............. ...............l .... 9,612 I'. 6,746 18,671
36 inches ...........................do.... 2,711 7,. '.. 2,298 8,095










10 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


1916 1917
Ar' i 3.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


Cottll I .t I'- I1 'I.
J !,I. ,.d
In .i .......................... pounds.. In.73 6,112 5,332 $4,236
On( ols............................ c r., 29.012 0,927 32,827 128,924
Turkey-red cottons and iJ'.ed r T clol hs... rr v.. 12.'27 24.261 9.107 30.604
Towels .......... .. ................. dI,,' enT .I ', 21 16. 076 19 299 8,221
Vel-ets and velveteens ...................r .I. 3x, 379 1l.hSI 26. 05 12,615
Y arns .................. ..... ...... pir -. 1 ,,,7. (000 'I ,4). 21 ll.,if., 536 3,444,035
Yarns,, 1. d, or mercerized.........do.... 12,t .I. 47, 196 99,86,3 47,221
Oilier cotton .,.. .... ......................... .. ..... 1 9 ........... .. 19 53995,725
.ii. i raw............................... pounds.. 11.067 1, 10 12,261 1,633
S, bed and table........................................... 5,155 ............. 4, 12
a ,,, ,, and. ,. l...ll.i,',i ware...................... .............. 4,301 ............. 6,019
)ye l 'r-, .i ii .
.i ...... ................................. ............ 6,002 ............ .........
I. i.. in mgrove....................... pounds. 1. 281., 2: 16,702 901 48 1 12,618
I'I i .' .................................do.... 1, 2,150 2,932 4,033
Sapan wood............................ d...do 289,333 8,287 197,468 4,311
\ermilion................................do... 10,800 12,922 16,268 10,741
Paints mnd paint oil...................... do.... 158,133 13,115 215,868 2., 4.0
Othier.................................... do.... 1,776,533 76,705 1,661,868 5;. .17
Electrical materials and fittings................................. 28,850 ............. 40, .45
Enameled ware...................................... ............. 13,913 ............. 14.732
Fans. pal -leaf............. ............ 1 I .,'00 931 1,212,000 9 149
Fish and fishery products................ n11, i 10 -, t.7 7-4;. :72 10.198. 000 72, 52i
Flour............................ ....... do.... 2l', I, 0 27_6 4, 92i 2r.3 1l. S, 20 i
Fruit, fresh and dried .......................do..... 2'%2 34 9,722 99,064 3,903
! i I lu*i .,Illi ii t,ir 11" l i .ii :" .... .......... ... ........, 52, 20 ............. 49,104
S .. *i. l, .n ilitrl.J, ti ............. gallons.. 3,210 1 T 5 6 3,6 3,389
i. -. ........... .. ... ............. ..i. ounds.. 2 .., 1; 245'. 11 16, 532 255, 2:i,i
li .. I I.. ........ ... ...... ......... boxes.. 2,'. 17, 1 1,819 14,
.1 L, .:l. *,.,:il ........... ... .. ....... .. ........ .......... ............. 7,93 1
c lue......................................pounds.. 20i.i 27,723 22 ., 600 42,571
Groundnuts......................... .......1.... .. -67 4 651 5,174.132 163, i2
ums anr d wax ...............................do.. 41.u 3. 2 11 3S, 400 5, 232
H aberdashery........................................ ... .. ..... I 7 ........... 9,639
Hlemp....................................pounds.. 7,, 0lti 119. 175 531, '12 95,190
Horns, deer.................................. do.... ', 1.3 20, ll 2 800 10.730
