Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00036
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00036

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text












.. : A.." N
Iw1 l CHINA. :
p.. menGA ThfMeaa Sxamanu, SUhanhaai. May 7.
tEiftther aided China's foreign trade in 1917, in-
l. i record of $826,812,672 to $1,032,699,412, a gain of
Sr approximately 25 per cent. Stated in local currency
.tioems taels) the year's trade represents 1,012,450,404
of 14,A46,043 taels, or barely 1.4 per cent, over 1916.
ancyiWvalues is, of course, due to the steady increase
'value of silver, occasioned by war conditions and re-
notieealy in the finances of China, whose monetary sys-
a gold basis. The average value of the haikwan tael
0.612; in 1916 the average advanced to $0.8283, an in-
yr &cnt. The year 1917 showed a still further advance
3m ease of 23 per cent over 1916 and of 66 per cent over
red with the normal value of the haikwan tael, which is
oneI d at $0.72, the present gold valuation is about 42
1nomal.
S eliea l Tariff Revision. i .
of the marked variation from year to year.in the
.Chi. esee currency, figures are apt to be very mis-
g comparisons of different years. A more accurate
liopment of China's fofign trade will be gained by a
raifaes in haikwan task, as set forth in the following
*Wof foreign trade during the last 10 years: In 1908,
*1909, 757,150,881 tells; 1910, 843,798,222 taels;
maIs 1912, 843,617,434 Wels; 1913, 973,468,103 taels;
tI.aleS; 1915, 873,3836883 taels; 1916, 998,204,361
91,? jO01,450,404 taels,
althat hindered trade during 1916 were present
6 di&gree. Both import and export tonnage
Uncertain and scarce; freight rates advanced
e local values of export commodities advanced
tues~;. increased materially with the price of
especially cotton and steel products, ad-
4b t these were ~regly offset by the increasing
lity of silver; continued to be felt throuh-
vir was shipled out of the country. ur-
lwere created by various internal troubles,
ani brigandage, and by disastrous floods,
I~orth China.
time war in August it was understood that
i of import that would make duty an




j3 1 "









effective ad vilorem 5 per cent instead of a merely nominatVW
cent as at present. As a result a tariff revision conference i:j:,*
being held at Shanghai. A.
S Demand& for China's Raw Materials-Shipments through Japan.
.. Notwithstanding the many disabilities under which trade larr
19i7 was a satisfactory year to native and foreign merchants.alikt
The shortage in the world's production of raw materials has caused
a lively demand for raw products from China, especially from the
central and northern Provinces. The demand bids fair to keep up
in spite of higher rates of freight, exchange, and insurance.
America, particularly, has been in the market for large quantities
of Chinese products which before the war found a market only in
Europe. The declared exports from China to the United States in-
creased by the considerable sum of $62,594,315 in 1917. The signifi-
cance of this may be more fully realized when it is stated that this
increase alone was only $6,537,386 less than the total value of China's
exports to the United States in 1915 ($69,131,701), and yet in 1915
there was a marked increase over previous years.
Large quantities of Japan's purchase of raw materials in China
were for ultimate consumption in the United States. This is par-
ticularly true of vegetable oils and oil-bearing seeds, many Amer
can buyers preferring to buy China's products in or through Japan,
owing to the greater facility of getting freight space out of Japan,
and also largely on account of gold prices based on Japanese cit%
rency not being subject to fluctuation as are prices based on Chinese
currency. Consequently, Japan has to her credit a large volume of
business transacted with China in which she has acted merely a
middleman purchasing for American consumption.
Food Products from United States-Increase in Imports. .,.
The imports of American foodstuffs into China showed a uahbt
stantial gain, owing to the scarcity of supplies from Europe and
Australia on account of Government embargoes. However, similar::
restrictions in America had their effect upon American importsb-
fore the end of the year. Provision dealers made attempts to secu
from America stocks of European goods to which the trade was a e
customer, but eventually accepted American substitutes, where
quality was satisfactory, with the result that many American br.
have gained a firm hold. .
American canned goods have been pushed vigorously both'jfif S'
tablished representatives and by traveling salesmen, with thb.l.
that several new brands have been introduced. There is a-.
demand by the Chinese for foreign foodstuffs, especially bis" ii
candies. Canned fruits are coming into favor and asparagus !
served at the larger Chinese restaurants in the treaty porti.
siderable fresh fruit products have always come from Ameit` a'
Canadian apples are now being introduced.
Imports increased from $427,739,914 in 1916 to $560,509,Jf
1917, showing an advance of $132,769,236-an increase in gold
of about 33 ppr cent. In local currency the actual increase
to only about 6.4 per cent. Moreover, in local currency,,
tually decreased by 3.8 per cent, but when converted to
higher valuation of silver ldring 1917 they show an'
about 18 per cent, having risen from $399,072,758 to $










While the high price of silver favored imports into China- this
advantage was to a considerable degree offset by advances in prices
of the commodities China needed. Another serious drawback was
the great difficulty of getting goods to China on account of restric-
Stions upon exports by countries now at war, scarcity of tonnage, and
S'delays en route both by rail and at points of transshipment, espe-
eially the Pacific seaboard, Kobe, and Hongkong.
1gbi. h WFreight Bates.
!iThe most serious obstacle exports had to contend with was the high
S'iice of silver, which for a time put many Chinese commodities be-
|! :ot the reach of countries using gold. Freight rates advanced to
ii: recedented heights. The year opened with a $15 rate to the Pa-
;iic flcoast, but by June the rate had trebled. Even $45 was merely a
10 ial rate on all conference lines, as they were getting from $50 to
t; falnd more. The highest minimum rate was $55 in July, but the
S ive rate was nearer $70. These rates were maintained up to the
Si1P': e of the year, and still higher rates are contemplated for 1918.
'iWbrld shortages of raw materials eventually brought prices abroad
..... up to the level of prices in China, but scarcity of freight soon pre-
s-ented a far more formidable hindrance to the free movement of ex-
ports outward. Japan and America suffered but little, however,
Seompared with European countries, to whose ports sailings became
very infrequent and irregular.
C hla's Trade by Countries.
SThe following table shows the value of imports into China and ex-
Sports from China by principal countries of origin and destination in
1916 and 1917. The original sources of supply of the imports into
China from Hongkong and the countries of destination of the exports
to Hongkong are not on record with the Chinese Maritime Customs,
from which the figures were obtained.

Imports. Exports. Total.
Countries. '
** 1916 1 191 1016 1917 1916 1917

rtH ngry...... $19,070 $1,056 $73 ............. $19,743 11,056
6.381 7,749 ..... ........ ........... 6,381 7,749
i di .... ... 2, 073,876 27,124,489 5,45,496 37,089,395 32,532,372 34,213,884
............... 1,514,766 9, 4,233 1,274,888 2740.252 2,789,054 12,004,485
1DatDh East Indies..... 4,238,255 4,326,877 1,933.862 1,748,053 6,172,117 ,074,930
a ................ 2,331,050 2, 39,933 22,581,081 26,046,801 24,912,131 28, 386.734
Indo-Chin.... 2,928, 675 2,424,008 1,195,924 1,654,424 4,124,599 4,078,432
.............. 292 ..... .... 66 51 20,558 51
............. 134,808,375 158,8423,10 98,969,963 118,159,805 223,778,338 277,002,315
...... 763 428,3 5,223,241 3,983,940 5,520,004 4,412,643
Chosen 134,010,378 230,370,641 001538 11,578,608 233,011,916 346,949,249
.. ..... 4,2 ,734 4,740,542 3,061,870 5,038,258 7,284,604 9,778,800
..180,92 34,297 16,008 26,883 1,097,020 61,180
1ie .. 012 100, 670 800,458 1, 505 531 2,767,466 3,263,101
S....... 70S () 54,265,416 50,745, 16 70,0 3,120 50,745,516
tlo ......... 63,110 k6,123 O I0 6,915,257 0,808,349 10,428,417 13,50,477
S11.. ,11 8 3 498 28, 4 9 ,031 0,611,654 8,669,144 79,5186052
li t ......... 1 937 81 59,706448 96,81, O 103142,540 158,619,785
Sei oer nt..... 700 101, 8,759 ,682, 11,842,549 8,604, 3s
TW otal.....:...... ,.a",a awem,a 6 soW,07%, P 473.190,62 86, sa1,a673 1, 037,a, 72,3
a Reexport exceed importlm $4,523,310.
",A peculiar feature of China's trade with Russia in 1917 was the
excess of reexports of foreign goods over imports. The total reex-



I!li
:EE':.EEIE :. "








4 SUPPLEMENT TO OO]MMEBOE BEPORTh I

ports amounted to $15,965,400 against imports valued at $11A SOh,
having an excess of the former of $4,523,310. The explanation e I
doubtedly lies in the large quantities of goods, especially coffee asd
leather, imported into China for the account of buyers from R dis,
who, because of disturbances in their own country, preferred to
finance their purchases through a central point such as She_
where shipments could be forwarded to Vladivostok or Habi
China's total imports of coffee amounted to 19,301,151 pounds, of
which 12,858,890 pounds were reexported to Russia, leaving a net
import of 6,442,261 pounds, as against 1,106,348 pounds in 1916 and
333,661 pounds in 1914, in which year the total reexport of coffee to
all countries was only 9,330 pounds.
Percentage of China's Trade Held by Various Countries.
The large increase in the trade of China with Japan and the
United States is the outstanding feature of the foregoing table. This
increase .is also brought out in the following table giving the per-
centage of China's trade held by various countries in 1915, 1916, and
1917:

