Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00029
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00029

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text




SUPPLEMENT TO

COMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 52g December 8, 1917

CHINA.
TSING TAU.
By Consul AVill)y R. Peck.
The second year (1916) in which the Leased Territory of Kiaochau
was ulnder tie .:lJapanese military administration, on the whIle. was
nmo-t satisfactory. The total tla'le of Tsingtau jumped from -.13,-
)0.Ut)00( in 19!1 to $3;9,1,.io, 1)o in 1916, but since gol,1 fell in value
over 3. per cent in -1916, as compared with the previous year, the
actual Ibuinell's was about fourfold. Native and foreign imports
increased from rt7.01n.000 to $20,000,000 and exports from -5.,500,000
to $19.000,0100. Thest figure-, cover the whole year 1915 and not
four months only, ,as in the tables that follow.
Building Operations and Muuicipal Improvements.
Between July 1 and December 7 a feat was accomplishelc by the
Tsingtau Building Co., a Japanese org'aninzotion, in the erection of
an entire new section of the city. Eighlty-eigh hol.-es in "24 groups.
comprising 180.0004 square feet of floor p;rat. were erected in that.
time on a location that is situnted in the heart of Tsingtau but wa;
formerly a -waste place of gultlies and brickyards. This Shinmachi "
(" New Street ") area is the i.'c-,cribel-.l di-trict for restaurants of a
certain type, geishas, etc. The builtling. are of German ap!,-i rance
to harmonize with the rest of the city. It is said that each is a copy
of a building already erected elsewlielc in Tiiiltau. In this region
other buildings have gone up as wAell (rows of shop-'. etc.), and it is
reported that large firms contemplate erecting lhandsilllome tricel lres
in an adjoining section.
A great deal of street work has been done in the :northern section
of Tsingtau, of which the new part referred to may ,bet considered the
southern boundary. In this inortliern sert ion there is much lunrc-
cupied land. The wharves are near-by, and also the Harbor Station
of the Shantung Railway, and it is the popular impression that this
great area, conveniently located, as it is, with reipdc, to both ship-
ping and railway facilities, is to b;e vigorously develulop. An order
issued in the course of the year forbidding peria.,eit :Igrif-iltural
improvements in tlie surrounding fields is believed to point to their
reservation for factory sites, etc. If tlihee 1. lns IIImtu e, Tsingtau
has a future of great commercial andl inllld-tri:;l activity, surpa.-ing
even its former rapid rise.
The building operations in Tingtlau inl 1016 were as follows: One
crematory, covering 1.872 square feet; 15 warehouses and factories,
covering 44,604 square feet; 22 resIidences, covering 0-4.404- square
26836-17---52g








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


feet; and 23 buildings in the new restaurant area, coving 78,876
square feet-a total of 65 buildings covering 189,756 square feet.
New Industries.
Work was begun on ;i spinning mill of 30,000 spindles at Syfang,
a suburb of T-,ingtaui. Work was also begun in the latter part of the
year on a flour mill to have a 24-hour capacity of 500 kokus (2,560
bushels). A nmoderate-sized bone-meal factory was established.
Heretofore animal bones from Shantung have been exported to Japan
for conver-ion into fertilizer. One egg-products factory working
entirely w without machinery was initiated and at the end of the year
the trials were sflid to be going satisfactorily. Another factory is
projected in which machinery is to be used.
Increase in Slaughterhouse Operations.
In 1916 the Government abattoir increased its cattle business 86
per cent and its total business 57 per cent over 1915. Its operations
for tihe two years were as follows: 1915-8,135 cattle, 214 calves, 5,319
pigs, 276 sheep, and 32 goats; 1916-15,140 cattle, 107 calves, 6229
pigs, 405 sheep, and 15 goats.
During 1916, 10,494 head of cattle (slaughtered) were exported as
follows: To Japan, 38 head; to Shanghai, 23 head; to Dairen,:390
head; to Vladivostok, 5,266 head; to Manila, 4,727 head; total, 10,494
head.
The contract for 6,000.000 pounds of beef for the American Army
in the Philippine Islands for the year ending June 30, 1917, accounted
for the shipments to Manila. This beef was contracted fof at 91
cents per pound delivered frozen beside the ship. Cattle are collected
from the Provinces of Honan and Shantung for export at Tsinanfu,
the capital of Shantung Province, and it is estimated that 40.000 head
leave that. city by the Tientsin-Pukow and Shantung Railways
annually for export through Nanking and Tsingtau.
Freight Operations on Shantung Railway.
The amount of freight handled by the Shantung Railway during
1916 showed a considerable decrease as compared with 1915, espe-
cially the freight coming from the interior of Shantung. Political
troubles along the railway line and lack of rain are given as the
reasons for the decrease.
The following table shows the amount of freight shipped from
different stations of the Shantung Railway in 1915 and 1916, together
with the distance of each station from Tsingtau:

Freight moved. Miles Freight moved. Wiles
Stations. from Stations. fom
Tsing- Tsing-
1915 1916 tau. 1915 1916 tau.

