Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00023
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00023

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text











m m m m pbutt o cO~Ufmac, waSmoTwoN, D. c.

SK Sc November 27, 1918

S*JAPA4N;

i :, =mll .. .. !i i
KOlE.

By Commal Robert IEnrer, Jr.

k 19 was the most prosperous in the history of the Kobe
district as it.,was of all Japan. The amount of business
ob was the largest on record, making it the principal port
R60 Ocg, east or west;: in the volume of foreign trade
i:-C.6 ne imported more than half of the total amount
ise lught into Japan land~ with Osaka, exported
i If tht ~hIpped out.
.i valiso f the imports meceede that of 1915 by 39 per
fil: value~i the 1917 imports.shows the record advance of
ier tlfigures of 191,: having increased from $186,000,-
0),0 ; The increase of exports in 1916, compared with
per peit, which was not.qiald .in. .187, when the in-
pe p1ut, the value being $165,000,000 in 1916 and
1914~ Though Osaka is of less importance as a port
Sforign trade also grew'very. greatly last year. Its
Sdfrom about $41.000000 to $47,0000,0 or 15 per
dtpht1s from $71,000,000 to $128,000,000, or 80 per
'prosper ity during:te hyer -were the increase
m, 9eh amounted to 84 per cent for Kobe
saka,: after sh0owingm increase of 80 and 77
:ih T lh '; bank deposits, which increased 87
t an increase of -40 per cent in 1916; and the
i of ba k and companii shjr e 'ti*e, iiwhich amounted
S .anu.m.in 1917 against .26 per cent in 1916.
pa.te last term by the seven cotton-spinning com-
ai raged 77 per cent.

l si~~~l dw attiree, sad minini are all of consequence,
4Iihe ma important activities of this part of Japan are
ig aSi foreign trade.

I. Y U...... UBi... ..... ..i :.....,r
]mmm "ii)(,, ] m 'Jr












The principal industry is cotton manufacturing, more ...
$111.000;000 worth of yarns and textiles having been exported e
this district in 1917. The other important industries are ths
factunre of brudhes, hats, braids, mattings, vegetable oils,
glas,. buttons. porcelain and earthenware, and toys.
In llineral production the principal article is copper, of w
$29,000.000 worth was exported in ingots from Kob. and Osaks in
1917.
The chief.agricultural or vegetable products exported las t :
we're: Rice, $5,602,000; beans, peas, and pulse, $4,628,000; iOe
sugar. $4,110,000; tea, $3,870,000; camphor, $2,563.000; and e laqi
oil. $1.811,000.

Foreign Trade of Japan Increased.

The following comparative table, which includes all of the portSiI::
of entry in Japan, gives the approximate value of the foreign trade
at enchl for 1916 and 1917:

I I- 1


DistricL and city.


Kobe district:
Kote...................................................
Osaka.....................................
Yokkaichi .................................
Nagova...................................
Tsuruga............. ....................
Taktoyo..................................
Itosaki...................................
8akai.....................................
Nanao....................................
Fushiki................................
Yokohama district:
Yokohama................................
Hakodate............ ..............
N gata.....................................
Yebisu...................................
Shimizu..................................
um ori .....................................
Muroran ..................................
Kushiro...................................
Neniuro..................................
O)lani... .............................
Ol omari..................................
Nagmsaki dstricl:
Napigsaki.................................
M1oii.......................................
Shimoneki ...............................
Wakamalsu..............................
Hakata...................................
Karnisu...................................
Sumlnoye ................................
Miike.....................................
Kuchinotsu...............................
Misumra..................................
Idzuhara...................................
hikami.................................
Hasuna................................
Nnha......................................


Imports.


186,488,000
40,867,000
9,4 2000
1, 57,000
849,000
2,425,000
1,242,000
76,000
28,000
44,000
104, 89,000
408,000
156,000
78,000
403,000
108,000
142,000
..............
188,000
2,000
7,051,000
1,415,000
1,175,000
2,080,000
318, 000
130,000
1,437,000
58,000
112,000
10,000
........o.....
..............
.... i ;oo


8525,464,000
40,820,000
13,978,000
3,059.000
1,456,000
2,327,000
2,316,000
61,000
335,000
84,000
143, 634 000
45000
100,000
86,000
2,078,000
82000
791,000




6,192,000
19 958,000
3,091,000
339, 000
3,000
1,285,000
25,000
q0;ooo
50,000

355,000


Exp


5165, 05,000
70,089,000.
1,8W5,0(0
5 106,000
,1300ooo
20,000
..............
..............
77,000
248,827,000
2,476,000
928,000
4, 414,'000
7.000
4.... 4, 000

88,000
503,000
191000
3,081,000

4,9 7,000
13,65,000
3,700,0(0
3,111,000
1,27000
MOSOoM
3,770


2,000
23,000


orts.










..........- .



= ,.. .
t < ;" ";
II,



1i,
.--.i..ml*ur .


The foregoing shows a large growth of trade at every city i Ii
portance. Imports increased 37 per cent for all Japan and: S
cent for Kob6 alone, while exports increased 42 per ceant: '-
Japan and 45 per cent for Kob6. .. .:iil
NE:Iv~


- I


1 i 1 .


Ilje
'i.~**lrrl
.R
It~
i 1


. ii. :: ... .
:......;;i.::..::.


lai


V... .
..::' [ .; d : ... .
..*~~ ~ ~ : : ::. ril









.Ii~


.':rrnmi : flrN-~-xbBn.


oeIIgn Ztra~e of Kob4, by countries, for 1917 compared to
S is shown in the following table:

Si:": Imports from. Exports to.
countries.
t:. 1916 1917 1916 1917

S ............................. 9 917,283 555,610 684, 479
............. 1,357 697 .............. ............
Rik .....+..- : ........... 6,685 ............. .............. ............
.......... .... ............ 1,58,267 2,872,026 327,856 745, 078
.......................... 20128,122 22,686,967 30,533,995 43,833,638
................ .............. 48,496 19,344 109,580 9,232
d pensions:
....................................... 977,832 877,936 5,776,401 12,766,75R
IndoOhina......................... 674,705 842.443 522.259 838,527
............ ....... ......... 1,097,118 714,555 ........... ..
and possessions:
llis.............................. 12,044,616 8,648,613 8,306,524 6,07.5,615
.................................... 407,898 718,865 1,963.503 2,266,749
Oloy and Natal...................... 157 7,902,285 1,564,845 2,111,263
.... ...................... 2,480,683 2,173,365 551,976 2,963,806
Britain............................ 19,697,459 15,728.954 23,172,281 51,924,309
................................. 138,203 360,722 8,849,297 11,607,270
-.....................................:. 59,416.031 71,002,056 18,270,323 23,346,094
tt Settldments........................ 3,644,502 5,316,196 4,451,504 5,634,287
Id and possessions:
India............................. 1,730,921 4,153,055 5,413,626 11,722,418
rltanrId................................. 27,379 45,472 34,759 23,367
:,i..... ................................. 188,612 93,537 215,516 5,805,606
r i Province............................ 4,963,442 8,631,726 3,864,785 5,964,019
..i..................................... 1,275 1,986 6 18 14,547
.j.. ..... ............................. 517,742 88,743 3,275,275 1,005,298
................... ..............7,111 1 86,790 113,742
........................................ 3,290 2,167 4,859 16,282
W passessionaz
.................... 107,363 254,026 2 62.55 1,280,591
ibbrtia...................................... 1,513 17,544 12,791,6%5 4,758,952
t ........... ............................... 1,187,750 1,577,807 601,029 548,096
...................................... 24,158 49,R44 697,041 58,676
S.......................-.... ........ 2.267,661 824,794 96,922 809
d .................................... 448,312 762,088 8,651 55,831
-- ---- .......... .................-. .......... ....... ....... ............
a hde .......................... 15,P95 37,929 2,334,613 2,205,737
ppe ands........................... 1,218,297. 4,920.125 3,835,128 5,500,332
............................... 4,312,167 95.646,929 24,202.603 34, 99,293
S ............................... 2,115,553- 7,574,436 267,576 1,104,743
. t1. F. .i ................................ 186,488,386 265,464,516 165,055,663 239,885,444

Slarg increase in imports and exports was shared in by nearly
Loountries with which Japan trades. Striking decreases in Kobe's
orts and exports were few in number and easily accounted for.
iaes in imports from Great Britain, and Sweden and in exports
Ii*DS ay, were all due to shipping difficulties arising from the war
lthe decrease of 63 per cent in exports to Siberia to the unsettled
Ealotibns in that country. The decrease in imports from Aus-
i is holy accounted for by smaller shipments of raw wool, due
governmental restrictions.
lr some time the United States has been the largest seller to
Mn, and its sales are increasing faster than those of any other
il.ry; the increase in American exports to this district alone hav-
%a about $46,000,000 in 1917, compared with 1916. The United
s was, last year, the third largest customer of this district.
t"_ Britain being first (owing to purchases of ships) and China










4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMBBQ(E EEPORI.

In 1917. 2,380 vessels engaged in foreign trade entered theut
of Kob6, aggregating 5,334,777 tons; and 3,856,357 tons of me a-
dise were imported and exported. i'
Imports at Kob6 from all Countries.
Imports at Kob6 from all countries, by articles, were as follows
during the past two years:


1916 1917
___-_- .o


inds.