Imports. Exports. Total
Count rics.
1915 1916 1917 1915 1916 1917 1915 1916 1917

Per t. Per ct. Per ct. Per c. Per Per ct. Per d. Per c. Pwr.
ria ungary.... ngar ............. .0 ........ .... ........ ........ ....... 0.01 ..............
Belgium..................... .72 .................................... .3 .............
British India................ 8.54 6.33 4.80 1.90 1.37 1.50 5.43 3.03 3.22
Canada ....................... .18 .3.5 1.64 .35 .32 .58 .28 .84 1.18
Dutch East Indies............ 1.41 .99 .76 .65 .50 .37 1.00 .76 .60
France..................... .51 .55 .41 7.27 5.66 5.52 3.58 3.01 .25
French Indo-China........... .68 .68 .43 .42 .30 .35 .56 .50 .0
Germany...................... ....... ..... ... .... .... ........ .02 ...............
Hongkong................... 31.04 29.18 28.1? 24.87 24.79 25.02 48.90 27.06 S '
1tslv....................... .08 .07 .07 2.23 1.31 .84 1.09 0.67 .A B
Japan ...................... 26.50 31.33 40.77 19.90 24.80 24.69 23.44 28.18 33.00
Macao ....................... 1.10 .99 .84 1.18 .77 1.07 1.14 .8B .5
Netherlands.................. .10 .04 ........ .51 .23 ........ .30 .13 .......
Philippines................... .76 .44 .29 .19 .22 .34 .49 .33 .31
Russia....................... 3.57 3.84 .......... 14.18 13.60 10.75 8.53 L5 4.47
Singapore, Straits Settle-
ments, etc.................. 1.06 .82 1.18 2.12 1.74 1.44 1.59 1.2 1.30..
United Kingdom............. 14.97 13.50 9.36 7.62 7.22 5.63 11.6 10.48 7.2
United States................ 7.76 10.15 10.96 14.46 14.96 20.48 10.90 1.48 15.36
All other countries............ .96 .71 .37 2.15 2.21 1.42 1.38 L4B '.,
Total................. 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00100. 100.00 100.00 IUBW

Foreign Population and Business.
With the increase in Japanese firms, there was a correspoadigi
increase in the Japanese population in China, which advanced froi
104,275 persons in 1916 to 144,492 in 1917; the number of firLm i!
1917 exceeded the number in 1916 by 960. The Russian 2populati
dccreased by 3,925, but firms increased by 1,492. Owing m tl
the war, the British population decreased by 620 persons, t Brl
firms increased by 11. The American population increased
10) per cent, and firms increased from 187 to 216. There wais a8
increase of 34,872 in the foreign population and of 2,381 i1
although, because of the war, the staffs of various American uLi:.
British firms suffered numerous losses. i















Persons. Firms.
Nationality.
1916 1917 1916 1917

i la ........................................................... 5,580 5,618 187 218
........................................ 296 317 19 IS
r ............................................................. 286 324 17
t ........................................................... 9,099 8,479 644 655
h... .......................................... 397' 450 1G 17
.. eh.......................................................... 277 298 29 22
h ........................................................... 2.374 o2,262 11G 127
........................................................... 3,792 2,899 281 133
........................................ 400 416 44 42
........................................................... 104,275 144, 192 1,858 2,818
L ......................................................... 329 277 7 7
S ......................................................... 2, 293 2,.297 47 51
........................................ 55,235 51,310 1,4 2,914
................................................. 366 300 28 8
...... .. ............................... ....... 423 513 4 3
t powers............................................... 157 215 3 7
Total..................................................... 185,613 220,485 4,721 7,055

a Includes protdg.s.
W1tQne in Foreign Shipping.
vFi'. foreign shipping at all Chinese ports declined by 1,738,760 tons in
4'i71H The British Government control of vessels under its flag dur-
*4i g-the year reduced the tonnage by 2,264,356 tons. American ton-
ie increased by 325,242, the Dutch by 248,444, and Japanese by
,.T,812 tons. Freight rates were exceptionally high, and shipowners,
ipecially Japanese, had a very prosperous year.
!::.The following table shows the nationality, number, and tonnage
Foreign vessels entered and cleared.at China's ports during 1915,
|g6, and 1917:

1i9i:1 "' 915 191 117
Nationalities.
.::. Number. Tonnage. Number. Tonnage. Number. Tonnage.

.......................... 3,148 804,414 3,082 799,913 3,609 1,125,155
33,339 37,675,557 34,132 35,840,573 34,902 33, 57, 217
82 115,628 115 205,734 83 142,238
287 496,664 233 463,995 374 712,439
S 57 561,955 409 596,237 328 584,891
............................ 979 58,263 1,151 66,532 233 17,054
............................ .......... ...........%. 57 979 478 14,912
............................ 20,141 23,873,016 21,598 24,233,835 22,454 24,581,647
......................... 726 774,873 472 636,217 370 474,349
......................... 78 152,021 440 129,478 456 199,438
............................ 4,873 1,922,055 3,790 1,545,085 3,276 1,429,200
26.................. 60,450 34 101,948 10 26,692
atialtie..................................... ........ 2 1,466 .......... ............
.,......8555....... ........,515 4,622,992 66,573 62,88,2

) g he' Chief Trade Port.
ti Of Chins total increase of $205,886,740 in foreign trade in 1917,
ni contributed $66,899,555. Dairen $56,551,174, Tientsin
0$aev8001, Kowloon $15,087,871, Eanton $12,321,873, Tsingtau
$3 Hankow $10,454,276, and Antung $19,632,162.
.hmaghai'a foreign trade amounted to 40 per cent of the total net
t e of. China, and exceeded by $48,838,888 the combined trade of




":L..










6 SUPPLEMENT TO OOMWERCE REPORTS.


Dairen, Canton, Tientsin, Kowloon, and Hankow, the tradeii& 0
next in importance.
The following table shows the import and export trade of C
by ports, in 1910 and 1917:
=-~- -


Imports.


Ports.


Algun.............
Amoy........
Antung...............
Canton................
Chbngsha..............
Chefoo ............
Chinkliang..............
CtiM gking............
Chinwangtao ...........
Dairrn I Dalny)........
Foh...ow...........
Hans, how.............
HBTikow...............
Harbin..............
Hunchun..............
chang ....... .........
Kiaochow (Tsingtau)i..
Kiukiang.............
Kiangrhow ............
Knuginoon.............
Kowloon ...............
L.appa.................
Lungehingtsmu.........
Lungchow............
Lungkow..............
NManchouli.............
MflTISz...............
Nanking..............
Nanninag.............
Nowr-hwin............
Ninapn.................
Pthoi ...............
Sarnsbui................
Ra nsing................
Sanu..............
Sh.nchai..............
lasii... ................
So 'K how..............
Sniilonho...............
Swa3fw................
S/cmnao............
T-I1unkow .............
Tengyueh...............
TiLntsin................
/1 % nhb icn .............. .
Weinchow ..............
' u"how ...............
M ihu ..................
Yochow................
Tntal.............
Roexports..............
Net total.........


Exports.


Total.


M.


I~-~- I -;


$107,836
7,0 R,8S79
14,'8X, 002
*21,4S5,. 31
955,128
f617.338
2,94, 158
395,043
I,083, 03
27, 630, 506
4,754, 04
186,329
29,764,472
68,102
342,649
114,603
]1,808,815
2,017,418
.1, 0 ,911
5,427,835
26,492,801
8,560,621
439.875
55,461
16,079
5,458, 675
4.035.079
981,842
755,101
4, R8, 103
2, 86, 607
1,345,826
3,647,803
4,792
24,019
171,486,875
123,395
13,722
13,657,676
11,9q1,553
131,324
1?4
1,417,776
%h,717.148
6, 192
6,934,030
1,271,732
9,974


149,124
8,163,2J1
29, 0010,501
28, 431,888
1,384,164
9,134,178
4,929,301
670,313
1,444,238
59,439, 9s7
4,653,920
139,277
37, 4W, 384
95,290
456, 30S
251, 96
18, 181, 267
2,186,.504
3,405,893
3,864,700
36,738,075
10,90P.557
827,401
53,602
9,129
2.926.624
6,039,776
1,694,398
1,131,318
5,190,314
2,76(1,044
644,373
3,301,345
12, ?62
28,073
214,287,709
290,669
24,583
5.930,302
13,870.331
240,080
492
2.246,461
54,581,819
11,690
12,084
9,397,271
1,300,019
6,924


$292,634
2,044,629
4,028,504
45,618,111
1,787
4,976,518
211
160,410
1,579,659
37,865,269
5,057,243
10,294,767
810,960
223,416
13, 547, 355
1,127
1,916,122
1,246,713
10,878,745
2,939,354
93,248
9,820
13,653,222
7,776,008
3.072,613
1,824,949
4,084,129
2.417
1,130,13
1,028,366
390,301
1,7'20
177,203,031
305
12,075, 629
9,318,393
21,228
7,542
520,485
17,701,303

5, 652,389
2,707
18,797


----------- I------


8752,295
1,880,005
9,438,167
50,993,947
1,805
3,842,625
36,144
260,706
2,883.505
52,607,052
2,228,919
13,023,131
1,655,424
429,661
17, 237, 185
1,484
2,396,08.3
1,429,413
15,720,842
5,271,765
479,335
4,621
10,317
11,393,309
13,122,981
3,737,9h4
2,205,414
2,8 1,161
1,738
1,132, 54
754,696
940.012
275
201,301,752
250
18, 342, 202
9,915,787
30,228
29,207
810.388
17,723,453
1,673
5,003, 000
284,442
24,205


1400,470
9,133,508
18,896,506
67,103,962
956,915
10, 53,856
2,948,380
555,453
2,663,622
65,495,865
9,812,147
186,329
40,059,239
879,062
566,065
114,603
25,356,170
2,018,545
4,986,033
6,674,548
37,371,546
11,499,975
533,123
65 290
16,079
19, 111,897
12,411,087
4.054,455
2,580,050
8,692,282
2,972.024
2,476,439
4,675,600
395,090
25,739
348,689, 006
123,700
13,732
25,733,305
21,279,940
152, 552
7.966
1,938.261
54,418,451
6,'192
12,58W, 419
1,274,439
28,771


my


mas


12, m
4, IM, 445
10,101
4,33748.
ns, r7,ma
6,83,8 ,
go, i s, W

351,196
St 1458

5,294,118
52,4589, 1
18,181,321
1,0W, 736
68,235
19,404


3.3 732
8,041,47M
2.761,7832
2, 776,05
4, 056,041
952,874
28,34
415,589, 461

24, 72 50"'
23,786,11 .
270,308

3,06,849
72W206,
,is,
I %
14 2n

u ,4oa


443, 362,837 588.928,966 399,072,758 472,190,262 842,435,595 ,1,0119,2S
15.622,923 28,419,816 ........... ......... 15,622,923 28, 4l, 81


