Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00037
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00037

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text
















T z.'I ..A -' hef. titUt for"the products" of lAnam,
....14W:" .B ... .


o.;"a mo, s.mti ee Ja icy "..







d abroi*, the im fas naturally smaller in
li0 h t r: iinre nkaa e"d ndth e ship from
its'nded a lo price Tokil fbrn marketms purposes.
'i. r maddite difHcult tD o fnd, buyer. F:The g a

hstll oaditions in A riamt ifths according to statistics
nd t r avails. confined iian 1 able; shipping facilities,
e te, freight were abn y high, the pricepos of com-
ANve $seO abroAd, the impolu e of was naturally smaller in
f 40i 8~5h slightly a nd thatuof e main exports
'Wl naanded a low price.it he foreign market at a high
Lw -ich made itdifficult to find buyers. The gross and biet
N& still d6ntihue inferpoun t those of prewar ties.
ne'd front $1,12 140:i1 p 914 to $7v21.123 in 1915, but
t~ :: gr1916,; 1aount~ig to $811,613. Exports were
S, i.e.inc 1e1n4, $1,96 1,8 in 1915, .aled :$185,2,2 in
,. $90,5 0 in the value of imports oas itthieina vaues-
pricei o merTlandie the world over. The value of
o Z,08978: poundi5 a6nd that of exports 31,157,366
sports, 1,628,421 pounds, valued, at $323,541 ,'were
rBoPl.ad:i 8,3.75,522 pounds, valued at $488,102, from
1tbe,::6 experts, 1,285,519 pounds, valued at $7360,-
B --.Fnce and 19,871,847 pounds, valued at $1,248,-
rcemiaigely in balky products of little value
.-vandIe9lire, an as few hips call at this port,
S se. Thevalue of merchandise imported.
a tgjd o-Chins.rn mounted to $3095,181, as fol-


S *ThM valge?.J merchandise exported to the
Ie o 1,P ~o, as follows: Fros.
S13, 'and from other ports
a. &Mm& mainly arteca nut,




.... .. .. .. .....

..... .::::..:::::: ...... .... ...... ...".


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Articles. 1915 1916 Artles. 11n
Petrole ................... $100,712 $130,630 Medi nes.......... ...... 18 I I
Paper and paper goods....... 104,404 63, 4 Firerackers ...........
Cotton yarn .................. 105,74 6,80 Tea.............
t'otteries and porcelains ...... 30,48 26,845 oss sticks.................... ...

Petroleum is the largest single item received and mjasilll *:
$130,930, an increase of $30,218 over 1915. Over 50 per cent o.:i" M
sold is American. The demand is large in proportion to thti p
tion, which is accounted for by the fact that kerosene is the in pjiK
lighting the principal centers of Anam, in contrast to thea
electricity in Tonkin and Cochin China. Paper, which was
to the amount of $63,664, comes principally from China, and n~L
share is used in worship. In this connection it should be..bo
mind that at Faifo and other places there are Chinese 'sttlema s
Cotton yarn was imported to 'the amount of $62,850, priner
from India. Imports of cotton goods, which have declined ia si
years, are not given as a separate item in the customs returns. .i.i
Value of Chief Articles Exported from Anam.
The following statistics give the value of the principal exportl i
all countries from Anam in 1915 and 1916:
Articles. 1915 1916 Articles. 191 es il

Cinnamon.............. ...... 586 1751,979 Silk.................. ....... $1
Sugarm ................... 247,08 428, 580 Rattan........ 48,1
Tea.................... .. 289,073 314,212 yolk................ ,4
Hides ............. ..... 98,529 86,234 .Albumen ......-...... 0

