Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00033
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00033

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text







:.'. SUPPLEMENT TO


MMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
SISSUEDBY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

A' .A al Series No. 55b September 15, 1917


JAPAN.

CHOSEN.
SBy Vice Consul Raymond S. Curtiee, Seoul.
The results of the foreign trade of Chosen for the year 1916 com-
pared with 1915 are set forth in the following table taken from the
preliminary abstract of returns of the trade of Chosen for 1916, as
published in the Official Gazette:

Imports and exports. 1915 1916

SE ports..................-- .........---.......---....... --.............................. 24,671,924 28,315,764
Imprts..................................................................... 29,510,879 37,116,717
ToWta................................................................ 54,182,803 65,432,481
"""":.'. r..-'- ..;. .------
EXp:aBss.I imports................................. .......................... 4,838,955 8,800,953
I1:1-.-- '.*. -" .-.-

::' .Both exports and imports reached the highest total in the history
-of the-foreign trade of Chosen, exports exceeding those of the pre-
'' violus record year (1915) by $3,643,840, and imports exceeding those
: of the previous record year (1913) by $1,433,964.
I.:.. dpments Of Bpecie and Bullion.
:i.. e excess of imports, formerly an unsatisfactory feature of the
"'i .. trade of the country and temporarily overcome in 1915, was
I in evident, although the natural conclusions from the first table
:: given above are modified to some extent by the excess of exports of
:' specie and bullion, as indicated in the following table:

Articles. 1915 1916

Imports:
Gold ein and bullion............ ........................................... 73,449 15 596,551
Silver coin and bullion................ ...................................... 332,013 1 218,953
: f Total........................................................................ 405,462 815,504
...-... orts:
.:: : Gold coin and bullion...... ................................................... 5,666,244 7,788,463
: uil ercoin and bullion........................................................ 198,192 247,783
': o t1 al........................................................................ 5,864,436 8,036,246
: ial.ttal ................................................................ 6,269,898 8,851,750
,, 9869-17---155b


'C~--- it-..---


* ZA .









SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Value of Exports by Principal Articles.

T'1w flilli\wiing ia 1llhle give the vial ue of the )riiiicipal articles ex-

portte.1 fr
Ari. i le- 1t1l i '. Arl i 'ls. 1915 1915
'I ~A ~LS


EI. I '1 I .
1 ;1 ii1 1 1.1 -nI- il l
.. l 11 '11

CI n ..... ..I
C .. ..- .. .......
C .. .. .. .. .. ..
I r li .
I11 I1 i l. ...

11i i 1 ... ........ .. ..
11.1, ,111, ..............I


i .


j' ;2i 7 $ '.., .i. 1 I ul l r mTI[irr niit c lir s...I ..i. 1, 111., 4'"
I I '. 0s l. I U .. .... I ..1 ,:."
1 l 17I2 l mi .- .. .... I 1 ,

".. ..l'ii, s;.' 1 i,, i... d i'i(,' r i.......... ....
S ] l l l 11 1 .
2, 1.1 ,. 12 ...... 1' "'1, 3
IlI.. r ih ll i11L .. ........ ; '.'.
.', *ll ,I ".' T II l.n .i .... .. .' t, '
S 1. 11 i 2'i '1 i l1l.. r in] l l i il: .... 7,'i
J'lI i ,I .-'" l -
,1.1 ii' 1, 7-l, TA, .l ............. 1, ,71,'121


It % ill be noted that all of the articles li.teo slhow ilncreoa-es in
value over the .;Itr 191. '. with the ex.\epttion ,if riie :ntl coal. The
decr(le:I-, in exports of rice may be accoluted flur b1 t(ie i,( c' ro1l
in Japan, lt---1iniiuig tlite I:lllanll for Koi ean, ri :lnd I by thle l1lil nil
of stocks for flirtlii r alJlupricialtion in price owiNgi to the ,expeta;tioi
of lrult'r ortlders from ,~i. ia. Tlhe ,lecrt:,st; in coal experts u as due
to a i.et' itel liiim;Iild for I;itlive coal by reai.:ll.of less importation
fii i thin, ,Manli,.rian ollierithe. The exlplits of leather mllaiiulf;lc-
tures it'll illi'utl to iliil'vil,:- abnormally thr.oughl the war order-, frl'ii
Russia for 1 di1 and ammunition plI-ll.cs. But tlhe most -.ti:.f:-
tot\ feat re of the expoi ,t trade is the incre.a-e in value of the orlii-
nary ulntive products available for export. This is particularly
!r, ti.evale.in the case of beans. fish, cot tn, i.cocoons, anid graphite.

Imports in 1915 and 1916 by Chief Articles. i ;' '

A t;:ile showing the value of the chief articleT- of import is
aplpendeld lher'Iwith:


A rti-le-.


Alir.. nin, hli I jir n'I lic-

l ir r iL'1p. I.Lr., .l I-f l ..... .
fRn'. mT I 's Ili n l .
i..4n ". ]ll'.'' liii,,.'r- .- nr "- I
.] I .u .I. I n..... .....


P 111? 1 111 :! r l I I-. I
C Ln ,, .. .m ... ...... .
(. l .. .. .
r_, i ,le s in ti Ir i r-


i n ... .
SII n ..... 1 ...... ... .
S' | i i .
Y r l... ............
b'T" n ,, .... .



