Supplement to Commerce reports

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00030
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00030

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text











11 ii

IBEtkIRAlElClA.
H S. .Rr.u*b, m .

I:.r t s m


h.i&


i tie. t is secure while
I a'ohaih -ide.d m, s akis, its
imWdW.k. on & I. ., scaleH
'wo: profatab* ia-^ 1The
pab3.:t II ig'itt.good hat-
tAitE i iatablf i r the volime
S ... port d d exports inm-
b Mfa:ltid than, in quantities of
Aftirv E rnzftty' rat predicts,
..e ..ind.s ... .o.0
-Ma W necessities,
rixy lais plsi grejr areas under
tia~attiw4Mew;tsEue~tia'


i s iin the eastern part
Ira.ctand uncertain. The
:' ...' cheme, to be financed
Within three years. It will
Wsoaw4~~5, acres of very
ca4ditias n eor two oc tree
Um- M. P


or OS". ia c



*j *ia'uewac aid
,o a t a ,r


n o w.g..". iEExR. H."...... ".. "m.ij-j. li... "


: i '; iii :


I;
Ii


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in each case, and it is probable that the imports of daiwj
have now practically ceased.
Local Industries--ore Fadtories Wanted.
The manufacture of boots and shoes is the most importaat1
in Port Elizabeth. A dozen factories employ more than .
and pay annual wages of about $215,000; Most of the ou
of veld-schoens or heavy low-grade farm boots, but an :
number of better grade shoes is being produced.
One tannery of fair size, with about 200employees, andtl
plants are treating cowhides, calfskins, and chrome leat
find a ready sale locally. With the abundant supply of rai
at hand this industry should grow.
Of the three furniture factories in Port Elizabeth one: is
the largest in South Africa. This concern occupies 850.
feet in shops, offices, and showrooms and specializes imi
dining-room, and office furniture.
A wool washery, recently established, is equipped thro
American machinery, consisting of two modern washers
and promises to be a profitable venture. Other industries '
breweries, flour mills, biscuit and jam factories, a foundry
chine shop, and various small enterprises.
In Kingwilliamstown there are two fairly large
plants, but the advent of the motor car has seriously i
this trade.
The municipality of Port Elizabeth has issued a book of
100 pages describing the natural advantages of the to.
facturing center and the particular benefits to be dive
municipal electric plant and water works, combined
ant supply of labor. Undoubtedly Port Elizabeth
siderable industrial importance in the future ..
Changes in Import Trade.


The large import houses with headquarters at Port El
East London not only supply the eastern sections a
Province, but also many of the requirements of merct
Orange Free State, Basutoland, Rhodesia, and part of th
In an agricultural country trade depends upon the praog
farmer. As 1916 was one of the most proftable ys i
the import trade was brisk and importers had d'Mqu
sufficient supplies to meet the demand. Because of thM
can goods figured more extensively in this market
previous year.



.. ............ ." ,
MAL ":EEE









MUM -AVIM-4t-POW KJOAPIMP -

the impmt trade of Port Elizabeth, and
*W*&'begum, a compmtiVe table40HOWS, COV.,
46*w ot thb pAnd*, lines of interest to Amerle&n reporters
or 1913 and 1916, with peramtages of the totak
aa& am into South Africa:



Par Per
Dot Cwt
value. Value. of
total. tot3l.

....................................... 000 45 sm'000 35
............ ......... 5m: is 72, SDO 21)
....................... ...... 7, 5W, oW 55 7,600,000 52
...... .............. 335 OW 25 115'(W 9
000 2D 477, ODD
................ ...... % 000 33 28,ODD
...................... W:OW 40 111,000 1
......... ....... 95,000 37 'W 000 Ip
...... 212,5M 57'
........ ........ .......... %I, ODU 331 000 $01:
--- ---------------- ................ 7, W-5, 000, 40 120 "3' ODO 50
............. ...... .... m-.-- 4 567, ODO 32 .1, 749, ODO 26
vAd ebina WUS ---------------- ....... ........ .... 230, OW 28 232,000 24.
.......... ...... ------ -4-W ........ ......... 382, ODO 13 695,0W 26
-------------------------- ......... ----- 11, 574, ODD 30 8, 792 000 so
............................... .................... 1,2%,000 26 952,00-3 33
RW*M. ------ ........ 437,000 25 427,000 21)
M ;Wlh'lay ................... ....... ........ 3,467,500 55 2 397,000 36
------------------- 2,-130 MO 32 1 533,000 22
............... ....... .............. 6W:000 45 772 OW 45
....................... sk" 27 240:0W OD
........... 1, 5N, 479 15 M, 000 20
------- ......... 3$637,003 58 4, W, ODD .50
A000 42 191000,.
etc.., ............ ......... 454 43
...... ......... ........... ............ 396,000 40 OW 40:
..................... .......... 2XII300 20 67,50
...... --------------------- 417,60D 17 344, ODO 37.
.......... .......... 143,000 10 M 000' -U
......... -------- 1, 000 29 1,405:000 33
................... ........ m .................. 156'000 83 31 000 90
............ 27;7 000 70 207,0001 75
.................. :: ...... 211061 25 729,ODO 20
'Z ...... 793,OW 52 842, OOD 0
........................ 610,000... 55 219, OOD 26
....... .............. ....... 264,000 28 89,700 21D
........... ........................ 165 WO 20 175, ODD is
+01'44'4-*Oo ............ -... I W'N8 so $WOOD so
............... iW,000. 17 W. OW 23

....................... so sm 98 46 000 off
....... W',OW 25 20 000 29
.......... ......... 0310(p. 65 65:000 23,
.................... 68,000 ODD as
4T _4 I + .. .
.......................... 000 OOD as
IWIT
K" 4",V. ......... 99,000 .000 MI.
............ ...... W7, 000 29: DOD Is+
...... I ............. 153p 001D as m'OW 36
SWOOO 67 000
...................... OW 20 M om
2?4:WO a 164OW
........ ........................ 97,0W 20 M ODO
........... 00'OUD 27 KOUQ so
....... OW is 104'idb
000 42 811,40 40'
IKOW U m 1W
........ ....... A 000 47
............ ........... A ...........


the UniW States in the bipo4 tradeof -
W Amany ingrevAng is shown by its gum in many item&