427,739,914 560,509,150 300,072,758


472,190,262 826,812,672


1,0 2,0S,412


China's Railways in 1917.
China's railway expansion has been hindered by the world war:.
Autumn floods broke the Peking-Hankow and the Tientein-Pukow,
lines. and goods traffic was suspended for more than three months
An nditional loss of revenue to these two important lines, as well aol
to the Peking-Mukden line, was caused by the depreciation of the
notes of the Bank of China and the Bank of Communications, l;
suiting in considerable revenue being collected in a unit worth
00 cents while the bulk of the expenses had to be paid in a unit WtI.
100 cents. Farmers and tradesmen are showing increased "apipd :
tion of railway service, but in many sections the movement of rod







j-I
















?na enective.
SThe value of railway-car imports increased by $779,046, while the
purchases of locomotives and tenders declined by $8,101,266 as com-
ared with 1916. However, 1916 was an exceptional year in this
Stature of trad
in Cotton Piece Goods.
~Zhiece goods, China's most important item of trade with foreign
ou Ntries, a decided improvement took place. The silver figures rose
oI1438,538,484 haikwan taels to 169,316,155 taels, an increase of
IT671 taels. In gold an advance of $53,809,551 is shown, due to
Shwigiher rate of silver exchange ruling during the year. As was to
irrpected as a result of scarcity of freight and other obstacles,
cai n and British goods fell-off, while goods of Japanese manu-
lpcture increased. Indian and Japanese yarns continued to decrease,
wiing partly to competition from domestic mills, and partly to Jap-
S4Me. yarns being diverted to Russia.
S he following table shows the imports into China of principal cot-
: -o manufactures, wool and cotton mixtures, woolen manufactures,
Mai other classes of piece goods in 1916 and 1917, the values being
:.expressed in both haikwan taels and American currency:

Kind of textiles. 1916 1917 1916 1917

Hail:wsan failku an
lads. talas.
nmanuactare........................... 136,679,386 158,950,207 $113,211,535 5162,129,272
WII: n and cotton mixtures ................. 723, 80 2,461,309 599,424 2.510,535
I O Moamenufactures.......................... 2,293,558 3,676,815 1,899,754 3,750.351
t J othe ldnds............ ........ ........ 3.841,860 4,227,764 3,182,213 4,312,319
Total......,............................. 143,538,484 169,316,155 118,S92,926 172,702,477

iikaL of Piece Goods on Hand.
alThe following table shows the stocks of different kinds of piece
r pods on hand in Shanghai on December 31, 1916, and the corre-
ponding date of 1917, and also the imports of these goods into China
ithe calendar years 1916 and 1917:

Shanghai stocks on hand- Imports.
i, Kinds of piece goods.
i p Dec. 31, 1916. Dec. 31, 1917. 1916 1917

Ituu s, sandenetians........ 529,872 785,823 2,499,25 3,W6, 8
................................... .............. ..............
A t .:........... ................... 63,74 18,835 613,841 1, 498, 30
Sl .................................. ,7 92
Jaia, and D tch ................ 2,810 2,430 21,434 21,079
I1....................... 1.880 28, 60 976,50 1,45,621
,s.... ,800 .........i ...... ........
'.. I 2, 4,360 10'225 1 30
m WM ll... .........................4... 1,a, ,67 07 1,317,795
a Not gSve Dani.










SUPPLEMENT TO (OMtEBOlE REPORT.


Kinds of piece goods.


Jeans:
A n rr. i c .................................
English, Indian, and Dutch................
Ja I nese.... .
Shagnghal...................................
Sheetings:
A r erienn............................... .
Inglili an Ild ian ........................
Jnp;'in c ...................................
PShtu, i .li .i ............ ...................
Shirtlinh.:
(;ra -
Pu 11,r pean..............................
Whit--
Fur, lpan ..............................
JapannesC........ ....................
SBpninh frItrpes:
lionn ......................... .... ....
Wiik L, J. ............
T cluths:
32 inches, English.......................
30t inches, English... ................
32 and 36 inches-
Indr i.in .................................
Japnese................................
Turkey rrds'
25- vard.................................
Japanese... ......... ....................
Velvet, and veveeteens....................
Yarn, cotton:
Indian ...................................
Japanse ...............................
Sh aghai................................


I ShanMu stock on band- I


..V



U r: ::
. .:lb


- '1 y


Dec. 31, 1916. Dec. 31, 117.


Pieces
(a)
87,453
3,900
2,040
40,580
13, 6 8
1,000
35,380

412, 33
5,070
924,172
7,150
19,500
216
996
3, 390
10,395

(a
97,648
10,262
S7,328
d9,233,200
S268,000
4 1,234, 800


a Yards.


Pieces.
(a)
54,775
71,020
1,780
37,840
12,600
19,000
47,860

526,147
320,290
781,190
19,000
26,323
8,154
738
14,220
(a)
60
94,850
71,070
21,780
26,280
d 17,154,000
d 4 585,200
d 92 ,533


Pieces.
7T5
177,068
1,241,7W

353,735
60,786
I,B21 ,W


i, 61,58s
686,472



16,9M7"
c40,487
151,04
25, 80
25,205
743,503

} 47k, R78
c 1,591,340
c 142,443,733
d 180, 14,133
...............


wrI:'


:-4-


.1-
........
.............









c WOl
1,530,47I
.............;

*1

145)0fl


SaeW


c3,398,89
c 137,436,733
d 8,0o a18
.............R


d Pounds.


China's Cotton Crop-American Cotton Seed Used.

The China cotton crop for 1917-18 was an average one, with the
exception of districts in Honan, Shansi, and Shensi Provinces, where
prolonged drought produced an inferior crop, and in Chihli Province;:
where the entire crop was ruined by floods. The shortage, though
marked, was considerably offset by extra fine crops in the Yangtze
Valley. and also by an increase in production resulting from farmers:
in several Provinces turning their attention from sesamum and rapeM
seed to cotton. However, it is the opinion of cotton dealers that there
will not be sufficient cotton to meet the demand of China's mills
partly on account of the increase in the number of spindles and more
especially because of the unusually heavy purchases made by Ja p
The total imports of American cotton for 1917 came to abut
1, t.213 pounds, a decline of 69 per cent from the total of 4,209,982
pounds in 1916. This difference is partly explained by the mills spin-
ning lower counts in 1917. At present mills are spinning mostly 20s :
yarnm using native cotton grown from American seed which has to a"
certain extent replaced the hulk of the American cotton used in p-i;i
viius years. It is expected that after the war the mills will be min
better position to spin finer counts, and inasmuch as the staple otfthb
best native cotton can not compare with that of American O-cott.
there should be a good future for American cotton on the t tii:l
market. '
Imports of Indian cotton fell from 36,061,088 pounds i. 1041
9,2'7,307 pounds, a decline of about 75 per cent. This falling ff iii

a














Exports of raw silk increased slightly over 1916. The year opened
with moderate demands from Europe and America, and old stocks
were entirely disposed of. Short crops kept new season prices up
despite the poor demand. In August heavy demands from America
S'couraged speculative buying in Japan. This forced prices in
Cih ia to a level where, coupled with the high price of silver-.
er than at any other period during the year-business became
possible and foreign buyers had to fill their wants elsewhere.
opean markets were also influenced by American purchases, and
'* hei. n the unusual demand from America fell off, moderate demands
i rom Europe, stimulated by a drop in exchange rates, maintained the
market and kept it from collapse.
Both steam filatures and white native reels enjoyed a good demand
t .it the beginning of the year and some activity at the close. Yellow
Ssilksi. for Bombay fell off; their marked deterioration in quality is
accounted for by the best cocoons being taken by steam filatures to
meet demands from Europe. Ciops in Szechuan and Shantung
Provinces were noticeably short, o*mg to internal disturbances.
'' The wild-silk industry showed a marked increase in activity, par-
ticularly in Manchuria, where the number of reels was almost dou-
bled. Chefoo exported 465,500 pounds less than in 1916. In the
early part of the year Chefoo pongees were very inferior in quality;
the production of finer grades remained about the same. Japanese
demands for wild silk to be manufactured into pongees for America
-are expected to divert mqch of the reeling of wild silk from Chefoo
to Antung, and the manufacturing of pongees from Chefoo and
Shanghai to Japan, Antung being mamer the raw product and enjoy-
ing rail connection with Japan.
Markets for China's Raw Silk.
The following table shows the exports to the most important mar-
kets of various kinds of Chinese raw silk in 1917:

Raw.
Waste, Cocoon
Countries. including and Total.
White. Yellow. Wild. yards. refuse.
SI."" "." -- -- -- -- -- -
S.,. Pound. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds.
India................. 147,467 1,483,867 ............ 82,400 ............ 1,713,734
......................... 2,635,067 674, 667 10,733 3,920, 933 459,333 7,799,733
og....5............. 5,325,333 29,466 5,733 5,632,800 3,515,200 14,508,532
S .....................067 27,600 23,467 1,226,667 1,588,267 2,885,068
f l and Choesa............ 4,666 25, 47 825,733 428,133 2,270, 800 3,54, 799
.o........................ M, 7 133 175,734 3,867 ............ 261,601
"............... ....39,33 14,667 3,467 .......... ............ 7,467
y, Egypt, Persia, Aden,
i.. ........- .. .................. 60,000 257,33 ................................... 317,333
ila n dn m.............. 472,133 15,067 7,600 .2,70,400 163,733 3,448,933
S d Stit ........... 2,886,000 13,87 1, 280,000 1,196,133 193,333 679,333
lothawr.aari ...... ... ... 1200 aS ............. 29067 ............ 50,533
"7 2W.. ............. lUa, ,682, 6400 13,431,467 15,810,400 8,190, 666 40,277,066
.. :9..a............. 11,88;,000 i,; ;oas ,490,933 18,497,467 9,987,333 44,733,866

