Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00035
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00035

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text













SNo. 66b December 6, 1917


BRITISH SOUTH AFRICA.
lo..1N yftee aonaml Clum. H. Helaler, Cape Town.
.ala Considerable increase in both the import and the
Se the Union of South Africa with the United States in
Wi y to the cutting off of commerce with certain countries

S'aid again in 1913, the value of direct exports to the
9:was, m round numbers, about $2,500,000. In 1914 the
sed to little more than $1,000,000, but in 1915 and 1916
$11,000,000 and $15,000,000, respectively. The imports
united States for 1916 were valued at nearly $30,000,000,
th $21,500,000 for 1915.
"the declared value of the goods imported constitutes a
actual volume in tonnage is considerably below the figure
ent years. The average increase in value for 1916 over
per cent, but the volume of imports in 1916 was 22 per
in 1913.
STrade by Countries.
sf the imports of merchandise (not including Govern-
*1into, and the exports from,'the Union of South Africa
and 1916 are shown by countries of origin and destina-
i owing table:

Imports from. Exports to.

S 1915 1916 1915 1916

................................... 98,802,818 132,40,318 555,697,953 186 26, 419
.................... 83,00,473 110,686,800 47,980,064 7,522,759
.2,211,995 6,330,956 1,475,398 1,327,192
..... ................... 21,466 51,8 2 118,373 246,916
............................. 6 77 4 432
87, 772 430432.... ...
6.. i..... .. ................. 4,759 822 4,21,542 1. 06,425' 2,179
...................................... I1, 321 174 139,49 241,
................................... 6,159,174 7,083,790 410,557 11730
S.................................... 61,95 112, OQ 251, 141 M
.... .6848 8,,203 16 9,39 25
.. ................................ sE, 503 1so, 309 0I! 6
.............................759,432 1,004,475 3,6 155 9, 94
A .............................. I 16 306,04 927 Ma 1, 43, 16
Ita. .... ............................ 7 36470 1,277 101 1, Ns
.......................... ... .. !I 241, 388 ............. ... .. ..
l t ............... ................. 4,3 2 16, 30 12 M 17, 385
.H* "................................ 5W 29,64,703 11, 331, 91 16, 6 2
is................ ............ ..... I1, 0 8108 14867 L 2
i Hi..w ..a......................... ..... 28,7 8 0M ............. ............
** ...*.......... ............... 8, 0 3, g m ......................
1....0..... .............
.. h cif f l.............................. M 4 IlaAM ............. ............
i .. **** .......... ..................... 1, 234 11 613 9 4 ............ ............
o ... 1, 138,13 ............ ......









SUPPLEMENT TO COMMEBOE BBPORTS.


Imports from. Expek to,
Countries.
1915 1910 1915 5W

Foreign counlries-Continued.
Denmark....................................... 544,78 427,030 ............. ..........
France.......................................... 2,357,,867 2,4 3,919 843,579 S1M 1
Madagascar ............................. .... ;4,;0 181846 55,790 o
Germany....................................... 5l(i,(185 177,038 ........................
(reee .......................................... 104.9 123,492.........................
Nellerlands ..................................... 2, 4 21 2,5;9,;17 33, 01 143
Dutch East Indies ........................ 82,290 8s5,802 19,685
tly ............................. 6,113 1,382,300 45,988 10
Norwy....................................... 1,074,703 1,314,610 ..... .... ............
Porgal ........................................ 252,902 259,380 00,831 ............
Portuglese East Africa ...................... 700,265 764,644 504,160 75. 147
1'ortugueso West Arica ................. 84,552 22,279 90,71B 9I143
Russia...................................... 155,743 33i,472 ............. 1
Sp tn .................. ..................... 288, 82 440,297 ........................
Sweden........................... ........ 2,180,500 4,3 31.834 .......................
Switzerland.................................... 1,54, 51 1,877,973 ............. ............
Turkish Empire.. ........................... 190,319 95,797 ........ ............
Total.................................. 142,145,106 188,621,948 a73,L34,611 1016,Ot ,IO

a Including ships' stores.
Leading Articles of Import.

The following table shows the value of the principal articles im-
ported into the Union of South Africa in 1915 and 1916:


Articles.

Animals..................
Anti[ri lion grease.........
Apparel and slops........
Arms and ammunition....
Assay apparatus ...........
Ba;. not leather.........
Binding twine..............
Bioseope films...........
Brass.....................
Bru shwar ...............
Canvas and duck........
Cement....................
Clocks and watches........
Coal, coke, and patent fuel
Copra..... .... ..........
Cordage and rope........
Corks aad bungs..........
Cotton manufactures:
Blankets and rugs.....
Piece goods............
Shawls................
U nderclothing .........
Waste................
Other.............
Drugs, chemicals, and
apothecary ware.........
Dyestuffs and tanning sub-
stances...................
Earthen and chinaware....
Electrical fittings..........
Electrical material, cable,
and wire............
Enameled ware............
Felt.......................
Food and drink, articles of:
Baking powder........
Biscuits.............
Butter and substitutes
Cheese..............
Chicory ands:ibstitu tes
Cocoa and chocolate,
unsweetenel.......
Colfee...............
Confeetlonryjams,etc.
Corn, grain, and four..
Extracts and essences..


1915 1916 Articles. 1915 U1


$2 7 ,284
201,176
9,4:4,815
812,608
107,1 11
3,126,958
83,.93
195,205
117,0.12
18d,502
402, y07
205,361
2j2, ,43
2.8,760
(a
284,933
145,981
1,001,642
8,764,423
ti:,61S
3,725,568
581,964
1,745,390
5,221,545
66,267
492, 92
886,067
^,021
13J,297
5),581
317,919
25S,440
911,879
756,547
168,707
251,666
2,627,910
1,621, 55B
7, 08,981
224,094


$369,567
3(1,764
14,025,720
1,6j3,56
125,4,0
3,355,570
101,241
195,546
190,855
319,832
481,501
227,475
441,241
208, 919
225,903
367,854
151,908
2,341,318
14,004,016
252,951
5, 999,494
960,6DUG
2,498,092
5,664,981
131,508
952,092
1,450,528
1,155,020
380,020
88,419
213,175
167,174
440,764
468,011
201,318
193,994
2,680.303
1,629,030
8,465,287
253,613


Food and drink, articles
of-Continued.
Farinaceous propara-
Lions................
Fish..................
Fruit and outs........
Lard and substitutes...
Meats, fresh and pre-
served..............
Milk, condensed.......
Oils, salad............
Pickles and sauces.....
Rice...................
Spices.................
Spirits, potable........
Sugar.................
Sugar products........
Ton...................
Vegetables, prepared..
Wine.................
Footwear, not leather......
Furniture, etc............
Glass and glassware........
Glycerin.................
Haberdashery and milli-
nery...............
Hardware and cutlery...
Hats and caps...........
lides and skins............
Hose, conveying..........
Implements, agricultural
and dairy................
India rubber, including
tires.....................
Instruments, musical......
Iron and steel manufac-
tures:
Bar bolt, and rod.....
Orders, beams, and
joists................
Hoop................
Pipes and fttings......
Plate and sheet........
Jewelry.................
Jute and hessian..........
Lamps and lampwaro......


6816,332
1,201,062
598,365
ss:3s
295,308
1,027,677
1,997,382
328,605
233,300
1,917,450
140,085
1,806,415
51, 849
322,167
1,557,688
147,975
250,274
156.346
1,741,145
889,705
1,767,186

4,539,865
4,886,365
1,020,343
113,239
43,38:
1,364,921

1,3L,30
321,738



134,71W
1,043st
1,8 48,I1
310, 1
13& =3
1%m


a Not separately stated.


i3tx, -1
som V
602,=2



ag ,
1, 11, 1g

z*ssm i'
1. 124, in







som


13= 313
2 741 11
179





32"






.,,'d:i!::i:|


i""ii":ii'
iiiiii;::::iii.


1_ i;




















iii1 ::.. ~iBliD ur *....- ........
(exceptloc
flu~):
ra,,l..........
and beltng.....








|g. ,L:: in I. beneatginde.......
:::..............

S Cttons..ee...........
M ter tse Lir.......


Ii;P'M a td splirs ..........
...t Paraffi (kerosene)
u Cocont...........


l Cottonseead ........
need bookb.........nder's
P: al...............
adiera'and colars..........
...v .................
a materials._
nds, I YOr and plated
Itte..................
Ai WhTerand bookbinder's
material.................
W i Vial l r ................
idlers' and shoemakers'
adeterial .................
le00 .....................
5hep and cattle dip.......