Cinnamon, the chief product of Anam commercially is miai y i
the hands of Chinese dealers, who ship to China and Hongleag.i .I
1916, 854,206 pounds were shipped of which 144,353 poit.imd.i
large and 709,853 pounds were small bark cinnamon. The v ik IMi
estimated at $751,979, or $379,118 for the large and $872,861 Sik.
small bark cinnamon. This product is obtained from e WiatiN
northern Anam. In China especially, the large bark is apEptb0
for medicinal purposes; however, Europe still continues to 0Ws
Ceylon product in preference.
In 1916, 15,560,630 pounds of sugar were exported abrod frl
Tourane, 8,230,221 pounds to France and 7,830, 409 pounds t to 0IWgL
countries. The export to France was valued at $235,956 and that t
foreign countries at $192,624, making a total valuation of $4P28 U
Shipments to France consisted of 3,707,908 pounds of brown asi
4,520,424 pounds of white sugar; nearly all shipments to
countries were brown sugar. The 1916 harvest of cane waa
and the prices obtained were high. This industry centers
around Quang-Ngnae, in central Anam.
Tea is usually shipped to France or to other ports of
In 1916, 1,794,591 pounds were exported to the mother
gain of 25,139 pounds over 1915. It does not appear that
will decrease in the immediate future, as this tea is required:


A.Y... i :;.














". a, TO Nk.

ig, ituated at the mouth df the Red River, taps the whole of
mmierie" of Tonkidn a Piovince rich in agriculture and mineral
.'The year 1916 was particularly satisfactory from the view-
Sthe local business man, who, though selling less, received
in former years, owing to inflated prices. Production was
:ess except in a few special cases, such as the mining and
industries, which were stimulated by the European war. Fur-
t .e raising of maige and certain other agricultural products fell
kahimuim, as high freights made exportation unprofitable. What
b-- on in Tonkin at present is a readjustment by which certain
r and. products. are being eliminated in order to concentrate
duties in demand.
oi0wing statistics taken from the Indo-Chine.se Maritime
mtleBturns gi v the amount and value of imports into Tonkin
ting $910: From France and colonies, 11.033 tons and $3,958,430;
oinrforreign countries, 40,808 tons and $8.926.636: total, 51.841 tons
"ni $19,885.066. The exports were distributed as follows: To France
anQ colonies, 10,915 tons and $3,052,102; to foreign countries. 242.379
:M iM:'id $9,084,703; total, 253.294 tons and $12.136i.805.
t Aii Articles of Import Show Increase in Quantity.
The import trade in 1915 suffered heavily from the European war,
Ii l '1916 there was a general improvement in conditions. Nearly
i ll the principal commodities purchased from abroad increased in
...aity, as shown in the following table:
S. Articles. 1915 1916 Article:. 1 1916
Piin JP *: .ds. Po:n ds. Pounds.
pll ammuniton. ..... 6 ,412 1, 178,920 Iron and steol............... :..Gl,3;1 7,200,444
J.tUB.......... 4,016781 43. 2,25 .Mae nery .................. s6,.3 O 598,990
A bw ..... 258,741 322,753 Meats and game, potted..... 14,320 49,824
f Ilta, Opium.................. 75,397 : .184
,44 12,597,97SP374
----- 9U---- ------- ,44B 2,567,d98 and paper goois...... 2,542,780 2,997,374
......... 6,951,765 ,0 44 S goods................. 6 406 5 265
MSO ltr ................ 3,00,9W4 3,3,O756 Wine........................ 595,031 a t461,002
!a Gallaas.
ji-lP tretLes ~nd tobacco come front various sources. In 1910, 20,946
|I of Algerian and 41,442 pounds of Chinese tobacco found
W.lfway on the decal market. Cigarettes came mainly from Al-
h 86ii 1iS$ .9 pounds being imported. A small quantity of English
Slad Anmrir tobacco is imported from Hongkong, nnd Philippine
sBmBateh eigrs are generally in favor.
Ctton pie- e goods forms an important article of import into
STonki, most of which; comes from France.
$ the iron and steel imports, more than three-fourths, or 5,554,710
pt i come from foreign countries. These shipments formerly
i ..fo. France,, but since the European war Indo-Chinese bust-
es b use have looked to American firms located in China for iron
Sad steel products.
ii .. .. .
f :::: :. i.
ii:* ......









