Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00025
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00025

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text
I ak A


SUPPLEMENT TO "" |- I

COMMERCE RE
i DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
i ~ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CiMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 65b October 23, 1918

BRITISH EAST AFRICA AND UGANDA.
By Vice Consul Arthur J. Doyle, Mombasa.
*The figures in this report are a testimony to the remarkable growth
of the importance of the trade of East Africa and Uganda in the
last 20 years, and it is interesting to record that America, one of the
first in the field, having arranged a friendly commercial treaty in
the year 1833 with the then Sultan of Zanzibar, has played a very im-
portant part in the development of its trade. Both American im-
ports and exports have increased year by year until 1916, when on
account of restricted shipping opportunities the imports of American
manufactured goods showed a decline as against the previous year
of nearly $200,000, whereas the total imports of the two protector-
ates had increased by $500,000.
Increased Customs Revenue-Development of Resources.
From April 1, 1896 to March 31, 1897, the customs revenue from
import duties amounted to only $60,000. Twenty years later the rev-
enue for the corresponding period-there had been no alteration in
the tariffs in the interim-amlounted to $900,000.
Exports show up even better as the figures for the same periods
were, respectively, $32,500 and $930,000.
Development has been along agricultural lines; with the excep-
tion of the soda deposits nothing has been discovered to denote that
the mineral resources of the country will ever be of much importance.
It is on its agriculture that its future depends.
The prospects for the immediate future are not particularly bright,
which is natural with the existing state of shipping. Space is get-
ting more scarce every day, and the effect is as adverse on the imports
as on the exports. Owing to a very severe drought the Governmient
has had to import maize, the chief native food, to relieve the sit'n-
tion. Another cause contributing to the adverse conditions is tlhe
curious position that has arisen owing to the scarcity of si vecr rupees.
The great future possibilities of British En are very little appreciated, except by those who have knowledge of
the protectorate. That their possibilities, bo-th la regards imports
and exports, are exceptional must be fully realizedby anyone taking
a casual interest in the country.
Field for American. Goods-Population Increased.
America should play a very important part in the future develop-
S ment of the wonderful natural resources of East Africa. Materials
for, railroads, locomotives, agricultural machinery, implements, and
S tools of all kinds will be required in ever increasing quantities. For
83913"-18-65b

I :. :.' .






I' -" o" -
- 2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

some time..passeveral American concerns have been doing a con-
,siderabl'bus ess in this class of American manufactures.
"'. The rtj population of East Africa and Uganda is gauged at
aibout-t"500,000. Considering the area of the two territories this is
not large, but since the advent of the white man, eliminating inter-
tribal warfare and being also the means of the diminution of disease,
the natives of all the tribes are increasing very greatly in numbers,
and for many years to come the bulk of the domestic imports will be
on their account. The chief imports consist of unbleached cotton
piece goods and dyed and printed cottons. The trade in these mate-
rials and all kinds of clothing will go ahead steadily as the native be-
comes more amenable to work, assisting the settlers in the cultiva-
tion of such crops as sisal, coffee, flax, beans, maize, etc. At the
present time the majority of the natives are satisfied with the culti-
vation of a few acres of land-sufficient for his mere subsistence and
that of his wife, who does most of the work on his land.
Exports and Imports Decrease-Principal Imports.
The trade of British East Africa and Uganda during the calendar
year of 1917 totaled $19,765,177, of which $12,811,128 represented
imports; and the exports were valued at $6,954,049, a total decrease
of trade amounting to $688,660, as compared with the preceding
year. This decrease was shared by both the imports and exports,
the former by $385,944 and the latter by $302,716. It is not possible
to give the figures showing the imports and exports by different
countries.
The following table shows the principal imports into British East
Africa and Uganda for the calendar years 1916 and 1917. The in-
formation as to quantities were not in all cases available.