Hicsiery................................ dozen pairs.. 102, 9)74 t;6, .7 S8, J94 118, 1 ,9
Instrunmnts, musical ............ .............................. ,. ')5 ............. 4. 00
Instruments and -lq., ar ij,, medical, etc......................... 9 ........... 5, 5
Isinglass................................... pounds.. 26,000 724 32, 132 13,811
Lamps and lampware .................................. ... 4.149 ............. 53, 275
Leather............................. .....I.. .. 411,0 u0 li S,443 243, G'i 112, 58
Leather manufactures (not including iai n-, i I .'. .............. 93 ......... 7,769
Liquid fuel................................... i, lus.. 3 i1, 02 330 4, I.J
T..... i i -In.* "mw nd mirrors ...................... ........... 1 719 ............. 12. 7
'.1, I ., II t1-iit. Ii ..1 ................. pounds.. 37,000 2.2S7 112,668 10, 7-
Machinery, textile industry.......................... .............. 1l. 9 ............ 167
Mainery, other, and I ................ .. 1.,7t ............. 9,710
: .!. hlii sewing and .ilil tin ...... ............. ..... ........ 21,'115 ............. 9,12.
M ..i.. ....................................oiin-h.. 1,298,533 2 ,;t03 2,519,.332 42,.593
Sil, ~r, !iese ............. ............. L-r. 1,603,604 5 ",,016 6 .t, 7,0 312,571
:i0 I i .. I. or preserved..... .............. ............ i, l; ........... 600.056
l .............. ....................................... 222,689 ............. 251,105
Metal and manufactures:
Brass and yellow mu tals--l.'ars, sheets, wires,
etc .................................pounds. 39,733 12,121 35,732 12,011
Iron and mild steel, new-
IBars...................................do.... 7.2 i0 26,823 381,332 21,384
Cobbles and shorts..................do.... 254,000 68938 441.372 16, .g8
Nailrods.............................do.. 192, 533 6 458 73,46S 3,92
Nails and rivets...................... do.... 1, i2'0, ..3 61.004 64,; 000 37,012
I' i .i......... ........................do.. 9 0i0 25, 5.l4 f.21, 268 2%, 02L
Sheets and plates ...................do.... 201467 9,175 204, Oo 10, 69
Wire.......... .................... do... 8 7 3,713 152,268 S, R5
Iron and mild steel, oI1 ................... do.... 1, 10, J00 30, 101 1,072,26S 19,2Ai
Iron, galvanized-
.-I t ................................do... 10,133 856 7,468 S29
Wire.................................do.... 9. 467 5, 834 54,800 4, 331
I.'- i'1. in pigs or bars..................... o.... 11. 67 14, :371 96, 66S 10,210
; .... ........d. 2 1.3 4,414 2,132 3,hO2
-1 I.inli o,,, bars, hoops, et............. d. ... .. 5',uJ 3 3.779 45,932 6,769
ii, 'I '. ............................. do.... 1,55f, 0l 539.502 1,711,06S 803,569
'Iin, ii, Uiil n turned (not including rinDfjil I.du.... ,3,933 623 36,932 3,605
Tinned plates .......... ............do.... 2, s,J33 166,702 704,268 82,654
Other metals and manufactures .................. ............. ,, 514 0528
Milk, condensed, in tins................ .....dozen.. 26,879 36, 141 21,977 36,477
Mushrooms............... ........... rIou]nd 114, p 30,342 68,532 25,036
Q I. .................................t. thousand. 2,925 3 198 4,380 4,787