366,680
713 166
867 726
1,48 ,185
3a184, 95
214,253
432,140
168,376
853,272
546, 629
1,018,981

674,798
1,336, 886
1,184,563
153,417
122,677
169,529
83,695
758,117
1,578,424
390,458
218,901
286,403
175,204
237,655
229,703
151,401
360,631


350,592
864,155
878,360
1, 178,661
3,549,192
273,930
398,523
272, 918
16, 819
. 1,356, 980
1,222,222

926,343
1,760,413
1,225,629.
165,991
105,146
323,501
431,298
1,303, 522
3,629, 096
527,178
292, 569
491,317
381,120
192,003
315,090
175,034
402,210


Dur an muu Uenuau appu-
anesi...................
Tallow and grease..........
Tar, etc.................
Tin and tinware..........
Tobacco, raw and manu-
factured...............
Tobacconists' wares.......
Toys and fancy goods......
Tramway material.........
Vehicles:
Bicycles and tricycles. -
Motorcycles and parts.
Motor cars and parts...
Motor trucks..........
Wax, paraffin and stearine.
Wood and timber.........
Woolen manufactures:
Blankets and rugs.....
Cloth and piece goods..
Hosiery and under-
clothing............
Shawls...............
Zinc and zineware.........
All other articles.........
Total ...............
Imported from Southern


218,739
438,014
121,268
625,641
.530, 547
153,932
467, 592
109,059
346,295
555,598
2,241,836
121,332
965,917
3,098,086
1,009,253
1,784,263
430,311
150,059
1,004,898
7,144,086
141,385,676


and Northern Rhodesia. 759,431
Total merchandise... 142,145,107
Imports of Government
stores .................... 12,661,747
Specie..................... 9,844,078
Grand total .......... 164, 650, 932


Imports by Countries of Origin.
The countries of origin of the principal articles imported into the
Union in 1916 are shown in the following table:

Articles and countries of origin. Value. Articles and countries of origin. Value.


i A~ lu and slops.................
S-United Kingdom ............
cited tates.....................
Tlb .........................
a l ... lo. .....................
AM= 4 jim ion................
United Kingdom ..................
SUnited Btates ............ .....
A at leather.....................
l.it" .................. .......
United Kigdom ................

SUnited tatet ...................
iliie ............
eOttaB maniuiactts:
Pia.goods..........................
United Kingdom...............

ItSrtod.. ..................
Ute ht...e..............
ZStad blankete................
nited Kingdom..............
Nrtberaids.................
ua an.......................
United a................
Underwarer iulary.........,...
apan........................
United states.................
OH-~andedismials ..................
Und kingdom. ............
United Stat .....................







Si .
x.


$14,025,720
13,310,360
339,088
185,175
78,214
1,693,533
1,004,635
682,955
3,355,579
2,824,113
519,012
8,551
7,334,497
6,257,385
921,477
147, 163
14,004,036
12,913,414
346,3M9
234,883
142.798
2,843.318
1,456,748
777, 312
137.323
s,9o, 404
4,3M6.130
8190,41
759, 88
5,664,981
4,725,128
,40022


Earthenware and china.............
United Kingdom.................
Japan............................
United States.....................
Electrical material (cable, wire, and
fittings)...................... ......
United Kingdom.................
United States ...................
Netherlands......................
Food and drink, articles of:
Coffee............................
Brazil.......................
Costa Rica...................
Netherlands..................
United Kingdom.............
.United States................
Confectionery ams, etc...........
United Kingdom..............
Switzerland .................
United States ................
Corn, grain and flour............
Austria ......................
anad ......................
Argentias..................
United States............... :
United Kingdom............
Portuguese Eat Africa.......
ndia ..........................
Fish, dried, cared, and preserved..
United Kingdom............
Norway....................
Canada.....................
Portual..................
I'iltr Silates.................


$952,002
860, 061.
509,31q
29, 53
2,005,544
2,081,83n;
322.40.t
121,555
2,680,303
2.502,617
62,325
37,974
11,767
1,529,0)
1,337,781
86,021
27, 41:3
8, 465, 297
5,178, 263
983,03S
734, 38
440,511
431, 94
326,294
302,122
1,046,1600
308,271
18, 1ZI
15a,700
326,31.


331,837
337, 80-1
1, 875
350, I4
652, 247
316,693
805,479
66,221
569,322
791,497
3,744,972
150,292
1,579,345
4,877,4001
1,448, ll
2,223,767
492, 153
242,634
1,898,938
8,296,797
187,017, 474
1,604,471;
188,621,931
7,984,384
3,820,37s
200,426,712









SUPPLEMENT TO 0OM0MERIr BEPORTB.


Articles and countries of origin. Value. Aticles and countries of origin. Vlie
--


Food and drink, arcles of-Conttnued.
Meint resh, frozen, cured, etc....
Ignited States.................
United Kingdom ..............
Denmark. ...................
Mil:, condensed ...................
United Kingdom..............
Nether.ands...................
U united States.................
Switzerlnnd ...................
l ii e .............................
India .......................
Fiunn..........................
rhina .........................
United Kingdom.............
I united St.ies .................
Spirit 'otablo ...................
L tuted Kingdom.............
Franeo........................
Netherlands ..................
Tea ...............................
Ceylon ............ ..........
I n ia .........................
United Kingdom .............
China .........................
Furniture. carpets. etc................
United Kinrdom .................
UniLed States .....................
India .............................
Canada ...........................
Glass and glassware ...................
United Kindom .................
UniLtd State .....................
Sweden...........................
Japan .............................
Glycerin ..............................
United Kingdom .................
Au itralia .........................
United States.....................
Haberdashery and millinery..........
United Ningdom .................
Switzerland.......................
France ...........................
United States .....................
Italy..............................
Japan.............................
Hardware and cutlery..............
United Kingdom ................
United States...................
Canada..........................
Sweden..........................
Hats and caps ......................
United Kingdom................
India ............ ............
Japan............................
United States...................
Implements agricultural ..............
United States....................
United Kingdom..................
Canada........................
Sweden..........................
India rubber goods, and gutta-percha..
United Kingdom................
United States....................
Italy............................
Iron and steel manufactures:
Bars bolts, and rods.............
United Kingdom.............
Sweden......................
United States...............
Canada......................
Galvanized and corrugated.......
United Kingdom.............
United States ................
Galvanized, not corrugated........
United Kingdom............
United States................
Pipes and piing.................
United Kingdom............
United States...............
Canada...................
Germany....................


81, 114,132
400,070
322,990
24, 42
1,e49,724
1,034,589
244,692
211,800
70,238
1,852,243
1,379,179'
291,071
91.3q3
8,327
733
2,188,938
1,704,370
351,571
98,099
1,4.0, 444
72;, 400
652,291
21,116
19.948
2.529,091l
1,663, 8iS
395, 43
13- ,632
93, 650
I,G;I, 1i0
583, 17
4.0, 43
267,317
140.'-72
1,826,S393
1,746, t06
63,956
2,930
5,971,430
3,930, 2.7
92., 404
504, 2.7
228, 078
141,294
119,935
6,791,294
4, 538,551
1,766,.52
253,773
152, .:3
1,004,932
1,553,601
20,498
15,564
12,478
2,173,467
1,054,463
621,968
26!, 757
177,472
2,425, 560
1,441,438
727,215
165,379

2,279,722
1,814,309
284,8 7
92,176
88 3-16
937 142
639,045
298,008
275,746
192,378
Q3,301
1,OOR, 529
519,625
366,701
70,973
50,35Y3


Iron and steel mfrsa- ntuad.
Plate, tinned...................
United Kingdom............
United States.................
Leather unmanufactured.............
Australia.....................
United States.................
United Kingdom.................
Machinery:
Mining...........................
United Kingdom............
United States.................
Other............................
United Kingdom..............
United States ................
Nitrates...............................
Chile........... .................
United Kingdom.................
Oils, mineral.......................
United States.....................
Dutch East Indies..............
United Kingdom.................
Oils, vegetable........................
United Kingdom................
British % est Africa...............
China............................
India.............................
Nigeria...........................
Mauritius.......................
United states......................
Oilman's stores.......................
United Kingdom.................
United btates....................
1I rance............................
Paints, colors, and painter's goods.....
Lmitcd Kingdom..................
United States....................
Paper.................................
United Kingdom.................
Sweden........................
Canada..........................
United States....................
Norway...........................
Silk piece goods, hosiery, etc..........
3apan............................
united Kingdom...................
CILna.........................
France ...........................
India.............................
S% it.crland....................
United atjtes....................
Stationery and books................
United Kingdom.............
United States...................
Tobacco, raw and manufactured......
niMted Kingdom................
United States .....................
Cuba............................
Netherlands.......................
Vehicles..............................
United States....................
United Kingdom..................
Canada............... ......
Wood and timber....................
Sweden.........................
United States ................
Norway .................
Russia.....................
Canada........................
United Kingdom..................
Woolen manufactures:
Blankets and rugs.................
United Kingdom.............
France.....................
United States................
Cloth and piece goods...........
United Kingdom.............
United Slates ...............
Hosiery and underclothing .......
United Kingdom............
United States ................
Zinc and zineware ..................
United States....................
United Kingdom..................