73926---162----2







10 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

Large Decrease in Tea Exports. : ...
The Chinese tea trade for 1917 suffered less seriously than in 19ftI IS
Tihe crop on the whole was excellent, especially black teas, but loses
(if the first crnop red Iued considerably the pickings of the second ani
tlird crops and the quantities brought to market showed a decided
decline from 1916. The British embargo on imports, disruption of
the Russian tea market, and successful competition by .ava teas mrde
the year a most difficult one. Although prices were 15 to 90 per cent
lower than in 1916 the higher exchange kept gold prices up. eHi
freight rates and scarcity of tonnage made it difficult to eiet
even with those countries who were in the market for Chinese teas.
Apparently the only teas not showing a loss are Pingsueys and Hoo-
chows going chiefly to America. Large stocks of costly teas, mostly
fine teas of the first crop, are left on the hands of the Chinese at a
heavy loss.
Total exports came to only 150,251,999 pounds, constituting a rec-
ord falling off. The decrease from 1916 amounts to 55,688,534
pounds, distributed as follows: Black tea, 23,260,800 pounds; green
tea, 13,684,667 pounds; brick tea, 15,539,867 pounds; dust and tablet
ten, 2,783,200 pounds; However, even under present discouraging
conditions, an old-established Chinese company has perfected ar-
rangements for turning out tea suited to foreign trade and prepared
almost entirely by specially designed machinery. This tea will be
guaranteed absolutely pure Chinese leaf. and it is hoped by this new
enterprise to revive the foreign demand for China teas.
Exports of Black and Green Teas, by Countries of Destination.
The following table shows the quantity of black and green teas
exported to various countries in 1916 and 1917:

13lack tea. Gree tat.
Countries.
S 11918 1917 910 W.T

Pounds. PatL. PanMa. PmII
Australia, Now Zealand, etc.................. ........ 319,200 81,733 400 ...........
Dritish India........................................ 111,200 97,600 1,10,13 4,13, 533
Canada................................. ......... 899,067 877,334 718,933 5 i,00
Central and South America........ .................. 175,067 1 ,133 .... .... ....
Dutch East Indies................. .................. 226,266 111,066 933 l,20
Franco...................................... 1,573,867 764,000 2,554,867 2, 090,133
Hlongknng................................ 16,495,067 9, 853,600 585.867 575,467
Japan (including Chosen and Waiwan) ................ 117,466 426,400 365,600 737, 00
Marao.......................................... 587,600 1,067,334 ............ 25,067
Philippine Islands............ .................... 45,867 18, 800 ............ ............
Rusia.................... ........................... 44,092400 34,220,193 17,553,600 3,430, 7
iingapore, Straits Settlements, etc.................... 751,200 572, AO 42, 400 %41
Stam......... ......... ...... ..... ................ 608, 529,867 4,667 1,067
Turkry. Egypt, etc............................... 402,533 28,933 1,840,267 63,8
United Kingdom ............................. .... 9,784,933 2,825,733 6, 1 ,400 l, 2. 1
United States (including Hawaii) ..................... 10,001,867 10,520,134 8, 4,133 1%2, 3 :.
All other countries................................... 178,000 082,000 106,400 1 8 .
Total................................. 8,430,00 63,1800,0 9,,00 9,400 a,145,1m

America Buys Bulk of Cow and Buffalo Hides--Exports of Goat and Sheep Fkbl .
Exports of cow and buffalo hides improved by 1,551,733 pu :
the total export cid;ing 1917 amounting to 63,613,200 "pi O i
which more than 45,000,000 pounds were cowhides. Of thusa~mr p nt .
America took about 70 per cent and Italy 15 per cent, the remainder
going to England, France, and Japan. Scarcity of tonnage and ir g ;h















,he 1916-17 season closed with very low prices, and it was antici-
.atd that with the opening of the new season, in November, buyers
I ~wld be able to operate on a favorable basis; but shortage of ar-
b at ports of shipment favored the Chinese dealers and enabled
An to obtain substantial prices for the bulk of their supplies.
P ngto internal disturbances, supplies were very slow in reaching
iiow, Tientsin, and Shanghai, the principal export points, and
i.t i thought that on that account the season, which terminates
i tally in April, will show a decided falling off in exports.
..Sheepskins advanced from 1,198253 pieces in 1916 to 1,721,823
uies and more than doubled in value. This product was exported
'mostly from Tientsin.
The total export of sheep's wool advanced from 44,604,800 pounds
S"1916 to 45,247,200 pounds, more than 90 per cent of the total going
't America and the remainder torJapan. Silver prices fluctuated
im: O t slightly, as the advances in the. American markets were more
than offset by the rise in silver.
!:. improvementt in Import Trade in Iron and Steel.
S Imports of metals, especially iron and steel, although improving
*o ver 1916, still fell far short of a normal year's consumption. Buy-
ing was irregular. Although America was about the only market
Remaining open, native dealers were slow in placing orders. When,
however, the more venturesome reaped good profits from orders
placed before the substantial rise in prices, buying became more
.general and kept up in spite of further advances and difficulties at-
tendant upon America's entry into.the war, such as embargoes, the
inability of American mills to supply a full range of sizes and to
inake prompt deliveries, and delays en route on account of freight
congestion. On account of these delays native dealers hesitated to
..place heavy orders, for fear the war might terminate before the re-
peipt of their cargo.
i. 'Unmistakable evidences of the prosperity of native metal mer-
chants are seen in Shanghai in the many new and handsome steel and
concrete warehouses erected during the year, for the most part under
.the supervision of foreign architects. The net result of the year's
trade is the decided improvement in the credits of all native mer-
iishants, which will undoubtedly react favorably on the further intro-
'ltiii ion and the larger purchases of American steel products.
l,:1!: I. of Automobiles, Coal, and Cotton Gooda Show Increase.
i. nimnportation of automobiles, mostly from the United States,
i,'iI' $364,024. The absence' of good rolid has been a serious
li....to .the more widespread introduction of motor cars, but
Im ~in d is slowly increasing. In Shanghai, China's chief comr
I".i.E pON more than 1,000 cars are in use.
a"1~l ,






12 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE BEPORTS. ,
Imports of coal advanced in value by $7,907,986, but the i1 ...l|
in (uantit i was only 22,1383 tons. The higher value is attrihutsWj 0
higher freight rates and higher prices ruling in Japan du the .
In cot ton goods, blankets advanced by $351,827, drills by $28i5U
and flannlcettes by $1,770,965. Cotton italians and veneta la. "
crcesed lby more than $4,500.0.00 and prints by $3,067,956. SheeilS:
rose from $6,704,555 to $10,27,131, and gray shirtings improvedby
more than $4,000,000. T cloths advanced by $1,281,382.
As pointed out in the annual report from Shanghai, Japanes manm- '
facturers have nimade considerable improvement in most of the timr I
of cotton goods above described. But Indian and Japanese cotto
yarn fell off by more than 57,560,000 pounds, the former through the
scarcity of freight space, the latter due to a demand from Rssia.
Raw cotton decreased by about 14000,,000 pounds, but in value there
was only the slight decline of about $150,000. Very little American
cotton was imported, owing to its high cost.
American Lumber Holds First Place.
The difficulties encountered in keeping the Chinese market aup-
plied with lumber made the past year a most unusual one. Owing to
transportation difficulties the imports of Oregon pine amounted
to only 20,000,000 feet. The demand far exceeded the supply, and as
so-called Oregon pine is now the'basic wood for modern construction
Work in this country the market remained firm throughout the year,
with the result that large profits were made. Substitutes were sought
among native timbers and about 18,000,000 feet of yellow and white
pine were secured from Antung. This pine is similar to that of
Michigan and Wisconsin.
On account of the high prices of softwoods, Philippine hardwoods
found a readier sale than usual, lauan, apitong, and palosapis b ig
freely in demand. Of these woods 4,000,000 feet were imported
into Shanghai alone, Tentsin. taking about 1,000,000 feet. Tbh
mii-ket created for tfese hairc~~w'os is likely to be maintain as
the Chinese like the high-grade hardwoods and will continue to
use them for interior finish in their buildings.
As a substitute for Philippine hardwoods oak was extensively
used. about 3,000,000 feet coming from Japan and 1,000000 from
Manchuria. Almost all of this cargo was prepared in mills in
Shanghai and from there distributed among treaty ports on the
Yangtsze and through Tientsin. Shanghai is generally considered
the central distributing point for timber in China, as an avtrag of
70 per cent of all manufactured woods distributed through northern
and central China passes through Shanghai.
Tobacco Imports-Woolen Suitings-Kerosene.
Imports of cigarettes. principally from Great Britain and Asameh,
improved in value by $10,354,078. Tobacco imports advanced by
$1.o00.904. One company has been successful in the planting of to-
bacco in the Wu Wei Hisin district, and another company is maki*"
an attempt to compete on the same lines. Several Chinesl t mio
factories have sprufig up during the last. two years, and will be more acute as years go on, particularly between thle finifr
companies and their Chinese and Japanese competitors .









9y1:anUa oura Oy io;zo,wQvv. mixes wool ana cotton coatings ana suic-
iwii uearesed by $934,221; considering the high price of woolen
i.;! it is surprising that this line of piece goods should show an
i ..mports of kerosene from America decreased by 1,328,778 gallons,
I e.;.,l Borneo by 669,898 gallons, and from Japan by 975,807 gallons,
hiile imports from Sumatra improved by 14.428,777 gallons. Two
r 4*Eaw companies-one an American concern and the other Japanese-
i e pushing the sale of their products vigorously. Prices in silver
for the various kinds of kerosene during the year were: Formosan,
4 to $3.75 per 10 gallons; Borneo, $3.75; Sumatra. $4; and American,
I 110 local currency ($1 in silver being equal to about $0.70 gold).
i ..'. er Inereases and Decreases in Imports.
ii ... Electrical materials and fittings,.chiefly from Japan, America, and
ireat Britain, increased by $1,265,418. Fish and fishery products
Rose from $11,390,481 to $14,427,630. Hongkong and Japan, owing to
their proximity to China, were the principal sources of supply.
Nearly three times as much flour was imported during 1917 as in 1916,
the quantities being 31,128,533.pounds in 1916 and 90,513,200 pounds
Sin 1917. Hosiery, chiefly from Japan, advanced by $1,147,992, with
increased quantities also coming fram America. In metals, iron bars
showed a decrease of 9,150 tons; nails and rivets increased by $283,705,
,bt show a slight decrease in quantity; pipes and tubes improved by
$749,744.
Medicines, including cocaine and morphia, advanced by $1,580,089.
Needles improved by $811,712; quantities are coming now from the
United States in competition with the inferior Japanese article, which
is entirely too brittle.
Imports of opium decreased by $2,153,614. Since April 1, 1917,
there have been no transactions4esau the. -opium warehouses. .were
tpaced under seal on that date. Anangements between the Chinese
Government and the holders of opium, regarding the purchase by the
former of the unsold stocks, have not as yet resulted in anything
definite.
Imports of paper decreased by more than $1,500,000; Japan was
the largest source of supply, followed by Norway, Sweden, Great
Britain, and America.
i Shoes and boots show an advance of $1,110,355. Soap and mate-
rials for soap making improved by $2,302,579. Shooks for barrels
improved by $473,885, owing to the increased demand for wood and
either oils. ; Imports of sugar increased by $15,730,367. Japan and
SHongkong being the chief competitors in this trade. Tea. chiefly
i;from India, declined by $1,013,693.
IP rvey of China's Increased Exports.
Exports of coal from China rose from $4,752,529 to $6,402 090,
ii 4enl Chosen, and Hongkong being the heaviest purchasers. Raw
pOi on decreased by about 2,476,0001 pounds, but the value increased
i..20ti.6 $6,200,000. Japan as usual bought the bulk, the United
-let akj& g increased quantities.
*~ .'ui.B ..mexn and yolk increased in value by $5,499,779, while
lm 4jii Ish, and preserved eggs decreased by $1,535,169. Great