Tons. Tons. Tons. Tons.
Tsingtau Station........ 49,494 59,7M4 ........ Changtien............... 3,324 15,603 187.0
Great Harbor Station... 32,909 20,353 1.8 Po-han (branch from
Wharf Station........... ........ 54,058 3.7 Changtien)............ 213,940 193,964 213.7
Fangtze................ 21,577 12,416 114.0 Tsnanu................ 178,532 13,396 28.0

The increase in traffic at Changtien Station in 1916 was due to the
fact. that the shipment of Chinese coins and other export goods was
transferred to this station from the Choutsun Station. Poshan Sta-
tion is the shipping point for the Tzuchwan coal mines.









CI [ NA-TSI NiGTAU.


Total Trade of the Port.
Aq the Chinese Ma iitimi C ilnius staltirt i, for 1915 covert only the
last four months of the year, for purposes of colpanris',n import and
export -tatistics for 1913 are included in the tables that follow.
Changes pre('-llllily due to the war may thlerhby be seen at a glance.
In 1913 the haikwan, or customs, tael was worth $0.73, in 1915,
$0.612, and in 1916, $0.SS3. To eliniin;te (lifft-renc-e between 1913
1nd 1916 that are due to the recent high price of silver, it would
be nece-.sa;mr to increase the 1913 valuations by about 13.5 per cent.
The following table shows the total trade of the port of Tsingtau
for the whole of 1913, for the last four nmonth- of 1915, and for the
whole of 1916:


Imports and exports.


Imports of foreign goods:
From foreign countries and Hongkong........................
From Chinese ports..... .......................... ........
Total foreign imports........................................
Reexportk of foreign goods:
To fo-eien countries and Hongkong......................
To Chinese ports chieflyy to Shanghai, Tientsin, Chefoo, and
Dairen).....................................................
Total foreign reexports...................................
Tot a I n t. foreign imports.................................
Imports of Chinese products (chiefly from Shanghai, Tientsin, Che-
foo, and Dairen).................................................
Reex ort. of oChinese products:
To forni-r comtries and Hongkong...........................
To Chinese ports..............................................
Total native reexports.........................
Total net Chinese imports..................................
Exports of Chinese products of local origin:
To foreign countries and Hongkong............................
To Chinese ports...............................................
Total exports of local origin.............................. ....
Gross value of the trade of the port..........................
Net value of the trade of the port..................................


1913


$11,290,753
8,030,414
19,321,107

26,804


Sept.-Dec.,
1915.


$2,620,243
1,191, 647
3,811,890

50,084


$11,808,815

16,149,751

147,418


162,586 82,171 350,513
189,39:' 138,255 497,931
19,131,777 3,673,635 15,651,820

6,051,061 550,399 4,285,827

672,467 11,602 I 23,888
72,521 3,336 93,665
744,988 j 14,938 117,553
5,306, 073 535,461 4,168,274

8,788,403 1,98i, 490 13,523,466
9,937,029 1, 881, 519 5,472,921
18,755,432 3,8W7,009 11 9 45,387
44, 127, (60 8,229,298 39,431,965
43,193,282 8,076,105 38,816,481


Fluctuations in Specified Imports.
Net foreign imports in 1916 were 18 per cent less than in 1913, the
last year before the war derange'l Tsingtau trade. This reduction
was fairly evenly distributed throughout all varidtiet. of imports.
Nevertheless, a few articles showed increase.- Imports of beer dou-
bled the pre-war totals. This was caused by the curtailed production
of the Tsingtau brewery and the large increase in the Japanese popu-
lation. Beer has become popular among the Japanese and, whereas
the German civilian population in 1913 was about 2,000, the J:ap;i,1n'-.'
civilian population in 1916 was almost 1.7.00>0, all but a few hundred
of whom have arrived since November, 1914.
Cigarettes trebled in value, owing partly to the griet iiic's( ( in
population. But the strengthened position of the Toya To,;l'ia Co.
(agency of the Japanese Governnent Tobacco Monopoly) has cau.-ed
a much greater importation than bef,)or of Japanese cigarette- to
supply not only a widened market amon;: the Chinese but also the
new market opened by the influx of Japanese immigrants.