1H


IMS

& 05,051




4,110,3

95,0
1,261,014
178,184
76,312
76,0
e2, MI

1,211,22
2 97




1191, ai5
572,461
502,1'.5
1m, a9
270,150
351,754
96,574
75,524
12,161
4,22 ,988
3i,, 0.
2,47, 637




29134
050



INM
112313



87 835
2 479,120







2,M,=78

1, 337, 40
4, 4869



42, 151
4722m,963









ip lortu of Government Stores.
The value of the principal articles imported into the Union of
South Africa for the use of the Government ini 1915 and 1916 is
given below:
Articles. 1915 1916 Articles. 1915 1691

and slops.......... 8,728 1100, 800 Railway supplies-Contd.
S a ddnek........... 168,673 325,00 Ties .................... 54,211 (705,117
55,702 120,971 Other articles........... 577, 00 105,385
cauI able and wire... 95,384 106,085 Telegraph and telephone
-ird drink, articles of.. 384, 85 148,691 material................. 174, 605 127,945
ihs: Uniforms and appointments 310,546 344,690
SSIm s............ 1,691,756 485,249 All other articles........... 2,993,175 2,377,970
i s.................. 2,263,365 443,971
: e: lagstock........... 2,820,925 2,264,967 Total................. 12,661,747 7,981,381

li .rt~ l of Automobiles from United States.
I .:The year 1916 was a prosperous one for the sale of American auto-
| i mobiles in this country. War conditions, which greatly hindered
British automobile manufacturers, assisted largely in the sale of
motor cars from the United States. Notwithstanding the inability
of British manufacturers to compete here, the American car would
undoubtedly have predominated in sales, as it is more eminently
S united to cope with South African road difficulties than those of
British make. According to local statements, South Africa imported
3,872 private and 51 commercial cars from the United States during
the fiscal year of 1916.
Increased Trade with Japan.
In examining the import statistics of 1916, it is of interest to note
the large trade which this country has der -1- L ....... a i ItULr
war conditions. The total imports ,i Jalianese goods in 1914
amounted to $536,575; in 1915 the' otal value was $1,078,382, which
increased in 1916.to $2,632,210 exports from South Africa to Japan
amounted to $84,000 in ru.
The Commissiop-. of Customs and Excise stated in his report that
i a regular stear- ip service has been established between Japan and
South Africa, and that during 1916, 100 Japanese vessels, with a
tonnage of 430,229, called at Union ports1 as compared with only 7
vessels, of 19,875 tons, during the previous year. The Japanese
S steamers call at these ports principally to obtain bunker coal, and.
italess a continuous trade with this country is possible, it is improb-
S able that so many ships will continue to use the Cape route after
hostilities cease and the Suez Canal is opened for world traffic.
tport Trade by Articles and Countries.
The quantity and value'of the leading articles exported from the
Union of South Africa in 1915 and 1916 are as follows:
1915 1910
Articles.
Quantity.. Value. Quantity. Value.

Alo .... .......... ....................pound.. gS, I93,9 257 W6,39 45, 283
frnl l ~iuM b ....................... ............... ..... ..... 1 ............ 1 40,
App aud opc .................................................. 16,881 ..... .... 3 0984
AM ..................................pounds.. 34.,68 34,187 5,s68 795u
r .................. .............. do.... 6,10, 1 216,0 8,80,47 3 ,92
......................... ......... umber.. I 4 83 46,86 8P0,900 110,766
B r, Wsttle.......................... andredweg hht..! 86, 615 9 ,1, i 1,51 ,410 1,22,7

L!
ii:* *




a


STTPPLEMENT TO OOMMEEOB REPORTS.


19
Articles.
Quantity.


Blosoopes and fl'min................................ ...........
Blasting compounds......................pounds.. 34,266.22
Buchu leaves..................................do.... 157,061
Coal......................................short tons.. 1,812.103
Copper ore end reulus..................... long tons.. 25,819
Cotton manuBCliures.........................................
Diamonds. rough................................carat.. 612, 87
Feathers. ostrich ...........................pound.. 94t, 945
Fodder and orase................ hundred iht.. 239,178
Food and druik. articles.OL
Ale and beer.............................allons.. 219,240
Butter and substitutes...................pounds.. 3,507
olee...................................... .do.... 6.... 1,813
Con.ecutonery and jams ......................do.... 567,317
Corn. Train, flour, etc.-
Flour, wheat...........................do.... 5,530,768
Kafir corn ...................hundredweight.. 12., 160
Mize...................................do.... 2,987,652
Maizo meal.............................do.... 8, 9.3
Oas ...................................do.... 80,901
Eggs.................................... numl,er.. 3,657,122
Fish, dried and preserved................ pounds.. 6,0-;, 149
Fruit-
Drned and preserved.................... do.... 1,133,650
Sresh.....................................................
Meats-
Fresh and frozen.....................pounds.. 6,658,903
Proser ed and cured....................du.... 7S, ~h,
Spirits. potable.......................... gallons.. 379,08
Sugar................................... pounds.. 2,6-., 145
Sugar products..............................do.... 10,994,312
Ve;Yelt8laes....................................... .............
Sinme.......................................gallons.. 97,J02
Hair, A ngura................................. pounds.. 16,34,J78
iard wd. .re ............................................. ............
iidc's iand skins:
Cat le ....................................pounds.. 16,387,690
Goat........................................ do.... 8,3J4,72
bheep......................................do.... 37, 226,422
Leather and leather goods............................ ............
Manure .............................. hundredweight.. 47,397
Metal, old........................................................
Oil. wlule.................................... gllons.. 1,438,371
Sop.............................................pounds.. 53, .28
Tin ure and concentrates.........................tons.. 3,8 5
Tubao..................................... pounds.. 802,177
Would:
scoured..........................hundredweight.. 86,628
Unwashed............................ ........do.... 1, 612, 599
Washed....................................do.... 873
Parcel-pl.t bhipments.......................... .................
ExporL. tu Rhodesia.............................................
Ship'- ;tor......................................................
All other articles...................................................

Total......................................................
Specie......................... .. ................
Grand total................................ ... .........


Vale. uai


Value. QuBtlt.. VWIt
191:171


216, 181
78!,373
115,662
5,546.082
3, 16,. :65
275,750
8,1.6,925
3,619..566
284,014
198;-300
10, 637
8, 7.j
73,839
182,445
114,606
3,073,905
106,425
102,386,
643,604
91,466
319,778
589,061
1&I, -255
343,701
14-,7v7
10.,2 S
181,179
144,719
3,346,375
258,136
2,814,107
1,289,014
4, u27, 467
144,903
63, 040
3&4,940
401, 041
45,151.
1, 877, 987
394,950
3,011,891
23, 132,674
35,571
213, 192
4,867, 7i2
(a)
3, 906, 332


............
112,816, M
180.794
565,663
21,316
............
2,291,B5
452.0S0


1,B4,737
302,419
1,074,5M0
2,164,528

9,618,581
60,956
3, 492, 060
102, 45o
.,3 as
7, 1-L,321
4,96, 952
1,40 958
............
17,749,873
i31, 6W3
76.,, 05
3, 50,673
8,597.165

186, 242
17, 3M2, 30
............
19,629,784
8,513,363
3J, 413, 89
............
48,067
987,538
973,533
2,557
1,269,708

102,973
1, 258,047
2,. 02


............


81, 100,178 ............
945,900 ............

82,00,138 ............


a Not separately stated.

The following table shows the principal countries of destination of
the chief exports from the Union in 1916:

Articles and countries of destination. Value. Articles and countries of destination. Value.


Angora hair .................. ....
United Kingdom......... .....
Unttei Siater .....................
Asl~ stos ..............................
UlnitEr Kingdom..............
United States.....................
Japan ............................
Blastii compounds.................
United Kingdo'..................
Australia........ ..................


55,429,482
3,33 ,248
2,107,233
334,942
294, .64-
2', 936
2''",03
17, 441
2,575,608
1, 8 0O, 245
506,744


Coal....................................
Aden.............................
Ceylon............................
Mauritius.........................
Argentina........................
Portuguese East Africa.........
Copper ore and regulus...............
United Kingdom...............
United States....................