14 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.
Britain and the United States took the bulk of the albumen and yi~ri
America more than doubling her purchases.
Ramie fiber improved by $1,317,250, going chiefly to Japan. Grlag N
cloth increased by $562,5-91, Japan being the largest buyer. Expoi
o(f leather increased by more than $2,000,000, and went prZrintcipal
to Hongkong. Fresh and frozen meat advanced by $906,248, Ruse
and Great Britain taking the largest portion and the Americaai sol-
diers in the Philippines being supplied by China.
Exports of antimony regulus and ore decreased in value by $,514,-
307, but. increased in quantity by 5,085 tons. The slump in prices in
this commodity continued during the year, and large quantities were,
it is understood shipped on consignment to the United States. Cop-
per ingots and slabs rose from $7,509,932 to $10,145,691, but the quan-
tity showed an advance of only 8,334 tons, Japan, as usual, taking
the bulk. Pitg iron showed an increase of $1,108,131, also going, as
previously. principally to Japan. Tin in slabs increased by more,
than $5,300,000 and went chiefly through the port of Mengtz to.
Hongkong.
Shipments of bean oil advanced by $8,738,638, the United States
taking an unusually large quantity during the year. Exports of
peanut and wood oil decreased, the former by 13,061,000 pounds and
the latter by 15,000,000 pounds. Exports of hides improved by $3,-
151,178, goatski.s by $3,528,628, and sheepskins by $575,113, due
largely to unusual demands created by the war. Tobacco, another
war-time export product, advanced In value by over $1,000,000!
Exports of sheep's wool increased from $8,861,700 to $10,748,680.
Significant Trade Features at Antung and Amoy.
With regard to individual annual trade reports of the various ports
of China (only those of Antung, Amoy, and Foochow have been
received, May 11, 1918) it may be noted that while the conditions on
the dividing line between China apd Japan, at Antung, were similar
to those of 1916, it is estimated 'hal 97 per cent of the imports were
from Japan. American kerosene showed a substantial gain.
The Antung export trade almost doubled in value, the principal
gain being in beans and bean products, which constituted 37 -per
cent of the total exports. With the increase of wild silk from 2,000
to 4,000 reels, exports of cocoons fell off decidedly.
During the year a number of important building operations were
carried out at Antung, the most important being nine new wild-silk
filatures, while the Japanese began the erection of a copper smelter
which is expected to be the finest in southeast Manchuria.
On account of the increasing Japanese competition the only open
ing for American goods in Antung seems to be in lines where qual.
ity makes it difficult for Japanese manufacturers to compete, and it
is suggested by the American consul at that port that the best method
of handling the trade in Manchuria is to entrust it to American im-'
port firms in Shanghai and Tientsin.
The American consul at Amoy, in reviewing trade conditions
points out that the entire district has suffered keenly from the
abnormally high silver rate. A large percentage of the population
dependent upon remittances of surplus earnings from thehundbi.b
of thousands of able-bodied males who are working abroad in: gold
using countries; as the high price of silver reduced the value of 4aUi*











awes by fully 50 per cent, the result has been that loans made with
AMive bankers at high rates of interest by the dependent families
Oid not be met, and a very large percentage of the population is
ipSj bankrupt condition.
WarA uad Zxport Statisties for 1916.
4Ih statistical data indicating the origin and destination of articles
Ainmg into China's trade are not available for 1917, the following
pimmary has been prepared from the Chinese customs returns cover-
l imports and exports of the previous year:
Mg.


. Articles.


Amount.


I'OoTS.


SJthousanlds..
... ................- vaue......

.i ... ................. alue...
T aggP....*.................
Materials and fittings .value.
I,', torns...
a#m L -heSr (101,60 )... value..
iatdel bars........ ..
.. ..i.. gallons.

:- pounds..
-* *.... ..........* ....i value....
ifl. r (. H wood) ....... uare eet...
Nallsni:ts teal ...
i Ls and rivets ................ v a e..
rl ritsajd i il (......... ounds..
.i per, including cardboard...... value..

P: g goods:
i I'; 1 .....................


l 's"ah-rMg, ray............. value.'
*ii' pie-..


y.. ................... aue.
t pieces..
apq. ................. ue..
Gray ......... (pieces.

Railway materials and sleepers...value..

: a~ m sad plates (34,33)..... I" ;
Sad tede.. ..
iI. hL# tr es..................... ...
i,.. .........-........ lue....
mis..

iii mad tenbr... value..
sta pm ar....................do...
ounds..
r ................Ialue...




|||||||,y ""' --- value.

.. '..." ..........(.. pns..
uns..I
.............. ....1lue..
Aliga, A:,., l... .. --k


6,686,228
521,620,808
55,263,006
87,785,236
326,329,866
50,672,225
$3,955,964
6,767
I1,018,376
25,778
IS; 936,341
147, 756,09
26, 404,257
15,611,600.
36,606,148
22 404, 051
55,894,657
22,184
$2,322,587
1, 40, 200
31,267,498
68,018,007


1,143, 374'
3,009;,4_9
s1,437,,1
$3,889,378;
2,447,318
$7,078, 590
2,326,584
36,369,070
3,67,,356,
812,213, 86
3,266,159
29,889
l1,874,799
25,664
82,994,658
19,790,533
82,737,580
II1 ,898, 578
596,183
25,632,133
$1,665,166


13. I97
54,068, 073
11,514
35,725,.03?9
586, ]16
514,562,3f1:
371. 1(100
$4,5M3,994
37, Ir
V7,M0:%932


Per cent credited to-


Great Britain, 49; United States, 25; Hongkong,
12; Japan, 9; others, 6.
tndia, 71; Japan, 11; United States, 71; Hong-
kong, 10; others, J.
"Japan, 50; Hongkong, 25; India, 21: others, 4.
Japan, 41; Great Britain, 20; United States, 17;
Hongkong, 91; Canada, 24; others, 1Q.
United States. 39: Great Bitain, 38; Iapan, 13:
Hongkong, 8; others, 2. I
Japan, 29; United States, 28; Great Britain, 18;
SHongkong, 12; Russia, 12; others, 1.
United States, 57; Hongkong. 27; Straits Settle-
ments, etc 5; Japan, 44; Dutch Indies, 3;
others, 34.
Hongkong, 674; Japan, 27; United States, 3;
others, 24.
apan, 82; United States, 11i; Russia, 5; others,
United States, 47; Japan, 19: Hongkong, 21:
Great Britain, 6: Canada, 2: others, 5.
Great Britain, 41; Japan, 18; Hongong, 17;
United States, 15: others, 9.
Japan, 40; Sweden, 131; Norway, 114; Hongkong,
7; Great Britain, 10; United States, 13; others,
5.

apan, 88; United States, 9; others, 3.
dpan, 86; Great Britain, 12; others, 2.
Japan, 76: United Slates, 17; Great Britain, 4;
others, 3.
Great Britain, 53; Japan. 30; Hongkong, 15:
others, 2.
IGreat Britain, 75; Hongkong, 16; Japan, 8;
others, 1.
Japan, 484; United States, 254; Great Britain,
15; Russia, 3; others, 7).
Great Britain, 38; Japan, 28; United States, IS:
Russia, 11; others, 5.
United States, 42; Great Britain, 30; Hongkong,
18; Straits Settlements, 4; others, 6.
United States, 624; Hongkong, 21 ; Russia, 6;
Japan, 8: others, 2.
Russia 91; United States, 8; others, 1.
United States, 66; Great Britain, 11; Japan, 7:
Canada 13; others 24.
United Slates, 35:; lontkon, 27; Dutch Indies,
S13; British India, 10; Japan, 9; others, 5i.


Japan, 74 United States, 12; Great Britain, 1;
others, 7.
Umnted States, 0; Japan. 25; Hongkor 9:
,others, 6. ,
apan, 1 Russia,O; Great Britain,; Ienmark,
11; butih Indies, 6; others. I.
Great Britain 31, United States, 23; Japan. 21;
ongkong, it; rance, 9; others, 2
An but very small quantity to lapan.


... .:, **:: :) :.::"
..;diiiiiiP :.:::": : ". .:
EiiiiiiEiiii "! iiEE! .
...ii:I E : ...,;;-iiii~~~~i~.ii ~ i ,Piiiiii :EE: .,;-" --









SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPOBETB


Arlilels.


Amount.


________________________-- ~ I I-,.


E XOTS -c-on tinurel.
p rutinds..
COrt' raw ................... %u i ....
Fg aibumnen and yolk....... "Uti11..
Ircr, pig....................... ., o.
Meats, fresli and frozen....... .'e...
Oil:
Dean............... ...... ...
fi.,mndls.
3 ood......... ... .. .-n ....
Silk, r.ns:
Rereeled........... .. u... .....


1pounds..
Steam IjIlIurt'.......... ...

Silk pangers.................. value....

Skins and hiejs:
Cow and bulfalo......... vlue...d
Inumber..
Coat, untanned.......... valu ....
poundss
Straw braid.................. .valun...
piunds..-
Tall w, vegetable............. value..
Tea:
1paunds..


GrTin in slabs..................... (value ..
ron s ................... aunds.

Wool, sheep's............... une..