L 46,















nearly 20 per cent of the enameled ware, a new line, in
Some American food products are gaining. Baka
principally American, as is 16 per cent of the chicory,
the confectionery, 121 per cent of the malt, 50 per cent o f.
meats, much of the cottonseed oil, and 20 per cent of othertl
The United States sent 25 per cent of the general fu rm
in 1916, including 35 per cent of the beds; 6 per cent .
bottles and jars in 1913 and 28 per cent in 1916; 8 per ..
plate glass in 1916; 40 per cent of the window glass; 23p8. -
largest proportion, of miscellaneous glassware; 45 per
antifriction or lubricating greases in 1913 and 60 per eai-!
25 per cent of the bolts, nuts, rivets, and other hardwaislil.
all the cash registers; 4 per cent of the cutlery in 1913.Z ai
cent in 1916; 80 per cent of the wire fencing in 1916; 66.' ll
the horseshoes; 33 per cent of the wire netting; 10 per '-ea..
nails and screws in 1913 and 28 per cent in 1916; 14 per a4f:
sewing machines; 42 per cent of the tools; 66 per cent ofteb
wire; 11 per cent of the miscellaneous hardware in 1913 na3iil
cent in 1916; and 66 per cent of the garden hose in 1916. ",'.M,:i;
American Iron and Steel, Xaehinery, and Vehicles. ,'
Of the iron and steel imports into the Port Eizabet-3
America supplied a good share of the pipes and fittings, plate
and galvanized iron. The United States furnished 30 per tid
lamp ware; 33 per cent of the piece leather; 16 per cent ofi .i
11 per cent of the women's, and 3S per cent of the childii
55 per cent of the agricultural, 35 per cent of the el
mining, 11 per cent of the manufacturing, and 40 per
printing and bookbinding machinery; 30 per cent of thi:
belting; nearly all the steam and suction hose; 80 per
engine packing; 94 per cent of the windmills; 33 per!F
pumps; and 18 per cent of the miscellaneous machinery.
Sales of American automobile tires in 1916 were more
cent greater than in 1915. Imports from the United StatmiF
33 per cent of the total. Although musical instruments d.ii
per cent, American exports to this district practically .'le|
value and amounted to 20 per cent of the aggregate.
Most of the lubricating oils, about half of the fuel oil,
all the paraffin came from the United States in 1916, an
is growing. America supplied practically all the turpei
cent of the varnish, 62 per cent of the liquid paint, 11l.
the paper bags, 40 per cent of the perfumery, 40 per
photographic supplies, 17 per cent of the sheep dip,
typewriters and 60 per cent of the accessories, and I
the toys.




'0 jr





T-7
hestdWY Mi the vehicle trade of
MP) & per Cent d the bicycles and tAdydes in
oat Od Ruh7lownalps and carts, 33 per cent of the
8 per cent in 1013), more than 7dr per cent of the..
aid over 80 per cmt of the motor trucks.
ia from, kneneftu were Oak, oplar, and walnut.,
ponkgomentii of American 4ne Irought in through
Lia-don were used in wilnection.. *ith the gold-
at the Johannesburg mines.
,amount of the increased imports from the United
-ttk.iabili to secure`certain products from other
the filtut-0 =Can trade in South Africa, depeiids
aftention to details and efforts to supply promptly
424
at 7orf Elizabeth and Zget London.
ing table is sho*n the value of the principal articles
''P6rt, Elizabeth and East London during the past


m low 1915 1916

FORT A-.'B-FT a-continued.
M 136 324k38D TODIStuffs, beverages, etc.- i
S'Y'479 15 N CmUnue4cL
19,486 42a 1 Vegetables, fivsh and
...... 4, 701, 101 405 canned. ............ 1", 298 90,2U
46967 101,486 Wfnes and liquors. E; U4 432,6M
li'189 28,527 Rbmnn.u& ............ 44,979 4, M
....... 2MI, 164 ZW M Fc*twear (not leather) .... 65, 635 10 170
--qq ... 15,04 R20a basket-
...... 0 579 Rals F=tI&I tl= ...... m. 497,5W: VS, W
A 572 144;9H Glow, glassware,. and lamp-
ware ........... ........... IODO 731 322, OW
.... .... .202 416 whery and millinery. 2,M, 814 2, SM, 276
8153. i140 Hardware aud cutlary ...... M, 123 ioff,009
65:441 78,W Elides and skins ......... -' 25,M 2 IN
6,880;"2 W 313 M llose fin, gardew, etc ..... .16" 6" 00 780
09,476 'Oe,165 Iron amd, deg znafiuf& .
IL % a ---------------- -... 316,09 32411
18,M6 21,038 LwA aud manuLacturm..... to, 136 277
70,375 174,211 LasUm goods:
BooUand oboes .......... 2,401,097 3,505,462
216,522 %485 Harnema, ssdd]Wry 537,07 0%682..
A 019 1217 L14614 jute; aild
........ 6%M 970
Use-M-Dery .............. 5W
ahMp.'. 46,704 $0,07 MusWi6gwMants .... 50038 'M! W
4K'7M 49'M Ogiawastam .............. li: 187 1 810
...... 84,= *4,SW aud veptabaa.. & ", a W9O', 445
39, etc. 91, 2MM29 V2 532
WiOff 176,761 2W, M 233
U, UO 62M ON t PCOP6.
tIL1112 Oak +10 rAVAM ............. 143,80 19%8%
jW'M ISDINO Photre oupplift..,..44: 25,2M A065
Plat,% vw wad
*4*- Wam ...................... W758 INOn
A= 46'M 32.M
191) .................
................. In on, M
............... 474 4,091
andeattledip-......- tm
SM aud aft goodIL.. W, Wj"
sit
............

_kSW 471*
482
WOM IdW..W"'4 WOO
*)W

iL












Artules.


1olT Blta.BEzTH=CbUtd.
Tobacco, cigars, cigarettes,
pipes, etc..................
Toys and fancy goods. .......
Vehicles and parts:
Bicycles and trloyles... -
Carts, carriages, etc......
Motor ca..............
Motorcycles .............
Wax perafn, and stearin...
Wood, and manufactures of..
Woolen manufactures........
All other articles ...........
Total merchandise....
Government stores.........
Specie......................
Total imports, Port
Elizabeth...........
BAT LONDON.
Agricultural implements....
Animals, live...............
Antifriction grease..........
Apparel and slops...........
Bags (textile)...............
Beads......................
Brush ware.................
Canvas and duck...........
Carpets, linoleum, mats, and
matting.................
Cordage, rope, and twine....
Cotton manufactures........
Drugs, chemicals, etc.'.......
Earthen asd chins ware.....
Electrical Supplies, induding
wire and posts.............
Enameled were..............
Foodstuffs, beverages, etc.:
Ale, beer, mineral water,
cider, and fruit sirups.
Baking powder........
Biscuits and cakes.......
Butter, cheese, and mar-
garin............-,----
Chocolate and cocoa.....
Coffee and chicory.......
Condiments .............
Confectionery-
Candy..............
Other...........
Corn, wheat, flour, etc...
Extracts and essences....
Parinaceous roods.......
Fish, preserved and
canned...............
Fruits and nuts.........
Lard, dripping, and sub-
stitutes...............
Meats,salted and canned
Mil, canned...........
Rioe.....................
Sugar and sugar prod-
ucts, including glu-
coe...................
Tea................