__I .


MM



61W
--AK


146S,2
310,187
S7g,966
24,uo
3A0, 419
245,520
319,22




14. 281"/
4,209,12


U546


261D
85,2 84
133.S57

1, 734,275


140.817
lgi,tes
moos
374,as

3, 902,81646
2,01 8,512
3,276, W
827,000
172,M
322, 64
98610
1,162, 58
,85, 14
4,1, 487
B, 1756, 7
66,716
37%6
18, S 66
7, 56W,56
4,14sa7


1o,4, a6
910,42

mu7,jhm


$1,568,887
8s, 587
33,537


I


I











Artiles and countries of destination.


Dlauond.........................
United EIgdom ................
United States...... ..............
roa mald ilrk:
At, bear.and stout................
fanth West Africae.............
: Britah Easttrica.............
S'Butrw, and substitutes for.........
|L e st West Africa.............
I P Port me East Africa.........
li dried and preserved.........
.:. united Kingdom ..............
South West Africa.............
United States...........
a .Ulit. fresh........................
United Kingdom............
S outh West Africa............
United States.................
Salu ..............................
United Kingdom.............
Australia...................
Meats, fresh and frozen...........
Egypt........................
iTance.........................
United Kingdom.............
S Spirits (brandy, rum, etc.).........
United Kingdom..............
South West Africa.............
New Zealand.................
Australia...................
Sugar and sugar products..........
aouth West Africa............
United Kingdom................


Value.


25,0695,004
25,694,954
49
310,167
179,730
94,234
579,966
34,475
33,550
785,230
627,778
38,348
10,998
325,262
273,969
38,002
647
4,269,712
3,577,899
463,621
1,734,275
683,237
674,025
374,409
892,740
305, 50
305,334
116,815
97,086
350,729
179,666
134,772


--- ` ` -- c -II





Although the United States is the principal market for South
African diamonds, the shipments are made via England and con-
Sequently appear in the official statistics as exports to Great Britain.
Most of the tinl exported is destined for the United States. It is
I sent to Singapore to be smelted.
Market for Office Furniture and Equipment.
SPrior to the Boer War there was no market for office furniture
Sand supplies in South Africa; at the termination of the war increased
i-Ierest was taken in up-to-date business methods.
T he letter-book trade, which was at one time an important and
Sremunerative branch of the stationer's business, is now very small,
the older style of copying having been supplanted by typewriters
everywhere, except in banks and similar institutions. Open cash
Still once in general use, are now seldom seen, except in the back-
country districts, cash registers or overhead railways having replaced
them in all of the large towns. Several firms have installed the dicta-
pone, and a large number of American addressing machines are in
ane. There is however, a considerable back country still to be ex-
poited, and the cities and principal towns are interested in ad-
Sditional and newer equipment.
In the past this country has looked almost exclusively to America
fo supplies of office machines, furniture, etc., as the British manu-
S aEtems have not catered to the trade. Local manufacture can
:hard be contemplated for some years to come, as there is a lack of
S sitale raw material, and the requirements of the country are in-
sufi8ient to warrant the outlay for the necessary machinery.
i fatkng of Goods.
Complaints have been made with reference to careless packing of
Goods, which results in considerable loss. One merchnnt informed


Articles and countries of destination. Value.

Hides and skins ........................ 1,277,384
United Kingdom................... 7,830, 25
United Stales...................... 3,429,515
Oil, whale .............................. 322, M4
United Kingdom................... 322,440
Ostrich feathers....................... 2,360, 81
United Kingdom.................. 1, 70,921i
United States..................... 475,705
Tin ore and concentrates ............... 1,162, 55
Straits Settlements................ 1,141,656
United Kingdom................... 20902
Tobacco............................. .585,124
South West Africa.............. 321,119
United Kingdom .................. 09,717
United States...................... 375
Wattle bark........................... 252,79K
United Kingdom.................. 029, IM
United States.................... .... 260, C9
Russia................ ........... 181,330
Wine ................................. 209,693
South West Africa................. 08,906
New Zealand ...................... 47, 545
United Kingdom................... 7,73s
United States..................... IS',
Wool:
Scoured........................... 4,884,487
United Kingdom............... 3,625,417
United States................. 1,253, 829
Unwashed.......................... 27,175,762
United Kingdom........... 19,357,939
United States............... 7,790, S38


.F 4







8 SUPPLEMENT TO OMMEbOE OEP OTB.

this consulate that when calling on a large importer he was sowna
an instance where between 15 and 25 per cent of space had been lad
from careless boxing of a certain line of goods. In such cams th:
manufacturer is called upon to pay, but even though the claim is
promptly and fairly met, firms do not like to make such a complaint
nor to lose the time involved in effecting a settlement. Amerioan
firms should remember that, while the overland freight in the United
States is paid according to weight, shipping to South Africa is pur-
chased per 100 feet. In the former, weight is everything, bulk being
unimportant. With the firms in this country, weight is rarely
considered, but space wasted at the present high freight rates per
cubic ton is a most serious loss. Moreover, every effort should be
used by exporters to reduce the cubic measurement of goods. Articles
necessitating open space should, if possible, be packed with supplies.
Trade Conditions After the War.
Importers in South Africa have been warned that the termination
of the war must bring some changes in business throughout this.
country, and that a setback in trade, though perhaps only tem-
porary, will undoubtedly take place after hostilities cease.
On the other hand, important mining developments, public works,
and buildings are being held over until a more favorable opportunity,
when machinery and materials will cost far less than at present. If
capital is forthcoming for such development and construction when
most needed, the disadvantages of the stoppage of war expenditure
will be somewhat offset. Should normal years prevail, this country
will be in a better position to meet regular requirements, which will
tend to prevent undue hardships and sufferings common to many
countries after the cessation of a severe war.
Tobacco and Cotton Growing.
The tobacco crop for 1916 suffered to a certain extent from lack of
sufficient rains, which necessitated late plantings in some districts.
In other districts the crop suffered not only from dry weather but
from hail during the early part of the season. For the whole Union
the yield was about 16 per cent less than normal.
Efforts are continually being made by the Union Government to
increase the annual production of cotton throughout the country.
Experimental stations have been established, where it is possible for
growers to obtain expert advice as to the proper methods of planting
and cultivation, and every practical assistance is accorded those in-
terested in this industry. Moreover, special ocean rates are granted
on all South African cotton shipped to the United Kingdom as a*t
inducement to more extensive cultivation.
Statements of the Department of Agriculture show that the cotton
acreage was increased during 1916, and a still further inereas was
contemplated in 1917. The department submitted the information
that the 1916 production for the Union amounted to approximately
500,000 pounds of seed cotton.
Production of Wheat-Maize Exports.
The decline in the production of wheat in 1915 and 1916 has re-
sulted in a serious shortage. As the production has not at anytime
been sufficient to meet the requirements of the people of this eon-f
.*U .i.,,







..:. ll:ITI.H BUUXl AFalUUA.


try, it is necessary annually import large quantities of wheat from
ovenaeas, which at Ns time is accomplished under difficulties.
:Thi figures for the production, importation, and consumption of
wheat in recent years, as given in the following table, are of interest.
S[i figures for consumption include the amounts exported each year.
*ih ., during the five years ended 1914, averaged 13,000 bags annu-
a quantity which may be accepted as negligible.
Ye. Produo- Importa- Consump-
YIl .; .. Year. tion. t on. tion.