':"1. h .. I; .i ...... .
Flourl, lea...............
ilr II' d n tnll.. ... ...... .
Gra cloths, ........
Ir,-;, andmn ,i n n :r of:
1 t i ...... ..
... .......
SOi er...................
A l rl<. ++ .. .... ......... ..

Millet ...................


191:1



'-*4, ,"t

I 111.7 ',

.1 I ''



11 1.,' 1


i'-7',..
l it .


-. 1

21 ,725 i


191. 191t


. f^t-, "37 $1,1:,,,750


-'2 7.32
-11 Ill



t117
'li 'l.

. .l 7., l.




1 i I .'
, .i. ,



Sl I "
I. I 01
1 71




72, M7
+ ., I,,


ai]i la
I' ll
.\I

I 'I i. I

I S, ir










ii'iir



' mll
.Tob0..
Umbr,

.li ,Tr


H p 111 .0 .. ... .... .. l. Il- .115, .?5
I rhi :r .. i .. :.-' 7.
"1-p-i l -l ilt inIlls .. ". I 2,01)l), I'31
l .Ih I"..ri lI -I .irr 11 .. 1:1 ,rilli ,1 3 l
nr-l fitl Ii, lihe ref.... 3. I. 273.351,
... ..... 1 ... 77 117, 32A
1",3.'.11 44 3,ti'23
........ ..... 1 1, 31 .40 ,77 5
. .ill.I A l l ll-n :-.
. .. .. .. .... :3, 114..'3- 3, .573, J
.i ...... I .. 1i1, ., 7 1.5
,' and 2."71',, ; 15 '."' 774
* .. .. -' 4 2 r0 74.
' .''- : i' l l .it -


I ra phaks.......... 71,,, 43 661, 911

.oolen .................. 2...971 2z7,1.39
1k ..................... 4' I', I..; (g.11, I, 4
,: 1. ................. 1, "il 77 1
Co ..................... 17, 119 2t0,487
illas and parasols, Eu-'
..n ................... 6 1.515 M" UJ%
'i u,,ifactures......... 92,. -It 107,911
,.r rali. ........... ... 9.437,335 12,020,936

It .l.d. ............. -.'..10,679 37,11 ,j,717


2'17,. )7
4U0,94'i

.52), ), 53
i.1 ', 1iL1
I.II I .
V, l, .hi
1.3. 1'7


I'l'







:.7
'. '


JAPAN-CHOSEN.


.: ..
..i..
<'


EI r erl


Movement and class of vessels. 1915 1916

Entered: Tons. Tons.
Steamers ........................... ........................................ 3,843,033 3,008,046
Sailing vessels .............................................................. 128,169 139,348
Total ..................................................................... 3,971,802 3,147,394
Cleared:
Steamers. ... ............ ................................................ 3,781,837 2,985,523
Sailing vessels ....................................... ................... 117, 758 134,546
Total.................................................................. 3,899,595 3,120,069

Receipts from customs duties and other taxes in 1916, compared
with receipts in the preceding year, are given in the following table:

Items. 1915 1916

Export duties ................................................................... 265,482 6,667
Import duties................................................................. 1,855,130 2,261,144
Tonnage dues................................................................... 38,533 36,82
Other receipts .................................... ............................ 61,601 57,789
Total .................................................... ................... 2,220,746 2,652,425

Trade and Economic Conditions.
The general economic conditions prevailing during the last half of
the year are ably set forth in the following excerpt from the semi-
annual report of the governor of the Bank of Chosen:
At the beginning of the half year under review, business conditions were
generally dull, as is usually the case in summer time, and consequently money
ruled easy. Signs of activity had hardly begun to dawn in September, at which
time farm produce for the year begins to appear on the market, when an un-
usually brisk scene was suddenly witnessed in the cereal market, owing to
large orders for rice from the Russian Government. With the coming of Oc-
tober, the mouth which generally ushers in the busiest season for the cereal
trade, the price of rice showed an upward tendency, owing to the report then
circulating in the mother country that the rice crop of the year there would fall
short of expectations and that the old stock was fast becoming exhausted.
Orders for the staple came pouring into the country from the home land and
other places, such as Tsingtau, Dairen (Dalny), Harbin, and Vladivostok.
While the trade in rice was thus going on briskly, that in beans was no less
active, owing to a large demand for them in Japan, where the crop of the yenr








\.


From. this table it will be seen that a majority of the main items
enumerated showed increases, the notable exception being millet,
the decrease in the importation of which must be taken as a favorable
sign for the agricultural products of the country. Where decreases
are-shown in other items, the amounts are relatively so small as to
call for but little comment. The increase in the importation of cot-
- ton goods is worthy of note, as well as the increase in the value of
S machinery imported. It is to be expected that, with so much
Japanese capital looking for opportunities for investment and with
so favorable an undeveloped field near at hand, there should be a
marked increase in the number and size of industrial undertakings in
Chosen; and the imports of machinery during 1916 may be taken
as confirming this natural supposition.
Shipping-CuStoms Receipts.
The following table shows the tonnage of vessels entered and
cleared from Chosen ports during 1915 and 1916:







SUI'PPLEMI.ENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


was rather i"r,1 :'i111hl, Mi.' lli ritiln bReans were ltililei very lilih. Tihe trade in
cotton was also 10 l il ]1 ;II i-r;lit,,ry, IeI.iIh-.,',- )i the hdiirt crop in America and
Stle exorbitiiut 'l i'tv i. i1i-1.l I', it. Tr:i.l' il other '',iiiiidiili iCs, such as w\'heat,
i ,.i ,ii, -. cattle 1 hiiI,'. etc., was also prI-p'. r '..,,nI .
As 1"*,u.i1,. s m ine'l p ,l' ir-i. the export of .-,li. ,'oppr, till-" ton, :mli iron
Showed a coilliilt bi illre' :ise. Il''Il IL -ii['lI. I I',t11 iill the piil'ivili'l, a Of
(.llc era l r ai t111'L l lit : ht rge tc ( t off int'Ior t 'li))ii. ha d t l l ilii;, I ielll'irt on
II ,' 1i,1ri iill *, i ti lthe fi -l1i L JIn. ] l' iln t11w1 C ast.
These fiavortale conditions prev:ilill, ill the various branches of native In-
alu-tr'. naturally enriched thi local people :1111, in '*Iii-i'ajtiIll'ir I1ie sales of
i....il. pi. 1 n ii,:illly -Ii ,liln and --lirliiiL'.. were \T.r.i .ati :t', lar\ in spit,* of
their rather higih' pri, u*. and the import trade was as active ts that of the
''l'rl. r \\-i.r,, inl.ls. sOmie r!.iwvbncks to olTset tilis ;*'llll pro' e,| rt.\, tnilong
which may I be 'n b llrtiertl ed ili-illi'inil r il\\.i\ :;I' iiia, l:I titlul shortage of
botttoms, sc. llity I sti;aill money. :iil I l i t1:ii; ii:.il lllnrst l-:li Iili by the ri'port
of (I he llernitln peacee jrotous;.ll. In spite of this the i'itlli. market twas 1:.id laui'
thllroiughoutl thle period, resullil in a -!:' l *I- \p;siion in advances by all the
banks in the peniii-iili aind in the circulation of bank notes.

TAIWAN.
By Consul Max D. Kirj.in.s'ff. Talhoku.
The external trade of Taiwan in 1916 amounted to S .Is.72
which is an increase of $-1.4,160,15. over the returns, for 1915. This
:Iini is due principally to the iilir.l'.;-e in export,it which almouinted
to .-;6,0(o5.4;161, 1 compared \\ith :1T7,(;60,381 for 1915, an iiicre..-e of
-si ,i~i.isI, or almost 50 per cent. Imports showed a ;iiin of
$5.81 i.072. from l ';.D'.- 19ll; in 1915 to -',".413,268 in 1916. Taiwan's
export trade in i191i was ov er :; per cent -of the total 'l+r(,,i:il trade,
the excess of exports over impal i rtm. aoaitinti o to $2:;.;'2,193.
Trade with Japan the Principal Factor. ,
The following table shows the value of Taiwan's iiilpotts fi nii and
exports to ('hosen, Ja:,; in. and other col itrict in 1915 anid 1916:

1915 1916
Countries. -- -
Inil ,-t--F F x!,,rtr Im port.. E [,,,rts.

t I I .. ............. ..................... ....... 20,103 ............ 8 $ 3,371 $37,727
Ja l...... ..................... ........... ......... ..... 2 .' i I $ ),' i 2. ,. ',21 40, 188,976
Other countries- ....................................... i. .. 7, 4 .'IN .: ;, .sl. ;.l 15,778,758
lIi ........................................... 26,598,196 37,660,381 32,413,268 5ti,,15,461

Japani continues to control the la I;rl-t part of the tratle of Taiw\ an,
(exp)rtis to that comintr, not including ('dh,.-. amountinii to
9!0.1 .;i 76 in 1916 as c;il:up: re with "1,97.i '*,', in 1915. while im-
jprts from Japan increased front ?-'1,212,571 in 1915 to S24.s.I.s.0i24
in 19.!1. Jlini ) pi'l~h: -ei all Taiwan's ri'. and alcohol, a gre:it. part
of tlhe fruit ,e(' rt.''I. all the ores, a lar' ,,, i- entity of ten, and all the
salt. tlii last colliini 11 i ~ ill :' a (ilo\'erliiiii'll it moll0 n ly. .M a n1 fac-
tuired .." of these l i',',lucts. however, 1,teiul really re.exl)orts of Amlerican and

Trade With Other Countries.
The value of TaiwinI's imports frlui i and ,expInr ts to countries other
tlha pa;apan in 1915 and 1916 is shown in the following table:





.. :?;.. W W

.. JAPAN-TAIWAN. 5

1915 1916
Countries.
Imports. Exports. Imports. Exports.

Australia........................................... 55,564 $30,224 $4,347 $2,632,142
Bitish India and Straits Settlements................ 844,827 136,308 1,305,047 189,457
Canada........................................... 358 15,250 11,458 1,613 192
hina............................................. 3,816,729 2,487,213 3,653, 438 5, 179,013
Dutch East Indies ................................... 84,792 980,252 113,022 803,566
Piace ................................................. 6,715 168,477 .,822 113,441
French Indo-China.................... ......... 23,218 ............ 56,067 28,800
Germany............................................ 52,692 ........... 23,838 ............
Great Britain ..................................... 354,551 464,008 615,025 389,534
Kwangtung............ ............................. 147,703 10,286 429:024 82,510
Hongkong............................................ 10,313 290,998 13, 107 891,265
Persia................................................ 468,617 ............ 888,977 ..........
Philippines............................................ 6,771 25 15,158 15,417
Ru sian Asia........................................... 1,203 12,225 ............ 34, 175
Siam................................................ 41,951 ............ 48,857 29,387
United States......................................... 379,236 3,077,666 379,322 3,758,422
Other countries ...................................... 120,282 11,386 127,464 18,437
Total............................................ 6,365,522 7,6S4,318 7,691,873 15,778,758