1


Article,


I II I .--


162,040
176, 88
191,755
63,002
977,261
230 497
(45
184,807
1,153,483
443, 455
33,744,068
24,216
5,840


217,727
253,640
38,996
85,990
1,341,8650
196, 98
56, 34
20,386
1,558,833
376,875
14,38,797
770,158
32,119


34, 37,124 4, 191,074


231, 208
16,059
19,497
683, 213
365,061
15,963
12,643
28, 848
(,)
30,007
1,504,298
1,182,950
34,528
143 173
(aZ

16,235
67,548
20, 29
62,715
16,026
331,968
69,966
85,656
14,980
1,336, 574
15,865
106,092
79,105
36,932
61,892
95,233
107,735
60,379


50,300
138,126


43,158
36,292
29,2;9
1,212,050
238,989
12,411
23,856
33,467
69,085
35,755
2,639,726
1,110,940
71,105
194,533
23,810

16,848
51,862
9,032
63,868
15,183
364,875
92,439
81,412
17,217
1, 18,854
16,162
75,348
77,956
27,447
32,060
63, 29
91,261
49,268

36,363
75,586e


RAM IoiaD -I@r ctd

OdntinUed.
canned. .............
Wluesadnthqua e- ---;
taoellaneous............
Footwear (notleather)......
Purtturaqinladlaing bukat
ware and rattens ..........
Glass, glaseuwe, ead lnElp-
ware...................
Haberdashery and allian y.
Hardware and utlery.......
Hose, garden, fIe,te........
Ironnd steel manufatumre,
n.e.. s...................
Leather and leather goods:
Boots and shoes.........
Harness, saddlery, etc...
Linen, jute, and manufo-
tm s ....................
Machine.ry...................
Musical nstruments.........
Oilman's stores ............
Oils, mineral and vegetable..
Paints, varnishes, etc........
Paper and paper goods.....
Perfumes and toiet prep
rations.................
Plate, silver, and plated ware.
Railway and tramway ma-
terials.................
Rubber goods, including
tires.......................
Seeds......................
SSheep and cattle dip.........
Silk end silk goods.........
Soap.......................
rt goods..............
St oner and supplies......
Sulphur, towers o ..........
Surgical and dental appli-
ances...................
Tallow and grease..........
Tents and tarpaulins........
Tin and tinware.............
Tobacco, eigas, cigarettes,
pipes, etc.................
Toys and fancy goods.......
Vehicles and parts:
Bicycles and tricycles....
Carts, carriages, oto......
Motor ars.............
Motorcycles...........
Wax, paraifn, and stearn...
Wood, timber, and mann-
tactures.................
Woolen manufactures......
Zinc........................
All other articles...........
Total merchandide.....
Government stores........
Specie....................


'Hi

I4f

,1.


L ot .............1a


a Not separately stated.

Exports for live Tears.
As prices of South African raw products have flet
widely for the past few years, there follows a five-year
statement of certain exports from Port Elizabeth ad
London to all countries, with quantities and values, a=d
age of the total exports from South Africa: *


. 4r&


sgl^i




--`-- 77,





mto
tmW
N~umWOOLm
....... 5 2,O 6 41,M 8,9 ,W 7,9 ,5
----....O O ,1,70 6,M ,O W6
--- -I-- ---- 3 M 0 0 5 W O 5,1 O0
. ..... ......... -,0,0) ,0,W 14 1 W Y F,00 6

..... 5 6,O ,0,00 5,7,0 12700 6
........ ........ j WO 30,W 681,0 1 4, o 4
..........64OD 717,W 14660 s

.... ,9,WO O,00 327,W 6770 5
4,5,0 52D 33330 7,0
-- .. -7.5
1..............,8,0 $01M 332O ,2O 4
....... W DD 11400 1470 6
411 O ,i 4- o 2725 6
|; 'N 5VO. 1205 9,5
........! 8.W 5820 1 1,9 0,4D 6

......|14060 27
10M OD 1,1,40 5,6,80 47,0D 5
---- .... 5 83 ,6,D 3100 76 O 5

















Article.


Asbestos, crude........................................
Buchu leaves.......................................
Feathers, ostrich.............. ....................
Hair, agora...................... ..................
Hides and skins:
Calf, dry...... ..... .... ......
Cattle, dry............................ .........
Fur................................................
Goat, dry................... ...................
Sheep, d .........................................
Wattle bark............................................
Wool:
Scoured.................... ..................
Unwashed............. .........................
All other articles ......................................
Total............................................


ma


I Pwouds.


Value.


- -


8,m00



8Mi 0
4MB4 we
4,8844000

1, B 00
341011,500


1, mn
1,444,104


4,105
178,4%8

SBT, 4
5,.48,7W


............ -.-.. -. -. .........2"


Returned American goods were valued at $4,673 in 1915rd i|
in 1916 the largest item being empty ammonia cylinders.
from East London in 1916 were invoiced at the Port.i
consulate;
Dependence Upon Shipping-Trade Outlook. .
The prosperity of this district, depending almost enti0l ... ,
demand for its raw products, will be materially affected.
facilities become so inadequate as to restrict exports to'ail
degree. The arrivals at Port Elizabeth (Algoa Bay) in 1914 M
329 steamships and 9 sailing vessels, compared with 85859 a'
and 10 sailing vessels in 1915. At East London 389 e
12 sailing vessels entered in 1916, against 376 and 5, 1
1915. South Africa has fared better than most countrieuI
war, but at present there is a growing scarcity of ships,
to the United States are delayed.
American trade would be greatly benefited if uotaio
logue prices were given in English currency. n c
trade of any magnitude it is advisable to send an exp
sentative to investigate the market and complete' r
selling through an export commission house wi
branches. American import commission houses are imf
very few local products are shipped to the United State
mission basis, and such shipments will continue rare
prices with cash payments prevail. American bu ..
throughout the wool season. The direct interchange of
South Africa and the United States has increased the:
tions of the two countries
DURBAN.
By Comuul Wlllisam W. M..iftm,.i.
There was unusual industrial activity in this distr
coal mines increased their output, etw 'fatoies wenr~t'
firms were incorporated, and branches of the leading-l


Xas


.. .. .-i
.. ....










Ielma m~w aenteast The drought reduced crops, but farmers.,were
by th Idgherprices they received for the'rpodcs
Wholes4anil-ad retai trade enjoyed w. pod year. Building
were continued extensively. The overnment erected a
seaingplant at this port and increased the railway mileage by
(piitonof, several branch: lines. This locul activity did much to
foreign trade, both imports, and--exports increasing over

of lroreign Trade4
soutresoutside the.. U-nited Kingdom, Japan and the United
lhv~ained most in, South African trade since. the war began.
for. imports from the. United States into'Durban in 1916,
T40 include only the articles shipped directly from America
Acttheconsiderable volume. originitmng there but sold in Eng-
and, other, countries before coming into this district. The total
% *tlh the, United States'_amounted to $5,031,300 in 1913 and
8,096, nearly double, in 1916. Ja~pan has made notable gains
91313 when its exports to South. Africa were less than $200. It
goods worth $683,399 in 1915 and $1,306,753 in 1916.
iFollowing is the value of the imports, and exports by principal
iotaitries for the port of Durban during the past two years:

imports from- Exports to.
coutrie.W
1915 1916 1915 1916

.......................... $M 36, 019 $10, 551 $131, 381 W8, 281
............................................. 490,2D7 553,291 ........ ... ...........
.......................... ......... ... 181, 8W7 M W6 ............ ... ....
., ....... m.................... 139:440 306,419 ......... G,06
... .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. 258 907 213,533 ...........
and sos................. 621:588 979,452 78,025 1 06
.. ................................ 5W, 294 39209 ... ........ ..........
....633, 390 1,06 153 701 25, 413
.....~~,16,4 1; 20 ....................... 5W,41 m a ....
........>..36,491 477,618............ ...... 4,3 2 49...... 16 21
,,..... ... .......................... 007 3132
... ......... ... .... .................. 41:90,0e 22, 499 ... ..... 1::: ,261::
..... ... ..................... 0005 331,326 ...... ... .. .........
.. .. ......................... .... OW,10 167 27, 4 6590 ........... ..7........
---- --------:::......................3 2,M 4 76...... ......... 46,3 4 5 296 ........ .