1916. 1917.
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

Aleandbeer ...........---------....------gallons.- 1,836,041 $176,295 65,851 573,633
Alcohol, mlythylic...- ---- -------do.--- 2,348 3,478 426 845
Ammunition..-------------------------. rounds-- 1,117,251 26,130 1,327,293 28,512
Animals, live............-------. ------... number- 269 8,833 1,216 10,774
Arms ...-----..--------------------------------............ 8,062 ---------- 8,121
Bacon and ham....-------------....hundredweight.. 459 15,338 64 2,561
Bags and sacks....-----........ ----------------------.... 330,404 ....------. 159,898
Beads ......-------...... ----------------pounds. 234,362 50,472 52,491 19,418
Beverages, nonalcoholic...........-----------------------------.. 33,425 --------..............
Books..---------------.....-------------------...- ----------- 12,196 ---------- ,741
Building materials...------..--. .. --------------... ------.9,430 3 ----------- ,776
Butter, tinned -------------.------ pounds- 104,253 28,375 40,533 1,206
Candles.--------------........-.. hundredweight_ 463 5,460 677 12,425
Canvas.....-------....... --------------- yards. 203,513 100,595 123,606 76,032
Cheese-.....------------------------------pounds-. 34,659 14, 38 6,430 2,567
Cement-----......------- -------bundredweight. 38,548 55,857 31,548 60,107
Copra (for reexport).... ................-------- -- ----------... ------------- --.. -. .. 243,320
Chemicals, n. e. s.----.....---- ... .------........... ------------ 42,805 ---------. 30,794
Cigarettes-............------------------ pounds. 268,968 198,075 537,314 34,833
Cigars..........-..... ................... do... 22,462 32,160 14,849 16,590
Coal ....--..--------- --------------- --- tons 1,162 22,813 325 11,725
Coal products..----......-------------------------------- ------...--- --------. 22,132
Cotton yarns....----..-----------------.....................pounds.. 12,704 3,021 6,132 2,376
Cotton piece goods:
Blclhed c.. ............... ..yards. 4,560,270 384,617 6,926,729 609,271
Un blached............................. do.... 23,078,168 1,800,868 18,269,937 1,684,624
Printed......................................do.... 2,728,778 320,450 3,102,824 490,054
Dyed ..................................... do.... 5,388,996 876,147 5,251,494 941,394
Blankets .......................number.. 2,397,535 700,631 804,886 461,710
Manufacturesa.............. ................. ............... 242,203 ........... 223,684
Cutlery. .......................................................... 52,673 ............ 2081
Drugs and medicines.......................... ................ 69,079 ............ 48,643
Electric apparatus........................... .................. 26,572 .......... 17,957













BRITISH EAST AFRICA AND UGANDA.


Articles.


Explosives.. ................................. -- -- -
Fencing materials.........................--.-------. .
Foodstuffs:
Animal....... ......................- .----- .---.. .
Other, n. c. s.................................-- .-- .
Fruit, fresh................................ .. ...
Furniture.................................. .. .
Glassware ..........................-.........-------.
Class, plate ................................... .... .
Gold, bullion......................... ....... ouncIs..
Grain:
Dal..............................hunrlredweiiht..
Flour and wheat meal.......................do....
Rice.. .......... ........................ do....
Wheat......................................do....
Other .............................. .......do....
Haberdashery.................................... .
Hardware................................................
Implements:
A gricul ural.........................................
Other...................................
Instruments:
Scientific.................. ..........................
Pianos................ ............................
Other................................... ....
Jewelry..............................................
Leather:
Unwrought.....................................
Boots and shoes..........................pairs..
Saddlery, harness.................................
Other manulactures...............................
Linen, hemp, and jute, manufactured.................
Machinerv:
Agricultural....................................
Industrial........................................
Other............................................
Manures and in ecticides..............................
Matches........................................gross..
Metals:
Brass and copper manufactures...................
Iron and steel manufactures .......................
Iron and steel wire ................hundredweight..
Iron and steel, building purposes..................
All other manufactured...........................
Unm anufactured...................................
Galvanized iron sheets............hundredweight..
Milk, condensed.................................do....
Mineral waters,etc............................ dozen..
Oils:
Petrol, kerosene.......................... llons..
Petroleum and others.......................do....
Coconnt..........................................
Ghee (clarified butter)............hundred\veieht..
Margarine..............................do...
Turpentine...........................gallons..
Grease, all other...................................
Fuel ......................................gallons..
Perfumery, et ........................................
Photos, pikt ures, etc ..................................
Plate and plated ware.................................
Playing cards...... .............................
Porcelain, china, etc..................'..................
Preserved meat. ....................................
Preserves, inned, etc.............. .................
Printed matter........................................
Railway and road material...........................
Rope and twine:
Agricultural and industrial.......................
Other...................................
.Rubber, manufactured, n. e. s.........................
Salt................................. hundredweight..
Ships, boats, etc..........................................
Spirits:
Brandy .................................. gallons..
Whisky..................................... do....
Gin.......................................do....
All other....................................do....
Silk:
Manufactured.....................................
Yarn....................................pounds..
Soap ................................. hundredweight..
Stationery..........................................