Of the foreign countries trading with Taiwan, China, as had been
the case in previous years, led in 1916. Exports to that country
show an enormous increase, from $2,487,213 in 1915 to $5,179,013 in
1916, whereas imports from China show a small decrease, the figures
for 1915 and 1916 being, respectively, $3,816,729 and $3,653,438. The
increase in the amount of exports is due to increased sales of prac-
tically all goods rather than to the enhanced export of any one
article.
Trade with the United States amounted to $4,137,744 (imports
$379,322, exports $3,758,422), an increase of $680,842 as compared
with the 1915 trade. Practically the entire increase is in exports, due
to increased purchases of camphor by the United States. Imports
of condensed"inilk from the United States show an increase from
$74,351 in 1915 to $82,779 in 1916. The sale of American locomo-
tives and parts fell from $25,230 in 1915 to $14,031 in 1916. The
import of petroleum from the United States shows an increase,
$166,065 in 1915, compared with $200,977 in 1916. American railway
materials show a large decrease, the figures for 1915 and 1916 being,
respectively. $24,526 and $1,626. It must be borne in mind that
Taiwan does not purchase all of its American goods direct, many
dealers preferring to buy through Japan.
Taiwan's trade with the United Kingdom was valued at $1,004,559,
of which amount $615,025 was imports and $389,534 was exports, as
compared with $818,559 (imports $354.551, exports $464,008) in
1915, thus showing an increase in imports and a small decrease in
exports.
Exports to Australia shows an enormous increase, from only
$30,224 in 1915 to $2,632,142 in 1916, practically the entire purchase
being sugar, of which Australia bought 70,069,340 pounds, valued at
$2,625,529, in 1916, compared with only 4,495 pounds, valued at
$185, in 1915.
The imports of opium from Persia increased from $468,617 in
1915 to $888,977 in 1916. No opium was purchased from Turkey in
1916.
The trade with the Dutch East Indies decreased from $1,065,044
(imports $84,792. exports $980,252) in 1915 to $916,588 (imports


aL sa e. 'Iu.


-;'"~i~~:;. :..;...;;,,'I;;. .. ....rr_ ~i*rC ...L:.









6 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


.11(.0'-2, exports $0:,..t;) in 1916, the exports thus showing a de-
Ir1,:-~e while the imports show a slight. increase. Tlhe falling off in
the exports .-e-Ins to have been (due to a decreased purchase of
Ponll:hieii i- tea. The inlcre:se in the export of cement l tlhe Dutch
Ei.-I Iirit,.. is iilote\iirthy, the reIir.iis for 1916 Al1iw\ing a sale of
111',i..002 poinlrlm valued at $78,174, w. i-onpllared with only 91,438
po)lili .. haviln ;i \:111e of $511, in 14151.
Exports to I:ill iin A.\in -ihow an itilcrc:tse. Caminphor was the
,lvly illportalit conmoiUlity ,1d to that comitry in 1916.

Principal Articles Exported to Foreign Countries.

In the foll, inj- i table the quantities s aiil valuiii of the nio.t im-
portant articles ru\lpited from Tai\kain in 1915 andll 1916 are shown,
t)L.Il, 1, I with the principal colin itrie of destination:


\rt iles anld toutntries. -
S. 1111 11 .


Alcohol JTpan). ................... ...... liters.. 7, 2. 44116
Bamloo spr outs, dried (total)............. 1" .1. 404
C(hin.. .......................... 4, 149
l ; .................. ........... .... .. do.... 2 .5
B an rl I i i:.) .............................dot o .... 24.*.' ,.' .i.'
Iloriit. drcd Japap n) .................. ..... do.... .1 ,I'
1i'i,, l, I i tl.41a !) ..............................do.... .' 142
Fra e .................................... .do.. .. 00
I'illted Kina'dom.........................do ... 1 2;7
ItJapin ............. ....... .................. do.... 2,9.'' -
IuI s Ai? l l.l ..i ....................... do.... ... ..
nit ed1 I ta s. .............................d .... 3, .' i7
S iii i .I J ii...... ... .. .... ,41 i7
> ,'', i I ,iI) .. .. ...... .................. .do.... 92 1 107
C('hin_ .................................... do .... ; 1 1 W+i
tl it 'hi East Indies.................... ...do.... ,
Japan. ..................................... do 40, I
Coal i ttl). .............................. ... .10ons1 3 :1
('hina ....................................... do.... 2, 53
lb IIo kon~ ................... ............ do.... 11, $)0
I |I' i, iflnitilain eneeld tnd silver (Japan) ..pinl(nds. 3, :6) 973
( .,ii II 11jls,, al kinds total)............... )nrds.. 5, 17;1, S05
(lChina. ...... ......................... .do. 71, '2
1, .n. I1 East i1.1,.- ......................do... ..... ...
IT 1.1. .... ... .......... ............... .. 1 ... .
I :lrt' L rl.-l (C(' ina ................. ... p m 0ls... I 11 .'
1 i-1I dried or .sal ted ii iii)................... o. ... I. -' ""
( hi na................. ........... do ... I 1 ,
It. l. ,.. i-. ....... ......... ........... do.... .' 034