r










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


. Aniline imports, for well-lknown ren-ons, entirely ceased and those
of artificial indigo pralitically ceased. A product not listed among
1913 imports. iiattural liquid indigo, was imported to t!e extent of
12"3,00)( pounds in ian effort partly to supplyy the deficiency, but the
lack of dIye -t itl's i- still felt by the Chi nese.
Artiices imported for the Go veirnmenI t, including materials for the
elertri,-light and telephone systems am1 the railway, do not appear in
thi, ~i.-tiii.s returns. Three American locomotives, as well as a con-
siderialble quantity of appurtenances, etc., from American sources,
were piirchaised and imported by the Shanting Railway in 1916.
Decrease in Kerosene Imports-
In 1916 no Russian kerosene was imported, as against 1,754,000
gallon in 1913, and the American product decreased by almost half,
while Sumatra oil fell about 35 per cent. An experimental ship-
ment of Persian oil, amounting to about 1,500.000 gallons, and ap-
proximate((ly the same amount of Japanese oil, both newcomers on
this mI: rket. helped to bring up the total, which, however, was only
7,000,000 gallons, as against 9,000,000 in 1913.
The comparative success of the Japanese oil is an indication of the
extent to which cheapness is sought by Chinese consumers. The
brand now being imported from Japan is said to be of very inferior
grade and generally unsatisfactory, but, being considerably cheaper,
it has suereeded fairly well in competijig with greatly superior ar-
ticles. This is especially true in summer, when open doors and win-
dows mitigate somewhat the disagreeable odors caused by its com-
bustion.
Imports of Foreign Goods, by Articles.
The following table shows the imports of foreign goods into
Tsingtau for the whole of 1913, for the last four months of 1915,
and for the whole of 1916:


Articles.

Ba, nny............................................ pieces..
Beer and porter ..........................................value..
Brass and yellow-metal sheets............................pounds..
Butter................. .....................................do....
Buttons, brass............................................ gross..
Candles .......................................... ..... pounds..
Chinaware.............................................. value..
Cigarette..................................................do...
Coal ....................... ........... ......... ......... tons..
Copper sheets............................... .............p. inds..
'ol ton pi.'ic Ecoids. .. .....................................pieces..
8hir in.-, e ny. plain....................................do .
Sheetin.a gray, plain-
A itmerr an .................. ... ...... ............do....
English............................................. do....
Japanese...........................................do....
-'liirtirng, white, plain-
Japanese........................................... do....
Other........... ........................... ..... ...do....
Drill-
.merri-tn ..................... .................do....
Enmlish........................... ..............do...
Japanese ....................... ..................... do....
Jeans-
Americi1...................................... do....
Englihl .................... ....... .........do....
Japanese................. ..... ............... do....
T cloths-
English...... ................................do...
Japnii'- ................ .........................do....
Lawwni ;nd nuislins, white................................ do ....
(arnbriL.s, 1Iwn; and rn:ilin-, white, dyevd, or printed....do ..
P'hintzes an plan prints........... ................do....
Printed dtills. nirniture corering., and twills.............do. ..d


1913 Sept 5. 1916


1, 068.0o I
1 6.-3
9,. 120
96, ,150
ItS. 209
266.300
846. 246
$307.3.32
............-
1.274
2, 14R, 7*2
382,304
82,227
7. 930
243,512

95.204
22,814
4.323
1,710
1. 780
131,085 I

392,992
25,813
26,461
136,488
13,316


312.896
S2.372
7,581
1.596
IR. 076
80,731
$5,495
110.332
6,497
13,413
542, 4.93
45,073
3, 6ti
75
119,909

13,058
855
930
9,879

3,753
62,911
31,050
71,255
1,055
24,873
2. 667


1,003,235
$79, 492
6.118
13,832
33.955
175.294
S 25.459
$I,079 152
14,338
22.610
1,189.497
117,622
15,880
3,283
239,100
5.608
51,735
2,472
269
11,063