ea ...................... t ............ 7, 145,6 r04 7, M2 I 6 15, 503, 963 20, 3, 639

Jityort Arftiaes--American Good&.
*of motor cars and motorcycles from the United States,
qqatrynow supplying this, market, have increased mate-
qrise the entire cargoes; of several ships entering
Otdo the past few months. American motor cars valued.
0 witrae mported in 1915 and $1,079,482 in 1916; motor-
ey $1996in, 1915 and $424,4N6 in 1916.
rAmeia Mianufactures that gained in 1916 were agriedY-
IOural machinery; bicycles; box shooks; candles; conned meats; choco-
late; clodia and watches; cotton goods; d-rugs and chemicals; enftm-
&ld and aluminum ware; fertilizers furnituree. irou and steel
I ers, joints, pips plaes and rails; printing, wrapping, and writ-
I papor; p wed e i en ;,ubr tires; wearing apparel; and wire.


a4
















were placed.
The following statement gives the quantity and value a
cipal articles imported into Durban from all countritOi
calendar years 1915 and 1916:

Articles. 1915 1916 ArticlesL .


Agricultural implements.....
Animals, live...............
Antifriction grease...........
Apparel and slops.........
Arms and ammunition......
Assay apparatus...........
Bags (not leather or paper)..
Brass sat manufactures.....
Brush ware................
Canvas and duck............
Cement...................
Clocks and watches..........
Copper and manufactures....
Cordage and rope...........
Corks and bungs............
Cotton manufactures:
Blankets, rugs, and sheets
Hosiery and underwear..
Piece goods..............
Shawls.................
Other..................
Drugs and chemicals........
Earthen and china ware.....
Electrical supplies..........
Enameled ware..............
Focdstuffs, beverages, etc.:
Ale, beer, and stout.....
Baking powder..........
Biscuits and cakes.......
Butter and substitutes..
Cheese.................
Chicory and substitutes..
Chocolate and cocoa.....
Coffee..................
Condiments.............
Confectionery...........
Corn, grain, flour, and
meal.................
Extracts and essences...
Farinaceous foods.......
Fish....................
Fruits, fresh and dried...
Lard and substitutes....
Meats....................
Milk, condensed.........
Oils, edible.............
Pickles and sauces.......
Rice, including paddy...
Spices..................
Spirits...................
Sugar and products......
Tea ...................
Vegetables..............
Wines .................
Miscellaneous...........
Furniture ...............
Glass and glassware.........
Glycerin..................
Haberdashery and millinery.
Hardware and cutlery.......
Bats and caps..............
Hides and skins............
Hops......................
Hose, conveying.............
Iron and steel manufactures,
n.e. .....................


628, 6683
108,116
75, 704
1,648,10
629063
67966
,66,728
54,461
63,649
104,450
105,554
37,759
40,090
107141
53,921
290,340
888,287
1,945,374
35,019
745,353
2,255,021
216,588
728,096
62,559
42,723
100,386
107,287
303,625
238,093
57,769
94,653
609,484
74,918
551,404
2,088,594
79,888
215,892
514,272
200, 757
64,321
571,954
566,012
258,540
97,724
1,092,363
51,219
" 737.965
111,474
546,683'
68,291
89,446
186,035
554,007
361,605
1,140,226
1,138,664
2,2 01,37
204,218
32,781
42,085
120,675
2,223,522


11,067,413
131756
126,310
8,156,811
1,190, 794
64,985
2,134,243
99,724
133,842
144,924
100, 362
78,173
48,650
149,835
62,072
915,505
1, 619,654
3,100,778
83,918
1,282,566
2,398,294
460, 619
1,362,630
170,376
52,777
69,469
81,397
205,293
140,145
92,546
64,925
635,467
114,317
574,914
2,467,944
94,231
201, 663
449,095
224,151
58,724
369,348
460,780
328,202
114,208
1,155,473
70,044
1,057,505
62,272
408,922
43,034
119,594
152,564
86, 512
674,147
1,332,034
1,525,658
3,442,635
382,507
73,951
50,461
182,773
8,170,951


Jute and hessian............
La s and lampwae.......
Leather and leather goods:
Boots and shoes.........
Unmanufactured........
Other...................
Linen and manufactures.....
Machinery................
Manures and fertiliare.......
Musical instruments.......
Nitrates ..................
Oilman's store.............
Oils, industrial.............
Paints and varnishes........
Paper and paper goods:
Bags....................
Printing ............
Wall....................
Wrapping...........
Perfumery and perfumed
spirits....................
Plate, silver, and plated.
ware..................
Printers' and bookbinders'
materials.................
Qmcksilver ...............
Railway materials...........
Rubber and- manufacturers,
including tires.............
eeds.......................
Sheep and cattle dip........
Bilk goods.................
ap.......................
sportia g goods.. ..........
SItatinery, books, etc........
Sulphur.....................
Surgical and dental appli
ances....................
Tallow and grease...........
Tar...... ...........
Tin and tinware............
Tobacco and manufactures..
Tobacconists' wares......
Toys and fancy goods........
Traeiway materikls..........
Vehicles and parts:
Bicycles and tricycles....
Carriages, carts, ate......
Motor cars..............
Motorcycles..............
Other..................
Wax, paraffin and sterdn...
Wood and timber:
Manufactured...........
Unmanufactured........
Woolen manufactures........
Zinc.......................
All other articles...........


,'



1,





IS, ON
lasg
em


-a5


Saiw



i.. ...
:: iiS..,!


* .":d .. .*:: s: a


Total merchandise..... 47
Government stores......... 5,
Specie....................... ..
brand total.............


The Export Trade of Durban.

Shipments of wool from this district to the United Sta4
from $17,254 in 1913 to $1,055,322 in 1916, and but fL&


''


H- I .