Ir. .. i I i i dried ota !) ....................ido .... ; -
I II 1 ..................... ....... .do..... ....
1)ltclh 1 :st Indl ie ........................do.... .............
,IT. ,, ........... ... ..... ............ Ido ... 108
'1 i i l .. .............. ............. .ros.. ".. ',267
(1ina..... .. ...........................do.... 1, I-.
I)lth Eas! I die.- ........................ do...
... .......... d.I i
J onik n .. .. ............... ..... do.... 2-- '.
Oilo r .( 1iti<>s. ............................ do.... .... .
(',' loril ........................... .o l.nd .. 190 4. I ,


l 1ii :.. ................................ do....
11. ,. .........................do....
S ."* "I ... ............... ........ .. .. .
Ja w .. .. .. ............................ .do.... 3
Unltie..i tate ............................do.... .1 I
) T. .......................................... "
Pe k : ........................ .....do. .
1etr :,,, ...................... .'
( i ................................... I,
I< :;,koni .. .......................... .do....
I :0i : +nned ',Jap ni) ................. do:.ni -..
" I -l i .. .I l .. . .. ... L 1,
;" I ........ ........................ : I ,
I', s,t In dies....................... do .. 4,
FIrenL h I lies ........................... .do ...
Iongkong.................................do...,


I ,

127,1>7(
11 ,071
,77, 110
'
2
-' 1>, ;2
Z

S70

S77. 749
,,; ].7"


21~,790


Value.


$2, 650,034
3 ,9, 1if
211
39,226




Is9:, 109

1, 12, 726f

4, ,')2
3, ,57

224




2, 2;92
3, ,:7






171;0
25,989
2, .21'S
2 .,9O


S...+2

- -
1.- 2 ,


2,041l,\54
I i
I't ", I
*I*




I I .*
44, I47
1:S'9 2?.<
4 9,1". "17


Iu .' '4



I .543


1916


< 11 Ill111111 ill .


10, 0~9, 445 's,.. 11.13
701, 291 11. Ii
9, 137 542


1,127,136 12.1 fI

1, 11 2' -I
2. ,. "7 i ,
99,730) 1. I I
6,-'". 3 I, I 2. *-
6,, 73 1 .1 ,2,.
11, 0 91 1 ,.
489 -;.414
10,. '. 602 7'.174

", 270 I '. ,''
i_. e '' j
2 11 7; .1
2, N. 1 1 I2

6, *, ,'_ I'.. 'i
I .', '< ,~627
i '17 403
!, .' 105,'i l9

!. I' "1 1 ,' ;)I 7"1
.'I '" i 1' l'J 2'-l

: 11 .. '11
., ., ,, 112 ,'27
.; I i )i.I .
3,1 1,) 1) 10 .^H
171,468 6,791
272,9 19
.2,14Lx '
............ 272,919
2, I i 1l1 l'.,.'ll
1 .1 I 1,'-.
I .'l 1, 11U,i7911

1 ,'I "2' '.21 ',71

91,323
"I 6,542

r !'. ", 7 37,707
1.7, 7",,I i;59,.i
..: 1,910,370
"', l*, 2+4.



1 111 '436 6,4
.'1 : 232, 34
"*' 6*I 222 ,57.
962,524 222, i1'4
21,694 4,522
''. 598 97,323
7,.'"- 45 1,157,076
2,151,33. 3.2,-.2.".?4
1 11' 93B 64,,77.A
172 2..9 27, ".4l'
536'028 85,155


j
i


1







iJAPAN-TAIWAN. 7'

1915 1910
Articles and countries.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

Pouchong tea-Continued.
Philippines........................pounds.. ......................... 49. 556 7,636
Siam ...... .. .. .....do... ...... ......... ......... ...... 179.409 24,365
Straits Settlements .................... do.... 42,705 $7,24S 04,12. I0,0. 4
Ra fe cloth (China)........................ do.... 2, 13-1.96j 20.(.0 2 2, 62,0.51 2.4,755
Ria (Japan)................................. do.... 266,715, ul 6 4,012.706 207,52),?3;. .. '9,6 04
SaL (Japan)............................. ...do.... 113,53),41J 16', 514 14 1, I06,C-i' 212, 190
Sugar (total)................................ do.... 467, .M ,36 1S,059.4 ) 719. T i0.355 31,742.375
Australia .......................... .....do.... .1,495 I .si 70. 11#519, 2, ,5, 523
British East India...................... do.... 3,044,539 126, I& 14,nhn.. '7 1 1 229
Canada................................. o.... ........... 43.0),i01. 1,6-,192
China ................................do.... 790,020 30,106 '17.4-.1.i I 72T,731
D airen........ .... ...................... do.... ... ......... ...........22.77 9,1 5
Hongkong.............................. do.... 356, 440 13, 4 9,7 L.,2 3 '7;, 14
Japan ...... ... ...................do.... 463,6.53,342 17, S,9,l017 565.0 4 I71 25,764,995
Sweet potatoes, dried tJapan) .............. do.... 4,574,212 27,911 974,761 7,663
W heat (Japan)..... ................. .....do.... 2,194,902 30,330 ............ ... ......