CH I I NA --SWATW.


iLrties.


1916


L rl .:. I I .


KeroiCLL ............................... 5,( I,71o8
Lulbri.itil L ........................... 23,318
O p um .... ....................... ...... 1 I ... ...
P aper.................................. I,1. 1 ..
P pcr ......... ......................... do.. -
Periui iltr 1l I .. icS ............................ ............
IP:hot ogr i n i':,.. ..... ........................... .............
Pic e igo; Lh:
C'inr n..n cot l ,c n ducls ................. r.3- 72,349
'- Ll 1 . . I A l i. 439, q
.lJ. ..... ..... ..... ................. .1 u, l .. 8,I9
IrjtatIi luI i.c',l;I ....................... .ai L 579
ii l r r .. .. .................... ... .............
Prltintg jI. [ilh.,,r .p1ln materials............... .............
Railwrlvy s:..p r... ......................pieces.. 9,057
4tlaus ........ ..... .............. .ut r .!"' 133
Sal .in l;troii-r .o:j ',): .. ................................
Sandialv.uod ...... ...................... I. .933
Sei.a cdli and aiur, -. r-..........................i 678,(i7
Sced .... ............. ............... ......do.. 425, 807
Ships and 1:o.s ..... .............................................
Shoes andl bot i \ '.,i r r.....................pairs.. 2,941
Soup~i, Ji l nltI,.tal.- lor making................................
Sod .. ................ .................... pounds 1. '
Spirits ol .i .............. ................ 11. ,, .. !. i
Elarch....................................ponds.. 18,000
Station'ry. .............................. .. ..........
Stlorr ho-.l. hul.l............................. ....................
Sugar:
Bro-n ...... ........... .............. ... ..l :. ..
h l; ..................................... .. .. 3,7
Riein: C3r11y. ... ............................. do.- .. 4.7
T ao ........ ........... .... ....... ....... .... ',,,
Tcle graplh .i n ..i.r ,j.............................. .........
Tinmb.r, 1i.iidaivo.*........................ul,'. feet,. 1n, r?
To incu. .. .............................poimds.. IA.', 4--U
Tolaerp ni [.' .upphi................................ ....... .....
Toiii rI ulll .i ............................. ....................
Tool4, !ajiil .......................................... .............
Toys anl ~.;ur .................................... .............
Trunks ua n .iiI.i-'* S...................................................
U m brells. .... ................ ........... .. 12, ,''
Varn ............ .............. ..lou .. i 19,., 0.
Vegetablr-s, drirel a tin Iri..~.h ........ ......... ... 9., 4110
Vahic lts.. ................. ........... ............ ..........
Water., ;,Tr:ilte.l lud irnlci>l ...................... ............
Was, parali .... ..................... .f ,.. i,7
Wines and pi rnt.:
Beer ..ii porter ...........................................
piri ........................................... ......... .........
W inrs............................................ .............
'Woj'I n. ..................................................
Wroo0I t ar ............. ............... ... ....... ..........
Woolin goods:
Blankets and ruF' ...................... riunl-S 3, 3i
Camlets and tlrmting.................. .pir?... ]11
'oat inLs Did suiua. L ..................... ar .1.. 13,652
Lon ell.. ....... ...................... re(s. 873
Spanish sri pes.......................... .ard-. .,
Yarns and cords........................ il:uins... 31, 7,
O their ................... .............. ............
Woolen and -coton aliuL .................... ...................
Postal parcels v. s ............................... .............
Al other article.................... ................... ........

Total................. ... .. ......... ........
Exso ss ol reetports over 1muplrts ............... .........

Ne: iots ........................ .... ... .... .


S1 .2' '1, .
I '.. .'.*
1 1,11lh,,..1


Native Imports.

A decline of nearly :!.r(ll.r( fi,.ns o,. i ridll in imports of n.i1tive 1':11n
cake, v.whihl i'. the frtilii:vr used for n ,iar cane. The red','d nar-
ket prices of :-IIL';'Ir aIffc't',dl the demand. Al kinds ,,' C(2iiii,- cot-
ton goods decrealel rx'wept yarn. This import i:- -till relatively ii ini1-


lf'1 7


I I.


'."




1,132
21. ,1

9', 59
32,009
2, 9C0
20,881
S" '*. -


6,1253










-IL
34, 673

12,857
9~1
12,10

;.,0Si

1,189


1 '!."



,. II
" '., i
. I .




16, 402



9,857
1. '.26
2 *.-i



-Il
14 I

11,',
2;. 'M.

11r. ^,14 1


'3 ,-: mi t
1?, .-0a






2,5
3S4,5 2
153, 7;2








407,732
17,H4




6S0, 9:12





5, 019
31S, 20S








3.......6is
281,332",
552,626
54,400




ST. ',



7,1i5"
407,732



ii;..........






1-----------
1 "' U .2


301,6CF8







5,095


641
20O
29,333





.. ..........


I1



6, 738
29,920
2,354








;- 7'1











1, 742
1.488
1. ,,i



















14,310
43,496
:'4. '.















5, 1I C





q 761
q, "i4










1,742
60,488


















]", 14
..,MT









5-. `77
7,4,.23

14,310




5,983


9,7G1
747
60,853
.1,.'il4
2-'7 5
21. *J.il


4 i.-0,65

1 1 ," 1,111









12 SUPPLERIENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

portent. Ranmie fiber, used in the manufacture of grand cloth, is im-
portl'd from Hainklw. Shanglhlni flour imports decrep-iied by
I1Il,0Ill.(1(0( pllunds but still were 4 pier cent of the total flour im-
1';rt.l Native Lgr'l''llllilll iml)porlts declrenl-7se(d by 3.0010.0100 pounds but
thl-e from foricin countries advanced by nearly 5,)000.000 pounds,
the net g-in 1,iiin attributed to better iprieev for the oil and to
greater i''-;iii. d for lighting purposH' owing to increased cost of
1Jt0', -ile. A il irk.1' iiicrea,.e OccullTrd iln .an51sliti, t hI native wine.
Native Import Statistics.
'The foll,,ivingi table shows thi prilnipal imports of native goods
t1ll'oiilii the MAii iti ll Cu0t-oi-ns for the yuars 191<6 and 1917:

19!6 19!7
Articles.