Quantity.


...........






48

5,112
75.4 71
9S, 74
3.415
7,564

......- ......


............




41. 120
............















49 I"32
""i,727



............




37,9J14

536. 0 _10
92, 1.52

1,373
?i4
1,461l
7,624







I...........
.. .. .. .
...........


73,'514


20,41;
92,223
9,1 lO
3, 24

............
164
29,774


91. 1 13
43, QA.
210
31.974
1.113
1 197<
43, ',')
374
14, i.3

3,92
3., 695
fiI, f45
11,492
31.3,39X
21,92A
42,3-0


771.616
V:-2,771
......i;......
1,2X
4
2,0 .l
I '; 179
............






...... ......


16,' 5 ............
2i. 7'. ............
3, 2.2 ............
45,. T1 51,957
21, 472 ..........

76S,FPS i 911
341,035 3q,0 I
21,276 5,624
15,316 1,677

32, 06 ............
509 6
257,705 23,353
125,501 .............


1 2, '?
S2, 1, 12


40,756
32
2,411
7.3, 0; 2
511
15, 55


2,2,




8, 601

17, 271
12, .'.i-
I:,
I. I1'
411. V.A)
335,97


21 1q: 797
1.5,7.3
11,703

33,640
16
252,S77
102,914
35,971








102,914


I


I


.1'. 1917.


Value. i,2uin ity. Value.


............. 3,.10
2 .......... 5,32
r .......... 22
444, I ........... 315, 123
4 .fY n ............ 441
21 $1'1 ............ 2i, 7'.
40, 7.17 ........... 21 ,
.. ............ .. ,1
J, 0 '" ........ ... 1 '-71

11 .975 903 9, 1A1
2, It 21. 43.57 21:,,3 ;.-
429s "i ", 0 2..9 ',
27, 99 li, 56.5 60, ,7 I
22, Ill ............ 1. 10l
14i-9.402 ............ 137,93:7

140, 1 ............ -5, C
18, 1S2 ............ 11, 1 '

4,045 ............ 644
6, 20 ............ 10,'.02
4, R2 ............ -7, 74'
526 ............ 792

32,647 ............ 9, W.l
SO 41I 3'1,221 9, 121
.502 ......... 4,672
10, 39 1.......... : 1,390
11, 42 ............ 3l',9S

in0, 3.2 ....... .... iri. 7'2
189.250 ............ 197, 0-
6;,910 ............ 22, 12!
4, 123 .... ... .. 1. 31
6S,019 111,671 76,571

19.272 ........... 12, 57f
116,976 ............ 133.251
1, 0( 2 ............ 71'1
4. ,61
3. .... ............. 4.1
39, *92 ............ 10, 4., i
3,.175 ............ 7
33,744 1, 51 13. 10
?' 9, .15- 3, 121 91,2'-I
45,171 ............ 22,.-'43