4 BU1JFLI5MWJN'X xU UUaMLms s rUwx ...

The demand for all kinds of machinery increases with t.r ii
nomic development of Indo-China. The 1916 imports totaled
pounds, including locomotives, tools, sewing mahinee, and
agricultural, printing, and textile machinery.
Paper and paper goods were imported to the amount of 2,9VT :
pounds in 1916, which is 454,588 pounds in excess of the premvou
year. There is always a large demand for these products in ,
as the large printing establishments are located at Hanoi, the sea
of Government of Indo-China. Almost all of the paper record
comes from France.
Important Items of Export Trade.
Below is given the quantity of the leading articles exported from.
Tonkin during 1915 and 1916:
Articles. 1915 1916 Artices. 115 MI I

Aniseed........ pounds.. 164,463 143,079 Maize.... ...tons.. 25,472 2481
Benzoin............... do.... ........... 16,755 Oil:
Cement and cement stone, Castor..........pounds.. 1,100,3 44
tons................... 38,450 48,939 Lacquer..... .. .do.. 8 5,4
Coal...................tons.. 477,396 419,110 Rice.......--......tons.. 285,12 IUl,
Coffee..............pounds.. 793,215 1,087,530 Tea...............ponds.. 1 67 i
Cotton yarn and waste..do.. 5,711,173 6,027,596 Tungsten...........tons.. 97
Fish, fresh, salted, smoked, Zino .... .... do.... 3,33,35 39,4
and preserved....pounds.. 5,488,792 3,221,802
Lacquer, stick and gum
.................pounds.. 218,035 202,162

The total exports of aniseed oil in 1916, amounting to 148,07$9
pounds, were consigned to France, as compared with 163,812 pounds
shipped to that country in 1915.
Exports of coffee to France in 1916 amounted to 1,079,598 pounds,
valued at $174,060. There were in addition 20,728 pounds shipped to
Anam and Cochin China. This increase in exports may be atl
tribute largely to the tariff imposed on foreign coffees by France, i
which permits Tonkin to compete favorably, in spite of enormous:.:
freight rates.
The amount of maize exported in 1916 was only 2,810 tons, or 22,- i
662 tons less than in 1915. Shipments to foreign countries (Hong.
kong) were slightly in excess of 1915 (2,810 tons, as against l1,$
tons in 1915); therefore, the decline was in the trade with Frane,
which fell off 93.6 per cent.
Rice is the chief article shipped abroad from Tonkin. The 191-5t
exports of rice and its derivatives amounted to 111,129 tons, value:
at $3,161,919, representing 44 per cent of the total exports of iat-i
fong in weight and 26 per cent in value. Shipments to Fraa'ee
amounted to 2,342 tons, or 18,534 tons less than in 1915. Other
including Hongkong, took 108,787 tons, which represents 45 :per 3
of the total transactions of Tonkin with foreign countries.
The increase of 35,053 pounds in the exports of tea is dui'ttuP, *
creased shipments made to France for the native Indo-Chines i:
Output of Cement and Lime-Increased Sales of Coal.
The following table gives an abstract of sales of cement. 'd
during the years 1907 to 1916, inclusive, by La Socibtb te
Portland Artificicls de 1'Indochine (a corporation with ai
2,000,000 francs), whose plant is at Haifong:













Itos~maww~l


Lime.


Cement.


.. ..a t --h .
AftnM= o~
?eaibl


I ath COMBt.


Abroad.


Lime.


Cement.


Yearly total.


II1 _________c?--


Lime.


Cement.


fbh Sn 'as Tem. Town. Tob. Tens. Tone.
.... .11,. 8,825 .......... 28,690 .......... 46,079
-.. 2 ..... 8,907 13149 .......... 27,108
-0... 0 ..... .10.00 ......... 18,000 3......... 85,000
27....122 2,589 7,603 10 27,724 2,8i6 41,539
I. 88 6 8 00 4,847 6,774 26 33,386 5,531 48,509
688 10,279 4,890 7,114 345 26,371 5,923 43,764
ol.. ... 734 6,533 4,505 8,096 32 35,488 5,271 50, 117
.... ... 506 200 3,451 12,6827 253 32608 4,210 51, 435
655 8880 2,35 21,649 7 38,450 3,266 69,979
i1 2,390 1156 2,132 14,676 .......... 4839 3,522 75,171

In 1916 the foreign and coastwise coal shipments of Tonkin
amounted to 419,110 tons. In addition, 247,306 tons were consumed
Locally and 67,057 tons for coal steamers. This brings the grand
total up to 733,473 tons, making 1916 a record coal year.
The following table given in the trade report of the Haifong
Chamber of Commerce for 1916 shows the total sales of all coal-
mining companies in Tonkin since 1907:

ears. Bri- Sifted Lump Total.
quets. coal. coal.