III

I .. ... .......................... ...... ..I. ... n-,r, l 7, 2,'.-., L.70 J If., 11 7 7, 1 S, 654
\\ I. a ..................................... ,o .. 1,2 :' 2' 7 31 31,917
Ci, [ .................................... P. i': I s 7., d :3 ,. 1 ] .',SOU 6-1,921
4'. I .... ................................... I'.i, 'J 1: 1J S 1 u25 13S,924
( .. r.,:I ''. ... ............ ... rpi c In, .91 20,"12 1,o02 4,041
I ,I' .i .. .. ... .................... .u, 42 ~, 3 1..I:,, "2, 129,0 S7
'.' in r .i .. ... .................. ..I l I 51 2l4 9,0'I 37,973
Ii .. ,: ... .............. ... .. 'I 11 1, 1 12 1 i
Y .....................................v n i 20:i, 1 4 77r -111 0u0 121, 618
Co' i A, ......... ...... ......... .... ...... ....... .. 1, ; i, 9t ',4 ; ..:' ,7JJ 17u, 3'0
Fi .. r -
If, -I .. ............................... 63,;, 1.33 21,210 1 .02, 000 135,147
Hi nir'.i.. ... ..... ........... ...... .............. J 7, fl ', "7 F2.;2 72" .,, 1 ,,7 7.1), 490
S J Jl ... .. .............................. .. 4,,, 2 9.I, .
Fi.'. : ,Ji\ r: s .............................. .... 4,5.3, 0*," 1 1,"',' ^3 1, ,'tu, i'.00 249,403
.. .r, r ................................... .. 36, 1 1,.17 9O .. 17-, 21i, :?' r, 'filil 805I ,605
Ci ii. 1............ .. ................. .......I 2 ', .. ., 12 2 17 3.' 177
M (I. I'. i ..... ........ ......... .. ... Io ... 2 ., .. 329, 0-6
< ( .L ... .r ...... ............. ............. ................... 3 11, 141, ..... 3i3 9, S3
,'I. *.i-iiiini i a ....... .......................poim.k.. (.1" 261 f);- I 2, 13 iWa
Sa Ii l a .... ............................. .... .)1... 4 t.il' lil., 1. 1'. 1 1 .. 7 9lis, 151
,' 1! p.n "ur,.Jr ............................ ..... d. .. 1 ,l'. 7 ti',7, 3 10116,1i00 i, 0'-29
Te .
il .: ......................................... .. 1, 100 i^2i0.; 1,177,167 300,833
'T n .................. ................... ... ... .; 1 I 'l 1,01
T O ,r .., f .. ...................... ... i. 3, 1.i,, ill 172,. 1-,l ,. I 000 210, 466
V ] .u.: Il i i I ni.. ir.. n.... ........................ .. 3.24,2137 2% ,..1 .1 WrL ,4p0 222,108
V[nI hl.ii'. Ill :iu IijI.r".. iii ............... ..
Exports from Swatow through Maritime Customs.
Tlhe to(t:l exports from Swa\tow were valued fit $15,.070,10:, of
ii'hi'*l k ,7"T'Il.'_.s was sent to foreign countries (including Hongkong)
and s.',:;1,174 to native ports. The items of export are for the most
part ('ilir ic-e fl,')d products anil h1lionsehold articles and other articles
of C'lhino.s lse. Outside of China they were marketed principally in
Siall, the Straits Settlements, and Dutch Ilndies, where there are
largee (C'lhin(-es c, onluinities. Direct steamship connection with those
countries facilitates this trade.
Oil pages 1i: an 1 4 :re given the principal articles exportoid (not
including icexplorts) from Swatow through the Maritime Customs
during tlhe Lpa:t two year :











CHINA.-SWATOW.


Articles.


19]


Qua.ntii'y.