Articles.
PoT

Food, drink, and tobacco:
In a naturalstate-
Eggs, fresh............................. 4,
loans, peas, and pulse................ 36
irc ................................. 73,
Soya beans............................. 23,
W heat ................................. 36,
I'.artl or wholly prepared-
Milk, condensed...................... 1,1
Sugar................................ 10,1
Ilav materials:
Cotton-
Ginned .............................. 737,,
In seed ................................ 20,
Hemp, jute, flax, etc ..................... 17,'
Hides, cattle............................... 3,
Lacquer.................................. 1,!
Nitrate ol soda, crude .................... 48,
Oil cake.................................. 66
Phosphorite.............................. 101,
Rapeseed................................. 51,
Rubber, india ........................... 3,1
Sesame seed.............................. 7.,
Shells of mollusca.......................... 13,1
Sulphate of ammonia ..................... 10,
W ool..................................... 23,
W ood.................................... ..... ..
Manufactures for further use in manufacturing:
Aluminum ingots.........................
Bismuth.................................
Dyes, artifeial............................
Fats, animal .............................. 1,
Indigo, artificial .......................... ......
Iron-
Bars and rods........................ 139,
Pig.................................... 142,(
Pipes and tubes....................... 12,1
Plates and sheets .................... 224,4
Plates and sheets, tinned.............. 22,1
Rails ................................. 1,
Wir, galvanized ...................... 12,
Lead, ingols and slabs................... 3,
Leather................................... 1,
Nickel grains, Ilocks and ingots............ 1,
Paper pulp................. .............. 73,
Phosphorus-
Red........................... .........
Yellow.................................
I'ulash, chloralt of ....................... 2,!
Soda ash............................... 34,
Soda,eausl ............................... 8,1
Silk, wild............. ................
T'iiningos and slabs....................... ,
Volatile oil vcgeltabl, rragrant...........
Waxs paramin--
Wree ............... ................ 13,!
O other. ................................. 3,
Yarns-
Colon ......... ................
Worsted and woolen ..................
Zinc-
Ingols and slalu ........................ I
Plates and sheets, free.................
'lates :and shcet, olher ...............
.\n r irfl wholly iminiuracl ured
Alpac'as, I'hI........................... a
Illeyc-les and pars............................
Cotton satin.............................. "
(ol Intl vlvrL-.s and plushies................ a
Elct cric' notoors under dynamo .............
cIa planes and sheIl ts..........................
Il.ts, cans, and biiunn ls.................... ......
Iron nail ............... ........ ........ I 7,


Value.


$273,000
602,000
1,118,000
352,000
643,000
219,000
320,000


102,000
216,000
196,000
685,000
449,000
925,000
827,000

501,000
166,000
95,000
066,000
299,000
160,000
300,000
965,000
255,000
927,000
781 000
109,000
825,000
O08,000

349, 000
85,000
168,000
236,000

368,'000
051,000
655,000
580,000
911,000
683,000
788,000
110,000
129,000
179,000
849,000
239,000
187,000
229,000
346,000
560,000
70,000
204,000
221,000
197,000
404,000
213,000




77,000
116,000




118, 000
340,000
127,000

i6O666O


Pounds.


--I


I-


2,964,000
37,400,000
121, 00,000
25,900,000
15,800,000
2,282,000
33,000,000

638,900,000
13, 2,000
41,705,000
1,770,000
1,Z2,000
65,569,000
786,000,000
102, 200,00
56,6 00,
4,177,000
4,000,000
13,568,000
24,000,000
38,301,000
..............
1,740,000
5000
5w1000
1,300
22, 59,000
179,592,000
14,332,000
390,890,000
14,926,000
38,182,000
19, 048,000
18,636,000
606,000
748,000
22,456,000
213,000
..............
221,i66
52,766,000
23,902,000
176,000
2,24 ,000
265,000
3,952,000
4,610W000
-58,000
196, 000
3,000,000
,6J,000
m, sooo


@2,424,006
S90,00
1,128, 000
... 4.......' .
4,--54,A0'


Val ...... *!






500



lw,aesa,5 '
as

2,471000
49s;sn9

8,,o000
,o0000
"1, 5agg
3,;Slg
1,1000
1,1h00N
17 000



1,10800



1, 100
13,500












m~ist




.21e
1 '1.
1,10
n005







680.








= .e i i. i d
...... .. .








.. :::::


92,060,000
649,000
1,413,000
594,000
284000
1,575,000
5,724,000
651,000
1,074,000
2,014,000
198,000
1,096,000
403,000
8,881,000
483,000
567,000
206,000
989,000
103,000

4,521,000
2,948,000
588,000
6,841,000
1,414,000
52,000
671 000
2,124, 000
691,000
426,000
2,508,000
108,000
75,000
842,000
560,000
589,000
89,000
447,000
429,000
651,000
247,000
102,000
:29,000
424,000
44,000
100,000

81,000
361,000
91,000
101,000
453,000
58,000
340,000









... ...... APAX-..BU. 5.


1916 1917
Artlcle-s...
Poundse.Value. Ponds. Value.

wholly mumfacture&-Continued.
B g........................................ 200 000............. 1,625,500
.ther.............................. .............. 2,909,000 .............. 5,392,500
and petroleum............ b3,276,000 464,000 1,918,000 279,500
ton Japanese ad tissue;......... 1,922,000 120,000 697,000 66,000
S a n,.............................. 6,505,000 508,000 1,060,000 102,000
................................. ............. 668,00 .............. 654 000
and ahestings, bleached........... e 1,530,000 139,000 a 864, 000 103,500
i.......... c 39,000 131,000 96,000 271,000
t at.. ......................... a493,000 367,000 a740,000 511,000
al cotton miedo ldths.............. *1,001,000 461,000 989,000 445,000
rtils......................... ........ 28,055,000 .............. 33,353,000
.. ..S.t....... ................................... 186,488,000 ............. 265,464,500

S a Square yards. b Gallons. a Number.

d cotton, of which $107,000,000 worth was brought into this
in 1917, as compared with $92,000,000 worth in 1916 and $72,-
in 1915, is by far the most important article imported at Kob6,
ing constituted 40 per cent of the total imports here in 1917.
increase, however, was entirely due to higher prices, as the quan-
ilecreased from 737,000,000 pounds in 1916 to 638,000,000 pounds
917. The other principal items, which with ginned cotton con-
led two-thirds of Kobe's total imports, in 1917 were: Iron (bars
sheets), $39,700,000; raw wool, $17,500,000; oil cake, $8,800,000;
Ofhemp, jute, and flax, $5,400,000.

S, Expx rt Trade by Articles.
Following table gives the customs statistics of the exports of
by articles to all countries in 116 and 1917:

1916 1917
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

-l..k, and tobacco:
paredS-
a n-peas, and pulse.........pounds.. 29,746,782 $1,178,622 65,468,624 33,412,921
Cod...............................do.... 6,257,053 167,602 4.111,817 129,129
t: Cutltle:.......................do.... 9385,029 619,727 11,634.824 850,693
Gia ,i dried.................do.. 3,002,993 151,473 4,333.322 217,807
.l Mur rooms, dried............d.... 2,169,864 520, 50 1,968,497 560,186
S :Oias..,...................d..... 17, 98,953 214,906 13,9 72,509 173,702
I'.:i: .,.` .;.... .....................do.... 26,570,093 1,295,347 22,38n, 972 1,215,076
i RelS..Bt6....;...... ..................do... 174,188.667 4,507,500 188,702,000 5,601,A21
: ,,laentSOf............do.... 2,301,500 329,076 744,529 190,671
S:iB ............ do.... 16,312,100 311,949 14,491,102 353, 77
: i., lps ad praws .............. do.... ..1,723,473 147,202 1,473,605 175,11n
................................. .............. 1,383,0 .............. 1.162,321
.................................. .............. 10.827.210 .............. 14.043,795
- S& !: : M. .. .


dr wholly prepared-
i'i 'rp: r (isngass)........... .pounds..
n:o". I n packages ...............
.i. i.w aaw ter .............. .. .doion..
ake, oriB wine..............gallons..
b .t. ... .......pounds..
.............
.................. do....
S....................... o....
........... ......

IM),: "

t~~~i~~t~~Syt ~ w wrrrrl


2,710,721 870,753 2, 11,154 708, r1i
.......... 4 143 ............. 610.825
282,817 11.,488 256,536 1.91,54
908,194 500,754 1,00 ,000 588,409
27,051,084 1,010.305 53.503,716 2,680,:.1
41,'31 934 150, 416 09,939,438 4,110,158
S11,210,009 1, 97,00 24, 277,344 3,87, 1a
.............. 1 4253 ............. 4,119,671
............. 8,0484 -----............--- 88,i75
:in =








II


SUPPLEMENT TO COMMEBOE REPORTS.


.ArticleS.


Pounds.


Raw materials:
Bamboo .................................-- ..............
Boards for tea boxes ........................ .... ....... ..
Cotton yarn, waste................pounds.. 19,804,872
Silk, waste................. .......do... 573,478
Wood, lumber, and boards...............................
All other ................. .... ......... .....
Total...................................... .......
Manufactures for further use in manufacturing:
Braids-
IIemps.......... .........bundles.. 13,091,278
Straw and chip....................do.... 20,760,992
Camphor.........................pounds.. 7,474,644
Copper ingots and slabs .............do .... 51,458,724
Cotton yar............................ do.... 119,641,405
Match sticks or splints........ 1,000 bundles.. 74,740
Menthol crystals...................pounds.. 260,113
Oils-
Colza...................... ..... do.... 26,721,240
Fish and whale...................do.... ,854,000
Peppermint........................do.... 225,190
Soya bean.......................do.... 5,349,800
'yrethrum flowers.................. do.... 1,530,656
Sulphur......... ........................do.... 32,482.386
Silk yarms, spun.....................do.... 29, 425
Zinc, ingots and slabs................. do.... 28,156,000
All other............................................
Total................................. ...............
Articles wholly manufactured:
Bamboo manufactures................... .... ..............
Brushes-
Tooth...........................dozen.. 2,880,389
All other.............................................
Buttons, of shell....................gross.. 13,133,258
Clocks...........................number.. 137,023
Coral............. ..............pounds.. 50,933
Cotton-
Crpe ............................ yards.. 2,982,372
Drills ..............................do.... 12,579,876
Flannels ..................... do.... 41,666,475
Handkerchiefs...................dozen.. 414, 50
Nankeens, imitation............yards.. 4,951,616
Shirtings and sheetings............do.... 51,140,800
Socks and stockings............dozen.. 1,473,408
Towels............................do... 2,395,109
Underwear, knit..................do.... 9,399,742
Cotton and hemp carpets................ ..............
Fans..............................number..1 12,673,630
Glass manufactures ..........................I.............
Hats, caps, and bonnets....................................
Hats. imitation Panama ...........dozen.. 453,428
Lamps, and parts thereof .................. ..............
Matches.............................gross.. 31,116,444
Mals for floor ..................... number.. 4,056,401
Mattings for floor......................rolls.. 117,605
Paper-
Pasteboard.................. pounds.. 8,55,030
Printing paper ...................do.... 5,294,160
'orcelain and earthenware.................................
Rubber tires................. .......pounds.. 2,595,158
Silk tissues, habutai............... do.... 160,926
Soap, toilet.........................dozen.. 1,152,587
To ................................... ..................
Umbrellas.........................number.. 2,598,990
AU other..................... ..........................
Total ......... .................. ...... ..............