VMV IM
t jWWE~
i
4H 7f
.I I........
J0
latrtta Ih av obe
WOWAM"teI"mesepi lpe wc er
Abr m hr a o1midfri n h
$UwutlAwm agey o evn.ti rd
6iaabr-Im- o, 9Proe, ot:$6,5
tote Z Sae. eor hewr6enan oo l
ofII rdc.Ter r ery2000 ee fwtl
lqtl h re rwrpdy auigi ih
kIseterctitoIape
ar eld Tebr1
anIIat h od ste ie
thxeoiy
at$045 n oar,$551,wr h te ed




I ... 1 ,8 0 esa dO n ..... 1 M- ..... .. $2,457,514iiiii
N9 W % 5 4 O ,w a e. .. 6 7 9 ,














demand for bunker coal. -
In Natal there are extensive areas of good steamuiW.
deposits were first worked in 1888, and in the folamll.g
tons were produced. The output increased to 3,866,20
At the port of Durban 846,000 tons were bunkered i
1,000,700 in 1916. From 6,000 to 7,000 tons daily are ahi|
from the mines, and it is planned to transport the
quantities. During the past year many vessels experienced
obtaining coal at Durban, and several lines filled their.'
other South African ports at higher rates because of the
here. *;,i:t -
Shipping of the Port. :; '
There was a material increase in 1916 in the number ..ii.0
entering the port of Durban, and a corresponding gain in the i's
clearing. The figures for 1915 are given in parentheses Mi
prison. Of the 1,389 (988) vessels that entered, 442(
coastwise vessels with cargo and 58 (118) coastwise vessels i
with a combined net registered tonnage of 1,291,983 (99W,71
landing 35,860 (21,220) tons of cargo; 861 (496) were o
with cargo and 33 (80) were over-sea vessels in ballast, w i
bined net registered tonnage of 2,824,636 (1,617,682) adi
681,243 (659,114) tons of cargo.
Of the 1,376 vessels that cleared, 560 (313) were coastwin' w
with cargo and 4 (15) coastwise vessels in ballast, with a 6i0
net registered tonnage of 1,613,147 (817,470) and loa .r
(244,608) tons of cargo; 738 (555) were over-sea vessels
and 74 (97) over-sea vessels in ballast, with a combined net'
tonnage of 2,418,355 (1,784,298) and loading 1,900,186 ('J
tons of cargo. .
The total cargo shipped in 1916, coastwise and over-seae,
723 tons, compared with 1,608,523 tons in 1915.

JOHANNESBURG.
By Consul Join P. Bray.
The Johannesburg consular district, embracing the
and the Orange Free State, together with Northern aui
Rhodesia, extends over more than 595,000 square
tory. The number of white inhabitants is estimated at.
natives 3,492,000. The following report deals only with
vaal and the Orange Free State.
Although the Orange Free State is essentially an
pastoral Province, its rich diamond mines supply a larg
yearly income, so that mining is closely related to its
economic life. This is true to a greater degree of the
world's greatest gold-producing center.
i


. ...... ... ..










4.% Iiitia% of theiTranmval minig industry- antd its
iW~~ti o 'W rsh South Africa ean hardly' be overesti-
.' it, 10osa y related to every branch of -prouction in the
whereprafically all of the wages amd salaries paid out by
is petor is iuiested hi local concerns. A, large proportions
O ges to the farmer for foodstuffs, and a near-by market is
oterwise much' of the annual income would be lost in the
i additional, transportation charges. Although a large sharke
Ovidends is paid to residents in foreign countries, the actual
6f money remaining' In South Africa with that returning to
saconsiderAble percentage of, the total.
mixgindustr creates demands which are felt abroad as well
'this codntr. Upon it rests the basis of American trade. Most
#4 iUnfports g oti consular district from the, United States are
d products used in connection with mining, but they
Ace he way for a more general introduction of American
P Ihecontinued diversion of trude channels in 1916 caused South
;jlfric to look more strongly to the United States to supply a demand
amuch-needed articleswhich had formerly been imported from
.d and the Continent. Commercial relations between the two
thedeveloping a better understanding of business methods
to hae propressed. rapidly in the year under review. Durin
many, American manufacturers. forwarded. goods to SoutK
who had not previously entered "..sfield. A great'number o
maile pergianeit arrangements to. remain im this market.

the beginin of 1916 many merchants. in this -consular
have ap~poijnitdrepresentatives at the principal Atlantic sea-
to look afier their interests in the Um~ted States. Members
leading commercial houses of Johannesurg visited that coun-
toorder to arrange permanent .buying agnenies and to facilitate
loipment. of goods. -A representative was ,sent there' by the
adChamber of Mines on behalf of certain members. of the
14 'Committe, to expedite consignments of mining ma-
%n materials to this district
SAmerican firm is not: represented in this market and the
ca importer has no agent in the United States, the most
o*method of obtaining goods is by placing the order through
Oii'mon house, to hicthe local merchant pays a percentage
0 v~al-of the purchase.
are usually made by sigrht drafts upon the importer's,
tr w York City on the deliv-ery of the shipping documents.
ll appear as a separate item and are almost
byd the importer. Charges on goods brought from
q rqApid, is a rule, bythe exporter in that country.

*fat moeino meanketurers sendMing their products to this con-
distk@ point a South African =im already established, to









vantages are eviaen; c s aiT aecauy an indmirec menoa 01 oa
trade, and the manufacturer leaves to his agent most of- .the ii..
ability for future inquiries. Other methods pursued are tian 6
a branch house in one of the principal cities and to 'ent
representatives. It is seldom that American manufacture
porters send joint representatives to this market.
If the South African merchant has been accustomed to
the same American firm, credit ranging from 30 to 60 to: m9 .I i
often expected.
Some of the leading concerns in Johannesburg objet4li
goods through forwarding agents and commission houses
to deal directly with the manufacturer or his export i
Especially is this true of those merchants who handle a i
line of goods, and of those who are desirous of s .i i
maintaining trade in American manufactured goods. .:,i,:
There was an increasing tendency during 1916 for manuf(iurf
agents to take orders subject to confirmation in the UniAte: !5tt.
This grew more customary as the year progressed and iiusi
proved insufficient.
Freight Payments to United Kingdom. A- ** .
In order to conform to the new measures adopted in otheiQ:4iR.
trade the steamship companies carrying goods from South..Bf '
points to the United Kingdom adopted during 1916 the p. :'
emitting shippers to arrange freight payments under one. O-6:.
lowing methods: (a) Cash in exchange for bills of la
bankers' sight draft on London in sterling, in exchange fit
lading; (c) at destination within seven days of steamersn
discharge, plus 5 per cent on gross freight; (d) at desti-a*S
demand of receipt by line of cable advice from their agent
name of firm by whom freight payable and amount col
of cabling to be collected with freight.
Hindrances to Trade with United States.
One of the greatest handicaps to the development of 1' '
trade in the past has been the inadequate steamship servee
the United States and the principal ports of the southern
eastern parts of Africa. Although several British At
panies are trying to operate as regular a schedule as p .
the present abnormal conditions, this service has been
inadequate. The limitations of the American mercihaxitl
been felt by the importer of American goods. ,
It is natural that the direct sailings between the United'St~ r
South Africa were proportionally less than between the Unitedll
dom and this country. As a result it was necessary for most...
originating in the United States to come here via England.
able delays caused many firms to hesitate to place
United States, which would not have happened had di
been more available.
During 1916 manufacturers' agents and importers pI
goods were considerably inconvenienced by the nonarrivi
before or upon the receipt of goods. In a great many
necessary to leave with the customs authorities a boa13A i


b;i i;;i ;;.... ii ;~;