11,76S
107,076
87,826
181,620
8,656
29,195
300











CHINA-TSINGTAU. 5



Articles. 1913 Sept -ee., 1916

Cotton piece goods-Continued.
Printed sateens...................................... pieces.. 15,596 2,156 2.970
Printed Tcloth........................... ............. do.... 21,875 1,211 :j.2
Italians and lastings-
Fast blark ...........................................do.... 452,761 32,308 64,561
Plain, colored......................................do................ 39.224 86,902
Figured.............................................do................. 34,674 56,009
Dyed shirt ings and sheetings, plain..................... do.... 5.379 519 3.621
Turkey red cambrics and shirtings...................do... 87.289 29,294 121. 12'
SSnarish strip,: ...........................................do.... 12,66 1,231 I6li
Flannel .................................................do.... 14,354 10,677 14,805
Colored woven cotton...................................... yards.. 125,457 ...................
Velvets and velveteens.....................................do... 51,912 19,060 14,050
Cotton blankets.................... ....................number.. 31,414 2,503 26,742
Handkerchief ............................................dozens.. 17,066 2,631 29,510
Towels.
Japanese............................................. ... ... ........ ....... 118,57
Other...................................................do.... 126,968 21,105 9,592
Cotton yarn.............................................. pounds.. 37,039,702 11,463, 137 33,141,339
Indian................................................. do.... 9,118,347 91i., 117 3 777,732
Japanese................................................ do.... 27,920,956 10,499,020 29,363,607
Cotton thread on spools..................................... gross.. 27,327 2,243 16,462
Bilk piece goods, mixtures............................pounds. 87,093 16,478 31,454
Dyes:
Aniline........................................... .....value.. S22. ,. 11, ; ............ ............
Indigo-
Artificial liquid...................................pounds.. 4,678,674 ............ 24,206
Natural..............................................do....................... .. 123,291
Lead, white, yellow.....................................do.... ., ,i7 64,638 162,526
Logwood extract.......................................do.... 11, 22,477
Electrical minatrials................. ......................value.. $29,058 8625 $39,273
Ennameled-w-ire basins................................ ......do........ ..... ......... $5,341
Flour a......................... ........................barrels.. 52,106 167 873
Fish, dried, fresh, and salt...............................pounds.. 2,292,133 206,133 1,181,600
(Glas,. window ..........................................boxes.. I,,,r. 1 104 1,664
;lassware..............................................v.alue.. 1 ,2,ij $4,697 $9,149
Irou and mild ste, 1:
New-
Bars ............................................pounds.. 2,384,158 195,111 ........
Nail, rod............................................ do... 493,962 ............ 2, 793
NIil-, wire..........................................do... 1,288,770 112,518 449,274
Shrt.rt and plates ...................................do.... 917,567 ,,. ,9) 292,331
Old....................................................do.... 19,46, 467 2, vi, 6,686,043
Kiro-ene ................................................. gallons.. '.1, r065 3,31, 171 6, 9?1.484
A merican............................................do. 5,111,727 2, -"'*., 080 2,17', 617
Japanese................................... ....o.......... do............. 22,020 1,403, 800
Russian................................................do.... 1,754,962 .......... .....
Persian....................................... .......... do.... ........ .......... 1., l14;, ".:
Sumatra...............................................do.... 2,497,376 1,034,071 i ..**', .1
Lead, in pigs ............................................pounds.. 549,024 ;l,. '72 1,I 111i
Lamps and lampware...................................... value.. $44,804 !,. 5'' 13,350
Matches, Japanese............................................. gross.. 6,610,566 1,469,283 3,716, 0 9
Mats.... ................................................number.. 519,890 71,229 109,135
Metal, white, or German silver, sheets and wire...........pounds.. ...................... 7,817
Needles................................................thousans.. 534,605 277,417 43,675
Nickel..................................................pounds.. 17,423 1,197 931
Opium ...................................................... d.... 2,181 1,204 15,578
Paper...................................................... do...d 6,494,390 952,281 2,442,412
Pepper. black................................................do.... 540,778 109,592 208,544
Quicksilver.................................................do... 4,788 ............ 931
SaL .... .................. ......... .................value.. ... ... ..
Seaweed................................................pounds. 4,881, .- 1,835,001 3,', 21;
Soap................. ..................................... vail .. $49,007 $6,830 $44,202
Soy....................................................p'1u 14 771,001
Stores, houiSehold.......................................... value.. $89,226 $10, 280 53,457
Sugar:
Brown................................................pounds.. 21,533,897 3,408,258 13,994,792
White....................................................do.... 5,249,510 1,904,826 3,033,048
Refined................................................do... 11,.' 530 1,r',, 51i 6,509,419
(onlfecrioner' ...................................... ... -', 797 2'2,. J-1 999,894
Timber:
Hardwood .................... ...............cubic feet.. 23,983 7,539 8,862
Softwood..........................................square feet.. 4,659,991 .......... 1,431,968
Tin plates, plain......................................... pounds.. 3,072,965 664,601 3,413,711
Wines and -piris; ........................................... i li $74,823 $32,195 $6,859
Woolen aind cot ton unions b ................................yards.. 83,878 21,832 17,214
Woolen goods:
Cloth, broad, mneliiii, and habit......................... .... 2,060 956 160
Lasting;, plain and figured .........................pit, (s.. 1,780 ............ 280
Longell. .............................................. do ... 516 57 ............
Spanish stripes.........................................yards.. 2,656 ........... 993
Woolen yarn..............................................pounds.. 35,644 ............ 12,768


b Imports of union and poncho cloth in 1916 mounn tel to 2,809 yards.


a Of 196 pounds,








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Export Trade-Fluctuations in Specified Articles.
While 1he chilnge in exchange rates gives the gold values of 1913
and 1916 exports as about equal, there was an actual decrease of 11
pir cent in the second y'ar, when the rise i the value of silver is
allowel for. Oie -tliir I o' the entire volume of exports, however,
.on-i-is of nd- that will not. have a permanent place in the export
trade. Se \te out of the 40 odd exports listed showed important