Alum, white ............................. ..I" 'in* .. 356,000
Anima!- .1i,. pill ryv:
Pil' .................................number.. 347
S... .............. .......... .............. .. i .i ... .07
Ptamlboo .-iad i a inmi ware ....................... -....-- .----...
Beans, yellw"', e ............................pou ,'. 83, 867
lUo.:k. .................. .. ............. ..I .1- 2'
Brassw.......r.................................. do.... 22.''
Camnphr ................. ................ ...do.... 2-' ''',
Coereas: Rk'r and paid.' ......................do.... -,.. 7
China r.or ................... .................do ... 'j, 41
ChinIII .. ... ............................. ..n.. 4,759

Clothlin-., ('hir se. m !,i lul e .l .ol. .1.. J -Ilo. :........ ...... ...... .

N.inkv n ............................... p -in l. I 1,271. "
Clolh. .i. r.tr ., f ................... ...... I '
Cord-: 'e, I n !., r. m I 1.. .... ........... r. in I .. I '
Es 'r.- i.. i rhil i .Ipr 1 ............... l.'u.d .. .I I
Fa ; ..... .................................pieces.. ll l'
FepIth,.r .lii,.k :.ril ,!.thcr fowl................pounds.. 1-', 1I
Filei .. ..... ..................... .......do.... I, .' :
Firi r 'i:.k, r;.- nd Illwo-ks ......................l .... .t'., "'
Fi hel ', pI:,idu-[-
C 'l',l h .............................. ...........to s.. 5,032
ih:ti il Ih. ........ .....................pounds.. 37., n
!'l !', Il! In. .I1, Ad........................do.... I,', I I
I r ... ri jr. 1' i 1 I-ps ....................... do.... 00
i. '... ... ............................ do.... T i,600
..,, k ............................... do.... .ii .7
ilth, .. ....................................... 2-A4 ...
FiF hi 'a netic .................................... ... 377;. 1i
Flour:
I'o lu. ...................................d..do.... 6,982,933
[I ,- l n i lli i ........... ................. do.... 2 ."2. ,14
Frull. JlI 'I .mllll *. r .], n. ................... .. 5,1 3 i
Fruit Ire-h, ni.t oth. r .'. j-r I ............ 1 .... 2,3 7 R
Fi ir t i ...... ..................... ... .................. ........
c .irli ................ ...................... i..n s.. 6,303
Ging .r ................. .. ..... .. .... ..... puIl1 .. 43 '.
; lu .......................................... .. ."', '
G r;is-. r:I i hI .................... ..... .......... I. ... 77., 4i;7
Groiliidnut ;.
In "hll .................. ............... ... 1,, .... 3,035,867
Kr, n.l ......................... ......... n... 17,467
IHah, hurin ... ................... .......... ... 1 64, 933
Horn,, lidr. voIun ............................p r- .. 34
Indi;o. l.i,.id ............................... p.i.u l rl 10,776,267
.Toss st ir ; s ............... ..................... d... 2,236,000
Lard ... ........... ........... ...................... .. 93,867
Lea.rithpr....................................... do.... 62.533
Leartecr !,)(ili -................................. .. 57 7
l.on !-,hi i.l ................. ................ ... 715,067
MU i,i 1li n ii c-lun.I1n, nu li h i.g. i .................1 .. 3.3, 1
M e i io ... ........................... ....... .......... ...........
Mct,-,e and mn.E.ra!. .
Iron pans ............................... p.unC'I 2,456,800
Iron,.. re .................................. ...... 80,400
\rol rInre.mt ie .......................... .. .1,200
tihr ..................................do.... 119, 200
Oil, gruindnii ................. ................. .do.... 4, 35, 5133
Olives, fresh and sale ......................... d-.... 1,314,2.7
Orana es, fr:-' ........... .....................do.... 2G,02.i .)
Pape-r-
First quality ...............................do.... 5, 41t.,i-.7
Second (|uili(y. ........................... do... .f, 0S-1 ..7
Jois ................................... 7,111,333
I)tha er ..................... ... ......... .. c. l .... .1,2.,7,
Pears. frch ............................... ..... ... 317,3.
Persi mmons, dried ............................ Iv .... 1,,93 067
P otash ........................................ n 1,1,, r".;
Potatoes................... .............. .. do.... 1,021,, i
Potltery and ea.lrlhtlnw'.ir ...................... un .. 9. ''1
Rerin .................. .... .......... ...... i'1 d .( ',19 7
Salmn hu ...................................... o ..... 3. y99 i.
Sam shu, m edicated.......................... ...... l,. -, ,.
Seeds:
Rape ......................................d..... (G03 .733
Sesam um ................................... d>.... ? 7213
Other..................................... d .... 133