.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


1916. 1917.
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

Sugar .................................hundredweight.. 77,538 $492,314 26,827 $389,047
Tea ...........................................pounds.. 546,495 126,189 267,645 136,568
Telegraph, supplies, etc............... ............. ............ 2,471 ............ 979
Tobac o:
Manufactured.......................... pounds.. 598,605 196,107 312,088 98,097
U'nmanufactured...........................do... 71,622 5,170 15,826 1,328
Tombstones...................................................... 1,020 ............ 1,407
Toys an gam es........................................ ............ 9,555 ............ 7,705
Trees, plants, seeds, etc............... .......................... 8,932 ............ 5,618
Vehic les:
Power, agricultural........... ........................5.. 2............ 5,228 ............ 6,393
O i ,r ......................................................... 152,470 ............ 149, 375
A Tr it Ilt ura I nonpowcr......................................... 16, 289 ............. 28,096
All n hers......................................... ........... ... 173,278 ............ 130,387
Watchesand clocl;.........................number.. 2,632 4,830 1,616 6,751
Wearing apparel .................................................. 153,708 ............ 232,933
Wine( ............ .........................allons. 43,606 125,042 18,181 62,379
Won-1, unninufacti:rcd ........................ tons.. 1,798 76,683 162 10,155
Woo' :ird worsted yarns ................ pounds.. 532 389 356 686
W oo ir, aniifacti red, n. e. s ...................... .... ........ .. 5,143 ............ 13,520
Wo 1 1 -,ii ,'cor.ted, manufactured............. yards. 39,912 32,203 34,293 47,745
Wo.l r -rls, rugs......................... number.. 4,857 14,979 2,892 8,780
Woolen Il nkc ... ..............................do.... 7,406 12,406 3,321 8,018
W oul, iI miI ul aIt' C ures goods, n. e. s ................................. 7,498 ............ 5,962
MI.-iclljnr-ous articles................................. ............ 426,513 ............ 417,206
Goods in ranli ................................................... 424,328 ............ 1,760,688
Coins ji limited into circulation....................... ........... 843,526 ............ 72,997

Imports of Cotton Piece Goods.
It. will be noted that cotton piece goods head the list of imports,
the total for 1917 being $4,413,033, only $24,000 less than for the
previous year, which was a record in the history of the country.
The importance of this trade is due to the fact that the native popu-
lation use mostly unbleached cotton piece goods and dyed and
printed cottons for clothing. The following table shows the value
of the cotton piece goods imported into Mombasa during 1917:

Kind. Yards. Value.

Bleached .................................. .................................... 6,96,729 609,271
Unbleached............................ ....................................... 18,269,937 1,684,624
Printed ......................................................................... 3,102,824 490,05
Dyed ......................................................................... 5,251,494 94139
Total................................................................................. 3,725,343

Marked Decrease in Imports of Foodstuffs.
Owing principally to the difficulty experienced by shippers in ob-
taining freight space to East African ports, the imports of food-
stuffs show a very marked falling off during 1917 compared with the
preceding year, decreasing from $2,346,077 to $1,553,223.
In some instances where the imports show a decline out of all
proportion to others, the reason can not altogether be put down to
lack of shipping facilities. As an instance, condensed milk showed
a falling off of nearly $200,000, two-thirds of the trade of the previ-
ous year. The probable cause is that as milk with other dairy
produce is being produced in the protectorate in increasing quanti-
ties, the European settlers having gone very largely into dairy-farm-
ing, the supply is gradually being brought up to the demand. It is
not long since condensed milk was the only kind obtainable.
Possibilities in Hardware and Machinery.
The next important group of figures is made up of hardware and
machinery which total $824,470. These figures show a slight de-


*;








'it





'.
ME









BRITISH EAST AFRICA AND UGANDA.