Copper ingots were unknown as an article of export before 1915.
In the last four months of that year almost 6.000,000 pounds were
exported. During the period January to August, 1915., when the
cll.-uiiihouse was in the hand of the Imperial Japanese Military
Adlillni-:tr; tion, the amou.nt exported was not p,ublished and no
estimate can be made, but in 1916 75T.2 37,000 pounds were sent out.
If this ian-n- of metal may be regarded for the moment as pure cop-
per, it equtal., 6G per centi of the entire prodini-tion of copper from
idonmliic ore(.- in the United States in the year i1113, and is remark-
able in view of the fact that there are no copper mines iI the region
firiii which the metal is drawn. As a matter of fact, these so-called
" copper ingots" are masses of old-style (Chinese coins flused together
on the outside. They are not pure copper, being coImposed also of
ziic, tin, etc. It is reported that the average price now paid
for these coins. along the line of the Shantung Railway is 23.30
Mexican dollars per picuI (abouii 10 cents per pound). At this rate
copper ingots alone account for $7,500,000 of the year's exports, or
considerably more than one-third.
Peanut and Castor Oil-Wheat-Salt.
The exports of peanut oil, over 31,(KJ),(00 pounds, were almost
double the 1913 exports, and Tingtau peanut oil is becoming well
known in American markets, owing partly to the care with which it
is prepared in this region. Castor oil was not listed among the ex-
ports in 1913 but was sent out in 1916 to the extent of 1,000,000
pounds.
Wheat exports jumped from 52,000 pounds in 1913 to 754,000
pounds in 1916, but as all went to Chinese ports it is not of interest
in this report.
Exports of salt more than doubled in value, being more than
100,000,000 pounds. This salt is manufactured from sea water
around the Kiaochow Bay littoral. There are at present no refineries
in the territory, but one is projected by Japanese capitalists that
will evaporate the sea water by means of artificial heat. and will re-
cover its various chemical components.
Tobacco-Wool-Other Articles.
Leaf-tobacco exports in 1916, amounting to almost ten times the
1913 figures, totaled 1,250,000 pounds. Most of this was tobacco
grown from American seed under the auspices of a large British
firm.
Of wool 771,000 pounds were shipped out, about double the 1918
quota. This increase is to be accounted for partly by increased de-
imalnd, in Japan arising from war contracts.
In 1913 Tsingtau led Chineses ports in exports of cattle, meats,
peanuts, and straw braid, as well as in peanut oil. But in all these











OIEwA-TSINGTAU. 7


conunodities the amounts exported in 1916 were far behind prewar
figures, the most notable decrease heing in meats and shelled peanut,
in which about half of the former standard was rea;chled. Pongees
recovered two-thirds of their former volume, but silks as a whole,
with 1,1,881,31 pounds, represented less than half of the amount in
1913. Straw-braid exports amounted to over 2,000,000 poundsd, but
this was less than 20 per cent of the 1913 exports, which coimprised
85 per cent of China's export of straw braid in that year.

Statistics of Exports, by Articles.

The following table shows the principal exports from Tsingtau to
foreign countries and Chinese ports for the whole of 1913, for the
last four months of 1915, and for the whole of 1916:


Articles. 1913 Sept.-Dec., 1916
1915 1916


Bean ca-e ........... ........................................tons..
Bont, anim:al............................... ................. do....
Brn''lsttiilT: \\'hoIt......................................pounds..
Bristls. ........ .................................... ....do...
Camp. ett .................................... ......... .number..
Cattle ....................................................head..
Coal. .........................................................tons..
Copper inors........................................... pounds-.
Cotton, rw. ................................. ........... do....
Cuttlefish ................................................ d....
D.qleq:
I'lk...................................................do...
Red...................................................do....
Eggs:
A lim ne!'n...........................................do....
Yolk...................................................do
v lioli. prepared.....................................do....
Fre h ......... ............... ................... number..
Fibers: [l:mp ................. .....................pounds..
Fish, dried and salt ...................................................
Glassware ................. ............................... do....
HBi.:, straw............................................ number..
Rides, cow....................... ....................pounds..
Macaroni and v.rmiiclli..................................do...
Meats, fresh, fiozIe' ....... .....................do........... .. do....
Medicine .................................................value..
Oils"
Bean .......................... ..... ....... ....... pounds..
Castor.................................................. do.....
Peanut...................... .................... ...... do....
Pear~ fresh............................................ do....
Penni:t--
In shc ll......... .................. .................do....
KereLs ............................................. do....
Pis, salted ............................................ munb r. .
Salt..... .. ............ ............ ................ pounds..
Seeds:
Apricot .......................... ...... .......... do....
Melou......... ...................................... do....
Silk and silk good ......................................do....
Silk, raw, white-
Not rereeled, not steam filature ...................do....
Heeled irom dupions.......... ................do....
SteA U blature......................................do....
Silk, raw, yellow-
Not rcreeled, not steam filature.....................do....
Steam i lature................................... do ....
Rerceled................................ ........... o ..
Cocoons .. ...................... ....................do....
Cocoon reluse...... ........... ...............do....
WasteCocoon r..............................................do....
Waees .....Sa....................................... do....
Pongees-, Shanm u............. ................ do ....
fiet.e egoods.....................................do....
Skins (furs): Goat, untanned..........................numb,-r..
Straw braid ..........................................pounds..
Tallow, ani t........................................... do...,
Tobatco, lea..................................... ..
Vegetable., fresh................ ......................... l ..
W alnuts .......... ............................ ..... .... lo. ..
W ool, sheep's ........................ .......... ... ... ..