Grand total............................


Value.


8207,114
598,491
767,225
392,142
919,830
2,927,294


1,9903,47
1,099,958
3,063,925
13,390, 92
19,847,279
385,655
605,488
1,006,454
1,255,819
197,588
313,831
291,026
813,737
446,477
5,152,000
10,604,245


S61,5657,918


646,813 ..............


797,087
1,455,602
2,600,170
131,682
191,236
207,033
742,436
1,918,153
275,822
136,880
2,650,921
609,398
1,213,009
10,110,431
1,167,321
267,478
2,578,385
321,939
2,547,933
1,071,629
8,605,690
985.556
425,735
163,000
428,600
2,626,600
2,441.312
755,060
403,290
1,430,908
776,543
28,043,640


78,727,292 .............. 111, 8,09


165,055,000..............


A few of the large increases are due to higher market value some ":
of the articles which show considerable increases in value, oE5 '
cotton yarn, vegetable and fish oils, hemp braids, dried m oi,
and seaweeds, having actually decreased in amount. I I,
90,000,000 pounds of cotton yarns, valued at $24,000,000, Siti i"
ported, as compared to the larger quantity of 119,000,000 ~0oudiP,
worth only $19,000,000 in 1916. The same was true of olse (f*-W :./


I


1917 *
.. ...
I *^ ^ ?' : .:';


'* Pounds.


..........
1,175,35 .
.* ? -?


mLi

4&M
,0tJI

"ilEEC"


I__a~o!ePi... ~i -


15, aooco
147,1100
4,038,000
s m,m
91,X1,000
16,000

17,585,000
25,94,000
170,000
5, 22LX0
3,190,000
2, 40,000
675,00
57,384,000
..............
..............


2a9,886,


3,351,000
10, 73060-
108,000
60,000
6,645,000
20,858,000
60,942,000
376,000
3,-00,000
65,012,000
1,686,000
2,013,000
5,315,000
...........;...
9, 888,000

421,66-
34, 463000
1, 55000
08,000
11,614,000
10,452,000
2,611,000
213,000
2,871,000
1,813,00B
..............


_~_~~__


I


"'----Li*l


" i I.


MgMI
"U,=



1, 0'1
",661,6






, lii,x
U, -









Ls, -



MAM
2,Nas




m.oo
1,4360



3,60,6
1,47000



2K005
i0a



AM,



000,,fl
iMrf ;58


.























:


iJI:









:: ": ..... .

~.'1i with 17,000,000 pounds, Worth $1,800,000, in 1917, as com-
to 26,000,000 pounds, worth $1,600,000, in 1916; of fish and
"il, with 25,900,000 pounds, valued at $1,34f,000, in 1917, com-
':to 29,800,000, worth only $1,200,000, in 1916; and to a lesser
Sof a few other articles such as hemp braids, dried mushrooms,
I:bweeds. With these exceptions, however, the exports of most
unimportantt commodities sold at Kob6 increased approximately
j m quantity as in value. The only considerable decreases in
oiorts of articles of great importance were in the case of knit
uiiderwear, brushes, other than tooth brushes, and lumber.
iion of Imports to Exports.
iC:fl be noted that the imports at Kob6 ($265,000,000) exceeded
sports ($240,000,000) by a considerable amount. This is ac-
iid for by the fact that KobA is the chief port of the industrial
*,of Japan, importing supplies and raw materials for the numer-
ctories situated in Osaka, Kyoto, Nagoya, and the entire
sai district, and by the fact that no raw. silk-by far the most
ble article of export from Japan-is shipped from Kobe.
if rate of excess of imports over exports, however, is rapidly
lsaing, as the imports exceeded the exports by 100 per cent in
'but by only 10 per cent in 1917. This is due, of course, to the
t increase in the export of manufactured articles from this dis-
b4 which now form the. larger proportion of all exports. This is of
tt interest, considered in connection with the fact that the largest
I of the district's imports are now raw and semimanufactured
trials for further use in manufacturing; as it shows that Japan
making more and more of the manufactured goods the country
smies and that continuously smaller opportunities are being left
6i1 to foreign countries to sell their manufactured products here.
the other hand, the Japanese market for raw and semimanu-
ired materials.is a rapidly growing one.
Trade of Osaka by Countries.
e foreign trade. of the port of Osaka by countries in 1916 and
F is shown in the table which follows:
Imports from. Exports to.
Countries.
t. 1916 1917 1916 1917
.,.. ....................... ...... s .
,.......................................... 15,964, 189 $17, 588, 923 38,636,059 577,445,225
ndq:sessios:
.............................. 107,525 244, 593 23, 103 883,884
-l ...... ::................: 79..,. -79,004 467,213 35,7)2 65,078
.. .. ... ... ....... .......... ...... 427,762 379,331 .............. ............
ritabttild mossessioia.:
.... ........................ 221,288 272,999 408,595 801,487
tt.......................... 2,444,089 2,210,315 1,694,550, 4,150,146
.i ................................. 31,869 173,431 2,836,527 4,517,747
I ........................................ 11,842,797 13,948,573 8,041,937 15,03, 239
ement ............... ........ 163,120 200,788 793,329 1, 410, 946
........ .................On I I ...... .... 6,039 .............. 13,153
rovnQ. ..... ............ .......... 2, 588, 884 2,534,995 8,576,786 15, 347,2865
................................... 967,903 982.133 614,316 1,410,882
.............................. ... 7,814 33,308 .............. 90
B 6b.i... .. ..,. ................... f9, 59 151,963 6,250,738 2,131,10 6
... .......................... ...... 8,986 .:............ 24,599 ............
um tray.................................0.. 15,974 .............. 1
and possessions:
IsBladS............................ 7,498 5 9,0~ 48,723 256,078
...... ...... ..8,807,326 4,683,157 1,00,033 2,700,144
............................ 2891,412 1,450,919 1,470,787
:e. ;" ........................................... 4,867,381 46,820,810 70,689,916 127, 6&,38s

i. ...
: ;- '"40


V.A
i*i..*


Si?.
Psi. .









8 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMEBOE REPORTS.

More than half of the total trade of Osaka of $174,O 00Q,000 g
with Chinan the volume of trade with that country amounting toabowt
$95.000,000. This was due chiefly to exports of nearly $56,000,~00
cotton yarns and textiles. British India was second in inporten-o
in Osaka's trade with $29,000,000, Kwangtung Province (Dairj
third with $18,000,000; and the United States and possessions r ti
$7,600,000, ranked fourth.
The weight of merchandise handled at the port of Osaka during
the past two years was as follows: Imports. 480.994 tons and 489,34
tons; exports, 479,020 tons and 581,984 tons; total trade, 960,014
tons and 1,021,331 tons.

Imports into Osaka from all Countries.
The following table shows imports at Osaka from all countries
during 1916 and 1917. Raw cotton was the largest article of import
at Osaka, as it was at Kob-, forming about one-third of the total
purchases. Its value increased from $12,000,000 to $15,000,000, bint
the quantity imported decreased from 109,000,000 to 91,000,000
pounds. The articles of next importance, although their increase is
also very largely accounted for by higher prices, were manufactures
of iron for further use in manufacturing, imports of which amounted
to $7,300,000 in 1917 compared to $3,900,000 in 1916:


Articles.


Food, drink, and tobacco:
Nnprepared-
Beans-

Eggs, fresh ...............................
l'artly or wholly prepared-
Condensed milk..............................
Sugar-
Raw ....................................
Refined.................................
Raw materials:
Hones, animal .................................
Borate of soda ..................................
Bristles.........................................
Co ton-
Ginned .....................................
In the seed..................................
Flax, China grass, etc ...........................
Hemp and juto ................................
I idos and skins--
Caltie ...................................... ..
Doe r .......................................
01Iher..... .......... ..................... ..
La=quer ........................................
M au mrL s..........................................
I'hosploit ......................................
Seeds--
Col on......................................
Rape or mustard ............................
W ool.................. .......... ................
Manufactures for furl her use in manufacturing:
Antimony, ingots and slabs.....................
Brass and bronze, ingots........... ............
Caustic soda, crude .........................
Copipr. ingots and slabs .........................
D)ys, anilin ................................
Fats, animal...................................
Iron-
Bars, rods, T-anglos, etc. ....................
Pig .........................................
Pipes and tubes ............. ............


Pounds.


2,400,000
6,332,000
709,000
1,103,000
16,916,000
5,036,000
7,021,000
2,447,000
321,000
109,823,000
3,838,000
8,087,000
3,917,000
10,743,000
65,000
1,048.000
447,000
..............
12,196,000
32,500,000
17,700,000
1,262,000
8,099,000
89,787,000
3,776,000
2,262,000
148,000
S 4,993,000
17,515,000
163,787,000
1,515,000


Value.