1


6





J.",..
0.. 1.5
2. 1iI
88,757
156,817

13.415


10,780
6,322
'.' 137
1, 85
196,668

434,777
.1 72
1 -'. 7



1.J.. 11
I. 2A




57,059
54, 582
15,732
1.401
31, 12I
6,308
129,350

161,095
60,078
278,339
24,456
1,469
3`2 '14
.S,l. 271;
1 1,i4
1, .3 ." -1 1

5?2,73

14,170
2,580
518,156
102, 780
:. 878
0). 454
27,645
36,392
6,134
S.I, 045

21,854
58, 256
22
5,867
302. 713
41,376
4. :, 1M.

605, 027
435, 923
1, IJ.680
1,808
7, 929
,I:', -;'J


i,.



35, 001
I2' -.0:)
,,; 2 ?"


Ba
13


1917


Quant ity. Value.


I' ". $22,666

197 2,465
4,913 .* 728
1,S.39,56 I' 1..752

', S 2, 0131
1 533 7, 457
16i.Oi) 7, r5sl
S, 1,138
463, 733 1 -'I
5,500
2. I'. 1.'

............ .i_ ..,


8n" 7M't. Ai 4(Y)
S 1 :-17

1.'12' -t, 4-, .'
:4 : rl' 824



7,175 100,981
394,133 1 .. 722
467,200 20, 9I1
13, 200 3, 10
378,400.
.,, 1. i 1 11

384,07 165, 0S7

7,195,200 n"" 024
l. ~." .'- -'. 681
4 1, 1 .' : 22(
2,104,200 31,335
............. 01.50
5, 431 1.l44(
447,867 1 1' "7
12,933 14-1
805, 88 870, 17

2,111 ??" 72,27,
i," ; 492
37,C00 In .
27
6,712. .410 371 5',.
1,0Q:".. ',IlV) lI'I. '.77
105,0 7 1I I'*'
70,000 ', -
56,133 31 ..0
411,200 *:,. .
29,723 ,
............. 111,02(

1, 7r1, 7" 74, 15
p'., ,' l, '.0)
38,933 11,00*
9c9.133 28,451
3, ,, ;,,. 383,15;
1, 11, 73 40,07;
23,409,2001 530,941

5,642,400 791,609
5,061,(Xo7 J21,.4
7, -1 N.il 1p,, 1,".52
3,:''.', tI"J 148,40M
"!" ",T 10,91I
2 3'; ,I 95, 64
S 3,923
77' 133 9,50*
662 478,42
', 7 9,M42
4. -, .1; 194,912


'.." .-" 1,59,
v .. ./ 3,159


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SUPPLETENXT TO COMMERCE REPORT~:'


riv' 1,' -.
Quantity.


Seedcake............ ........................ t on 117
Silk i an l li ures.... ... .. ................... .. ...........
Skins and hides......-.-.-.-...-. .........' n t.11. 7j p
in .................................... ... d.. .. 11. .Li)
I. .. .............................. .d ... 3- 160.9 3
White ............ ........................ 12... I
Ilack.................................... do.... 4112.1 ll:
('hretn ............ .......................... I.... t1.. i
TIb .I I and yarn, ra 'ir...................... ..I... .
Tin fo l.............. .... ............... ... 4.
Lea .and stalk ........................... II.. .
'.,, d yarn, ra................................. ... 1 ..7
Toys ... ......... ................................. ...........
' i a .and st alk.ud d i ...... ............. .... ji v, "
,,,mbrelLas, paper.............................[.I I'. III
V garnish ....................................pi..l l .. 111 ..'
'". i > I saltcd aud d ,, ................. ... I .. 2.i.,
'mbrli, paper.................................. .i. re... ..", .


Yeast. ...................................... poiilI ". 41' i
Postal parcels, n. e. s..............................................
All other articles ........................... ... .............
I ....... ...... ...................... ... ...... ... .......

Articles Exported through Native Customs.