113,471, r')
$11. I.57, 5:
34, 4,0 133
Si, 170,, U9
.15,1. 175
i, K. 5,I'1
40,76 L417
52, 17, 518
204 7'2, 000
9,8011. 4 I'
68.1 ',, 731
$1,565,108
1, 820, rM
57.506,00j1
8,776,0.57
144.53S,143
3,235, 467
15,809,181

02,061,467
$11 ,.53,746
9,888,271
54,527,524
7,610,6087
$2,603,575
40,800,400
32,494,;87
86,430,40G
515,713, G72
39,830,400
511,787, 791
8,406
$7, 157,421
44, t04, boo00
68,8u:, 701


Per cent credited to-


Japan, 80; United States, 14:; Oreat Bl I ,I
,tithrri. 2.. li
Great Brilnin, 574; United States, 32; fj Cl: I'
Japan, 5; others, 3j.
.'raan, 'A; United States, 2; Canada, 2; o b~:i.::
Great Britain, 38; iPhi.ippine Islands, 4 tflh '
58.
Japan, 37; United States, 23; Great sB llt,' *
SBweden 10; Russi, 6; others, 4.
United states, 78; Hongkong, 12; Japan, ;
others, 5.
United Stales, 67; France, IS; Great Brtain, 12;
others, 3.
Hongkone, 54; United States, 22j; 1ranMe, 21;
Russia, 2: others, A.
Hongkong, 201; Great Britain, 181; United States;
16j; Australia, New Zealand, et, 15; India, f8
Canada, 56; France, 7i; Egypt, Persia eta., 3i
others, 5.
United States, 36; Japan, 29; Hongkong, 18; Italy,
8; Great Britain, 31; France, 3; othes 2.
United States, 70; Japan, 211; Franae, 7; others,
1j.
Japan, 434; Great Britain, 244; United States, 8
Italy 2; France, 20; others, I1.
Great Britain, 41; Italy, 26; United Stags, 11;
Japan, 7; France, 84; others, 6j.
Russia, 644; Hongkong, 15: United States, 12;
Great Britain, 11, India, 3; France, 2 others, 2S.
United States, 22; Russi, 43: Great Britain, 1i;
India, 3i; kranoe, Ci; Egypt, Persia, etc.,
others, 5.
Practically all to Hongkong.
SUnited States, 74; Japan, 25; others, 1.


Principal Imports into China.

The following table, compiled from the Maritime Customs records,
shows the quantity anasnet vaiwuwthe principal imports into China
during 1916 and 1917:

1916 1917
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


Arms and ammunition..........................
Automobiles...................................
Bags.................................number..
Beans, peas, etc...........................tons..
Belting, machine...............................
Butter (including ghee)................pounds..
Candles..................................do....
Canvas and cotton duck ................. yards..
Chemical products (except medicines, match-
making materials, and soda)...................
China and earthen ware.........................
Clocks and watches....................number..
Clothing, hats, gloves, etc. (except hosiery, shoes,
and habordashery)............................
Coal...................................... tons..
Conrectioncry (except chocolate).................
Cordage...............................pounds..
Copper:
Co arsP rods sheets, plates, and wire.....tone..
Ingots and slabs......................do....
Cotton goods:
Blankets.........................number..
Cambrics, lawns, and muslins, white, dyed,
or printed.........................pieces..
Drlls .................................. do....
Flanneltte .......................... do....


..............=
..............
42,171,817
28,552
..............
1, 120,200
3,097,600
2,445,405
... ...............
268, 952
..............
1,421,991
..............
4,468,533
638
1,737
464,812
875,769
1,056,645
680,383


$108,138
68, 814
2,804,759
939,723
490,399
422,197
297,849
607,469
1,493,145
801,393
404,897
8,807,292
7,434,685
204,829
430,832
844, 940
005,5688
268,539
851,740
2,745,047
1,9 4,782


..............
46,947,016
65,290
945,867
5,985,867
2, 93, 37
..............

338,279
..............
1,444, 124
6,784,267

088L
1,844:
747,136
BI, 14B
1, S67,
,1,07,S57


us, us
5, 88,821
2,512,196
418,274
7?, 881




4, 444,90
18,342, 871
201, S


an, u


ussgnl
Us '~s-S


A I


. 'i ii
xx ad!j


__




















tt wgoods-Continued.
90Z dke.lelsh.........................dozens..
t: blS, venetians, and lasting, plain, fast
.. ".. b k.............................. ..e ..
i Italians, enetians, poplins, and Iastings:
Colored.......................pieces..
Figured..........................do....
J.rns.................................do ....
Prints, plain..........................do....
Sheeting...........................do....
Shirtings:
Gray........:.......................do....
White.............................do....
T cloths.............................do....
Velvets and velveteens............ yards..
Yrn..............................pounds..
a ttn, raw .............................do....
ye; colors, and paints:
alint and paint oil.........................
All other.....................................
Eletrical materials and fittings..................
Enammeled ware..............................
Fib and fishery products.......................
Flor ..................................pounds..
Fruits, dried.................................
Furniture. and materials for ....................
Gasoline, benzine, etc...................galloas..
S Ginseng-..... ... ...................pounds..
lia .. eG s and glassware:
dWindow ...... ....................boxes..
S All other.................................
Haberdashery................................
Hemp..................................tons..
Hosiery... .............................dozen..
Instruments, musical...........................
Itu and steel, and manufactures of:
Bars..................................tons..
Cobbles and wire shorts..............do....
Hoops ............. ..................do....
Lamps and lampware......................
Machinery and fittings.....................
Nail rod............................tons..
Nails and rivets....... ........... do....
Pig and kentledg.................... do....
Pipes and tubes.....................do....
Plate cttings............ ..........do ...
Balls................................do ...
Sheets and plates, n. e. s...........do....
Sheets, galvanized................... do....
Rtoves and grates............................
S Wire, n. 6. a ......................... tons..
Lead pigs and bars .......................do....
ather.............................. pounds..
Imitation and cloth.......................
Manufactures of (except boots, shoes, and
:gl ove.s) ..............................
Lumber:
Hardwood....................... ubic feet..
Softwood......................square feet..
Maehies, knitting, sewing, and embroidery......
matd hes...................................gross..
Matth-msking materlals.......................
Medclae ........................................
tMkC eondeased........................dozens..
N edle...............................thousands..
Ols:

American ......................gallons..
.Born eo ................ ...........do...
BIo n Japioan e....................... do....
IRussian...........................do....
i Bulatran.......................... ...do....
IiUrloatiunt g.........................do ...
..t.. ........................... do ....
.. .......................pounds..

.ma..l..t.T............................
sa'dl G e .........................

npl' i llt M material...............

V i aa tcars.....................
"- mle .mo t nd tendars......................
Is ............................number..


1916 1917
Artiales.antit.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


1,578,076
1,133,243
787,544
578, 38
1, 430, 129
613,841
2,326,191

2, 307,980
3,469 ,98
1,168, 03
1,591,340
328,924,267
54,852,533

...............



31,128,533

685, 906
511,568

203,192
..............
..............
1,143
2,091,983

24,480
5,610
6,688
.............
............
805
20, 906
.12,102
10,304
3858
9,828
22,075
6,353
..............
504
5,121
15,192,13.3
..............

..............

1,891,758
223,975,813
..............
20, 620, 717

464,567
396,420

108, 775,017
10,447,512
6,40, 400
1,047,372
19,204,569
4,358,000
199,757






1,i746,571i


~i~ I


1514,094
6,478, 123

3,398,523
2,934,209
3,868,324
1,598, 03
6,704,555

6,327,133
11,530,089
2,269,615
349,411
51,326,203
6,683,379

1,206,067
1,776, 871
2,842,370
532,632
11,390,481
972,875
704, 808
869,466
278, 247
8,115,654
1,381,725
506,685
708,987
238,589
1,602,609
479,874

1,861,917
271,042
709,272
555,736
4,991,521
52,401
2,182,595
442,382
962,417
189,794
510,982
1,784,966
95, 130
81,388
70 423
897,275
6,246,629
74,366

203,679

784,982
3,882,888
234,602
5,778,237
1,525,334
4,229,961
688, 157
261,773

19,265,166
1,6S6,750
1,286,520
517,415
2,404,422
1,518,280
8,520, 445
7,R92,570
734, 412
364,010
340,347

443, 650
11,750,042
1,552,874


1,317,793

1,181,184
1,181,0-10
667,229
1,6 5, 518
1, 498, 630
2,739,209

3,160,872
2,822,911
1,360, 16
3,398, 5K9
271,364,133
40,017,067


........3....2
..............





1, 183,895
507,664

183,302
..............
..............-
523
2,544,943

15, 33
6,69.1

..........
..............

5,634
12,404
3,417
10,555
16,943
1,768
..............
1,637
5,205
17,666,533



2,836,412
77,935,786

15,594,320
..............
455,.502
1,155,038

107, 446.239
9,777,14
5,430, 593
300.679
33,633,346
3,287,494
14,024

..........
..........i;."


1,051,241


I


1552,001
7,491,088
6,023,773
4,874, 87
5, 63,017
4,665,959
10,227,131

10,564,315
12,802, 652
3,550,997
1,145,358
6L,345,662
6, 531,348

1,237,647
2,513, 90
4,107,788
786,137
14,427,630
2,874,947
865,614
1,083,723
562,140
5,275,738

1,626,181
852,558
477,306
263,262
2,750,601
694, 106

1,559,594
484,321
810,188
809,499
5,369,242
-.'.........
2,466,300
345,881
1,712,161
288,371
747,695
2,174,136
40t, 576
83,073
234, 637
980,896
9,8Sl,795
151,993
250, 703

1, 511,80
2,976,981
440,553
5, 666,652
1,422,148
5,810,050
853,832
1,073,485

24,529,885
1,798,733
1,312, 09
106,832
6,071,15 -
1,162,339
6,366,831
6,374,279
1,024,551
531,550
47, 248

3649,76
1,106,157









SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORT.%


l .....:


1816 117
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Vahlm.