$39.000
79,000
39,000
84,000
470,000
160,000
59,000
185,000
190,000
12,635,000
138,000
470,000
118,000
2,105,000
11,000
205,000
95,000
51,000
73,000
268,000
336,000
186,000
1,044,000
6,764,000
233,000
386,000
438,000
379,000
663,000
2,391,000
72,000


.1 -~-----


Pounds.


3,100,000
4,900,000
572,000
1,448,000
15,300,000
2,900,000
117,000
956,000
321,000
91, 00,000
272,00
12,884,000
4,078,000
4,679,000
102,000
3,413,000
328,000
............
sse, enoWr
37,300,0000
37, no, ow
12,500,600
5,46,000
16,884,000
53,237,000
2,069,00
1, 878,000
63,000
,82,000
34,713, 00
89s408, a
4, 6,00,


Value.


4 -


134,000
50000
149,000
546,000
112,000
s000
000
13,218,000



1, 000
000
9 ON







S&I
it:




tI










-JAPAR-KOB. L


i..r 1916 1917.
Artile .
Pounds. Value. Pounds. Value.

Si r further use in manufacturing-Con.
and sheets-
SaIvanied, corrugated .................. 1,301,000 370,000 466,000 135,000
g alvanlsed, not corrugated .............. 540,000 30,000 708,000 61,000
Tinned ................................. 5,322,000 307,000 4,465,000 403,000
Other.................................... 7,237,000 30, 000 10,764,000 1,053,000
-."-", ......................................... 1,409,000 68,000 2,172,000 158,000
40 m aundbrwnse ............................ 2,152,000 231,000 1,488,000 178,000
........................... .......... 11,041,000 141,000 12,663,000 308,000
-F -...................................... 373,000 40,000 135,000 7,000
-... 4.... ..............................--.............. 162,000 ............ 93,000
rwax .................................... 5,052,000 436,000 6,057,000 586,000
i ........................................ 739, 000 875,000 277,000 418,000
t......................................... s18,099,000 454,000 2,145,000 84,000
aits..................................... 1,131,000 89,000 1,412,000 125,000
t a gats nd slabs......................... 3, 188.000 413,000 3,848,000 350,000
l ~olly manufactured:
.................................... 2.268,000 239,000 417,618 64,000
o........................................ 1,430,000 438,000 528,000 201,000
'a .....................................7... 1,172,000 54,000 1,912,000 125,000
g g macL nes.................... .... .............. 108,000 ............ 43,000
..... .. .................. 129,00 13,000 67,000 12,000
ll ..................................... .............. 213,000 ............ 257,000
i derivatives............................. 195,000 678,000 207,000 88, 000
rivets, crews, etc...................................... 201,000 ............ 169,000
em and kerosene.......................... 1,890,000 253,000 c 1,947,000 272,000
lmrtiles. .................................. .............. 4,680000 ............ 7,377,000
..................................... ................40, 867,000........... 46, 820,000

SSquare yards. b Ounces. c Gallons.

S Whipped from Osaka.
sports from Osaka to all countries during 1916 and 1917 are
m in the following table:

V '1916 1917
Articles.
J Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

&Ik alnd tobaoco:
need..........................pounds.. 20,202,000 $751,000 42,516,000 (1,729,500
......................................... ...... .... 536,500 .............. 312,000
324,500 .............. 775,500
S fi further use in manufacturing:
v, ingots and slabs............. pounds.. 5,356,000 1,477,500 5,332,000 753.500
yellow metal....................do.... 4,994,000 1,402,000 9,277,000 2,776,000
and slabs.....................do...d... 18,281.000 4,322.500 17,05.000 5, 007.000
... ............................do.... 1,164,000 349,500 3,670,000 1,216,000
r No. ................ ..... do .... 35,310.000 5.912.000 36,210,000 10.323.000
~l 2O........................... do.... 21,049,000 6,558,500 22,496,000 11,434.51()
l .*. ..............................do.... 1,089,000 499.500 1.290.000 836.500
S and'slabs.................. do.... 2,428,000 490,000 5,297,000 ;62 500
I manufactured:
................................don ............ 220.500 ............. 1,024.500
418,5M00..............600,50
Il,,;.................. ................ gross ....... 418,500.............. 600,500
ae ................... ...dosen.. 634,000 171,500 80,000n 314,500
i ...........................pieces.. 710,000 269,n% 1,122,000 509,003
Otoa d sillk tissues........square yards.. ............ 84.5 .............. 497,
si.lkas. tlns .......... ......... do... 888,000 22, 1,15 423.501
yll U........ I.................do 51,000 23.5500 6n.m00 303,300
i .................... .........do.... 14,227,000 1,015,500 19, 00r.00 2,n,
S........ .................... dosen.. 399,000 28.500 615.000 546.000
............................... do.... 1,206,000 716,000 1,313.000 914.000
Splain.....................piees.. 6,0943,000 2,65000 77.995.00 4,107.4fWl
ed.......................do.... 474,000 17000 1,945.I0M 162.. 0
aheetma...............yards.. 5,073,000 104,000 154,3t2.Ann 14.72R, 000
S.........................do.... 21,8.000 1,201,500 3,965,00n 8,432. .5M
?'9 *l/........................... ads/. 6O0,000 250,000, 58,000 824.000
:: ..:.
.EE::










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMBBOE REPORTS.


Artl les.


Articles wholly nanuractured--Conitnued.
Col ton nainuIfctunrP -
Tisasus--
StriT ed.....................pieces..
Twled.......................yards..
Othper.......... .................
Towels ............... .........doz ..
Underwear, knit..................... do....
F not wear...... .......... ............ ...
class manu!Micti1Es-
iottles aid fla1ks .................pieces.
Mirrors..............................dozen..
Oilwtr mlassware..............................
Iron inmui netlurs--
Fn:umeld ware .............................
Other manurfcl ures ........ ..........
Lamps and parts...............................-
Machi nery and par .......... ...............
Match.ls-
Safely ...............................gross..
iHher......................... ...do....
lMedirines. prepared........ ........ ........
Paper-
Prrting........................ pounds..
Other................................. ...
i'olt ry ware...................................
Soap, tuilet.................... ....dozen..
Woolen tissues---
Monsseline ................ ........ yards..
Other..................................
All other.... .......... ........................
Total .....................................


Pounds.


372,000
89,39a, 000
733,000
1,528,000
............o
3,310,000
5,190,000
............
............



466,000
8,615,000
............
14,rp4,000
............
1............
|i,363, 000
884,000
.::" *.......


Value.


I ~ I ~ ..


8302.800
5,332, 00
1,944,500
371,000
2,767.500
425,500
544,500
324,500
1,467,500
240,500
1,088,500
351.500
1,001,500
157,500
1,509.000
222,000
Z-77,500
300,500
537,000
392,500
152,000
399, 000
14,902.900


m. L


Pounds.


1,21000;
......


4,164,000
6901,000

..............



1,544,000
7,017,000

30,449,000

2, 07,000
..........."..
..............


AWIN.


....... ; .

N.


asr







25 uI, us


_ -


........ .... 70,689,900 ....


127,615,6101


Osaka's total exports show the notable increase of 80 per cent i4
one vear, the most remarkable growth occurring in cotton manubfo
tures and cotton yarns, the former having increased from $22,000,OQ
to $52,000,000, or 136 per cent, and the latter from $12,400,000 AQ
$:1.700.000, or 75 per cent. These two items comprised nearly 60 per
rent of Osaka's total exports during 1917. The quantity of yarn ex-
ported increased only slightly, the gain in value being due anlost
whlull to higher prices. The quantity of cotton textiles exported
increased considerably but not in proportion to the increase in valuh*
Other articles of which the exports doubled, or in some casese.wo
than doubled, were brass and yellow metal. paper, brushes, and asey
matches.
Official Inspection of Goods Exported.
During 1917 five articles-silk textiles, matches, glassware, braids,:
and enameled hollow ware-were selected by the Japanese Dejl-
ment of Agriculture and Commerce in regard to which a system oin a
section before export was established, and it is expected that 4ottQo
manufactures, brushes, pencils, and codfish will soon be added, :- i
The object of this inspection is the desire of the Governmnt:aM
of the more progressive Japanese merchants to fully grasp tbairhei
ent opportunity in world trade by assuring and improving the q
of the goods exported.
Imports from United States and Possessions into Kob6 and Osaklr.
In 1917, 32 per cent of this district's total imports came ~fti'iIib
United States, as compared to only 28 per cent in 1916. Oft'k
ports ginned cotton, valued at about $30,000,000 formed S
and iron, bars, sheets, pig iron, etc., valued at nearly $50
up no less than 50 per cent. Sales by the United States to


___


1 _i/l __ I_


L

















tp&y e urmxea mtares to JiODe naa aireaay inereasea -u per cent
lo Osaka 310 per cent, compared with 1915.
iports into Kob6 and Osaka from the United States for the years
tid 1917 are given in the following table:
I-. __ __


Articles.