In the follow iniZ t:llle is s-liiwn tile (iiantit. of thl principal
articles exporteld fn'riii S\\atow\ tll'o)gh'li tie nliati\e cll.tois1I in 1916
and 1917:


Alll .......... i'.. i.>
C i i i '.- i' . I "ILI '_ i
F .r ]n p ..... .. rI. ,- .. 1' 1 -.
Fil. jute....... pj'..nliJ '.'', ",.7
Flour, potato........ ..-... I .,.. .
Groundnuts.......... .' .. I ..... .
nl i ',. l l, d ........ J. *
Na. u eens..............pur 1 4. '.j
Nankeens ............ p,,r,, 15. u-3


I'.I, 4'"'
I 1. 11


'1 II
$i, I.


Arti l, i.


1 I, .t ,,n l.t ...p nlin,] ..
-,l ., i. .m i l i i .. O .
I'Pot l 1iand fi i.Lu ire,
t il ......... ....... .......
Sh -...... .. ... p ir-, .
TinibI 'r, rl n'-':, It .r,,i
riii, I ,7 .. .... e.
NVt,, ....... .. [,;ec.


Chief Products Shipped to Foreign Countries.

Tin- follow ing were the principal piodinits sent to foreign coun-
tries: Naiikeen's. 4-2i0,l)00 pounds; feathers, II 11,iIII), poulllnds ; grass cloth,
244,000 pound; indigo, 1.s 1,00) )0 pounds :oranges, llS- ;,18tl 1)pounds,
as cn iariip red with 1:>,.1-4.1)533 poliinlds in 19i1;; about one-half of the
joss paper export, and tlie great lhulk of the exports of banmboo wnre,
4lIin;,ware, clothing efPi. jite, fireerac.kers. cuttlefish. and sea blub-
ber, fishing nets, dried fruits, garlli. groundnuts and oil. human hair,
joss stick iron pan-., paper. pot t'er, skins and hides, ramie thread,
samsliii, tin foil. and prepared tobacco. Among the products that are
reexported fromI Hongkong to western countries are feathers, jute,
human hair, lgroiundnult oil, and hides.
A con-id-er:,lile reduction was recorded in coarse chinaware, which
consists chiefly of lChine-se eating utensils. The export of nankeens,
eggs, and featliers al.o diiiniisheld. The manufacture of grass cloth
from imported ramie hI er and also from jute and pineapple fiber
is an iinportant industry. Although this product was exported in


fRi


1910 1917


l417


92,400
301, 400
761
17, 02
10, .12
41,304


64, 01111i
24.4, YF7

29, 106
11, ,51
0u, 150


I


Value. Quantity. Value.

S-I4,051 120 $,5-261
2,. 749 ............. 7,341
12, 7903 KW. 00 88, 341
Ilu 42u, 933 6,461
1,3S3, 511 .5,;2-7, 4i.7 2,037,096
391. 2'7 11,., 792, iJ0 8 11,406
.*, ':,22 393, )00 106,299
.2j4 ., 1, 30..l
2 l',t'. 1, iJo'. 201) 247,414
2.., lR,11 4i6, j 1i.7 296,960
1 '1.:. 2'<7.467 4,437
S ,i. 3,543,.333 9i)2,60 '
-. '-. ........ ..... t,,474
,..,,- .1 772 6 0'82
.;i i1. 2: .,a.2 36,269
-"2 (5,.3 9,0 1
lil I.l-' 12. i.13- 11 ,%ll
.1. 1. 711 v 'I t,2.999
3" 1 2,929 50,776
4 .............I 5,52
S... .. ... .l t 61.t77
27. .. .' ........... 1i,7, 222
1,, 1 i 1 I .:.... ..... .. .09. j, 102