7,155
IT.I .
54, 1, ?
488,775
57,301
28,413
161,523
6,420,575
ItlA,521l
11,635,372

213, 066
I, 198, 197
17, 24?
27, 0-,-1,' (
615, 125
251,769
894,425
187,708
5,167, 081
11,571,931
$268,399

3,548,307
19, '-. 226
1;955,898
15,274,917
121,114,721
1,745
46,748,835
1,007,342
626,829
2,728,096

37,373
3,059

584,136
27,132

1,142,736W
916,902
16.093

11,609,304
4,237,11
IlI
1, 90s",'sli
4112, l.7


634
79.
-4011. 18-
12.,48 3
483
3,972
5, 087
5,007 *ll
5, 44, 11,
5,985
320,796
180,747



7,536,970
4,489
154, 280
29.1, :..tj
1,500
1, 5.1. 174
1, 152
979, 811
$16,740
2,555,994
7,701,099
1,429,218
376,656
13,187.482
4.158
-10, .n 112

184,072
42,959
1,281,721
14,231
1,330
6,384

149,359
Q.'1 4,

............
50 008
714,875
2q2, n09q

176, 140
751,849
503,405
A.M). 165
1, .1'. 421
:.4.1,746
731,101


2,077
1,806
754,110
92,568
1.-'.74

68,583
75,257,252
3,279,381
150,822
382,242
555,142



4,004,140
7,049
519,764
664,069
54,382
5,290,07-,
3-., 21.
4,432,757
$77,70'1
12,094,355
1, 102, 437
31,193,953
87,780

632,548
70,336,385
1,858
103,400,850

64,771
883,652
1,881,331
29,526
1,729
3,990
168,112
76,475
23,275
40,964
141,379
771,001
6i22,706
2' 394
126,150
2,:j2:J, c02
3{,,5r61, 174
1 ,-41-, '.21
2,233,0,
.3 ,, SI
771,267










8 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

Destinations of Direct Shipme.nts of Native Produce.
Six per cent of the beef exported went to Japanese and Chinese
ports. The (leclar':l--'Xl olrt riturns show that over 40 per cent went
to the Philippine ,INluil.- tr, ill in Army beef contract; the remain-
der w \e\i almost entirely!\ to Vladivo.sltok. IPractically all exports of
animal bones go to Ja;ilpal. FTlis was thie 'asie eve before 1915. It
is reported that the :-o-called copperr ingot. are used in Japan in the
manl!fIn-iU of war ilaterials.
Seventy-three per 'tent of tllc raw cotton went to Japan. As
already -I ded, a spinning mill is in course of erection in Tsingtau
by a Japanese crllpany. lilt. Japanese yarn, even when spun from
Cliine-r cotton, occupies so isuperior a position from the standpoint
of c.l-tt:insi treatment that competition is difficult. Shantung cotton
is so white that it is in demand for wadding purposes and for mak-
ing medicated cotton, bIut its staple is, so short that it can be spun
into the coalrer counts only.
Sixty-one per cent of the fresll egg's, 96 per cent of the bean oil.
and 81 per cent of the peanut oil went to Japan. Of the peanuts,
27 per cent went to Japan, 5S per cent to Shanghai for transslhip-
ment, and 13 per cent to other Chinese ports. Reductions made on
the Tientsin-Pukow Railway have deflected overland to Shanghai
some of the peanut exports that formerly left Tsingtanu hli sea. All
the salt went to ports outside of Japaln andl China. p)rolbably entirely
to Vladiv,. -tok and Chosen.
Exports in 1916 to Foreign Countries and Chinese Ports, by Articles.
The de-tinaiions of direct -hipmeints do not. of course, indicate the
coiuntlie.s of final consillptionl, but the table that follows- is of value
in showing how Japan, ha' become either the principal final con-
sumer or else the place of t ranl-.hiplnent of mont of the important
exports from Tsingtau. Exports from Tsinwtau in 1910 to Japan
and other foreign countries and to Shanghai and other Chinese
ports are shown in the following table:


STo T I To ollIer
Articles. o d;:r. counlother

Bean ca e ...... .. ...... ...... .to 2.(77 .......
Beef, fresh ..................... I ouni ..i 27. 12 4 i. 11, 142
B ones ............................. 3.t .............
Bristles ......................... do.... b.3SI .............
Coal.................. .... .... .ions..! 11912 9.075
Copper ingots ................. o 7rou .. 7 .. ..........
Cotton, raw.................... .. ..2 .:''* ............. 71
Eggs, fresh ................... riiml.rr..' 2. r6..40 92.4' 0
Glassware..................I.... lou nds. 3 99 .512
lidr~,. cow.................... ....o.. 4.2Sj, 127 i99.00
Bean ..................... .do 11,1.24,067 .............
Peanut...................... do.... 2.. 41 517 21,915
Peanut :
In shell.......................do.... 416.215 4.5. 4
Kernels......................... .. i9, 245.
Salt................. ......... d .I ......... ,0 .
Seeds:
Apricot.......................do.... ..............
Sesame ................ ..i.. o..... 'I.I .............
Silk:
Raw, white................. .. .............
1; yellow .................. .. .... .. ........
W aste ...................... .. .... .I I.,. u. .......... .
Pongees................. .. ... .. ... ...... ... 1 l ,620
Skin. goat........ .......... ainii, r. 1.2.2 .... .........
s' rai', braid ............ .. ...... ] ].. .. ij. :'12 .............. I
Tallow, animal ................. .. -, ll2.(;
\l alnul." .... ..... ... .... ..... ..... .... '. ,,o 70 j-.3
W ool, hli r-p,' ....... ........ .... ri ....


. .. .. ... .. ii i
4.1r,4 211,071!
1. 96 1.33
f'. 1;1 ............
44.:361 1,.212
6. i 619
5s'" I 2'4 1. 0
59. 70' Stl.1. 100
1 .0 .0,2 4 .1. 056
7S.470 27.39S
4711, 2'.1 ............
l.i. l 119 1. S17.312
121.0.30 1 Q,S17
41,371.911 |9.727.620

40.964 ............
6 7 3 ............
3.5,215 ...........
267. 'N62 ............
701,01 1 1.995
0Ill. ) 6 ............
124.898 ............
671.517 36.013
87.2!S 1,501. 437
31.5.609 6.916
23,674 1,729


Total.

2.077
4.429.0i13
3,613,610
92. ,' 6
75,257,252
3,279.381
4.001.110
661.069
5,290,075
12,0'94,355
31,193,953
612.548
70,336.385
103,400,850
64,771
290, 472
35,245
267,62
771,001
622.706
126.150
2,020.802
3,561.474
395.808
771,267


~_










CHINA-TSINGTAU.


Prominence of Japan-Total Trade by Countries.
In direct trade le(tween T.-in!rtlu and foreign countries Japan
leads with 7T r per cent (if the imports, 9:1 p.-r cent of the export;, and
87 per cent (of the entire rade of the port, by values. It should be
relmembnered. however, that these figures indicate Ior,-ly that for the
trade covered by the Iprc't:tlges given, J;i!a;r.se ports were the last
ports of shipment and 11filst ports of de-tin action, r, pei-tively. The
prominence of Japan in Tsingtai's trade is a natural ,'o-eellll1e
of the great preponderance of Japanese shipping, which, as stated
elsewhere, was s4 per cent of the tonnage entering Tsingtau in 1916.
The following table -hows the imports and exports at Tsingtau,
by countries of origin and destination, in 1916:


Countries.


Honekong.......... .. ...............................
Sing.pnjre, Srailts Sertle:rnctnts............................
D ut' h E ti In>lle<. ................ ........................
Unite I Kingdom.... ..... ...... .. ...................
R;u-si.in Pacir.- porls.....................................
Chosen....... .... ............ .......... ........
3ap-in (irtallriin" Taiwan) ....... .........................
Philipoino Islands ......................................
United tB ates....................... .....................
Total..............................................


Gross
imports of
foreign



$1,069,293
203,449
155,739
178,519
2,989
418,624
9,162,835
738
616,629


Exports
plus
r'I I I0
gorn: to
ports.

$137,297
............

87,504
350,465
12,890,739
81,349
............


Total.




$1,206,590
203,449
155,739
178,519
90,483
769,089
22,053,574
82,087
616,629


Reex-
ports of
foreign
goods.



$81



820


11,808,815 I 13,547,354 25,356,169 901


Declared Exports to United States.