IN--- ORTS INO OB.
O n IoBrs Io XoBl. ,


ila Bgots and slabs................pounds..
UE .. .................................do....
.. of potash.......................do....
mpoS tad...............................do....
....h............................do....
tial...............................do....
:ilk.d................................do ...
d'ad other tanning extrcts ............do....
asoda_ orude..........................do....
wood.......... ................c. ubic meters..
o of potsh .........................pounds..
c ................ ..................ounes..
ed ilk......'..................... pounds..
i d"............................. do....
bOsreamers, and screw taps........do....
ta hila, and medicines, n.e. s..............
aitt.. ................................pounds..
r paper making........................do....
line ...................................do....
Mkbark, and similar tanning material...do...

tea.............................square meters..
pets............................... ...do....
...... .............. ...............pounDs..
it......................................do....
andskins:
Ie and buslo.........................do....
d.....................................do....

ahoml ... ....... ........... do ...
isi D awlohoopi.......................do..
rAd. fNTangles, etc............... do....
a. .S, ...............................do....
t.iS pss................................do....
a s b..............................do....
a dalbs...................... ........do....
... ................................do....
E.--.....................................do....
nd tube..............................do...
tid sheats..........................do....
63s amd sbeets, galvanized......... ....do....
S ...........................do....
tts.:..................................do....
en..................................do....
te or old.................... ......do....
tI... ..... .. ...............do....
....vansd... ................ do.....do
d.. ................................do....
H 1abn ed labs..i o. .......... .....d.....
ilverand platinum............ouncest.
r r ......e.................pounds..
li...... ..................................

iMd ..........................number..
ie ma d electric motors ........................
r t.maors................................
.~ .D n machin........................ .....
NW:Sar es and = parts thereof..............
S 06l adacsoi.s...........................
W ..obinery. ...........................
* toilets mnd aocessoriea....................
.........................ond..
mane.hinery. ........................
".A.r........ ::...............pounds..
,.. ............................do....I


Quantity.


48, 922
....... ........"
41,712
..............
276,029
2,165,012
651,173
385, 649
1,201,950
6,403,385
795
990,454
17, 607
I,928,952
207,888, 933

..............
236,850
35,732
229,705
4,534;050

46,117
239,277
336,136

358,572
30,582
..............
1, 475. 497"
112 745,744
........ ......
..............
8,872.406
7. 26,984
2,257.920
8.963. 421
131 437,206
14. 455. 16
1,401,793
.............
605, 065
..............
3,315,524
10,572,254
8,872,4016
13,037,895
20,473
1,203, 133
83,269

.......... .
-..........
..............






203,48
2532.16


Value.


$568,760
............
47, 296
............
156.839
102,883
690,579
61,185
10, 758
487,011
57,117
409,732
61,756
219,174
20,470,967
57,017
361,065
146,955
43,966
33,641
84,516

108, 108
176,572
42,974

81,802
63,572
............
77..303
3,546,490
............

503.432
296.959
45.197
419.366
3,622.011
902, 887
44,449

70,001

14, 559
555,P57
360,703
954, 4P5
63,570
49, 748
33,437

159,955
32,541
342,448
....iii;........
111,537
97,738
61, 4PO
75, 27
............
231,836
37,840
41,528


Quantity.


1,739,653
161.548
50,702
1,472,826
260,880
60,700
2,552.228
204,053
21, 7460,38
22. 758
16.214
2,224.680
176,551.968

59.925
49,106
52,037
............

16,628
61,541
79,826
78,266
277.064
29,967

951,556
4.11, 062
214.327.126
1,776,728
726,069
1,791,720
1,372.552
4,874.786
37.815.885
1, 521.20S
335,888.121
2, 657, .1i9
3, 112,740
638, F56
1,271,199
20,932,014
5,532,740
*4,600,635
9,435,550
2,931,483
953
538,226
1,692,248

139
............
............
............
............
............
............
............

12,425
10.038


Value.


31, 128. 752
434,687
8,812
290,218
116,581
315,610
1,619,313
40,307

1,566,436
7,570
180,371
271,229
30,146,891
648,339
68,252
71,352
9,658

40,325
241,493
12,977
47,513

69,752
70,603

80,950
297.267
11,028,789
148, 654
36, 459
73.445
71.677
290.073
1.068.768
1,021, 96
28,311,862
191.92'
1,318,101
61,569
196,313
478, 429
357,973
1,349,344
489,057
239,715
2,623
171,417
110,796

120,479
312,417
48,217
564,781
535,R26
155,225
254,003
589, 625
22,146
44,210
1,052,513
2,4M9
.3W7


i A*


I-------~---------~


r;:
Ei. ;..









SUPPLEMENT TO OOMMBB0 E REPORT.


Artilels.


Quantity.


Value.


I!
ii,
"-ii==

S 1 iilll
*T .....i......i..r


/. ,I


_____ *I. I.------ .. *-


SPORTS INTO KORt-continued.
Illumint-iti mIlcellaneous.............gallons..
Kerosene and net roleum in cans...........do....
Mineral, misrcllaneous..................pounds..
Volatile, vegetable (fragrant)............do ...
Papers:
Cardboard ................................do..
Imitation Japanese and tissue paper.......do....
Match.......................... .......-..do....
Parking .......................... ..... do...
Printing..............................do....
All other............................---. ..
Paraffin wax ...............................pounds..
Pine fir, and cedar...................cubic meters..
Platinum, Ingots, slabs, bars, and plates....pounds..
Pulp.........................................do...
Quicksilver.................................. do....
Rosin .......................................do....
Salicyli acid ..............................-..do....
Soda ash .....................................do....
Tobacco, leaf................................do....
Vaneline...................................... do....
Zinc:
Ingots, slabs, and grains...................do....
Plates and sheets.......................do....
All other articles....................................
Total.........................................
IMPORTS INTO 08AKA.
Alummum, ingots and slabs................ pounds..
Caustic soda, crude...........................do....
Dynamite..................................do....
Iron:
lars, rods, T angles, etc.................do....
Nails..........................................
Plates and sheets......................pounds..
Plates and sheets galvanized .........d.... ....
Oil, kerosene or petroleum................gallons..
Paraffin wax.............................. pounds..
Surgical or orthopedic instruments, and parts of .....
Mac'hiner. and parts of .............................
Soflt rbbers..............................pounds..
Vessels (steam)...........................number..
All other articles....................................


610,911
2, B5.90P
10,00, 761
65,516
830,956
645,130
553, g8
671,365
1,299,114
..............I
14,126,;728
10,462
52
509,718
93,121
9,510,001
18,854
720,764
720,337
1,016,114
522,298
..............


$175,113
344,307
116,295
47,131
54,227
33,745
37,185
79,874
..........i.
153,987
77,368
219,813
95,538
375,864
95,260
155,812
47,477
145,759
88,195
2,302,1409


368,27D
1,ar;TOg
91,64
I, 02,1 i

254,377
910,63
2MI,
821,7 6
8, ,r142

28,79
5, 448,5
1411,0
13,130,432
580,93
2,407, g



505,128
-...........


.............. 49,312,167 ............


fgl




lip ... ...
' I ,. ,, : .

%,R


















2.
9,646,
^^ rs


Wa,MB.K'l


402,640 253,911 74,716 34
2,512,188 182,789 1,853,384 Il
785,036 277,232 222,768 7,7
7,984,389 266.054 13,964,545 8 Wi
............. 147,644 ............ ,147
2,806,322 136,54 9,55 8,778 9 5 W
.............. ............ 911,204 81,
1, 890, 136 253,467 1,942,653 f 91r
899,205 69,565 968,a64
.............. ............ ............ A id
.............. 96,294 ...S........ m,
.............. ............ 66,178 ,a8
1 m5, 000 ............ .........
101.............. ........... ,1,
.............. 1,618,816 ............ 2, 31;,5


Total........ ...... .............................. 3,367,326 ....... 4,63,110

Exports to United States and Possessions.
The tctal increase in exports to the TUited States and possessions
wA;s no less than 40 per cent in 1917, compared to the preceding year.'
The following table gives the quantities and values of the principal
articles invoiced at this consulate for the United States, Hawaii, sand
the PIhiliippine Islands during the past two years. (The Japanes
custom s statistics, owing to transit merchandise, show smaller expdi l
to the ITnitedi States than are declared at this consulate):

9106 ?7
Articles. __":l-
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Vmih W.I,:
__. ---- ---... .: __i_ i


TO UNITED STATEn.
Antimony, regulu uor metal..................pounds..
Art works, mor than 100 years old............pieces..
Braids:
S Chip and straw............................do....
Hemp............................... ......do....
lureadstuffs:
Rice, brown and clenned................. pounds..


3,086
25,785
10,132,607
4,876,088
85,703,980


81,820,814
141,011
928,896
76,096
828,773


17,142,88M

17,077, MU
1,43, A.
95,482,8a


eUp~. i

















"i:. am a0 Um ITED bAT --contied.
0 grefined atd appeared ................pouds..
im ...................................... deet..
........................................dozen..
.helli.'................................. rss..
dAtW, dyes, and medfines:
S ......................... ..........ponds..
r fined.... .........................do....
L Prystals .......................:...do....
bonte of l.............................-do....
-hlorate ofw .............................. do ....
P.it thrm flowers .......................do....




l|.tthen, stone, and china ware:
i:, .. vergmlbletbe .............................. .. ces..
China and porcelain ware .................dozen..
SErthenand crockery ware ..................do....
Mhers, mannfatures of, gunny bags, new
r :.......... a ............................

ors ......... ......................... pounds..
Peanitsl ....................................do....
l ia:: ast d fuirskL s, undressed..................~ees..
,safety ................................ rOs..
|[!f paper, Panama straw, and rush.. .........aozen..

ill Mattng and mats, st raw and grass......square yards..
aii Ih:: h.. ..l ............................i.... ns..
.- C astor......................................do...
: Coconut .................................pounds...
SCottonseed...................................do....
: Pa .. mnut................................gallons..
o papeseed..............................do....
By bean ....t...........................pounds..
mke ......................................... gallons..
s B elite ore........ ....... ................ ans..
Seeds, mustard...............................pounds..

F riso............................................
Wi, i W tse.. ..............................pounds..
Sch,potato .................. ................ do...
... ...................................... dozen..
S'" .getables, crude and prepared:
S Beans............. ..................... bushels..
S eas ............ ......................... do. ..
.' 4 ..m. Other, dried or salted.................pounds..
'; woeed and laamboo, manufactures of:
S Bar o.ketsr. .............................. dozen..
S Wiodshaving strin.cspc.......................pices..
Wooden :-are, miscellany ous-....... .......... do....
|jh I Lfhlrrfir:: .::::::::::::::::::::::::::l
i ohare ............................................