Notable Changes in Export Trade.
The largest item of export was sugar, to the value of $31,27S.375,
an increase of $13,219,895, or over 73 per cent, over last yearr's sugar
figures. Rice exports fell from $4,012.706 in 1915 to $3.469.604 in
1916. This seems to be due to the increased amount of land taken iup
for sugar-cane growing, it being the policy of the Government to
aid sugar cultivation even at the expense of other agricultural prod-
ucts. All the rice went to Japan, as did the alcohol, which showed
an increase of $1,181,579, the figures for 1915 and 1916 being, respec-
tively, $2,650,034 and $3,831,613.
The value of the exports of crude camphor showed an incr'.ase of
$212,712, due principally to increased sales to the United Statea and
to the sending of $34,130 worth to Asiatic Russia. to which country
none had been exported in previous years. The total exports of
camphor amounted to $3.076,734, the United States i;king more than
half of this amount. Camphor oil to the value of $1.1:2,.'57 was
exported, all going to Japan.
The United States, as usual, bought the bulk of the Oolong tea
exported from Taiwan, its purchases amounting to almost 73 per
cent of the whole. The figures for this product show a decrease of
$24,973, more than half of this decrease being due to the fact that
Canada made no purchases in 1916, whereas it imported ('olong tea
to the value of $15,250 in 1915. Pouchong tea also .h4owi d iI slight
decrease, in spite of the fact that large shipments were made to Siam,
the Philippine Islands, and French Indo-(:'hina, novne oft which
countries appear as purchasers in the 1915 returns. Th %-:,!iile of the
exports of Oolong and Pouchong tea amounted, tesiectively. to
$2,621,871 and $1,157,076.
The export of petroleum, largely a reexport, showed a slight fall-
ing off.
Matches continued to be a large item of reexport. a itLminting in
value to almost double the figures for 1915, $96240.4. :.-, coimplared
with $479,823. The gain is due entirely to an increase in value, the
quantities exported being approximately the same fur both years.
The export of cement shows a noteworthy inl'rea-e from 929.107
pounds, valued at $4,592, in 1915, to 11.093.091 pounds, having. a
value of $83,588, in 1916. The Dutch East Indies purchased alllmist









8 SLIPI'I.I'.EMNT TO C(lMNIMERC'E REPORTS.


all of this, the exp1,rt to tll:tl (C(IIllt Iry I'l'm nllltilln to lO.2.i!,.i;() pounds.
valued at T$7..174. Tl ii h ollle of tllhe emellnt -sold was uillnlditedl v
a l'eexplot of Japanese c'illiit, 111iiic' of it wn is nllllfactllrcd by the
A.;ano Cemeint Co., at Takao.

Leading Imports for 1915 and 1916.

Tihe quantity and value of the )prilnipl)l imports_ into Taiiwan in
1913 and 191<6. by coitlitrl'it' of ,oriAlii. are given n i the follwi)ng
table:


Articles and countries.
Quanii y.


Barley (Japan).......................... bushels.. 11,891
l i..ll I', i....[:lI .......... ...... ........... ......
China..................................pounds.. 1. 423,005
Japan ................................ 1..u .li 99,506
K\' ..n i ln L ......................... .. ,, riiI.. 300,533
lBca'i ,ll IJ.I. ril ........................... Iallons. .1 230,955
Beer (Japan) ...................... .luwo' I i..ith .. 195,411
Canned food (Japan)..........................................
Cement iJ i .I ...........................pounds.. *',.1',2, %'
Chinese paper (China) ........................do.... i" ti., .(1
Coal (total)...................................tons.. ", 125
China ....................................do.... 30,728
French Indo China.......................do................
J .p.... .................................. do7.... 7,.7
Condensed milk (total)................. ......dozen.. 93,172
Japan...................................do.... 41,453
United States...........................do.... 51,713
Confectionery (Japan) ................................. .......
Cotton (total)............................pounds.. 005,508
China ...... .............................do.... 182,297
Japan.............................. ......do.... 423,271
Cotton cloth ilI'i.il ....................square yards.. .............
China....................... ......do.... 131,404
Japan....................... ..... ... do...............
t< rn,-:i in aind I1.il.~i(GCreat Britain)...... do... 7.974
C'I i rI11iish, dlrn-l.ti J;L. ..... .................. pounds. 4,'.1, 773
Fertilizers (total)............................do... 214,1 4.. 499
Oil cakes:
China.................................do.... 100,967, 64
Kwangtung..........................do.... .1. '.1,. 791
Japan................................do.... 1, 7,192
S'ir, rphi.il,.'> and other artificial manures
iJjapan)...........................pounds.. 111, 148,446
Fish dried or salted (total) ...................do .... 1. 741,602
China...................................do. 1,718 145
Japan.....................................do ...j 0,023,457
F:linnel (Japan)...................... ... ... ...
loulur, wheat (T il ti I........................pounds.. 18,730,573
GilnsenLig iutall............................do.... 12,810
( luna .....................................do.... 12,410
Chu-iti ..... ........ .....................do.................
Hongkong ................................do.... ............
United States.............................do ... 400
,;Inn\ bIags (total)...................... number.. 1,204,845
Itrinihi India............................do.... 057,045
Japan .... .......................... do.... 5 47,800
1HIrinp ro'pe JJa[ipj ) ................ .................. ........
I lo), I Jap.;in I ..... ....... ......... ... .l .. 17,779
Il '-iry .l J p n ................................. .. ....... ... .
Iron and steel, and manufactures of (Japan)......... .........
Jute (total)............................. puinvi-. 1, 519,163
China................................ .... i.i 2-, ;,1, 149
British India........ ..................do.... 763,013
Locomotives and parts O'ri, il ....................... ..........
r.ntil Britain... .......................... ........
Japan............. ........................ .... .............
United States........................ .............
L 1'm ber (total).......... .......................... .............
China........................................... .............
Japan........... .......................... .............
Machine oil (Japan) ...................... .lluns.. 488,709
Matches J.ij.... ......................gross boxes.. 3,057,269
M .i( in,; I i. Ital ................................ I hi ......... ....................... .do .. 8,786,805
Japan ........................do.............d


Value.