Exports to the United States and to the insular territories of the
United States declared at the Tsingtau consulate in 1915 and 1916
were as follows:

1915 1916
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

TO UNITED STATES.
Bristles..............................................pounds.. 1,260 $6,078 5,720 $1,725
Rides...................................... ......number. 540 4,792 318 8,021
Do...............................................pounds.................... 16,380 .......
Household effects .................................................................. ....... 2,100
Oil, peaout .............................................pounds.. ......... ........ 1,092,332 78,437
Peanut kernels .............................................do .................. 225,575 10,505
Silk, pongee .............................................do... .......... 3,346 2,121 2,928
Do................................................pieces.. 1,000 ........ 1,000 ...
Straw braid................................................... .......... 19,628 .......... 37,265
Total .................................. .................... ......... 33,844 ............ 135,981
TO PHIIAPPINES.
Frozen beef...........................................pou ........ ...... ... 1,858,102 176,039
Grand total........................................................ 33,844 ............ 312,020


There were no declared exports to Hawaii or Porto Rico.
While there was a fourfold increase in 1916 over the preceding
year (exclusive of the Philippine trade), the total was still only a
.third of pre-war figures. This is to be accounted for by diversion
of certain lines of export, to some degree, to other Chinese ports


. 401








10 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

and to the increasing use of Japan as a reshipping point for Chinese
o od.s going to the United States.
Shipping Decrease 20 Per Cent.
The shipping entered and cleared ldecreie(le 300,000 tons, or about
one-fifth, but was even then only slightly less than in 1913, showing
that the 1915 tonnage was in exccs of reLquiremients. The following
table shows the number and tonnage of the vessels that entered and
cleared the port of Tsingtau in 1915 and 191H;. In this case the
figures for 1915 cover the entire year:

Number Tonnage.
Nationality.
1915 191G 1913 191G

STEAMERS.
American........................................................ 2 8 7, 40 20, 00
Norwegian....................................................... .2 ........ 8,831
Russian.................................................. ........ .. ... 2,844
Chinese........................................ ............... ....... 1 ........... 8,574
British......................................................... 120 1 112 1" .,967i 13G,822
Japanese........................................................ 1, 1 l' ,3US, 101 1,005,4.51
Danish........................ .................................. ........ OS
Unknown......................................................... ....... ..... ...
T.i ll ...................................................... 1, 164 1, 3U1 1, 4190, 2) 1 I, 1 ,1 l,613
SAILING VESSELS.
Chinese................................................................ ............ 318
Japanese......................................................... 24 51 1,753 4,075
Total ...................................................... '4 57 1, "7, 4,393
Grand total............................................. 1, 1S 1, .:. l,- -,030 1, 19.J, 06

In 1913, the last normal year, the percentage of the shipping at
Tsingtau belonging to the ditierent nationalities was as follows:
German, 44 per cent; British, 31; Japanese, 17 ; and others S. In the
following year the German and British shares h:ad fallen to 42 and
28 per cent, respectively, while the Jaanese claimed 19, and others
11 1pr cent. The effect of war conditions was first seen definitely in
1915, when Germany, of course, was not represented, British shipping
had fallen to 11 per cent, and tlat of nations not separately men-
tioned to 1 per cent, while Japan's .lhips held SS per cent of the total.
In 1916 a fall of 4 per cent in Japan's share counterbalanced a rise
of 4 per cent in that of other cotuntrie., the United Kingdom staying
at 11 per cent. In none of these years did American shipping reach
3 per cent of the total.
General Survey.
Col idering the inadequate shipping and high freight rates,
Tsingtau made satisfactory progress in 191(. While a comparison
of values indicates that foreign imports in 1910 were only 18 per
cent less than in 1913, the imports of the two years appear to show
a much greater disparity in liuantities imported. This difference is
more or less explained, however, by reference to the tables of valua-
tions establlished by the Chinese Malritime customss for statistical
purposes in the two years under review. A few items indicate how








CHINA-TSINGTAU. 11

valuations have risen, thus making up in values for shrinkages in
volume:.
In' r.'nc ., Increase,
per 'eur. P:lper. Japanese: per cent.
English shirtings ----------------- nealendered -------------- 70
Japalnese shleeting 2 a----------------1 Clendered ___----______ 100
Ameiricanii sheet in l------- -------5 Tin I.;hite-, plain-------________ 69
T elntlo (24 yards)--- 10--- Ir,,n -heets and plates -------_- 77
Flour 4 n -------------------------- I i ire --__-------- 95
Sugar, bron-\\l.---__ ----------- 14
These increases in valuation, together with difficulties in shipping
and in procuring stocks, also nacouint for the fact that imports were
not stimliilated Ilorle by ihe high value of silver. It will be observed
that among the gre latest reducli-lions in imports in 1916, as coni;pared
with 1913, were cotton piece g ,nls and other textiles, flour, glass,
metals, and sugar.
If one abnormal line of export is included, i. e., copper ingots, ex-
ports as a whole almost recovered a normal level in 1916, lacking only 11
per cent of reaching 1913 figures. Thi- was due to the fact that in
spite of unfavora:lle exchange land a general rise in prices, the raw
and manufactured materials sent out through Tsingtau (raw cotton,
peanuts, wool, hides, vegetable oils, etc.) were everywhere in extra-
ordinary demand.


WASH1 I N.:;'ON GOVERNMENT PRINrINO OFFICt 19 1




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
11 1W11 II fIB 1 f II IWII. H1111111111H1 H ll HI t 11111 I1I 1
3 1262 08485 0667








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U.S. DEPOC1TORY