.............................................. 2,329,000 1,120,016 3,449016
l............... ........ ............... 1,381,000 ,456,436 3, 83743
................. 2,013,000 1,805,535 3,818 535
I .4.. ........................................... ............... 2,114,000 1,411,729 3,555,720
.*... ...... ...... ............................... 943, 000 1 555,685 348, 685
... .......... ............................................. 1,437,000 1,131,605 2,568,605
r"i f 1915 and 1916 the price of wheat ranged between $6.57 and
[i: 7: per bag of 200 pounds, although in 1911 it was but $3.86 a bag.
;In 1912 the amount of maize exported was 83,000 tons, in 1913 it
iiipped to 13,000 tons, and the figures for 1914, 1915, and 1916 were
Il00|0, 149,000, and 174,000 tons, respectively.
jlbased Production of Butter.
...& larger amount of butter has been produced in the Union during
ti!he: last few years, increased interest being given to this industry.
T Dports have decreased and exports increased.
SButter exported during 1915 amounted to 96,570 pounds, valued at
S$36,41, and in 1916, 1,558,075 pounds, valued at $534,892. The pro-
dctifon in 1915 was 13,407,000 pounds, and the net consumption was
1t83,O00 pounds.
I large amount of butter was reexported last year, due to the fact
1Wat the production was greater than anticipated. There is no con-
iol over the exportation of butter, but if it appears that a shortage
is likely. the Government will undoubtedly take steps to prohibit
S estimated that for 1917, if the season is favorable, the output.
f : wi be over 15,000,000 pounds.
lte fti.t ranustry.
.Cape Province is the important fruit-growing center of the Union
awdE:produces annually large quantities of all varieties of fruits.
TIh yearly production is considerably in excess of that obtained
linathe other Provinces. While in some sections of the Cape a reduc-
tie in output was noticeable last year, as a whole results were very
raisliasctry. The principal causes of reduction in the crop were
a& fUili t heat and wind, and the usual loss from pests.
I Di.ffisit haive lately been experienced in procuring ample cold-
trakge facilities on ocean steamers for shipment to the United
ri n Kidom which country takes practically all fruit exported from
the Union. Owi to such diiulties, together with lack of ton-
Snag. and restrictions on certain imports into the United Kingdom,
Sthe exportation of fruit has greatly diminished.
206. 6-1e-T--8-b-- 2








10 SUPPLEMENT TO OOMMEROE REPORTS. i

Small shipments of fruit to the United States have been made',i 1:!
considerable success. The seasons here permit the shipping of t
fruit from this country during the winter season in ti "aheU lld
States. :
The number of bearing and nonbearing fruit trees in thet ;l0
Province in 1916 were as follows: Apple, 328,753; apricot, 6411 i
pear, 232,7:57; peach, 238,869; plum, 233,472; nectarine, .26,1jV
orange, 213,142; mandarin, 29,964; and lemon, 70,120. There wem
also 6.326,299 pineapple plants in the Cape Province.
Ostrich Farming-Sheep and Wool. .
A firm in the Cape Province states that official returns for 1918
give the number of ostriches farmed within the Union as 776.800. I;Z
the opinion of several firms, the official returns understated the achimi
number, and the total was probably close to 900,000 birds. At ti
end of June, 1916, it is stated that there were 360,000 full-growu
birds on farms and 39,000 chicks under 18 months old. The shortagep
is therefore, roughly, 48J per cent.
When the present lack of demand for feathers is taken into consid-.
eration, it is seen that the number of ostriches is vastly in excess of
trade requirements.
According to the last census, December 31, 1915, there was a total
of 31.434,080 sheep in the Union of South Africa, the Cape of Good
Hope having 16,259,126. These figures include wooled and other
sheep.
The wool market remained exceptionally firm during 1916, the war..
having no depressing effect upon the sales in the Union of South
Africa. As in 1915, buyers came to this country from America ready
to take all possible supplies, and record prices were obtained at every i
sale. Shipments were made directly to the United States.
The wool shipped to America in 1913 amounted in value to $17,254. ;
In 1916 shipments totaled in value $1.055,321, and the imports would
have been larger had there been no shortage of shipping and had the
ocean freight rates been nearer normal
Government Irrigation Policy.
The present irrigation policy of the Union Government, as out-
lined by the Director of Irrigation, is to continue mostly along the
lines that have proved very satisfactory during the last 8 or 10 years.
The policy of these years has been to encourage irrigation by Staite
assistance to groups of owners operating in conjunction with one an-
other. and the results have apparently satisfied all expectations.
South Africa is practically unfit as yet for 'large State irr tion
schemes, owing to the comparative smallness of the white populatio
and the entire absence of large local markets. These shorteomiap
militate against the success of great State works, which in other couLrt
tries under different conditions have been undertaken suoessfull
Every large State scheme of irrigation in South Africa hWM prv
unsuccessful, but not a single cooperative scheme has been a faiura.
Since the irrigation act was passed the cooperative schem ee tabi
lished in the Cape Province have covered an irritable area of ab u
175,000 acres, at a capital expenditure of approximately $SO i.#00, '
and others are in progress to a capital value of $2,500,000.



'r--- H







IBIITISH SOUTH AFRIOA.


II ftlaf L It U.i th Afric id Ifeeminently a mining country; approximately 60
mf cant of its income being derived from the gold, diamond, and
: p mines. The working of these mines necessitates the importation
wLrnaomtly of large quantities of supplies of various sorts. War condi-
t:iu t have to a certain extent prevented many of these supplies from
.b:miii received regularly, and the general work on most of the mines
Sli.i^ been somewhat retarded. These conditions have been accentu-
:iii by the higher cost of raw material, which has considerably in-
tireased the price of machinery and supplies, and by excessive ocean
Iteights.
: u The gold mines, located in the Transvaal, are the most important
Il the Union. Diamond mining ranks next, with the principal fields
At Kimberley, in the Cape Province. The figures for 1916 show that
.between 600,000 and 700,000 carats were produced in the Transvaal.
Important coal mines are in operation in Natal and the Transvaal,
which furnish adequate supplies for the Union and bunker coal for
ships calling at Union ports.
S In spite of all prevailing difficulties, the value of minerals
produced in the Union increased from $221,692,750 in 1915 to
S$244,784,950 in 1916.
Their Rand Gold Mines.
According to the report of the consul at Johannesburg, the out-
put of gold in the Transvaal for 1916 amounted to 9,295,538 ounces,
of the value of $192,152,293, an increase of 207,867 ounces, valued
. at $4,173,068, over the 1915 production. The return is the highest in
the history of the Transvaal for any one year, and surpasses the
previous record of 1912 by $3,763,698. At the close of the year
1916. the Transvaal goldfields had produced 121,219.666 ounces of
Sold since 1884, representing the sum of $2,500,935,931.
S The gross working profit in 1916 was lowered by $1,465.113. and
the dividends declared by the Rand mines decreased by $2,068,263.
Prominent among the mining questions is the proposed extensive
development of sections of the untouched areas of the Witwaters-
rand. It is estimated that if only one-half of the claims in this area,
not held by producing companies, and containing reef at a depth of
less than 5,000 feet, prove remunerative, after certain deductions, it
will yield gold to the value of approximately $2,250,000,000.
SThe Government mining engineer, in a report on this subject,
states that capital to the extent of about $250,000,000 would be
needed for such work, the expenditure of such a sum naturally
being spread over a number of years. There are now available for
leading on proclaimed ground a total area of 16,842 claims. When
the remainder of the reef-bearing land is proclaimed, amounting to
64,868 claims, about 48,000 claims will become available for leasing,
bringing the. total approximately to 65,000 claims, of which 49,200
claims contain reef at a depth of less than 5,000 feet.
lm Damadn-Copper--TIn.
The Department of Mines has lately issued a statement regarding
the production and value of diamonds recovered in the Union of
Bouth Africa. The production for the Union during 1916 is given




a


2 SL'PI'LEAMENT TO COMMMECE REPORTS.

ait 2.346,330 carats, valued at $27,877,215. In the last normal .g.i.. 'ilV.E.
lie outputs and values were: In 1913, 5,163,547 carats, valued l ::'::!!
S55,426.063: in 1912, 5,071.882 carats, valued at $48,964,237..
The total production from mines was 2,170,348 carats, value i "'
S23,210,670, being an average of $10.69 per carat, as against '0 i
in 1914. $10.10 in 1913, $9.02 in 1912, $8.19 in 1911, and $6.91 in' he. l
linlf year to December, 1910.
Alluvial workers last year recovered 167,020 carats, valued a
s4.610,221. The value of $27.54 per carat was exceptionally high
exceeding all values obtained per carat during the last five and one-
half years. The value of alluvial diamonds produced in 1916 was
S',707.599 above the value of the production for 1915.
The copper output in the Union during 1915 amounted to 28,970
tons, valued at $5,072,421, while in 1916 the output decreased to"
22,862 tons, but the value increased to $5,509,559.
Tin produced in the Union is obtained almost wholly in the Tranw
vaal. The output for 1915 was 3,435 tons, valued at $1,656,698.
During 1916, 3,263 tons of tin, valued at $1,734,649 were prodnued
in the Transvaal alone. The output from other mines in the Union
in 1916 was valued at approximately $15,000.
Coal Mining.
During 1916 the profits earned by the South African coal-mining.
companies exceeded -expectations. The advance in the price of
hunker coal did not lessen the demand, because War conditions forced
many steamers to coal at South African ports which had not done
so before, coaling places in other parts of the world being inacces-.
siblo or the routes to them too dangerous. Moreover, coal was
shipped in greater quantities to Argentina, East and West Africa,
Ecuador, and other -countries.
During 1015 the Union collieries turned out 8,281,324 tons (exclud- .
ing coal used by the coal-mining companies), valued at $10,426,874.
The output for 1916 is recorded at 10,007,473 tons, of a total value
of $13,214,070. Notwithstanding the fact that large quantities of
coal are being mined annually, there is apparently no danger of the
supply in this country becoming exhausted, it being roughly esti-
mated at 55,200,000,000 tons.
The Transvaal and Natal are the important coal centers of British
South Africa. The output of the Transvaal for December, 1916,.
was 525,015 tons; Natal produced 248,544 tons; the Free State
A7,263 tons; and the Cape Province 2,755 tons.
Increased Production of Asbestos.
Since the outbreak of the war greater interest hlas been shown with
regard to asbestos supplies than ever before, and it is possible that
the exportation of this material may in time reach fair propo.tiOsl.
Both blue and white asbestos are being obtained in the Cape Prov .ot
in varying quantities, and it is believed that supplies are available
for many years.
Previous to the outbreak of the war Germany took most of the,.:.:
asbestos shipped from the Union. England and the United States
are now taking the output. of the partially developed fields, as well i
as that of newly opened areas. Small shipments have also been made ..
to Japan.