Ritr rl upaddy... .....................tons.. 752,268 $27,9 7, 466 658,813 fl30,
Sailfs and strong d .oors....................................... 145,579 ..............
SILiles and Ilalances ........................................... 100,002 ......... .
Seeds...................... ................... .............. 582,537 .............. j gm
PlSho and boots. leather............... pairs.. 115,236 150,099 432,068 ON
Slap, and materials for........................... ......... 1,452,987 ..............
Shook for casks.............................. .............. 674,008 ..............
Rorda.......................................tons. 32,80 2R4,25- 14,402 437
Stallonery (not including paper)................. .............. 88,18 ............... h3.
Stores, household.............................. .............. 1,554,786 .............. 1,75,84g
Sugar:
Brown.... .........................tons.. 12,95 7,279,84 125,367 7,5a,547
White.............................. do.... 62,063 5,125,714 74,074 G*4,u,1m
Rfind .d................ .......... do... 143,925 16,217,850 1 3891 = 9'175
ConfeIctionrs'.. ........ 11,752 1,323,051 15,007 2,28
Tea...................................pounds.. 30,943,733 5,579,422 25,259, 00 4 5,72
TclFphontu n telegraph materials............... ............ 506,209 .............. 60
Tinn slabs .... ......... ............... tons.. 3,137 2,000,983 2,86. 6 2 3,642
Toba'cii. andl mIinuhclturi.s ol:
Ci.grrt tes......................thousands.. 6,656,244 21,534,209 7,909,103 31,88,287
'igdrs............................... do.... 42,608 99, 928 39,343 0W1,
Totacco .........................pounds.. 19,617,600 2,713,312 20,523 600 s me
Toilel rL.ui.sites.................................. .............. 602,933 .............. 74
Toilel rv,.luitcs..602, 933 .74. R m
Uinlrerllas........................... number.. 2,605,084 1,018,578 2,546,684 1, 6868
Was, luaraflin............................ tons.. 10,158 1,318,605 14,244 i2,13
Wines, hber. spirits, etc.:
Beer and porter.................................. 675,357 .............. 961,Ta
Spirits................................................. 760,307 ............. ,081
Wines. .......................... ................ 1,013,826 .............. 1, ,01
Woolen goods:
Blankets and rug ................. pounds.. 71,501 45,314 169,118 174,853
Coalings and suiting ................ yards.. 412,551 545,746 971,796 1,589,461
Woulon and worsted yarn and cord.....pounds.. 569,200 544,119 831,733 1,370,443
Woolen and cotton unions:
Alpacas. lusters. and orleans..........yards.. 390,148 121,393 741,305 34,111
Coatings nnd suitings................ do.... 267,544 215,725 1,189,446 1,149,046
All other articles ......................................... 65,859,081 ............. 8 772,554
Total net imports....................................... 427,739,914 .............. 50,509,150


Principal Exports from China.

The following table shows the quantity and value of the principal
exports from China in 1916 and 1917, according to the Chinese Mari-
time Customs returns:


1
Articles.
Quantity.

Animals:
Cattle, shpep, goats, and pigs.......number.. 416,997
Horses, ass's, and mules.............. do.... 3,322
Poultry............................do... 4,083, 845
Bags.......... .......................do.... 6,126,530
Ilruns .....................................tons 586,166
Br'adsilulIs:
Bran. ................ .................do... 22008
Wlh't ................................ do... 77012
Tritlls .............................. pounds. 8,371,600
Chnriaware, heart hnware, and pottery...................
Coal.....................................tons.. 1,314,922
Collon:
Haw...............................pounds. 113,471,600
Nankeens...........................do.... 6,668,667
Eggs:
Albumon and yolk ..................do... 38,446,133
Fresh and preserved ................dozen.. 29,500,833
Fro.en............................. pounds. 24,150,067
Feath'rs, fowl, etc..........................do.... 7,658,133
Fibers:
Hemp.................................do.... 19,173,200
Jute.................................do.... 13,518,667
Ramie .............. .................do.... 2,124,133
Firecrackers and reworks ............................ ..........


916 1917

Value. Quantity. Value.


33,470,393
205,092
690,607
365,744
14,562,363
283,451
1,841,421
4,5 3,994
2,334,133
4,752,529
14,157,536
2,392, 66
6, 739,8
2,526,406
1,373,518
039,886
1,407,589
409,155
2,336,807
2, 008, 129


346,437
1,134
3,150,532
7,342 ,42
667, 10
34,578
103, 840
8,557,4867
..............
1,575,627
110,995,067
6,518,267
54,003,538
20,616,656
4, 76,188


11 839,38
22,4,963


3, 01, 964

2,35387

439, 000
6,209,071
2,34879

20,4m6,579
2,970,615


i~n~r
45, 11

oSSit
**;=K-l


7 i ii


i:
ii5
... ,i/// :) *J !ii!!!i
,:.ui;i :"



















P labh ad fishery products..................tons..
Mlour.................................pounds..
]kfUs:
Fresh.............................. do....
Dried ................................do....
lls .....................................do....
Sinew...........................................
Gla ware, bangles, etc ..........................
(ea. cloth............. ...............ponds..
O. mdnuts..............................tons..
Hair, all kinds..........................pounds..
Bal
R, sh................... ...........number..
Wood shaving or chip .............. do....
: dm liquid...........................ponds..
Lubk .................................... do....
S Liy rowers, dried.......................do....
auinher.................................... .....
Mat ..................................number..
tt ...................................olls
Moets:
Fresh and frozen....................pounds..
SPreserved and prepared................do....
Poetry and game .....................do....
ediines.......................................... ....
Antimony-
Regulus and crude ...............tons..
Ore............................ do....
Copper ingots and slabs................do ...
Iran-
SPig..............................do....
Ore ................................do....
SLead .................................. do....
Lead ore...............................do....
Qulaksiherw...................................
Tin in slabs........................... tons..
Ore................................do....
Spelter.............................do....
Muak.................................... ounes..
Oils:
Bea............................... pounds..
Essentia........... ..................do....
Panut ................................do....
Wood .................................do....
Paper......................................do....-
ambsaCnative wine)...................gallons..
Seeds:
Apriot ................................tons..
Cotton........................... ......do...
M elo....; ............................. do....
Rape .................................do....
S eeeaime.............................. do ...
Bea" ase. .............................do....
Bilk and nmaubactures o:
l aw white-
Seeled and rereeled ...........ponds..
it Filature............. ............do ...
Wild.............................. ..
Raw, yellow .......................do....
Cooons................................ do....
Waste ................................. do....
oCamus, rel .......................do.... do.
Piefe goods ............................do....
P'gmpes. ......... ...............do....
i All other....................................
S kins and hides:
Cow and bfal~....................pomnds..
Soat, untanned................... number..
:ore, ass, and mule..............pounds..
I- Ga, uha n..... ... ..........mbar.
iis B drm, d:
B,;Go.: at tmnned............ ..........do....
......... ....................do....
"M t a and rugs.........do....
i ma, and rugs.........do....
l i; m an .. ......... ...... .do-....
"i. bi a ..................do....
Steep-M ad rugs............. do.....
:::::::


Quantity.


9,615
88, 632, 33
2, 884,133
..............
6, 27S,733
..............

42, 784
6,060, 133
2,853349
681 706
12,007,867
3,080,133
4,699,600
..............
25, 761,i08
187,692
40,761,867
5,485,067
4,79B333
..............

24,740
12,968
37,654
159,475
311,982
1,244
9,80
.............
8,403

452
803
25,190
208,752,000
1,257,467
74,868,267
68, 733
', 570,800
1 45, 450
2,227
24,870
4,654
41,599
103,873
54,062

2,612, M93
8.776,067
2,490,933
2,420,133
4,044,400
18,281,867
28, 400
1,980,667
23, 467
..............
68,061,467
9, 888,271
3,400,933
1,18, 253
494,771
238,395
M 805, 55
163,042
114,949
53,252
27,029


Value.


*1-


Quantity.


Valuu.


i1 i-


578, 182
945,676
389, 841
534,535
855, 221
166,742
337,140
1,416.671
2,166,607
982,286

93,303
20,436
626,700
1,033,663
375,367
1,371,614
1,519,158
1,087,748

2,137,518
699,628
274,757
2,651,478

9,793,408
1,145,740
7,509,932
4,286, 431
757,981
209, 841
89,215
488,058
7,148,365

14,022
202,833
427.354
9,801,412
727,943
4,970,209
4, 5, 108
2,92, 123
402,452
456,318
343,647
463,811
1, 6,8g91
5, 796,237
948,421

9,79, 751
44,538,143
4, 77,645
6,116,007
2,155,333
6,790,590
811,425
10,110,717
5, 809, I
791,298
14,563,745
4, 527,524
448,321
410,805
402,329
222,848
571,405
176,406
121,367
195,216
35,579


9, 343
10, 404, 133
27, 228,400
..............
5, 534, 133
..............
..............
2,104,400
31,421
5,104,667
2, 095, 241
341,964
10,419,733
6,199,600
3,897,333
32,606,770
72, 124
52,736,133
9,700,533
7,282,533
.............

38,539
4,254
45,988
162,194
340,878
825
423,655

13,088
251
476
21,272
252,180,400
1,334,533
61,807,067
53,514,800
32,385,467
1,460,750

1,220
24,692
2, 828
28,713
14, 80
70,862

2,491,733
9,200,400
2,431,467
2,652,400
4,483,067
15,310,400
3,707,600
1,730,800
2,297,067

63,613.200
11,735,579
4, 101, 933
1,721,823
425,291
173,941

an, 276
71,354
46,018
48, 67
21,887


I$, a11, 99
2,338,230
447,033
590,418
914,538
183, 66
311;737
1,979,261
2,052, IU5
955, 389
72,434
13,910
668,759
3, 121,261
316,961
2,146,442
1, 946,614
561,391
3,043,766
1,191,731
586,383
3,396,699

6,182, 385
242,456
10,145,691
5,394,562
1,038,848
167,699
790,152
779,965
12,448,975
7,268
116,958
544,592
18, 50, a0
863, 981
5,293,637
4,902,60
3,267 144
49086
284,927
468,087
370,384
1,62,640
1,122,546
1,545,855

12,088,317
54,367.286
6,133,228
8,142,754
1,5804.651
635,517
68, 541
11, 122637
6,451,7
772,833
17,714,923
8,056,150
717,909
985,918
44a,178
196,887
362,387
23,748
56,478
131,838
43,018









EUPPIZEMENT TO COlMBRRCE BEPOsi.


Artcles.


Skins, fur, dressed and undressed:
Fox.............................. do....
Marmot...............................do....
Raccoon.............................do....
Wceasel.......... ..................do....
Straw braid ............................pounds..
Sugar, including confectioners' and cane.. .ons..
Tallow:
Animal........................ pounds..
Vogetable...........................do....
Tea:
Black ................................do.
Green.................................do ....
Brick-
Black............................do....
C reen...................... ......do....
Dust and tablet....................do....
Tobacco, and manufactures of:
Ciparettes............................do....
Lear and prepared....................do....
Varnish.......... .................. ....
Vegetables, n. e. s...........................
Wool:
Camel's.............................pounds..
Goat's........................... do....
Sheep's........................... do...
All other articles...............................
Total..................................