CHINA-SWATOW. 15

a slightly greater quantity than in 1916 its value was less, due to
the production of cheaper grade-. The export of liquid indigo de-
creased by about 4,000,000 pounds, owing to increased local require-
ments, the indigo crop being about the same as that of 191!. Exports
of groundnut oil used for cooking purposes fell ofi in quantity but
the value increased.
Principal Increases and Decreases in Exports.
Although the orange crop was an average good one the export
dropped by nearly 3,000,000 pounds and was the lowe,-t for many
years. The decrease occurred.in the trade with Siam and the Straits
Settlements and was due to unfavorable exchange andl high freight
rates. The market. was generally dull. Paper, made from bamboo,
is particularly a product of southwestern Fuiien. Pottery and
earthenware are exported chiefly in the shape of food containers.
The export of cow and buffalo hides, which is not large, was mostly
taken by Japan.
The principal export from Swatow is sugar, which advanced Iy
13,000,000 and 4.000,000 pounds in the brown and white grades, ie-
spectively. This was the largest export since 1913. The Yangtze
Valley is te largest market for thi market f ts product. Unfortunately, the
average prices were about 25 per cent lower than those of 1910, for
which the low prices at which imported sugars were sold was partly
responsible. The good tobacco crop of 1917 is shown in the export.
Some Japanese firms are engaged in the purchase and export of tlii.
product.
The principal articles of reexport to the South Seas are beans,
samshu, tea, silk goods, vegetables, and ramie fiber.
Products brought out from the interior under transit pass for
export increased in value from $211,066 in 1916 to $105,'20: in 1917
and the number of passes issued from 164 to 287. This trade is con-
fined entirely to prepared tobacco.
Shipments to United States-Foreign Population and Firms.
The total value of the articles invoiced at this consulate for the
United States was $920 in 1910 and $18,441 in 1917. The item in
the latter year were drawn work, $281; feathers, $6,004: hlouieholi
effects, $199; and wolframite, $11,356.
The number of foreign firms and individuals in this district is
reported as follows:
Firms. Pr'.-on'.
l'ati'nility. ---- ----
1 '1,: 1: 7 11; i I '11

American ............................... ......... ......... 1 1 ?2 7n
Austrian ............... ............................. ........... .. ..... ..........
B ritish................... .... .................................. I i; l.I
Danish................................. ...................... ... ..... ...... ..
D u r h ....................................................... .. ........ I
French .......................................................I.. 71
GFrmanc................................................... .
talimn............................................................. .
Japunese....... ................................................................ .
N or e ian ....................... ... .. ... ...... .... ... .. .. '...... .......... ..... 1 ....
aortuin ese ........................................ ... ......... ..... .... ...... I1 "
tusian .......... ... .. .. .............. ...... .. .. 4
Swedish..................................... ........... .... ...... .. ..
STurkwdi:sh ....................... ....................... ... .....
Totl ............................... ................. 70 '.i-' i 4 i 73







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE RI


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIl11II1ilII II11 11 11IIIt111111
3 1262 08485 1764
EPOR1L.


SThe Japanese population is mostly of the mercantile class anj
the number of firmn includes many small shops, of which there was
an increase of 15. In British firms there are included firms of Chi-
nese protected subjects. The British population includes a large
missionary eklncnint. The American population is mainly missionary.
Ti-,. ChlinAc- 1Iuptlatiun of Swatow is growing steadily.
American Imports-Transportation Facilities Needed.
Among imports in which American goods shared were all kinds
of hoiuilold .-tores, biscuits, toilet articles, toilet soaps, lamps and
i:niipware, electrical materials, window glas, and milk in tins.
During the pnat three years three small electric-lighting plants were
installed in interior cities, and without doubt further advancement
will occur in this direction. The knitting industry is capable of
ex'ian-ion, in which more American machinery should find a market.
Owing to the hopeful signs of development of the mining industry,
oppoiI unities may soon exist for the advancement of American trade
in mining machinery and tools. Besides wolfram ore, coal, iron,
tin and antimony are found in this district.
The expansion of trade and the development of the resources of
this region are greatly handicapped by the absence of modern trans-
port;atin facilities. Roads and railways are badly needed, and the
construction of both should be a matter of primary consideration.
Exe"lpt for the ricksha at Swatow, vehicles are not used in this dis-
trict, as the roads are merely footpaths. Numerous waterways, some
of which, however, become unnavigable in dry seasons, afford water
train-portation to the principal centers by means of the slow-moving
'ntive boat.
Low Cost of Imported Merchandise of Primary Importance.
In most lines of general merchandise low cost is a matter of pri-
mary importance to the China market, which is the natural outcome
of the prevailing economic standard of the people. In developing
foreign trade it is necessary to offer such goods as the people desire
iand at prices that they can afford to pay. In China, where competi-
tion after the war between the leading commercial nations will be
keener than over, close attention to market requirements and the
cuftoiis of the trade. will be prerequisites of success.


WASHINGTON: COVE


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IRNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1.U

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