crease as against the previous year's figures of $939,213, but in both
cases they do not represent the demand that is very far in excess of
the supply, the principal cause of this being the restrictions placed
upon exports from Europe and other sources of supply.
As in other years, agricultural implements come first with a total
of $205,695, and industrial machinery next $1!.7.051. On account
of the rapid development that is taking place agriculturally there
is bound to be a rapid and ever increasing demand for all classes of
agricultural implements, machinery, and tools.
Decreased Imports of Alcoholic Beverages-Receipts of Tobacco Increasvd.
In 1916 wines, spirits, etc., formed the fourth group of figlurtes be-
ing in value far above the tobacco trade, but they have filllen iiff
considerably, representing in 1 117 onl\ $::130.;;f90 ,of ti tot :l i iprts,
whereas in 1916 they amounted to $7SS.,;23. The import. of \vwhi-.ky
were valued at $208,797; ale and beer imports were T$7: 01i:3.
The importation of Japanese beer is growing oii-ri.lcn rably: (he
exact figures are not available, but whereas in 1916 there w\va only
one consignment. from that source, there were several in 1917.
There was a slight increase in the imports of tiobicco as collmpared
with 1916. The receipts of cigarettes. cigars, and tobacco during
1917 were valued at $462,848 compared with $431.512 for 196!, hut
this difference can be accounted for by the inSrease in prices.
The native is becoming more accustomed to cigarette smoking; the
quality is of a very low grade, put up in packets of 10 and retailing
at present for 3 cents (American money) per packet. In 1917 ciga-
rettes represented $346,833 of imports.
Demand for Vehicles.
Importations showed a slight falling off in last year's figures, but
the demand is very much above the supply, especially in light buggies
for farm work, and also in motor cars. Every consignment of both
these classes of vehicles is taken up immediately on arrival. and
agents are booked up with orders for forward delivery, most of the
makes asked for being American.
Clothing Imports-Soap-Stationery, etc.
There was a slight decrease in the imports of ready-made clothing
during 1917 compared with the previous year, but thiis is a trade
that is bound to grow when conditions become normal, as the native
is buying this class of clothing very largely, especially in the more
civilized centers such as Mombasa. Nairobi, and Kampala.
There was an increase in 1916 of 140 per cent over the previous
year in imports of soap, the value being $257,705. In 1917 the im-
ports were valued at $252,877, and practically all were of British
manufacture.
Imports of stationery for 1917 amounted to $102,914, 20 per cent
less than for the previous year.
Imports of bags and sacks showed a falling off owing principally
to the fact that the exportation from India was and still is pro-
hibited; the value of the imports was $159,898. The country is
practically bare of stocks of all classes of chemicals, drugs, medicines,
glassware, china, enamelware, building materials (particularly ce-
ment). Woolen goods are now unobtainable.











6 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPOBRT9.

The Export Trade.

A loss of 4 per cent represents the difference in the total exports
for 1917 as compared with the previous year. The falling off in the
actual amount of produce exported must be considerably greater as
values were higher in 1917 than 1916.
It is not possible at present to give the countries of destination of
exports, but roughly it may be stated that 75 per cent of the ex-
ports in 1917 went to Great Britain and India, most of the remainder
going to France, the United States. Italy; and South Africa.
The following table is a comparative statement of the principal
exports furm British East Africa (including Uganda) for the yeai
1017 as agaiii-t 1916 (tle figures as to quantities are not available):


Articles.


Anim is-
G alr ....................
M ule s ...................
Shlrep ...................
W\' II' .................
t htI r livistoclk..........
IDc.c5':a\ ........... ....
( nrl.onmtl o jsoda...........
Coconuts. ...............
C'c!ii( ............. ...... ....
(opra......................
(C'hlli 's .....................
( ol t'.: ......................
Cocoa ......................
'owric and other lhells......
Fiber.
Sial. ...... .......... ..
Other.......... .......
Flax.........................
Ghee.......... ..........
Gold itrair;it c\': Belgiani
Ko, l cl ...................
Crain-
-M u ...................
Ilean3 ;jindl Ilas. ........
(;rotllu l i I .............
Millr t...................
Pulse ...................
Se. .m e ....... .........
Clum copal..................
Harm a Dr h.lirjn ............
lhdes, call e .................


$1, 83f
97
77
4,074
2,010
22,544
130,4653
2,309
627,004
99,378'
104,943
2,063,570
J,S44
290
522, 53R
17, 1P1
1,.5;)
13, d64
1, 3, 103
12,370
75, '71
3,6.80
79
27,497
293,i609
3,4:37
9,0ti0
692,649


$1,387
58
817
1,232
700
58, 399
284,090
2,944
786, 212
124,764
70,329
3,046,524
590
230
772,312
29,i606
1', 1)74
21,923


3, 414
17, '4 i

*i, 97


2, 116
>.',,. 239


Articles.


Horns:
Rhino...................
Sportsmen's trophies....
All others ..............
I vory.......................
Oil:
Sesame................
Cottonseed .............
Ostrich feathers ............
Potatoes...................
Rubber:
Plantation .............
W ild ...................
Seed: .
Cotton ................
Castor oil................
Rubber................
Skins:
Goat ....................
Sheep..................
Wild animals...........
Sugar, raw ................
Tpeth. hippo...............
Tolbacco.....................
Tortoise shells..............
Wool:
Fire...................
Other ..................
'Wol,). raw ..................
.ll other ...................


Total.................. 7,256,765


Destination of Exports.