Tows. Tons. Ten. Tons.
1907........................................................... 84,244 89,273 147,886 221.403
1 .09.......................................................... 91,966 126,286 178,000 296,252
1....................................................... 81,684 143,893 212,085 437,662
......................... 83,884 146,827 202,157 432,865
15.......... ...... ... ................................. 90,150 163,884 217,538 480,572
191S................. ...... 121,950 178,247 256,782 556,988
1 ................. ..... .................................. 176, 768 190,343 233,826 600,937
.... .. ................................................. 98,318 199,412 430,132 727, 82
...................................................... .. 109,686 224,357 399, 430 733, 4T

rorwth of Cotton Industry-Exports of Minerals.
In the following table is shown the importance the cotton industry
of Tonkin has assumed since 1907, only seven years after the first
a, periments in this industry were made. It may be noted that in
1. 916 the exports of cotton amounted to 4.558,892 pounds, showing
S nly a alight decrease from shipments abroad made in 1914, a rec-
ard year. The demand of foreign markets for Tonkinese cotton
iyan was slightly under what it has been of recent years, while the
Firench market proved decidedly better. Nearly all the cotton waste
was taken by France for war purposes.

Cotton tread. Cotton waste.
Year .
STo France. Toforei Total. To France To o Total.
ecuatdee. countrisC .

Pounds. Poand., Pound. Pounds. Pod. Poads.
................................ 685,851 1,08 1 1,755,30 413,142 661,380 1, 074,5a
.......................z'.... 1, n,33 2, 521,90 611,777 249, 61 861,8=
C... wl...........-......---- 16,755 ,,l7 2,061,742 742,980 2, 30288,3 3,=
..K............;............ 22 81r 784 381,006 I SO 3 80I
737Mf2, 737,=11 721,12 1, 1, kii:
^i.... ................................... 3..", 461,408 3,461,308 557,323 1 Bs t SM
s............................ 441 3,,774,4837 ff. 1,8.1. 4M
1.. .................................. ...... 4,748,708 4,748,708 236.333 33 ,25 2 5 589
1............................... 8,223 38 s,10 3,948, 29 220 1,782,074 1,742,24
SI....*.............................. 1,910, 28 ,Seo 4,5S6,8 9 1,193,349 275,2a6 ,4
I' __ __, __,_ 4,_,___,1t, 1 ___5,a55 1,U





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0 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REFOBTB.

The three cotton manufacturers of Tonkin, located at N~Jaz i"
Haifong, and Hanoi, employ 62,000 spindles and 270 looms, n
produce from 4,500 to 5,000 tons of thread. They supply eatetidv~
local needs as well as the large foreign demand.
Exports of metallic minerals have steadily increased since 1910,
with the exception of the years 1912 and 1914. The year 1916 was
marked by a substantial increase of more than 6,000 to es-or r f*1ew
in spite of restricted and excessive freights. The high pitiia re-
ceived, due to the demands created by the war, made it praXtable to
work mines formerly idle.
One of the chief features of this trade has been the development
of a wide market in Japan, where 30,873 tons of zinc and te entire
output of antimony, amounting to 785 tons, were sold in 1D16. The
United States received 4,500 tons of zinc and Great Britain ?.30
tons. Of the entire mineral output France received only 424 tone of
tin and tungsten.
Shipments of Lacquer-Castor and Lacquer Oils.
The exportation of stick and gum lacquer was about tle..ae ne in
1916 as for the previous year, but materially less than in prewar
times. This is due in part to the loss of the French market and to
the employment of these commodities locally in the manufacture of
dyes, which are being substituted for German aniline dyes. The
distribution of exports of lacquer for the 10 years from 1907 to 1916
was as follows:

Years. Toforeign Total. Years. To Toore 'tal.
France. countries. France.

Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pond .n PnuNs..
1907................ 643,523 156,30 799,829 1912................. 68342 83- 774 WW76, 0
1908............... 588,849 326,280 915,129 1913................ 1,000,616 6507 ,u Sm
1909................ 5i9,083 213,846 272,929 191............... 412,922 100,971 1 8
1910................ 812,174 41,226 853,400 1915................ 52,029 16a,006 218,
1911................ 390,798 115,962 506,760 1916............... 123,458 78,70 8,

Both castor oil and lacquer oil fell off in imports during 1916. In
1914 and 1915 no castor oil was shipped to France, and in 1916 only
33,369 pounds, which is difficult to understand in view of the large
demand on the Western Front. The year 1917 gives better promise,
the French Government having urged the planters to increase their
production in order that the aviation camps may be adequately
supplied.
The amount of castor oil and lacquer oil shipped to foreign coun-
tries from Tonkin during the period 1907-1916 is shown in the
accompanying table:

va Castor Lacquer Cstr la
Years. oil. oi. Years.o.

Pounds. Pounds. PoenA. I0m16.
197 ......................... 1,102,741 599,210 1912......................... 867,SU1 .1 .M
1908 ....................... 531,529 763,233 1913....................... 1,I06,887f 1,-U
1909 ........................ 53,351 878,754 1914....................... 1, 3, 8 2s 51 0
1910)....................... 1,176,368 790,570 1915...................... 1,00,316 8 3 I
1911......................... 1,446,5 9 592 1916......... ......... .. 484,101 .6AM


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f--NOH IO+": "f B TlT NI 7

t h V te. p..... .
raiPde with the United States can not be gauged by customs sta-
is, as there is no direct line between the United States and any
the JIndo-China ports. Consequently, American imports are
m Iusly listed as from Hongkong or some other port through which
Oey reach Haifong. It is certain, however, that American goods
sflirP ing ground yearly since the European war and will be more
ia:n more in favor and demand, on account of limited steamer con-
:nectins with Europe and the disorganization of manufacturing in-
atries in France; there is also a better acquaintance with American
IMtices, which in former years were considered not up to French
"todcts in quality.
i The: i main export from Haifong to the United States in 1916 was
l .iii n :,c, 4,500 tons being shipped direct. Rice, hides, mats, and other
articles were doubtlessly exported via Hongkong. The principal
j:: American imports sire petroleum, typewriters, automobiles, flour,
Sewing machines, hardware, and tools.
b l dipping at Haifong.
In recent years there has been a decline in the number of vessels
i entering Haifong, due to the need of ships in other waters by the
Allied nations and to the discontinuance of German shipping and of
Sthe Dunkirk-Haifong Line.
SAlthough there were 28 French ships less to enter Haifong Harbor
in 1916, the net tonnage registered was 72,501 in excess of 1915. This
is due to the fact that several large European liners have touched
at this port since July, 1915. In 1916, one American vessel, of
a.it,58 tons, is registered as having entered the port.
The following table shows the nationality, number, and net ton-
nage of the vessels entering Haifong during 1915 and 1916:

1915 1916
Flag.
Number. Net ton- Number. Net ton-
nage. nage.

........................................................ 194 239,022 166 311,523
.......... ........................................... 135 158,027 96 113,283
...................................................... 75 73,211 21 28,306
S Dutch ...................................................... 14 13,022 12 11,481
tch......................................................... 7 5,976 9 12,068
Potuee..................................................... 1 217 4 2,544
S....................................................... 2,646 2 1,764
S.ri n ........................... ............. ..: ........... ......... .1 2,758
E .al .an............................................ 9 8,946 ......... ..........
To ................. ....... 438 501,067 311 483,727
.... .... .... '.,0 . .


..::
WASSINGI"ON ;"GOVtNMMNNT PRIMfING 0TIOUC : 23 :


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