hf Ihas g thEnasrty.
S he latest available statistics regarding the fishing industry in
th, Cape of Good Hope show that an average of about 4,000 persons
r re employed. The fish landed each year amount in value to approxi-
ai;lj y $150,000. About 900 vessels are utilized for this purpose.
::There are 3 whaling companies operating in this Province, em-
.: Iing a total of between 400 and 500 persons. During 1915 (no
i.fi,,atis are available in regard to 1916) 13 steam vessels were em-
i;played, and the number of whales caught totaled 855, amounting in
tvaite to $516,835. The number of whales caught showed a decrease
jft comparison to the catches of previous years, although the total
vtaue was greater for 1915 than for any year since 1911.
S development of South African Resources.
S' Interest has lately been shown throughout the Union with regard
to a greater development of the resources of the country for the pur-
poe of enabling South Africa to be less dependent upon overseas
production. There is at present little manufacturing of the raw
products within the borders of the Union, by far the greater ma-
jority of such products being exported for manufacture elsewhere.
According to an article in the Cape Times, Cape Town, talc, or
soapstone. has been discovered in South Africa and is being shipped
to Great f1ritnin and America. The talc is being supplied from the
Verdite mines. The industry has been developed since the beginning
of the war, and the product is now supplying the local demand.
SExperiments are continually being made by the Imperial Institute
in England to test the suitability of varieties of South African grass
for the manufacture of paper. One of the materials under investiga-
tion is the tambookie grass, which grows in large quantities in the
.Transvaal and makes a satisfactory paper of fairly good strength.
This grass is said to yield, under the same conditions, more pulp than
SAlgerian esparto grass, but a little less than Spanish esparto. It is
-of good quality and can easily be bleached.
Following the discovery of earth pigments and ochers in the Cape
SProvince, a company was formed during the latter part of 1916 for
: .:the manufacture of such products into paints, distempers, etc. The
" machineryey for this purpose was purchased in England. Although
"little has been accomplished in this new venture, those interested
".:'hope to produce paints in such quantities as to satisfy local require-
ments. An export trade may be developed in this line if results
prove satisfactory.
-The Government has established an Industries Advisory Board to
study the resources of the country and encourage legitimate enter-
prises in connection with the industrial development of South Africa.
This board has been in existence only a few months.
Xaflways Encourage local Industries.
The continued increase in the number of articles hitherto imported
but now being manufactured in this country is to a certain extent
due to the adequate facilities for quick transportation provided by
Sthe Union's railways and the granting of special freight rates. The
granting of reduced rates for goods of South African manufacture is
of particular importance, for by this means not only are local indus-
tries greatly encouraged, but the local manufacturer is able in most
Cases to successfully compete against other producers.




S


14 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.
Development of Leather Industry.
The leather industry of this country has developed conAidti
since the beginning of the war. The demand for leather good0i0
the shortage of supplies in other countries have given an iIms"
to the trade, and manufacturers in this country are doing exep....r, I
aIlly well at present. They are endeavoring to raise the tii A
of their products, especially boots and shoes, to compete with b
class goods. Fresh capital has been invested and new factories h..ibreiaV;
been opened.
The general secretary of the South African Federated Cha iber
of Industries states that sole leather .produced in South Africa 'isl
held in high esteem, and that a considerable quantity of both sole
and upper leather has been shipped from the Union for British
army purposes. Manufacturers here are producing in increa sin
quantities high-grade chrome upper leather, the demand for thins
class of leather greatly exceeding the present supply. For certain :'
grades of particularly fine leather a sufficient supply of raw material
is not available in South Africa, due largely to faulty curing andt
handling, deterioration from tick marks, branding, lash marks, etc.'
Efforts are being made to overcome these difficulties. The Govern-
ment's policy of dipping cattle is steadily improving the quality of
light hides by reducing the great number marked by ticks.
Railways in South Africa.
In the course of his budget speech in Parliament the Minister of
Finance stated that the receipts of the Union Government's railways i i
in 1916 were nearly $100,000 from the coal traffic. In passenger re-
ceipts there was a satisfactory increase, and the general business of
the railways was surprisingly good. The revenue for goods and
mineral traffic exceeded the estimate by $584,000. The favorable ,i
results in 1916 were due, to some extent, to the general advance in
the Union's agricultural, mineral, and industrial development. Di- :' "
ing the weeks ended December 16 and 23, 1916, the weekly revenue il
was, for the first time in the history of the Union railways, over. :I
$1,460,000. The net result was that the ordinary railway revenue
exceeded the estimate nearly $5,000,000. During the year'885 adg..i
ditional miles of railway were opened, making the grand total fero i
the Union 9,419 miles. 4
The revised estimates for South African railways and harberst.Ier 'i?
the fiscal year ended March 31, 1917, as presented to Parliament, are :l
as follows: Expenditure-railways $70,205,774, harbors $4,8 0 5g ll]
total $75,073,739; revenue-railways $73,804,181, harbors $4,700,11,
total $78,504,452.
The estimates for the present fiscal year, ending March 81, 191 liij
:is presented to Parliament, are as follows: Railways-expendl 41 s
$72,338,133, revenue $70,803,882; harbors-expenditure $4,086BI .j
revenue $4,193,867. .. :,
During 1916, 15 locomotives, costing $324,036, were placed misW, ;: ;i
ice, as well as new passenger coaches and freight cars costing t :i'
020,611. Also, it is estimated that on December 31, 1916, loco~sitiva
valued at $5,207,647, passenger coaches at $2,207,143, and f rig,
cars at $4,107,476 were ordered or being constructed.
". ii ". ii. : ..... *
"*= *i .: -









masinagj uounamon.
On December 81, 1916, the advances of the South African banks
totaje$i'94,94,000, which was $30,659,000 more than they had ever
lbth, at the close of any previous half year. It is not possible to
.ascertain how much of this increase occurred in British South
Arimen, but the figures of the Union show an increase of $34,676,000
Sthe figures for December 31, 1915. The following figures show
di2i Jj its within and outside of South Africa:
Deposits Coin Ln
Year. fixed and bank
Seating. coffers.

191 ........................................................................... 220, 133,000 535,923,000
1914......................................................................... 219,924,000 38, 075, 000
1 ................................................................................. 249,729,000 43,033,000
..........................-..-.................. .................. 2 ,054,000 32,896,000

The large increase in the amount of deposits in 1916 is remark-
Sable, in view of the fact that during the year $4,500,000 was sub-
scribed by the people of South Africa to the Union Government
Loan. Apparently the bulk of the money subscribed has filtered
back to the banks.
S Advances, within and without the Union, for the past four years
follow: 1913, $204,340,000; 1914, $202,709,000; 1915, $201,096.000;
1916, $234,934,000. In 1916 the amount of coin in the bank coffers
decreased over $10.000.000, and on December 31 showed a ratio of
only 12* per cent to the fixed and floating deposits. It is stated, how-
ever, that the banks hold Government securities to the total value of
nearly $40,000,000, which in case of need could easily be realized in
London or elsewhere.
Jt is thought probable that the next few months will show a de-
crease in advances and an increase in the banks' resources, which
have. recently been largely drawn upon to meet the requirements of
export trad.
: The profits earned by the banks in 1916 were well maintained, and
the following dividends were declared: African Banking Corpora-
tion, 6C per cent; National Bank of South Africa, 6 per cent;
Netherlands Bank of South Africa, 4 per cent; Standard Bank of
South Africa, 14 per cent; Stellenbosch District Bank, 12 per cent.
The banking returns indicate the soundness of the commercial po-
sition in South Africa. Credit after two and a half years of war
is still apparently very good, and no serious setback is now antici-
pated.
Zanease of Telephone Charges.
S The telephone tariff which came into operation on June 1, 1916,
Increased the rate for trunk-line telephones from 3d. (6 cents) per
25 miles tq 3d. per 15 miles, making a considerable difference in the
total charge for use of a long-distance line. The Minister of Posts
and Telegraphs stated in Parliament that the loss on trunk-line tele-
grams amounted to $136,262 per annum, and that a higher tariff
Swas necessary.