#j)*'_WWthe estimated value of the -shipment. Invoiciii
1b6 fbcwardd so that the consignee can produce'them.
goods flrom the customhouse. .1
Shanditcp plaAed -tpon the importer of American
was tha high Aevel of prevailing freight rates, which in-
MOMe Proportionally, between the United States and South
tbAm between the United Kingdom and this country. As a
numberr. of, the imports from the United States are of great
it is beomming more difficult to obtain them.
tor Amerton Goods.
ij Me of the principal demands for goods in South Africa is that
Otv* by the native and the laboring- classes.. The better grades of
sre bought almost entirely by Europeans in the larger towns.
adbives, of courseare much more numerous. German ffirms were
%pWV successful in their efforts, to Supply cheaper lines, upon
-wihwas based much of the German trade in South Africa. To
doe American manufacturer thi opportunity now presents itself, as
00*r connections are being made.*
Althughimports from the United -States of cotton goods of
maious kinds hosiery, shoes, and wearing apparel in general in-
Maagd slightV during 1916 over prevous years, there is a con-
altwalylarger field for these goods. Amiongw the articles of Ameri-
ftu m facture far which there is or might, be a demand here are
Itral implements,.al kinds of machinerytosselpouts
'o piping, pumps, hardware and buildig material, timber,
fittgs and apparatus lampware, furniture, mattresses, bed-,
shmtig office equipment and supplles,:typewriters and ac~ces-
penclssafes, twine, cordage, paper,. blankets, sil goods
r, aned meats Landi vegetables, larid and its substitutes, bak-,
r, automobiles, and motorcycles.

ensofnthe banks show that profits were greater than in
', The dividend of the, Standard -Bank of South Africa was
at 4 pr cent, and $389 320 was apportefrins-
n 116,agast$a45,52.5 in 1915. The amount carried forward
b~iankw $486,650, compared with $123,385 in 1915.
1916 the National Bank of South Africa opened 15 new
InM this country and established an agency in New York
easnn power of this bank increased materially. Al-
16# Riidend as maintained at 6 per cent, the net profits
a gw of $170,000. Deposits amounted .to $112%037)5861
$0 ,417I6 in 1915, and $215,586 'was: carried forward in
with- $108 914 in the preceding year.
Banking &rporation also enjoyed prosperity. Ti
^ was increased from 6 to. per cent. ,The net
jroffas $688181 more thn hin 1915, and deposits rose from $27,077,-
07t to W*196. 'Ihe Mum of $482865 vus carried forward to the
V *ichis tiow $1 070680









I ne nnancial returns or rae ranways ana nargolora zr ..J
an increase in revenue of $5,154,485 over 1915.
$15,335,670 were authorized for the railroads, o whic-
was for capital, $200,456 for betterment, $8,388,619 for
$330,275 for working purposes.
A surcharge of 6 shillings ($146) per ton on coal ca
ports for bunkering purposes became effective on Janemq
it will continue in force until the return of normal con.
Fifteen new locomotives-six standard and nine narrow!.
costing $324,036 were placed in service and for new p
and freight cars $2,920,611 was expended. During 1916 .
ments of agricultural products and other requirements seviesd
the available rolling stock; the abnormal traffic necessitated
ing of more equipment. On December 31, 1916, there w
built or ordered locomotives valued at $5,207,647; passengers
$2,207,143; and freight cars, $4,107,476. ./
The proposed electrification of South African railways' agat
ceived consideration during 1916. On the recommendatiotti
Railway Board an English firm is to investigate and report ..i..
feasibility of electrifying certain sections of the system~ T .l.j
is also to include the estimated cost of conversion, the b~ne*
derived therefrom, and the effect upon operating costs.
The Gold-Xining Industry. '
The output of gold in the Transvaal for 1916 amounted to
ounces, worth $192,152,293. This is an increase of 201,86
and $4,171,754 over 1915, the return being the highest ever:
for any one year and surpassing the production of 1912. by.
At the close of 1916 the Transvaal gold fields had produced'
666 ounces of gold since 1884, representing a value of $2,
The amount milled on the Witwatersrand for 1916 was
tons, 200,000 more than in the preceding year. The av
of the ore treated was $6.47 per ton, compared with $6.7 L
but the working profit fell to $1.98 per ton and the growss
profit was lowered by $1,465.113. An increase of 12-centsi
occurred in the working costs, which totaled $125,376,954.
The increased cost of production is attributed by
mining experts partly to the rise in prices of mining supp
unprecedented ocean freight rates; to the large sumsp
allowances to employees on active war service; and to
allotted to regular workers. Advanced gold realization
the war levy also reduced dividends, which totaled
decrease of $316,333 from 1915.
The operations of the mines were generally normal
the year. Although many kinds of supplies were
difficulty and many checks due to the war had to be met
was carried on without any critical interruptions.
affected haulage operations on one mine for a short
shortage of native labor and the employment of nao
August and September slightly checked work during
Oertifeates of Importation.
Although Government committees have been estabH
manufacturing centers for the -issuance of priority




Mi- .,n
4,; -3
L4K
gvle rmteUntdigof'
ho, o e cniee t e sa .t
fo he g l -m n n i d srL u
in Awolyem ae h eriiaino h O
// fCmec ta atcla ril a osnia
Y f:anp prtos
fh//irt etiiaei osanl xadnta
#A1xeti sams morbet motmnn

4jWKndm Uapiain o-criiae
ixysiaeadpofi7is rq~rdta h
-aefrdIe t tegl-migc

.Y )pnis
UseEh plcaini umttdt ucm
ono g waia nierwihdcdswehr h
aiiewilt hqM' .idsr. h netgtn
thn//drntolytepopcie ueo h atce
orebtas h mutofsokatalo ad h
tomiti h upis bt o oices hm
"4 oOI aain t h 0Vt..
II lao odtosonti a ee naoal to
of te yara spritof onciiaton as sownby oth em-
twpqee A'srie of omadS b th uion reslte: i
cofrnedrn h&tomd pratqetosds
wer ths eaigt tnaxie iiumg n h