$13,087
348,774
201,422
143,311
4,041
103,389
264,339
232,020
117. 925
I III si.'i
21.1,.16
119,516

94,430
142,801
68,441
74, .i;'
112, 951
71,559
17,445
54,114
2,044,119
12,429
2,1 1- .91)
.;i.', -,21
2, "', 2.5.1

ll. 1,820
141,076
(8,318

1. l;. 339
2, -'1, 951
I'", 180
2, li.. 771
;3,791
530,151
19,096
15,476
.......

3,620
I1. 50
'i, 141
71,093
20,423
258,499
140,814
.'t, 745
146,576
125,459
21,117
148,630
2,190
121, 210
25,230
.07, b18
174,102
633,516
122,902
667,878
320,963
302, 960
IS,003


Qinutii vy.


9,975

3, 9"1..''27
l ., 7i5
2;1,71.
3, 370
'ls, 991
1,12,1 12
q.'i a 1 wi.3
I iili J'.jl
77,682
3, 185
10,C00
32, 891
..-., r'.-
34,146
54,412

760,131
113, 921
-' .,4 2.10


603,963
3,389,006
261, 47 ,. 35-

98,800.992
3ii, 3i ., 957
I lI, 1,' t0

86, 657,852
60,716, 485
104,207
60,552,278

2.. r.,213
"2 1 ",
18,839
601
797
!0 '
1,871,530
1,727,112
144, 418
......ii,....

.... .........
2,2',i286
'11",' 252
1,353,034






465,064
3,262,374
I6,685,W042
.............


Value.


$10,818
269,431
59,.I4
.109,51
-,,55ll
17,5110
-J9,959
219,2.1%
'21,.'04
95, 284
267, 172
133,728
33,340
100, 404
142, .78
59,599
<2,779
l.S, 44.1

.11,738
1;9,901
2. .7,070
9, X2
2,527,188
9,g839
131,553:1
3,428, 051

1,032, 195
415,431
11 i, 08

1,518,039
1, .35,212
i, 880
1,828, 332
135,378
S.31;, 111
., t767
429

5,784
244,335
223,259
* 21 07ti
23,983
164,285
I1 7,329
I.40, 619
103,620
28203
7.,317
I1. ,872

111)7, 41
14,031
7si, 635
114,201
1-22,434
137,370
1,250,041
436,764
371,898
64, 86G









r

5,.


Articles and countries.


i:


1915


Quantity. Value.


Mushrooms (Japan).......................pounds..
Opium (total)............................. do....
British India............................do....
reAsia....................................do....
ey......................... ........do...
Ores (Japan)............................... do....
Paper (Japan).......................................
Petroleum (total)......................... gallons..
Dutch Indies............................do....
Japan.................................... do...
United States...........................do....
Porcelain (total)...................................
China................. ........................
Japan........................................
Railway construction material (total)......pounds..
Great Britain............................do....
Japan................................... do....
: United States............................do....
Ra ,tMI tics (Japan) .....................number..
ERae tissue (total .................square yards..
a.............................. ...... do....
.iat. Britain............................ do....
an........ ........................... do....
Ramie loth (total)...........................do....
Ohina.....................................do....
Okaat. Britain............................do....
Rei -shi orjoss paper (China)........... pounds..
ice (total)..................................do....
na ..................................... do....
Japan................................. bushels,.
Sake (Japan):
BotLles................................. dozen..
I' rcasks................................ gallons..
Shirtings (total) .................. square yards..
J 8;.....................................do....
OTher coun ees ........................ do....
Shrimps, dried (Japan)...................pounds..
Soap (Japan)............................... ...
Soy (Japan)...... ....................,.gallons-.
Sugar .(Japan).,', .................. ......pounds..
Suga-mill maaciesry and parts (total).............
SGreat Britain.'................................
Hawaii........ ....... ...... .......
Japan.........................................
Tea boxes (China)............................sets..
Tea lead (total)...........................pounds..
Great Britain............................do....
Japan.....................................do....
Japan (other lead).......................do....
Tobacco, lear(total)..........................do....
China ................................do....
Philippines..............................do....
United States............................do....
Tobacco, other ('otal)..............................
Japan (cigarettes)................... thousand..
Japan (cut)...........................pounds..
Vegetables (Japan)..............................
Onions............................... pounds..
Other raw................................do....
Radishes, dried..........................do....
Vermicelli (total)...........................do....
China.................................... do....
Japan....................................do....


349,419
253,856
1441, 666
104,15S
3,0132
84,263,490

3,651,350
62S,216
1,899,980
1,125,153


6,763,937
6.530
5, 48, 364
1,269,043
563,522
............
1,018,170
2,273
..........
4R0, 460
480,460
.............
2,928,571

360,707
321,303

193, 408
331,721
.............-
2,063,687
204,037
2,758.033
.............
6,146,116
5,545,700
.............