;,~i|::^, ; TO PUIUIPNUI ISLANDS.



!Viii :: tit, bleached and colored, dyed .. .square yards..
Ylll|!|l .., W 'hawadt and yarns.................pounds..
M eateranrtss...................................... .
Ga 'ot i............................................









riutoher, and chinr a sared. ..........dozen.
phes... .................................po nds...








AU other manufacture of............... ... .
U)nmalft boxes- .gro s..
I i...... .............. .pounds..




mud parasol patns --.d--en.-
Alpllt ...................................... ...
ToMar........................................




sietjles ......*.......................... pounds.
:i llt Wheat flour ........................h.r .
.,bh oe. ble.ahed and colored, dyed ....square yards..
d" end. yms ......................... pounds..
,... .. ...Y.. .r s ................................ do en..
..... .......... .. .......................... ..
..................................... do....
.len es ................ .................. p... ...
.. boxes................................ gros..


31,956

2,359,102
3,660,118
449,890
2,214 547
110,000
40.800
112;000
781,472
2,192,910

4,233,144

16,177
446,425



163, 106
4,198,022
416,281
498,355
1,179,111
11,837,275
1,374,330
210,670
2,910,835
3,430,4090
1,537,974
2,389,600
72,417,618
273,776
54
1,948,261

48,'600
4,984,000
6,756,412
1,410,723
............

657,153
191,981
1,575,337


343,615
1,3D1, 600
864,520
146,003
1,100,694
239,894
11,137
46,909
145,963
245,512

145, 941

73,690
296,779



8,784
150,274
204,716
2,131,030
360,584
1,378,038
416,510
108,545
213,412
189, 6F9
615, 58
929,631
3,980,589
149,879
91,284
51,0960
109,583
37,455
241,315
398, 058
1,081,036


323,764
8,776
84,450
5,978,486
5,119,584


10, 223
16, 08, 000
4, P31, 308
5,316,232
294, 361
1,963,733
117,325
917, 69~
332,640
2,625,604
2,246,714
389,393
5,440,654
............
31,046
528, 110
106,273
2,328,792
8,814,073
10, 777,218
887,050
372,822
1,179,310
10,045,667
1,501,089
516.219
15,789,263
2, 005,650
2,618,784
2,847,417
64,932,091
241,476
169%
5,s03,300
............
397,349
6,004,364
10,647,609
1,060,694
415,034
1,212, 602
581.469
966,080
1,352,690
............


$276,292
117, 184
2,573, 221
917, 241
100, 126
1,154,193
305,376
203, 852
119,873
531,421
257,974
198.908
205,911
240,428
175,668
-318,996
99,641
173,395
447, 187
497,577
664,738
1,396,523
436,247
1,478,980
568,180
409,792
1,704,957
165,164
1,525,688
1,277,487
4,947,962
144,886
286,990
166,746
178,247
420,463
290,011
632,975
3,509, 449
1,096, 231
102,643
270, 010
130,724
113,502
12,610,280
5,692,723


........... 33,510,873 ........ 56,361,951


155,993
851,542
334,579

284, 128
115,661


232,341
.217,001


............


23,644

80,373
222,519
845,405
192,636
90,414
110,159

145,310
84,167
36,572


748, 801
885,988


549,247
65,075
7,735,794
1.125,471
911,273
429,485
78,477
10,248,552
............
356, 089
S307,675
416,097
121,568
175,568
............


4. I


............. I 2,.,oo I............


107,927
3ml,729
797, 697
461,519
1,282,939
406,153
169,976
163, 586
106,408
157,517
1in592
17, 809
Im, 130


1,1, 16
=, u, s


7,470,34


I2=1=








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


4.,;;' ;;;


1916 1917
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. V~lbKI

TO AWAIIAN ISLANDS.
Breadstuff: Rice ............................ pounds.. 34,88,101 1848,610 80,7,73 7
Sake (Japanese)...............................g alons.. 95,701 3.5,699 7,
All other articles..................................... ............. 44M,M ............ J
Allcharges............................................. ............ 286,780 ...........
Totl........................................ ........... 1,619,952 ............ 2,W


,, :


Declared Exports from Yokkaichi.
Exports to the United States as invoiced at the consular agency at;
Yokkaichi, which includes the large city of Nagoya, increased about*,
60 per cent during 1917, and were as follows:


-------------------------r-- *m .,:i
1916 1917
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

Breadstuffs: Rice...........................pounds.. 702,178 520,134 1,081,9360 57,85
Earihenware and porcelain....................dozen.. 2,165,954 1,031,260 2,721,904 1,89
Matches, s-.fety................................. gross.. 854,505 258,976 1,359,310 a i, l
Musical instruments:
Violins ................................... dozen.. 3,930 12,792 3,083 58,566
Violn bows ................ ............ do .... 6,22 12,093 18183. 71, 78
Oil, soya bean................ .............pounds.............. .......... 88,139 63338
T a..... ..................... ...........do.... 2,252,365 440,839 2,870,787 38,244
Toys.................... ........... ...............dozen.. 1,313,970 87,138 1,567,42b 275,171
A III her art icles......................................... .................. 499, 7
All charges ........................................... .......... 206,301 ........... 614 78
Total............................................. ............ 2,337, IS0 ............ 3,776,21

Goods to the value of $5,218 were invoiced at Yokkaichi for ship-
ment to the Philippine Islands in 1916 and $15,268 in 1917, and:to
Hawaii $50 in 1916 and $250 in 1917.
The Cotton Industry.
Extraordinarily favorable business conditions in Japan and the
conttinul d withdrawal of the products of European nations from
competitionn in the markets of Asia and Australia made the year 1917
an extremely profitable one for the spinning industry, andfirmly
fixed it as the leading manufacturing industry of Japan. Last year
there were imported into this district, which is the center of the in-
(l1-tr'V in this country, more than 7.000,000 bales of raw cotton; and
t li're wcre exported i'fom it about 457,000,000 pounds of cotton yarn
aml $70.()00,000 worth of cotton textiles.
What is said to have been the first order from Japan for spindles
in 1le 1'nited States was filled during 1917 by a machinery company
near Brston. These are reported to be giving excellent service. The
impo1.rts of spindles from England, which formerly supplied nearly
:iIl of those u'ed il this country, have greatly decreased.
Trade in Vegetable Oils.
The l i' moints of the three principal vegetable oils-rapeseed
(co(.-l). sova) bean, and coconut-largely originating or manufac- ',
turned in this district, exported in 1917 were slightly smaller than in:i!
1!)1G, but their value was far higher, and there was a greatly i
creiIed trade in oils from the mainland and South Seas transshl pS ,"
and marketed here. The latter, however, as they are not entered for
consunmption in Japan, do not appear in the local customs statistikcs.L:



-H:


W

-^
:: *.::












a& m.saaL, en0 inc WmreFAuW mIIo JLA 'uIY T,%PAZ ULLaz tL %, ULAL L L lAIpaz A.
trlMIsb ipment business here. (2) The high rate and rapid fluctu-
ations of silver exchange in China, of which Japanese buyers can
skes, quicker advantage than the representatives of purchasers in
seo distant countries. (3) The great increase in oil mills owned
a! operated by Japanese, both in this country and on the mainland.
4) ZThe shipment of large quantities of copra from the former Ger-
It i in-owned South Sea Islands for crushing in this country.
SOctober, 1917, saw the beginning of the largest buying season yet
known in Japan, it being estimated by exporters that between ilie
Beginning of that month and the end of the year about $25,000,000
| worth of vegetable oils were sold for future shipment to the United
States alone. Quotations rose very rapidly during that period, the
following being the approximate prices at which the four principal
oils were sold at the beginning and end of 1917, per 100 pounds
i landed net weight c. i. f. Pacific coast ports: Soya-bean oil, $8.90
and $15.50; coconut oil, $12 and $15.75; peanut oil, $9.30 and $16.75;
Sand refined rapeseed oil, $13.25 and $18.
Sources .of Supply of Oil-Exports.
Soya-bean oil, which originates principally in Manchuria, is al-
Smost entirely controlled by Japanese. The supply of beans last year
was very large, and the amount of oil turned out was limited only
by the capacity of mills. A number of large new plants were started
both in Manchuria and Japan and most of the already-established
mills increased their capacity.
About half of the coconut oil handled here was pressed in Japan,
the-other half came from Saigon, Singapore, and Java.
Virtually all of the peanut oil transshipped at Kobe originates in
North China. so little being manufactured in this district that the
item is not individually mentioned in local customs statistics. The
Chinese peanut crop is said to have been far below normal, but the
high prices brought out stocks that would not otherwise have been
exported.
The principal supply of rapeseed comes from the northern part of
Japan, but large quantities, and some of the oil itself, are brought
here from Manchuria and North China. The oil is expressed from
.the seed in this district in very many small and a few large plants.
The following figures, taken from customs statistics. show de-
creases in the quantities of rapeseed, coconut, and soya-bean oil ex-
i. ported, but increases in value:
1916 1917
", "Detintion. --
Pounds. Value. Pounds. Value.

RAPESBBD OIL.
Australa.............................................. 964,742 $70,240 701,281 t73,577
tance-................................................. 76f3,b8 4,6e s 301,986 18,00
SmSt Britain.......................................... 7,971,616 485.037 3,837,766 379,806
c.:n S st ... ...... .................... ........ .........
a las...................4.. ........... w. 384,465 29,74 342,37
S tat es........................................... ,40, 7 1,017,412 11, 0,461 1,3 ,58
counatriaa.................................... 97,06 92s 735,20 3,287
I' Total......................... ................... 28,721,240 1,686,454 17,5855,000 1,811,389




ws~


SUPPLEMENT TO COMMErBE REPORTS.