I *:.




a


SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


War Bonus to Government Employees. l ii.iiii
A stitemient recently made in Parliament regarding the L ii'.. il
ing cobt of living in the Union indicates an intention on the pi
the Union (overintiit to increase the war bonus granted a l: i
to v(;cineriniinent employees.
The anilount of war honus granted was 25s. ($6.08) a monti :' to
niarriel employees drawing less than 240 ($1,168) a year.. tit.i
now )ipropoMd to increaIse the monthly allowance to 35s. ($8.59), sad,
ti inlKct'rIse tllh limit of salary or wage up to which the warbonus::i'
would he paid to 300 ($1.460) a year. This will increase the amount
of tilt conces.,ion in the case of the railway and harbor service by
125.,000 ($608,313). nnd in the case of other public employees by
4(0.000 (.$!4,,600). i making a total wnr bonus concession of 510,00.
($2.41sl.15) a year.
Although representations have been urged in behalf of single inie: :::
it ik stated that the Government will make no change at present ili:l
regard to their concessions.
Changes in South Africa's Trade.
The shutting out of Germany and Austria from the South Afri-::
can market has necessarily had a considerable influence upon im-
portation. In the latest normal year (1913) South Africa pur-
chased from Germany merchandise valued at nearly $16,000,000.
Part of Germany's former trade has gone to neutral countries
mid a good share to the United Kingdom. Switzerland has doubled
its exports to South Africa since the war began. Sweden has intj
creased its sales. Japan's share has grown nearly fivefold and now....
amounts to about $2,500,000. Japan's range of goods supplies is a,
wide one, including cotton hosiery, other cotton goods, g1asswarej
silk piece goods, and superphosphates. On the other hand, Sout i'
African wool. mohair, asbestos. and wine are finding a market ,i.
Japan. The value of exports from the United States to Souti
Africa have almost doubled; its purchases from South Africa hiyI~ .
increased almost sixfold, the increase being largely in wool -
nIohair.
Protectorate of Southwest Africa. :::.
SThe Protectorate of Southwest Africa, formerly a German colon"j
is proving a market of considerable importance to farmers in thi
Union of South Africa. Of the exports of potatoes last year fr6o
the Union, 2,600,000 pounds went to the Protectorate. Likewise ul.gi,
quantities of butter and eggs and food products of all kinds hmaveib
been sent to the Protectorate. In 1913 produce and reexports shipped d.
to Southwest Africa were valued at $686,177; in 1916 the .toal :
exports to that country amounted to $4,589,110.
The Union Government has taken over the administration of ;
Southwest Africa. The railways of that country have been ca -.:i
nected with the Union lines, and the entire system is regultad
the general manager of the South African Railways. a ii
steamiinrs call occasionally at the ports, but most of the goods in'teadI
for that country are being carried by the railways. '; .





.* j "
: N..jllllm ll :










ThWe ffBowinu tale gives the tonnage of cargo landed and shipped
Sat the chif Union ports during the years 1915 and 1916:
SPut. 1915 1916 Port. 1915 1916
2:eW. Tb Durban: Tons. Toni.
S70,385 8,175 Landed ............ ... 60,334 717, 1B
............9... 4,,792 eb Oipped ................. 1, 53 2, S, 723
.s0.9 a. Land.= ............... ...1 ,73 0 0
................. 507 10, 808 hipped................. 17,304 8
Mmi li aon:
Lm ..de ............. ... 196,340 195,906
t ampeped................. 154,564 113,847

There was a large temporary increase in the number and tonnage
'. vessels entering Union ports with cargo in 1916, the total for the
Syesr being 1,751 vessels, with a net tonnage of 5,381,575, as compared
'pth 990 vessels in 1915, with a tonnage of 4,614,086. This increase
Swas mainly in Japanese and Dutch passenger steamships.
RHODESIA.
By Conaml John P. Bray, JOahaBembur, South Africa.
Rhodesia is subdivided into two distinct Provinces, which are
known as Northern and Southern Rhodesia. This vast territory is
thinly populated, and stock raising and mining are therefore its
principal industries. Notwithstanding this fact, Rhodesia is not
eatirely self-supporting, and imports of foodstuffs go to swell the
already high cost of living. It possesses a fertile soil, but inade-
quate rainfall, and the scarcity of efficient labor and capital has
necessitated the importation of products which otherwise could have
bian produced within its own borders.
Aftancement of Southern Rhodesia-Mineral Production.
Owing to its greater accessibility to the important markets of the
YIansvaal and to the existence of gold-bearing areas, Southern
Rhodesia has made more rapid strides toward development in the
past few years than its sister Province in the north. Greater atten-
tion to agriculture has also helped in reaching a higher economic
stage. Mineral production is likely, however, to remain for some
J pars its chief source of wealth.
The total yield of gold in Southern Rhodesia for 1916 amounted to
980,58 fine ounces, valued at $18,956,531. This is an increase of
1i~37 ounces. in weight and $351,084 in value as compared with the
year 1915, when Rhodesia ranked as sixth in the list of gold-producing
countries of the world. During the year 2,987,444 tons of ore were
crushed, as compared with 2,845,934 tons in 1915. Sands treated
were 1,245,547 tons, as against 1,115,480 tons in 1915, and 606,871 tons
of alime, as compared with 671,546 tons.
Te average monthly number of producers for 1916 was approxi-
1 nt4y 206, of which 182 were small workers and tributors and 24
Swere com1' The number of stamps in use was 1,172 in 1916, as

Te total vaxue of the entire mineral production for 1916 was
,5085B4, as compared with $21,407,694 in 1915, which is an
increase of $2,096,060.







18 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

The following table shows the quantity and value of the p l j ;iI
minerals produced in Southern Rhodesia during 1915 and I918 F .
1915 1064
Mineral. ______
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Valu.
Gold..... ....................... ounces.. 915,029 18,605,447 930,26 I MU> bS
Copper......... ............... t... ons............. 2,1 I Ml W
Chrome irn ........................... do.... 00 581 885,8, 871 3g
Coal.......... .....................do.... 409,763 .............. 491,8
Asbeso ..... ........................ do.... 2,010 156,653 6,317 i
Silver....................... ........ounces. 15,233 .............. 200,0 76
Mining Dividends-Labor Conditions.
During 1916 the Rhodesian mining companies distributed larger
dividends than in any previous year, the total being $3,124,200, an.
increase of $381,509, or 14 per cent, as compared with 1915. The
total cash dividends declared by the Rhodesian mining companies
,amount to $22,466,857, exclusive of dividends declared by develop-.
mcnt and miscellaneous companies in cash or scrip amounting to
more than $11,679,600.
There was an increase in the monthly average number of natives
(colored) employed in mining industries, the total for 1916 being
40,214, as against 37,916 for 1915.
The rate of mortality during the year was 26.73 per 1,000.
Agriculture and Stock Raising in Southern Rhodesia.
The report of the Director of Agriculture of Southern Rhodesi:.
for 1916 shows that the number of farms under cultivation was 2,178,
as against. 2,145 in 1915, and 2,042 in 1914. The acreage under Euro-
pean cultivation increased from 183,407 acres in 1914-15 to 254,702
in 1916-17. The total acreage reaped by Europeans during 1916'1tf' ii
estimated at 200,946 acres, to which may be added 1,155,585 acres ..
cultivated by native laborers, and, although the returns were some-
wvhat disappointing, production was, in the aggregate, considerable,,,
On the whole, arable farming, though secondary to pastoral farming
formed no small part of the industrial wealth of Southern Rhodesia.,
Of the total acreage cultivated by white farmers no less than 86.0D
per cent was under maize-176,647 acres-from which 680,285 bags ;
were reaped. There was also a steady diversification of crops, and
more attention was paid to the scientific treatment of the soil anOit
products.
The number of European-owned cattle was 468,504 at the close of
1916, while native-owned cattle numbered 491,522, making a total
of 960,026, an increase of 119,100 over the preceding year. Sheep
numbered 357.367, which is an increase of 45,552, and goats increased
by 35,059.
An event of considerable importance to this industry was the
opening up of Johannesburg as an outlet for fat stock from Matabele-
land, with the result that 12,719 head of cattle, valued at $W45,000,
were exported. During the year the demand for well-bred balls
far exceeded the number available, and further and continuous imn-
provement was thereby experienced. The imports numbered 878
pure-bred bulls ind 1,493 heifers, including 85 high-class bulls, and
116 heifers from overseen, and 291 bulls and 1,455 heifers from the
Union of Southl Africa.