Although the output of diamonds in the Union of:
for 1916 does not compare favorably with that of 19'
record total of 5,168,545 carats, worth $55,428,496, was
past year's production, 2,346,330 carats, valued at $27,877'
the present state of this industry in contrast to that of
there were 454,686 carats less than in 1916, but with a value
785 greater owing to the price of diamonds then prevail ..g.
Of the 1916 production the Transvaal furnished 615,20
worth $4,543,674, and the Orange Free State 220,365
575,735.
The total output of copper in the Union amounted to 26 jP t
in 1915 and 22,862 tons in 1916, valued hat $5,072,421 a~nd $
respectively. The Transvaal yielded 14,996 ($2,555,428) .Wti.
12,244 tons ($3,036,073) in 1916.
In the Transvaal in 1916 were produced 8,263 tons of i "
at $1,734,649, an increase of $121,794 over 1915.
The Coal Industry.. .. .
A marked improvement took place in the coal industry i.i '
past year. The total production of this mineral in the ni
South Africa was 8,281,324 tons, $10,426,374, in 1915 and
tons, $13,214,070, in 1916, when 6,136,913 tons, $6,729,812, '
the Transvaal.
The past year began with a scarcity of coal cars. Of
trucks now in service, approximately 25,000 have been a
coal traffic. The failure of the railroads to anticipate the A
opment of the industry occasioned loss to both producer a.;IH
At one time 15 steamers were awaiting bunkers at one port.
Although the price of Transvaal coal remained at abo0
level throughout 1916 at the port of Cape Town, it rose'J
ton at Durban. The increased, demand for fuel caused the
Coal Owners' Association to refuse to renew its contract*
railways to supply coal at the old prices. When they w
to obtain sufficient quantities from the nonassociated e
railroads compromised upon an advance of 12 cents per *i
were more than compensated by an advance in freight rateL
between certain points, which is estimated to have yielded
This extra impost did not affect the demand for bunker
The added importance of this industry is due largely t-eA
donment of the Suez Canal route by several of the pru~
ship lines in favor of the voyage around the Ca e of
The large coal deposits in South Africa may iflue
nance of the present route and encourage shipping to a
ports and to engage in South African trade. This i .dt
gold mining, the proximity of the coal fields hn i~
low working costs. The cheapness of fuel suppliw..-.esi
way development and industrial enterprises ..,.,,i




S -" A *A. .... .r'.. e."
;1YI~RM











enlilen, is the failure: to utilize waste c66l4 Of which
U6ns *Ailt semulxted in 1916.

p o alprchase& of the mmine in the Union of South Africa
atdto $687107,923 in 1916. Of this. amount $63,545,915 was
addfa the 'T*rjasas1 and the Orange Free State; for gold
a, in~the Transvaal, $62,900,359.
is the official list 'of store's consumed by the Trans-
duig 1W16

t le. ate. Artices. Value. Articles. value.

.. ..... 89,5 oosuf nd 6Ty Minlacreenings ........ $34,476
... ....71,05 les(for colbred a Motor cars and acces&
...... I. t5, res): Dories .........-.-.. 67,143
......... i95, 3 Beams........... W20, T Oils, other than lubri-
5@,..... 66,312 Rioe..... ........ S1,592 ca"ting: r e ... 1,6
..,......1,45, in3 Mealt... ......... 129U2,861 Tasom r... 1,6
............ 454, 478 maltan crel Other- ........ 9,m82
for boar........ 145,888 011sdki suts. ......... 48,564
5,,.,,..... 88, 2 Mealt ........ 2,.&%6'025 Packing... ..... 197,162
.....J..2.. A4,5 la ..... .. 25649 Pain, tr, drir~ tc.. 105,199
Salt............... "!20 aaf 121,046
5.............. 20%,223 G oeiel-offee, Pipes ad pip fittigs 21037,003
is......*,. ,175: oil, sugar, ghee, Rails,erosinssloop-
1.......... 7803 m lssges, etc... 203 396 er et. .. ....131 57
Ai am"as Stndry food, In- Rock drills and parts 11 24M0
Wootle and Vepetables.... 207"6,18 ouigGZ.1,3IN60 RCcotton and -an' a '65,640
and ma~ttng.. 08,493 Medicns etc. ... 132, 652 Wire .............. 739:290
Clothing .......... 126, 495 Sceeinsotherts tha I
th ... ... 123,016 Pouindry requisites.. 85,266 mill. I ............ 30,587
apse........4,517 37 Gaolie.......... 8, 600 he n dies ........ 907 278
........ 185,677 =aM ols: PikSkips and parts ....... 73,372
Sn*40 S58997 -bves -----rs op.............. 655,am
@ngachnesetc............ 621L=5 loda, rude. ........ M15774
@58.,....... 66,20 H rdwae: tationery ...... 35, 274
Dolts, nuts, wash-I ......l.
..... ,55 ers, and rivets. I10, $75 atol at ete. 137, 807
IL,, .... 7,24 Looks hinges,sta adeil.e:. 404,421
(ppr-6 plschains, etc. 8,0 okdil... 616,722
fr. ......... 1e,m8,8 Gorews and nails.. 13295 Ghe.. ....... 62D, 572
h e...... 2,-------- a"te....... ,4 Other...j.. .j ... 42,475
..... 142,.034 Hosefittings........ .' 12E,449 Timber:
and RHosing, steam, sno,- Buidn celns
) i 08k .003469 tion. and rock-dsill.. .350,040 doors, ooring,
Iron:-----------. 121, 862
4.<.... 1520268 Barazdangl..... 375,887 Deals.. ....... W3,639
Galvanited ....... 97,,798 M1ining poles and
..1,9^,;234 Fig................ 13,339 lagga .-t ...i ,15127
Shea.. 11, 096 Orego ic ie
..4,09,616 L4mp "d ... 8,7 etc ............ I, an 3.07
140 304 & O a Lwd Other ............. 7,772
li.2,' P0.. .. 620 Tube mill requisites:
.. 227,06 s~heet:............. 3,452 Lies.. ..... 6,
Yes., 4,,38 LhwePebbles aind flints. 0
BS,%r Btle.......... U".4 Other requisites... IK 486
Wstie...5K6974 Trucks and ports. .... "W8. 03
18,91Larians:waste.. ........... 89542
: A4 rae n alw 383,719 Water (pxurhased).. A. 86L=26
Oils- .,.., 47,5 Wooditial... ......... 23,721
98,85patsa.e~..1"2384,414 Zinc and zine disks" 1, W) 70D
apt ma All other articles...... 367M2




Aro"ght UAWi the, Md Of November,

bagic (lidG poundo nol
atAOf south 'Afrioa, VMS so6pe
We'M*,I* Trawved wiasu pot 4ib
someof teOrange Free Staite *soba









Transvasa ana &x per cenm; se range s a:sein;e..iii..
better in other parts of the Union than mI this
crops reduced the estimated total of the Union to .$4 :
normal. .. ....
Of the yield of maize for the Union in 191", b
the Transvaal and the Orange Free State prodticedi
2,123,369 bags, respectively% In spite of an incre :f
in 1916, amounting in the former Province to 9 per ,
latter to 20 per cent, the crops were only 44 and 40 pet
tively. The Union produced 7,056,118 bags, 2,198,882
1915. .
Owing to absence of rainfall, tobacco planting was
many sections. The crop was estimated by the Dea
Agriculture at approximately 7,000,000 pounds, somewhait
normal yield. The quality was satisfactory.
Cotton Growing in South Africa.
In South Africa, especially the Transvaal, Swazilnd, .
land, are large areas adapted to cotton growing. iThe i
acreage in 1916 and the attitude of the Union Governmeiij
encouraged the growing of this staple crop by providing 1ep
stationsand by assisting the farmer in the selection of so
the recent development of the cotton industry. .
The kinds of cotton that have given the best results in thej
burg district belong to the Big Boll group and include such-e40
as Bancroft, Cleveland, Russell's, Drivitt, Bakeman,.. ~di
The average yield is from 250 to 300 pounds of lint per aftrdl..
women, whose daily wages are from 12 to 24 cents, pick fr
80 pounds of seed cotton per day. Native men assist to saidi
receiving higher wages than women but accomplishing littW
It is estimated by the Department of Agriculture that I.
for the 1915-16 season amounted to 500,000 pounds of s
for the entire Union of South Africa; the 1916-17 crop i1
to yield 1,000,000 pounds, provided conditions are no
acreage, said to be more than double that of azy p
is placed at 7,000, of which 4,000 acres are in the Rustenbu
2,000 in the Waterburg, 500 in the Pietersburg, and 5
districts not specified.
The whole 1915-16 output of the Rustenburg district
English brokers at 9j d. ($0.19) per pound; some of-
crop, now being ginned, has been sold at 10 d. ($0.21)per
During 1916 cotton seeds were delinted by a cooper
in the Rustenburg district, which is the principal o
section of the Transvaal, and found a ready market att
ing from $31.62 to $36.49 per ton.
Cattle and Sheep Raising.
Between 1904 and 1915 the number of sheep in S
creased by 20,677,497, cattle by ,29,995, and goats b
a great deal of meat was imported .uxm9l l .O4,i 4
$428,807 was exported. More was shipped in 1l Mi
did the export of frozen meats piro'ise to. wio'a
industry6 ... .i t: :.... .. ... :, Li .ii