1016 1931
Destination.
Pounds. Value. Pounds. V t

COCONUT OIL.
Asiatic Russia ...................................... .. 7 S 1,37, 0
Australia.............................................. 964,752 70,240 1,31, 08
France................................................. 763,558 481649 1,666
Great Britain......................................... 7,971,616 485,038 2,87,01
Kwanitung Provoine.................................. 064,268 44,445 4,000
United Stales ......................................... 15,840172 1,017 412 15,71 86 1,a
All other countries...................... ............... 98,83 5,642 11,946
Total............................................ 26,302,772 1,671,432 11, 8090,96 M 316
SOYA-BEAN OIL.
Australia............................................ 483,156 28,216 171.885 iL
Br iish Canada........................................ 260,900 14,317 87,286 .
France..................................:.............. 75,333 ,335 ............ ............
greatt llritain............................ .......... 567,478 37,806 ............. ...
united States.............. .................. ..... 3,962, 13 228,157 4,962,813 4. 7
Total......................................... 5,349,840 313,831 5,221931 476,


Porcelain and Earthenware-Glass Exports.
Exports of both porcelain and earthenware increased somewhat
last year, in comparison to 1916, as shown by the following table:

Countries of destination 1916 1917 Countries or destination. 1916 91r

Australia.................. 573,783 $332.478 Hongkong.................. 201,206 1777
lritisli India............... 346.637 271,845 Philippine Islands..................... 2 7,5
British Straits Settlcments.. 178,072 217,033 UnitedStates.............. '431.801 440.3
China...................... 161,808 166,457 All other countries.......... 832,398 897, 710
Dutch India............... 225,336 48U,746 -
Great Britain................ 175,559 18,903 Total................. 2,626,00 2,720,800


Exports of glass of all kinds from Kobe in 1917 were valued at
$2,607,154. The United States purchases only an insignifinhil
amount of glass and glassware here, the principal items in 1917being
glass beads, valued at $84,464, and miscellaneous glass manufac-
tures' $63,510. The various kinds of glass exported in 1916 and 1917i
together with the quantity and value, are given below:

1916 1917
Kinds.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


Brads....................................
To i lies.........................................down..
Mlirrrs ...................................... num ber..
Sp rar s.......................................do....
Timiltrrsand gobletls........ .............dozen..
'aium Iasks. ................................do....
Window plato.........................square meters..
Ot her glass .......... ......... ..... ............
Total.....................................


10,412,056
6,772,847
2,151,683
3,044,679
.............
............
............


$226,932
1, 096, 300
190,230
53,940
739,229

271,754


7, 500, 861
5,063,487
1,424,168
1,730, 478
35,055
1,16, 985
............


............ 2,578,385 ............ 2,7W5 1


S aciso&a
't,

1438P1
sam,,
&,S
558:


Shell-Button Industry-Exports of Toys.
Jnpan has captured a position in the shell-button industry, w t ,
it is believed it will maintain after the war. The small decree s( 4
exports last year is largely accounted for by the import restrictiPo~'

; ,d' ". "~ "









l JAiP A-KoBo. 1

t : Britain. The quantity and value of -shell buttons exported'
oiini'Kobe in 1916 and 1917 are shown in the table that follows:


Countries of destination.


t l...... .............. ............
Inia .......... ...
B... .. ... ........................................
slta s.....................................
Sates........................................
4BRpther countties.... .......... ............
Total...........................................


Gross.


1,041,872
1,010,023
555,792
4,681,824
549,505
3,659,439
1,634,803


13,133,258


-- ,I-----.-----.- --


Value.


$231,877
216, 03
120,038
796,298
146.850
732,268
356,246


Gross.


668,548
601,314
740,652
2,301.134
150,311
4,324 292
1,935,431


2,600,170 1 10,730.682


Although the exports of toys slightly decreased last year, as com-
pared to 1916, owing chiefly to restriction of their importation into
Great Britain, the industry has been a rapidly growing one during
the past few years. In 1913 exports amounted only to $662,149, as
compared to $1,263,635 in 1917, the increase being due to causes aris-
ing from the war. Exports of toys from Kob6 during 1916 and 1917
,aregiven in the appended table:

Coeatries of destination. 1916 1917 Countries of destination. 1916 1917

AdetrJ .................... 175,371 $184,594 United States............... $446,386 $542,614
British India............... 288,520 167,183 All other countries........... 238,968 195,790
seat Britain................ 197,327 59,415
r m ... .......... 4 309 52,282 Total.................. 1,430,908 1.23,635
Islands ........... 36,027 01,757

The Match Trade-Floor Mats and Matting.
Exports of matches in 1917 showed an increase in both quantity
and value compared with 1916. Prices for the best grade of double
impregnated matches have risen gradually from $12 to $13 per case
of 50 gross of boxes f. o. b. Kob- before the war to $28 to $30 in
July, 1918. The following table shows the exports of matches from
Kobe: during the past two years:

1916 1917
Countries of destination.
Gross. Value. Gross. Value.

Rsasia................................................ ............ 2,024,695 S614,4
it dIhIndla..................................... 10,846,781 32,854,495 13,331,963 3,768,331
Btri sBettlements..................................... 1,748,414 513,684 2 237.b43 672,325
Chin ..... ........................................ 5,702,510 1,245,449 4,415;180 1,051,234
Ind .................................... 1,456,355 371,642 3,194, 36 801,446
b: :................................ 6,093 821 1,784,507 4,961,552 1,6609,89
ROT. ............-....... .................. .. .......... ............ 2,109, 451. 782,064
S ercountries.................................... 5,468,563 1,835,823 2, 18,072 760,393
Total....................................... 31,116,444 8,605,690 34,463,192 1, 210,255
** .. i. .- 1 --- *--------------------

The exports of floor mats and matting is an important, although
for the tune being a decreasing, one in this district, due to the fact
that, they are very bulky in proportion to their value and can not
89409D-18---55c-- 2
'^ ..


Value.


$166,411
131,132
156.269
456,002
67,367
779,580
544,876
2,302,537


~"` ~~---~--I I I 1










18 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE BEPORTL


be so profitably shipped at the present high freight rates as frm
Exports during the past two years were as follows:

1916 llt
Countries of destination.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Vales

MATnfG. JaReOB.. Adl..
BrIULi Canada........................................... 5,844 11,761 3,36 1
United States.....................................,-- Io 32,a5 4 45; a
All oiler countries....................... .......... 22,657 77,439 19,57
Total............................................ 117,605 425,735 68,28 3

MATS. Number. Num '.
Australia...........................................- 13,65M 21&, 181 117 ,t4 ,
Bnt ih Canada........................................... 23,505 49,799 Gm ,
Chinn ..... ........................................ 42, 104 M6. S7 21, 17 5.8
;real Britain.................................. 1,743, 49 194,936 264,3 4
United States ............................................. 763,311 522,385 I ,1I M i 4,
All other countries.................. ........... ........ 641,301 103,399 M0 M ,377
Total.............. .............................. 4,056,401 9S ,5 1 1,5 I0 T 7 I7
a Rolls of 40 yards.
Hats and Hat Braids.
Two of the most important exports in value from KobA are hats
and braids for manufacturing hats, the combined quantities shipped
hn ving a value of $6,783,148 in 1917, compared to $6,241,401 in 1916.
The amounts of these articles, with their values, exported from Kobe
to various countries during the past two years are shown in the table
below. A bundle of braid contains approximately 60 linear yards of
material:

1916 117
Articles and countries of destination. unity. Value. Quantity. IVl.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. IVaWo.


PANAMAA" HATS.
Australia .............................................
Can da.........................---.................
l;re3t Britain.............---------.--......-----.......------..
Ilon-kring.....-.................. ....- ...........
New Zealand...........................................
1'hilinrine Islands ...................................
I'nited States.........................................
All other counLries...................................
Total .........................................
HEMP BRATS.
AI i rallj ......................... ....... ..............
Canada ................................................
F rin *. .................................................
i rPai Hirii-:in .......................................... .
I nllnl SU r .........................................
All other r entries ....................................


Dozen.
61,676
3, ?80
8,215
3,981

369, 37
6,439
453,428

Bundles.
611,515
21R,560
2, 28. ?50
5,270,155
4,620,194
141,604


Total................................. ...... 13,091,278


STP.AW BRAKES
Ai~ntrnlia ..............................................
Fru ie .................................................
Ir,.ar Triri:Ltn ..........................................
S[' iii lr inlr I -lind .....................................
IT'ToJiI C;al .p ...........................................
All other r.ointrie ....................................
Total ...........................................
CH P BEPA* I s.
Candla ...............................................
F'rian r .................................................
rn? 'rilain.....................................
i:'r i -bi[Ie s. .........................................
\' no. vr o ntries...................................
Total..........................................


$373,143
17.,12
62,132
24,482
.-.-.........
2, 37, 397
33,167
2,547,933


8F,127
30,239
335.079
783.448
731,844
S17,742

1, 93,479


Dozes.
45,783
28,519
8.632
7,233
7,70
4,468
308,g5a
9,818
431,000

Bundei.
1, 14,780
161,800
1,039,700
7,741,548
2,449,783
192,900
12, 800,511


S71
0,m
31,3562
265

1,947,
I. 14. 271




215,87
20, We

1,450,981
432,423
386,213
2,36., 06


149.756 10.228 Isa 214- 140o5
1, 787. 195 161, 972 49620 9,%
5,079,703 461.130 4,416,9 "1 W
540,165 36,313 423,06$ WM
8,003,993 777, 66 10,547,225 1,, 176
153,321 11.085 117,115 10,42
15,714,133 1,460,454 16,157,218 2,005,40


66,000 3,744 .
674,800 28,471 305,000 s
1,301,782 66,405 1,694,500 IS
2,813.065 138,765 4,713,0 n 37 l,
191,212 3,OCO 278,160 15,1


5,046,859 W


m39,535 6.u 0,0w


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wEr owsmitsan g w. ew ozer quauLes ana rancy patterns formerly
0b.mad out by Italy and Switzerland, with the result that grades of
value are now being exported. Exports of both straw and
Sbraids increased slightly in quantity but largely in value. The
of theses is geatly affected by the price of labor and materials,
t were both considerably higher last year than in 1916.
#k: nt Tonnage Entering Kob6 and Osaka.
Th. e following table shows the number and tonnage of merchant
i sme:ies entering KobA from foreign countries in 1917, compared to

.. 1916 1917
Nationality. ------
..: .. : Number. Tonnage. Number. Tonnage.