I 1916 I 1M


Quantity.


6313
61, 682
486,971
22,871
7,610,667

40,800,400
31,261, 333
N 430, 400
39,830,400
52,89, 200
21,842,133
4, 68,400
904,800
26,979, 867


3,971,067
1,737,333
44,664,800
..............


Value.


IM2, 2M9
103, 730
35,571
76,161
2,603,5737
1,008,20
4,187,115
2,404,587
15,713,672
II,787,791
6,607,296
1,443,295
613,679
405,145
2,5 l1,984
653,237
989,047
886,966
352,174
8, 1,707
71,118,497


399,072,759


ti


Quatity. I


13,09M
272,W28
,1 748
5, 403,200
30,758
86,961,067
20,1441,687
63,1t, 00
25,146,733
29,776, 8M
1,786, 00
1,676,989
2, 816,800


4,497,867
1,818,800
45,247,200


Heavy Increase in China's Declared Exports to United States.
The increase in the value of declared exports to the United Sbles
amounted to $62,594,315, coming within $7,000,000 of the total otide-.
clared exports for the year 1915, the figures for that year beiag
$69.131,701.
Declared exports to Hawaii showed an increase of $13,299, chiefly
in canned meats and peanut oil.
Declared exports to the Philippine Islands showed an increaa. of
more than $100,000 cement from Tientsin decreased by $54,890,
while coal and coke from Dairen and Tientsin advanced by $113S .
Frozen meat from Tsingtau increased by more than $300,000, ulid
hams also advanced by almost $110,000. 'Raw silk rose from $41,408
to $115,336, an improvement of $73,928.
Returned American goods to the United States, which are nat in-
cluded in the figures given, amounted to $57,669, as against $2O600
in 1916. American goods to the amount of $3,545 were returned to
the Philippine Islands in 1917.
Statistics of Declared Exports for 1916 and 1917.
There follows a condensed table of the declared value of exports
to the United States and its possessions, invoiced through the ABair-
ican consulates in China in 1916 and 1917:


Articles. 1916 1917 Articles.


TO UNITED STATES
Antimony:
Crude..............
Regulus..............
Art, works of:
Porcelains............
All other...........
Leeswax.................
Brass ingots...........


$441,981
3,337,278
357, 85
47,869
247


$80,04,045
1,520,398
155,391
136,687
444
81,500


TO UNITED STATEZ---on.
Bristles..................
Chemicals:
Albumen............
Cantharides..........
Camphor ............
Dyes:
Aniline...........
Indigo paste......


61,891,207,
1,323231
12137

640, 71
46,471


Va' ":













^1
. E14IE


4tii

1:I .
0, age
79, Ou


473, 1,S.i


.. ::.. ..'
i *
.'::. "" .. : ; i i




',':
..


:; l ii;;


_


1










SOETNA.


to0 TnITD r8TAE-cO.
aAilmels-am
Gallnuts ..............
Licorice root..........
Mask.... .........
Rhubarb ...........
9Sda, benzoate of.....
Turmeric-...........
.r.per slabs..............
Wsat, and manuactures
fd:
Raw..................
Waste....-........
Waste yarn...........
Lace, embroidery, etc.
OilAerieos....................
arthen and ina ware..
resh .................
Dried and frozen......
Yolk...............
Fans palm4eaf...........
Feathers and downs......
Ftber, and manufactures
of:
China grass..........
Embroidery, etc......
SHemp...............
Jute.................
All other............
Firecrackers .............
Fruits and nuts:
Apricot kernels.......
Peanuts............
Walnuts.............
Furs and skins, and man-
ufactures of:
Dressed-Dog mats...
Undressed-
Deer and doe.....
Cat..............
Dog..............
Fox.............
Goat.............
Marmot...........
R abbit .........
Sheep and lamb..
Weasel ...........
All other.........
Gold bars...............
Hair:
Horse...............
Human ..........
Nets.................
Hats, rush, straw, and
wood-shaving..........
Hides:
BuTfalo..............
Cow and f .........
Horse, pony, and don-
key................
All other..............
Household effects ........
Iron, pi .................
Joss sticks ...............
Matting, mats, and rugs..
Meat and dairy products:
Sausge casings.......
All otber.............
Metals: Tungsten or wolf.
ram ore...............
Oils vegetable:
1can................
Castor...............
Cottonseed...........
Peanut...............
Rape................
Wood..............
All other.............
Pap s, ad manufactures
Books...............
a e ethi rIneer.....
I. sA Otblf,.f.......


lei 1917 Articles. 1916 1917


82,547
79,711
18,956
68,060
56,080


2,431,637
110,120
8,138
67,226
210,551
75,434
83,372
744,235
1,128,482
50,648
451,936

14,961
10,804
52,858
104,041
297,570
292,779

25,981
103,565
679,632

175,703

155,311
32,678
461,626
46, 508
7,715,459
131,695
44,703
401,703
32,055
247,099
114,122
570,244
83,771
376,601
300,897

86, 135
6,909,9587
328,284
6,911
43,392
152,472
16,876
407,438

372,753
732


562. 686
3, 25t 619
72., 926
218,221
53,595
4,342,275
84,209

10, 426
17,717
7,230


147,214
54,816
1,076
1,480
120,950

5,203,290
99,171
8,453
586,353
233,912
137,510
51,296
1,108,930
3,515,235
39,332
826,740

233,893
1,281
179,481
95, 658
154,367
330,739
15,998
481,452
531,866

483,424
588,823
36,467
164
114,117
15,102,507
33,846
12,121
2,528,707
156,783
574,251

402,773
306,122
545,999
288,046
892,036
10,757.561
164.264
97,135
26, 545
65,473
11,040
221,028

835,325
9,527
309,747
20,564,610
212,403
885,032
1,558,982
110,513
4,727,225
4,477,

14,663
9,423
14160


TO UNITED 8TATES-COB.
Plants and bulbs: Narcis-
sus bulbs..............
Seeds:
Cnstor...............
Linseed...........
Mustard..............
Rap .................
Sesame.............
Sorghum (kanliang)...
All other.............
Silk manurt'tures:
Pongpes..-...........
All other..............
Silk:
Rnw..................
Waste..............
W Uill.................
Cocoons...............
Silver cins ..............
BrioRs: ('asis. ..........
Straw brai.................
Tallow:
Veztnble ...........
Animal...............
Tea.......................
Tobacco leaf ..............
V'eaetables:
Beans..............
Peas.................
Woods, and manufactures
ol:
Banmbon, split........
China and pilm reeds
All nthcr............
Wool, and manufactures
of:
Camel's hair........
Goat...............
Sheep............
Carpets and rugs......
Zinc ore...............
All other articles..........


Total.............. 93,089,075
TO HAWAI.

Curios.................... 644
Porcelain ................. 2,721
Iron, pig.................. 5,529
Meat, canned.........................
Silk pongees............. 1,622
Oil, peanut...........................
Tea..................... 1,271
All other articles.......... 27

Total............... 11,814
TO PmLIPPINES.

Arbutus, dried............ 2,289
Breadstuffs:
Flour................ 8,00T
Vermicelli ........... 7, l18
All other ............. 1, 76
Candles................... 6,1 (
Cement.................. 807,4.8
Coal and coke............ 367, 615
Cotton, and manufactures
of:
Cloth............... ............
Nankeens........... 4,416
Yarn................ 3, :152
Laces................ 3,234
Earthenware:
Chinawaro ........... 2, 89
Fire bricks and Ore
clay ................ 2,298
Eibers, and manuloctures
o(:
Fish nets............. 4,357
-Crass cloth........... 110, 2-Y
STwine................ 2,45 .


314,20
............
113,426
81, 402
15,789
79,86:1
3, 228
1,239,019
117,464

22,393, 677
2,200,633
1,805,.32
45,325
262.291
107, 835
2,027. 084
35-1,72S

3,513.7'18
131,377
38,095
121,6 7

21,870
73,218
35.096

705,872
265.348
9,462, tl9
968,)17
7,725
1,322,503


526,955
126,892
431,058
9,226
20,115
82,247
31,231
3,450
2,002, 480
214,545
27, Ri8, 80
2,960,314
3,010,003
116,216
68,319
3,671,274

1,596,804
227,266
5,357,007
1,664,118
1,488,630
401,868

37.391
36,999
48,511

1,072,017
54,366
15,060, 448
819,102
332,054

155,683,390


2,774
2,549
6,049
5,709
1,762
3,076
377
2,757

25,113


4,134
C03
15,443
789
3, lIO
262,578
481,138

67,503
27,252
12,475

6,044

7,059

3,355
5,806
............









SUPPLEMENT 7o! COMBbOM BkPOBM,"


Articles. 191I 1017 ArtUi l. 191


TO FlILIrPPI ES--C00.
Fruits and nuts:
]'can u L ..............
All other.............
Iron and steel, manufae-
lures of:
Pig iron.............
Diiillery fittings.....
All other............
Meat and dairy products:
Canned meats .......
Frozen meats.........
Hams................
Milk, sterilized......
Oil, liquid fuel .......
Oils, vegetable:
Peanut...............
All other.............
Paper, and manufacrures
of:
Jinoks, printed.......
All oth r .............


9, 908
4,GB8

1,208
3,1A3
21,655
2,340
1711,039
70,698
2, 716
............
7,013
5,456

6,978
6,825


$2,034
4,826

1,570
.............
8,701
5,G0'
477, A51

10,7121


10, 746
14,053


TO PHBILIPPDf--O
Photographic films.......
Silks, and manufactures
of:
Piece goods..........
Pongoes............
Raw ..............
Soap ..............
Stra1 braid..............
Tea......................
Vegetables:
Beans..............
All other............
Wood, and manufactures
of:
Canes..............
Combs .............
All other.........
All other articles.........
Total...............


3421

6,912
808
41,408
1,218
6,300
8,267
7,461
23,491

1,413
2,513
164
34,314
1,787,500


WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTriw O NIVW IoW


Inv


116













4Ff.

4387
0987


1,887,808


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.... .... ..









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UNIV. OF FL LII.
DOCUM gENTS DEPOT



A DD EP aT



U.S. DEPOSITORY


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