,' lT pwi w ac;uppin carmi maae consiaerame progress during
t, ithl expriments being carried out in this tern-
i 1tepI health o cattle should be much improved. As an
Sof the activity now being shown in the general tendency
idpt means for the prevention of diseases, it may be mentioned
the number of dipping tanks increased from 427 in 1914 to
f 1915, and to 761 m 1916. It is also stated that the natives,
own the majority of cattle, showed a great willingness to
the practice of dipping,. and, that having been encouraged by
S rtment of Native Affairs, they combined to erect numerous

erable progress was made during the year by the Govern-
lexperimental departments, and practical and scientific inves-
m* regarding known and potential crops and in the feeding
treatment of livestock were conducted.
i|ii nt o Southern Rhodesia by Countries.
lThe following table shows the value of the principal imports into
thoen ERhodesia and the principal countries of origin in 1915
Id 1916:


seotries origin.


l nmdom A .........
l m st s *............
ai tf grease............
UnBed States.............
my.?l an slop .........
itd dom.........
i Jtead tas..........
II th Africa...............
g. wl ammnitio.......
U:"tH ngdem........
u1iWted States.........
... ..............
S ilngdom......




Sttes.........
Kingdom.........


S A, .rlea............
a e...............




ngd m.......
e......f.........













..............
u Sa te......


0i ..::. ..... ..:........
U Elngdomi.....;



.."^^iasetoi.::::




utied fagdae....


5455,665
22,328
421,059
21,539
11,208
8,297
517,240
450,073
16,439
40,4R9
86,346
.82,516
482
34,269
31,447
2,278
125,886
7,300
1 1, 421
390,818
1,917
388,901
i07,496
2,905
104,591
16,381
9, 154
3,538
3,285
432,758
341,254
,3eas
243



I26
10655






IS
6129
31,317



a6e0
T, i
l:8i


45,014
85,774
175, 41
27,277
10,795
8,414
654,325
584,617
20,605
41,954
186,432
175,252
1,173
38,308
34,610
423
153, 421
6,677
146,720
436,578
1,251
438,317
17, 907
9,849
167,058
18,336
9,601
2,805
5,825
642,95
591,659
25,401
1,070
194,588
56,729


116
so1,m


ale
471, 83
96, 35
X4, 107
25,369


IS,=


Articlesand countries of origin.

Electrical flttings...........
United Kingdom.......
Netherlands..............
.United States.............
Enameled ware..............
United Kingdom.........
Netherlands............
United States..........
Food and drink, articles of...
United Kingdom.........
Canada.... ..........
United States............
South Africa..............
Haberdashery and millinery..
United Kingdom.........
SFrance ...................
Switzerland.............
United States...........
Instumn t, musical.......
United .s s gdom.........
Germany... .............
United States............
Iron and steel:
Bar bolt and rod.........
United Kingdom.....
United States........
Pipes and piping......
United Kingdom.....
United States........
Plate and sheet; plain....
United Kingdom.....
United States........
Jewelry..................
United Kingdom.......
United States............
Lather manufaetures:
Boots and shoes.........
United Kingdom.....
United States........
Switzerland ..........
Other .................
United Kingdom.....
United States.......
Machinery:
Agricltar a.............
United Kingdom .....
United States........
Bonds and belting........
United Kingdom.....
United Statis........


.. .... .



........ .. .... .


36, 863
27, 880
1,085
5,348
11,242
5,830
2,618
136
2,051,949
002,090
126,597
96,298
917,004
*160,610
117,653
10, 195
13,685
5,124
10,999
7,704
1, 742
516

67,518
65,338
1,226
45,092
44,548
158
21,349
21,164
27,914
26629
78

142,281
121,410
8,406
5,504
2258
15,9a
322

33,517
14,678
16,81
72,414
6515
7:M9


142, 431
2825
3,231
8,137
23,982
11,086
1,737
8,054
2,169,697
584,209
110, 124
88,400
1,059,996
177,481
127,473
19, 885
16,201
7,032
14,979
10,385
1,878
964

85,495
75, 572
1,411
60,753
58,977
1,630
19,188
16,70
1,927


,17
31,676
30,313




68
11, 470
9,8652
5,173
1 ,


s14171
7,m
7919
6.05




S: UNIVERSITY OF FLOP IA


SUPPLEMENT TO COUMMEXE DRPORTS.


Articles and countries of origin.

Mfachinery-Cont nued.
Electrical................
United Kingdom.....
United Stales........
Mining.................
United Kingdom.....
Australia............
France .............
United Slates........
Oil, mineral:
LubricatingF.............
United Kingdom.....
United States.........
M tor spirits.............
Dulch East Indies....
United Stales........
Iaraffin .................
Duteb East Indies....
United States........
l'. rlc ......................
United Kingdom.........
United States...........
1'erfumery ....................
United Kingdom........
United States ...........
I'hotographic supplies.....
United Kingdom........
United States..........
'lato silverand plated ware..
United Kingdom........
United States............


328,021
18,201
8,404
383,000
227,811
17,911
10,152
48,004
n.. 153
38,017
30,834
67,937
35,550
32,353
48,538
7,134
41,401
42,694
17,554
856
18,424
11,115
5,000
16,911
8,020
X,390
19,510
19,228
151


I-----r II3


638,071
33,856
3,848
388,765
245,549
20,391
9,767
54,714
86,556
41,127
44,227
89,879
24,118
65,756
47,229
6,477
40,752
85,388
34, 32
3, 737
20,838
10,891
6,949
10,174
9,256
9,139
22,523
22,847
49


ArUdas and counties oeiflB
I :


Rubber, and munahMtamr o.
United Kingdom........
United States........
Silk maanfacturs..........
United Kingdom......
China....................
Japan....................
oap, toilet...................
United Kingdom..... ...
United States...........
Vehicles:
Bicycles and tricyles.....
United Kingdom.....
United States........
Motorcycles and parts
(except tires)..........
United Kingdom.....
United States.......
Woolen manufactures:
Cloth and piece oods.....
United Kingdom.....
United States........
Blankets and rugs........
United Kingdom.....
France...............
Hosiery.................
United Kingdom.....
United States........
Zinc........................
United Kingdom.........
United States............


Principal Imports into Northern Rhodesia.
The total value of imports of merchandise into Norther.3
in 1916 was $1,205,636, as compared with $745,480 in 1915. ":
for the Government amounted to $176,045, and specie to
making a grand total of $1,583,354, an increase of $706,722.
The principal articles of import were wearing apparel, aa
to $32,484; bags, $19,918; coal and coke, $30,328; cotton manu
$314,694; drugs and chemicals, $14,030; articles of food .-
$308,370; boots and shoes, $12,288; haberdashery and mu
$19,271: agricultural implements, $17,592; machinery, $58,714.
ware and cutlery, $27,416; oils, $12,161; vehicles, $45,32, j
.ement. earthenware and china, furniture, and stationery
Exports from Southern Rhodesia.
T'he following table shows the value of the principal ei
Southern Rhodesia, for the years 1915 and 1916:


Articles.


Articles.


----~ -i--- I I 41-(


Animals.....................
Asbestos,raw...............
Iags......................
Beads, Kaffir..............
Brass and copper...........
Cement.....................
Coal.........................
Coke and patent fuel........
Diamonds ...................
Food and drink, articles of..
India rubber, raw..........


it, 627
133,070
6,156
3,908
1,577,837
19, 802
126,614
122,028
02,776
2,200


8584,531
432,500
5,421
4,643
2,202, 63
30,956
172, 288
2,641
31,215
269,256
6,842


Matches.......................
Ores and minerals:
Chrome iron.............
Gold...................
Soap, common.............
Tobacco, unnm ua ...
Wool sheep.................
All otherrtile............
Total.................


The principal articles exported to the United KingdoMd t
tos, amounting to $432.500; copper, $3,640; diamonds, $S1$
-411 anld-.4wome.iaan ore, $158,820. Minerals
c fd-tUnited States, shipments of chrome 1
b M b ng $1,280,679 and $2,198,90$, r

| W -O 1 WASINCTON : GOVERN WMNT 1P8x0ia
IIDD


U.S. DEPOSITORY