Practically all the cotton went to Europe, mostly England. Hides,
the next in importance on the list of exports, were shipped mostly
to England, the remainder being shared by the United States and
Italy. A product that is of rapidly growing importance among the
exports, having more than doubled in value in the last two years, is
coffee. At least SO per cent of this is shipped to England and the
rest to South Africa. Sisal, another of the rapidly developing prod-
icts of the protectorate. li;s increased in export value to about the
snami extent. This is al:-o shipped mostly to England. The pos-
-ibilitv of the future of this article has already been dealt with in
an exhaustive report by Consul H. P. Starrett. [See COMMERCE
rrorm.s for .une 8, 1917.] Carbonate of soda, all procured from the
Lake Magadi, was shipped mostly to England. Goatskins were
largely taken up by American firms, who bought either delivered
Liverpool or New York. The exports of sesame were divided be-
tween the British colonies, France, and Italy.


$2,705
344
552
253,528
2,286
1,718
1,130
39,308
36,951
1,791
28,920
78

215,462
4,326
2,804
456
S1,542
1,538
252
3,902
1,288
63,831
13,139


$11,736
871
652
181,199
2,529
..........
123
61,280
129,531
5,434
33,169
3,074

134,781
2,682
930
2,022
17,814
286
9,094
..........
52,491
10,617

6,954,049









BRITISH EAST AFRICA AND UGANDA.


Exports to the United States.
The declared value of the principal exports invoiced at the consu-,
late at Mombasa for shipment to the United States for the years
1916 and 1917 is shown in the following table:
Articles. 1091tl I? .1rti kks. 1'11. 1917
Coffee............. ...... $1, 162 ........... M.n rvo h .ri ............ 1 ........
Goat skins .................... 76,02 $122. .2 I' O r t i .. ....... ... .....
Chillies....................... 31, SI 2.3. 71 1 I urtic I .\ ul i t. g. .I ... I i .' J
Sheep skins ................... 5. ......... -
Cloves...................... 5, 57 .......... Total .............. ..... l' II '. 1 1 N15

Increased Freight Rates-Uganda Railway.
Rates from New York to Monibas:a have intr'ease d very ,',n,-id-
erably in the last few Imonth.-. as mrluch as $002 per tn ii iei-''011 l u,-11 ilt
having been quoted Both on outward and inward freiglht. 'i'lii lne
must have a very seriou- cf'ift on American tr;ide. All 'li'i'nts
arriving nowadays', not only from Aimerica I bt from il Ei'lropi as
well, are coming via Duirban, wlcre tlhey are transshlippld tIc a 1,;Ial
line of steamers which is still running i monthly service hoeIt\eu.
Mombasa, Durban, and Bomb ay.
The Uganda Railway, government ownIed the main line of which
runs from Momnbasa on the coast to the (Lal(e) Victoria Nvanza,
shows very satisfactory results for the fiscal year ending March, 1917.
The total receipts were $3,884,(;S9. an increase of 21 per cent over
the preceding year. The expenditure for the i..anle period was
$2,076,348.
Banking Conditions-Exchange Situation.
Some anxiety has been felt by the banking and commercial com-
munity on account of the shortage of rupees (silver). The princi-
pal cause contributing is the prohibition of export from India, and
unfortunately the native and the Indian-there is a large populla-
tion of the latter in the country-are inclined to hoard. To meet the
situation the government is bringing in from India a large quantity
of one-rulpee notes.
The exchange question is causing some concern among the settlers,
who, taken as a body, have very little actual cash in the country.
They are affected adversely as the rupee is now worth Is. 6d. instead
of Is. 4d. its par value, making remittances from Europe at the pres-
ent time very costly. It is on their remittances that a large number of
the farmers and planters are depending to pay their labor, which is
now costing, on account of the exchange, 121 per cent more than when
the rate was normal. On the other hand, import merchants are at
the moment reaping a very substantial benefit as most of them are
not taking their profits on exchange into consideration when cal-
culating their costs.
Government Expenditure and Revenue.
During the fiscal year ending March 31, 1917, the Government
revenue amounted to $7,437,837 as against $5,452,970 for the fiscal
year ended March, 1916. The three principal sources contributed as
follows:-Railway, 50 per cent; excise licenses, 20 per cent; and
customs, 16 per cent.
The expenditure for the period. under review was $5,505,970 and
for 1916, $5,203,647.
WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1918
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