STEIAMEBS.
ij~ cana ............................................... 36 86,134 58 161,370
............................... .. .......... 1.954 3,944,816 1,893 3,936,113
t ....-.. ...... ..... ......... ..... ... .... 10 4,674 70 82,797
Ittia ... .............................................. 280 1,164,375 156 668,836
S.......... ............................ ... ...... 44 214,916 41 170,96
.............. ......... .... ................ 21 69,371 36 114,931
Swedish................................................ 10 30,367 3 8,304
No ian ................. ................... 12 31,157 20 62,274
.............. ................. 9 119 ,065 70 82,486
............................... ........................... ............
............. .................................. 12 38,551 9 27,463
I".. ...................................................................... 2 7,744
A ...Total....... .......... ......... ..... 2,464 5,707,289 2,358 5,323,277
BA I"W VXS3ELS.
iam aese .................................... ......... ... 3 401 5 99
O ...................................................... 2 966 17T 10,504
S ;:ot .......................................... ..... 5 1,367 22 11,500

The above figures show a decrease of about 7 per cent in the ton-
mage of vessels calling at Kob6 in 1917, whereas the quantity of mer-
htndise handled here increased by about the same percentage in
weight in the same period. The result was an increase in the con-
tion of cargo and lack of freight space suffered in 1916. with a
a responding increase in freight rates.
:i he .total tonnage of vessels in the foreign trade entering Osaka
wi as nore than double that in 1916; 788 vessels with a tonnage
ii!i:i1683 having entered the port in comparison to 450 of 685,437
,i: ini the latter year. Of these vessels, 1 was American, 743 Japa-
i:i 29. Russian, and 15 of other countries.
ft ae Gharter fates.
Ebipping rates from Kob6 to United States Pacific coast ports,
were from $9 to $11 per ton of 40 cubic feet by unsubsidized
and 20 to 25 per cent less than those rates by certain Japanese
Receiving subsidies from the Government in 1916, advanced
throughout the year, rising as high as $60 in some excep-
Cases, and ruling around $8 to $50 early in 1918. The rate
to about $40, where, with some fluctuations, it remained.
ying the highest rates was that shipped just before the
import restrictions went into effect. The tonnae








20 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE BEPORBT

of merchandise for the United States has decreased sine the
above restrictions went into force, but the decrease has had 1%A i |
influence on freights owing to the diverting of vessels to other ro .ter,
Charter rates to the United States, which were quoted in bMay,
1917, at around 18 yen ($8.96) per dead-weight ton per monthkha 4
advanced to as high as 40 to 45 yen ($19.92 to $22.41) at the begin-
ning of 1918, but again receded to 30 to 35 yen ($14.94 to $17.4). ;.
The highest price at which any steamer has been sold at this part
was paid for the Kumiai-maru in the summer of 1917. This was
1.000 yen (about $500) per dead-weight ton. The most recent pribel
paid here was $435 (in July, 1918).
Labor Conditions.
Preliminary figures jist issued with respect to the industries in
Osaka in 1917 show that at the end of that year that city contained
15,900 factories, employing 92,000 men and 95,000 women.
Some daily average wages, according to data published by the
Department of Agriculture and Commerce for 1914, were: Weavers,
male, $0.23; female, $0.145; tailors, $0.31 to $0.42; shoemakers, $0.36;
carpenters, $0.43; plasterers, $0.45; masons, $0.50; bricklayers, $0.525;
and day laborers, $0.28. Some of these rates have much more than
doubled in the past four years, at least in this city, investigation hav-
ing shown that masons are now earning here about $1.30; bricklayers
and carpenters, $1.20; tailors, $1.95; day laborers, $0.80; and steve-
dores from $0.85 to $1.45 per day.
While no one now need be idle for lack of work, and the working
classes are generally prosperous, the increases in earnings above
shown are largely offset by the enormous rise in the cost of living,
especially in rents and in rice, the staple food of the people, which
is now retailing at about 10 cents per quart, or more than double its
price before the war.
Banking Returns of Kob6.
The report of the Kob6 Clearing House for December 31, 1917,
gives the following information concerning its constituent banks on
that date, as compared with December 31, 1916:

Name of bank. Deposits. Loans. Overdrafts. iS. ated h 6d.

.Milti................................. $8,640,578 $3,661,304 3213,442 36,374,681 ~Wi0 5
D..I Icl .................................. 11,727,212 3,639,241 523,265 7,911,771 009
' klianiu Specie....................... 10,533,178 16,514 530,510 290,786 .2 14,67
.S' l\-lillh............................ 7,470,933 1,596,175 413,665 3,945, 0 1,14,317
Tinrt \ -crighti............................ 6,425,640 4,269,492 1,128,345 1,601,19 g60,881
N ,lpon Shog-yo......................... 4,713,719 1,407,390 174,345 4,539,01 ?7 19
S nllonio ............................... 178,954 3,124,912 807,200 5, 29,477 &,G 857
M,-II 1 .hihl .......................... 7, 11,651 1,979,000 321,224 6,374,860 4Q.3 1
Kishimrim) ..................... ....... 4,71-,293 2,917,612 1,051,818 506,869 O W
K jirna................................... 1,706,491 453,703 336,540 891,797 24141
. ni"ii .................................. 6,16, 193 1,549,702 401,99 1,419,446 8 85
' irtl .-I l rtll ..................... ... 5.,10-i,434 2,197,074 105,704 ,1,173,181 8 o ,81
Taiwan............................. 6,324,463 ............ 132,911 2,299,422 M
Kuwusaki............................... 12,140,183 2,610,000 519,591 11,532,029 80,927
Kilalnha, a.............................. 114,422 53,801 20,396 8,12 34,01
Shnsn ..................................... 1,024,965 ...... 124,365 2,619,24 194,9
Snli .................. ................. 1. 06, 878 539,035 139,446 792,834 7 ,54
Yamrai lrbi ............................. 1, 27,036 524,04 9,796 413,991 47 209
I; a s i Itranch................... .... 407, 24 132,250 ............ 06,800 82I a1
IlHynn Noko........................ 1,811,978 11,406,970 ............ 14,327 25,
ikaza..ki.......................... ..... 7,035,768 1,931,000 ............ 4,316415' 36
Total, 191........................ 113,231,795 44,158,223 6,460,462 3,4589,6E 13,o4 11
Total, 110.......................... 60,657,468 32,241,230 5,445,344 39,136,41 4

7, H


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U rt:UaVWUt u pau jtiUtn UULtLLg iLeZ pfitVIUsLb yea "-iuallu aituU llreUrtwau
FJ per cent last year, after showing an increase of 100 per cent in 1916
"Ai r 1915. Besides the foregoing Japanese banks there are three
lieoeign banks in Kob--one American and two British. The returns
.iE these are not published, but there is reason to believe that they
i oyed quite as prosperous a year as the domestic institutions.
,n the year previous to the war, 1913, there were 20 banks, includ-
iMg 4 foreign ones, which made clearances through the Kobe Clearing
BEouse, in comparison to the 24 named above at the end of 1917. Of
the 20 existing in 1913, 2 went out of business, one of which was the
SDeutsclh Asiatische Bank, closed by the Japanese Government dur-
iFi: ig the summer of 1916. The six new banks established since 1913.
i whose deposits now total $13,398,000 and loans $23,750,000. are the
SBank of Chosen and the Omi, Yamaguchi, Kawasaki Brancl, Hyogo
i ai;o ko, and Okazaki banks.
La, rger Profits Made by Joint-Stock Companies.
S During 1917 there was a large and general increase in the opera-
tions at the clearing houses of the whole country, those at the four
Sf principal commercial centers, compared to 1916, being:

.' Location. Year. Number. Value. Increase,
1917.

Per ccri.
017 1,224,000 $1,790,748,000
.ob. ..... ............................................... 1916 1,005,000 974,224,000
Ogaa 11917 4,701, 000 9, 23, 7870
Osaka......... ............................................. 1916 3,704,000 3,017,580,00
1916 3,996,000 3,017,580,000
To 1917 6,557,000 6,427,444,000 O3
okyo ..................................................... 11916 5,548,000 4,041,559,000
Yooh 1917 883,000 1,118,349, 0001 32
Yokohama............... ............................... 1916 788,000 R46, 505, 000 3

Far' larger profits were made by virtually all of the joint-stock
companies in this district in 1917 than have been known here in any
previous year. Figures in regard to the average of dividends paid
by companies in Kob6 have not been worked out, but the Hypothec
Bank at Tokyo reported that at the end of April. 1918, the rate of
dividends paid by companies in that city, which can not be very differ-
ent from those paid at Kob6, averaged 27.30 per cent per annum.
The Mitsui Bank also reported that investments in new enterprises
in all Japan amounted to $611,000,000 in 1917, compared to only
S$184,000,000 in 1913, the year preceding the war; and that invest-
Sments in the enlargements of already existing enterprises mounted
:to $1,038,000,000 last year, compared to $150,000,000 in 1913.
According to investigations made by the Osaka Chamber of ('om-
maerce, the money invested in bank. and commercial companies in
I Osaka during 1917 amounted to $156,000,000, of which about $100,-
i,:l0. 000 was invested.in new concerns and $56.000,000 in old ones
| extended.




I WASHINGTON GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 190S






























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