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vi*wndeny was to consider the number: rather than the
&A mhe-outle. ,The development of this industry gave rmise
190to ki denmad for compulsory grading. The -p~revention
'tion of diseases has also been brought to a higher:
imiadmina"Agi ihe efforts of the Department of Agriculture and
osagticultural societies, there were several outbreaks of
is thea Trans&a last year, caused largely by the unscientific
,hitherto, prevailing.
Vster supply and xrtrigatin.
'Vaal River scheme; which was proposed. to impound 13,633,-
gall*=s of waterand to cost 1124M,000 ($510831125), was
S during 1916. Under the present ylan, the barrage is to be
ansame height, Iut through the filtration plant, pumping, plant,
pielines are to flow only 5,000,000 gallons per day. The esti-
agdcost of the modified scheme is 770,843 ($3,751,307), of which.
S 1($3 451393) is to be, spent for engineering. Owing to the
y o obaiing machinery and equipment, the only work now
way consists. of-the barrage and a few buildings at V ereeniging.
barrag~e is composed of 36 steel gates, each 30 feet wide and 2-5
legwhich weigh about 23 tons each and run on live rollers.
A Hrtebeestpoort irrigation project,- one of the most ambitious
t poposed by the -Government, was delayed during 1916 owing to
at nd certain legal questions; but tenders, for some of the plants,
sealedd for during the latter part of -the year and the early
Of 1917.
Ixtustries--Iron and Steel Products,
SOMcal Manufacture of stamp battery sho 'es and dies is still
experimental- stage, but the results obtained during 1916 were.
,about. opne-tenth4 of the total requirements-nearly 7,500
Supplied. .Considering. the. present price, this meant an,
-616 saving to the mining industry. Shoes aud dies, which are
of steel, have been imported principally from the United King-
"heSouth African consumption of steel .Products was much
thnthe output, prices advanced considerably over 1915.
nation of one of the most: important steel works in South
was gmetly re-stricted owing to delay in the arrival of ma-
to increase its facilities;- but an important addition was made
leinof a new:20-ton smltig furnace with a capacity
1,000 tOsof ingots per, 0oth
tof magnesite, silica, and all fettling material for fur-:
a discontinued by the Un;ion Steel Corporation of South;
airing 1916 this mill widened its range of sizes and sections
v got4pand raiks Additions were mude to machinery and
Thei poduction of finished material by this mill was:36: por
thnin 1915.
products valued at $12 166,250 were impre into-
othAfrcain 1018 but urg 1916 the dl culty of
lisfrom abroad o~reed lclconcerns to depend-












Thus steel and iron products were in great demand, alto
regions are so well endowed with ironstone, limestone,
the Transvaal. .. *1
Copper is produced in the Transvaal, but no special
made to develop manufactures from this ore. -
Sales of Machinery, Tools, Tractors, and Electrical Goods.
The war has deprived South Africa' of a large number 3li|.-
and implements required both by the mining and agricultural j i
tries. Upon the prohibition of the export of certain of these
from the United Kingdom, an opening was made for a fr1aiiij .
duction of American goods. A few local firms are now x1
ing hammers, rock drills, and parts.
The Transvaal and the Orange Free State have Iong b .:
purchasers of American machinery and tools; the 1916 .
than kept pace with the incoming supplies and current req
were not satisfied. The drought during the latter half ofW...
affected sales somewhat. Local manufacturers increased th$d
of small plows, harrows, and cultivators for the native trade
Imports of tractors for farming purposes were larger;
power for farm purposes is one. of the country's greatest if
account of the irregular rainfall, which necessitates ploughii A
a short period and often when cattle are unfit for hard or
work.
British manufacturers still send most of the imports .of
goods into this district. The United States exported $317"
in 1916. American standards and specifications often ..
those used in South Africa. Japanese manufacturers sent i
ments here. The qualities and prices of their products uatiN.
compare favorably with English goods.
Timber and Building Materials..
Building operations were considerably restricted duri:sgi
the high cost of materials, the uncertainty of deliveries, and. '
dency to reduce expenditures. Manufacturers of cement
difficulty in disposing of their entire output; imports
Africa amount to $227,475, or $22,114 more than 1in 9- ,j
Various consignments of Baltic timber were received.::
the past year, but shipments were more infrequent. MoB t .-.l
ported for use at the mines, where South African wood was
to some extent, but the supply was limited. Oregon pine was a grat
demand for the gold mining industry, but a lack of tonnage and in1
creased freight rates militated against additional imports of irnmbs
from the United States.
Purchases of Xotor Cars and Accessories. H.: .
The automobile trade continued to process during 191 '
though extensive buying for military requirements was
sponsible for the gam in imports, the local demand for
vehicles is constantly expanding. The merchant of the



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"i "."ii '' III !


cotton manufactures r fthi ati%
clothing, kimpoos aqnd ilk gdtIsh
chinaware, brsh ware, glasswa eil
The satisfaction with which manyaMerea
doubtless prove a direct stimulant to this trae
generally arrived in good condition knd Sot.A.:
say that the Japanese exporter has been careful to
requirements.
The development of Japanese. trade with South
largely dependent upon the Nippon Yusen Kaith j
Steamship Co.). There are about three sailipngs
mented by irregular calls of British iteamers. Tie
has been the means of further connecting South
markets of the Orient, and the interchange of
Declared Exports to United States.
The total declared value of articles iuvoioed 1.aiN
consulate at Johannesburg for the UTlited State-ml
1915 and $1,022,187 in 1916. The list in 1915 'incl.ud
rough diamonds, $315,371; household efets,
$339,310; and corundum ore, $684. In 1916 thes'
diamonds, $232,873; household effects, $2,682;
chrome ore, $782,174; corundum ore, $1$56.;
talc, $271. Returned American goods, chiefly
were valued at $8,206 in 1915, and $2,307T iii llii
were recorded for United States possessions.' .-






iU.S DEPO.. .. ..'






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