511,325
1,831,138
566, $49
1,267,259

6,W809,228
6,770,967
II, IWS
27,153

436,7 4)
176,A1

2,27c,,218

1,420,432
1,062,110
394,221
66%,219


The import of fertilizers amounted to $3.428,051, a


over the figures for 1915. Opium, a Government monopoly, was
imported to the value of $1,856,470. showing an inlreease of $765.419.
Dried and salted fish to the value of $1,835,212 was imported in 1916,
a decrease of $459,739.


JAPAN--TAIWAN.


96, 49:)
1,091,1150
0i1h, 15i"
46',.l17
16,277
191,429
432,429
501,9i60
67, '7f
26, 019
166,065
184,311
75,154
109, 167
13..;57'
932
110,220
24,526
150,709
121,731
74,425
368
46, 938
45, 609
45,009

....... ......
4 ;, 0(39

199,547
495,959
6,48MQ
48.8,471

386,840
223,795
136, 5S7
122, 42
13,745
261,745
10(,921
2112, 469
36, 827
22,8 06
20,261
2,51j
........ ....
39,374
125,097
39,925
85,172
. .. .... .. .
53, 152
'32,N34
914
4,406
412,7q9


311,0-59
26,750
30, 709
4fi. ll
20, s32
25,679


1916


Quantity. Value.


34,11014 94,033
307.11 1, 95l, 479
11'3, 223 97,521
143. su5 S88,958

45,533,390 129,914
...... ...... 576,825
4,1431.77F. 93x,916
C"'27 726 75,250
2,r25,750 fi;2, t;9
9, 3300 20), 977
............ 212,710
............. 71,0(06
. ..... .... .. 141,704
4,614,124 188,708
. .". ... .. .. .. .. .
4,512,393 187,082
71,731 1,626
635,735 176,033
.. 130, 768
973. 93 78,143
9, 77 1,752
........5 5 85,73
348.386 31,207
345, 30 33,743
2,556 464
2,983,191 205,754
...... ... 633,469
1a6,286 3,816
402,085 629,653

196,912 406,119
307,724- 226,228
............ 131,508
2,003, 935 119,419
194,2R5 13, L9
2,314,515 226,820
........ .... 139,620
6.402, 731 2An,222
3,4650,4 279,Qh6
............. 211,914
............. '77, B 4
.. ...... .. 418
134,312
652.6T 56,45l
1,S32.20i1) 209,431
810,709 82, 47
532. 141 73,075
44, 8.56 53,511
2,499,689 229,3'0
2, 433, .26 213,321
29,271 7,310
36,892 8,749
....... .. 341,458
i34,i500 306,965
11s,746 34,493
...... ..... 79,635
1,c36,710 22,578
........... 24,416
1,437,331 32,311
l6r 1, 29 43. 40
32.1,0.36 21. 91
530, 093 22,359


gain of $740.387







10 s.PI'P.i-.MFN TO C 'MMERCE REPORTS.

Movement of Coin and Bullion.
Tli'h following li.,1re1i shnow the proportion of Taiwan imports and
exports of coin and i)lili,1' (gold alnd silver) to Japi:u and other
ciilln lt.is:

1915 1916
Articles.
A ,apan. o,,ir 'o l. Japan. ter Total.
SI Countries.

imports:
Gold coin and I iiI .................. $17,125 ,..'J $17,820 tlt.T,609 $666 tllis',27"
Silver coin and bullion .............. 123,487 38,800 162,287 261%, 498 5, 112 273, 0IU
1'.: X I ,)r I
I l.o coin and bullion................. 198, 484 ......... 198,484 799,103 41.929 841,032
Silver coin and bullion................ 35, 108 118,985 154,093 1], 923 51.i, ?J 535,221

Internal Commercial Conditions.
()O\ini to the high ratr.- of intlrvr.-t clarged1 by the banks in
Taiwan, not much in-il(ling of private dwellinlgs and s itall Ii.ines.
hoii:-ts \-:is done in 1916, people preferring to wait iintil they can
kiorrow capital more v;:.-ily.
Taiwan's prolduiitini of pet rol',lv has increva;ed from 2,)555 gal-
lons in 1915 to ,i.,s:1.,! ;alllons in 1916. Local production, Ii,\\ov\er,
has not yet rea;(ched a stage' where it can a ffec't c\ve the Taiwan
marlkt.
Coal ii ilinn, (due to the dhIlm;nd from abroad, hl;as iincrea.Lci in
't i it v. The export figures of this commodity show all inci'rese
from 37.,S4 t(on,. valued at '2I.:. in 1915, to 78,270 tons. of $1!99,580
value, in 1916.
Shipping at the Ports of Taiwan-Customs Receipts.
)Dring 1916. 1.570 ve\.-.', with a tonnage of 73;,s.240, entered
Taiwan ports :is compared with 1,373 vessels, with a tonni:ge of
i ;1,074, in 1915. Vessels cle:ri"ng the ports numbered 1,525, with a
tinniIa-e of 6i;t'.li02. in 1916, as. c'mlpalred with 1,319, with a toniin;iag
of 651,"I;., in 1915. Tlie greater part of thice were Japanese vecsel-.
Cust oms receipts for 1915 and 1916 were: Import duties. $6-'73:,07
and $"638,985; tonnage dues, $11.234 and $10,488; misceileollanus re-
ceipts, $7,721 and $10,115; total, ;'i2,030 in 1915 and $ t51,588 in
1916.


WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRTNTINC OFFICE : 1917






























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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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tJUNi' 3OF FL LIB.


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