Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00021
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00021

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text





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o combo
Of the trade, of ighanghai in 191T amountedt
0A9 aU Mierease of $118,6741705. over 1916. -inhi
sttdin the, Chinese customs returns, the increase
taels, the 'greater gold: dollar increa .se being dueto
ve higher value of the reel in 191T. Of the foreg
Wlih was,.above the 'illion4-dollar mark, Shanga
.-89,01-or abotit 40 peF cent, That United States m
As much'from Shanghai ,s ,4an' other two countries
,833-in 1917.
'ozorts of Shanghai to the. United States were mor
e valu0 of -any other tvio countries combined, the sae
'nawer aproxnallytwice, ask inuh as both thos
Staes ndGreat BritathL- ineIdilig'British India ad
with Great Britain's acti~itiesJapan takes second pla
Sof Shanghai.. Hongkonag, how~ever,- handales the good
.-untries, including the products of the United States.
gginTrade by Countries.
notable shows the vala of the import and portt trad
I wth the princip91 forob :.,intries in 1917:

3prt Exort Ttal

.7 ............ .......... $21, 642, M3 86,06,30K SW 27 73 3
.. ........ t.... I, '9 M55379
............ ..., ----- 47 66 917 21, 125, 814 6B, 79 9
----...... ............ 10:4i, 906 16,030,507 35,'0 41
~: -:: ---- .............. 74,378,083 4,693,11 W9 0o71 196
............ 261075 8 116, 599 8,S 674
--.. ............... 32, 370 77 388,463 110,1 33
...... ......... ............. 16,389428 312 78 102 '28 6, 530
,,................. 214, 297, 7N 201, 301, 752 415,50 46

of ohangha.
of their trade Of the, port eixeeded the rd figure
Wrid net values of the tirade of Sha i for 191
Sin, the "olowin statement, compi fromth
MaritimeCstm
t" t*I hsrpr n$.23fr11 n 10 o


























Shipping at Shanghai. "
Shipping conditions are growing steadily worse and, in lefr of the
requirements of the Allies during the present year, little .im
meant can be expected, although the Nippon Yusen Kaig .apai
Mail Steamship Co.) has decided to put four additioniA~, l MaB
aggregating about 80,000 tons, on the Pacific run, the ns e to.e
withdrawn from the European route.
The following table shows the nationality and total tdoEwge of
steam vessels entered and cleared at Shanghai during the yers 1916
and 1917:
Natlaonlty. 961 191- Nationality. ,---.-- ...
*: "* I "' ,'. "* "!::


Tons. Ton-. -- ,.- i .
American ................... 287,568 404,787 Russian..................... 9 6
Britsh ..................... 6, 58,508 5,579,439 Swedish ...................
Danish ................... 110, 07,704 Chinese............ .. .....3, 4 01
Dutch..................... 11, 094 218,665 All other countries..........
French.................... 43, 86 400,131
Japanese.................. 5,230,706 5,215,963 Total................. 16,538,87 Mlf
Norwegian ................. 19,071 111,276


Shanghai Industrial Prosperity-Large Dividends. :
In general, the importers and coal merchants, the latter sey'..i|I
natives, enjoyed an exceptionally prosperous year; deaiert'' 6 s.i: E
and steel were also successful. The piece goods and yamrn .: *.ii:
speculative; successful dealers cleared profits at the expevlOf
unsuccessful. Bankers had a satisfactory year. i
In the export lines, tea merchants made slight profits
the latest reports, principally from teas shipped to the Uint
Silk merchants came out about even.
Enterprises that paid large dividends during thb .e.
Spinning &";Weaving Co., 40 per cent; Kung Yik
per cent; aftd the International Cotton Mill, 1 i-:
Engineering and Shipbuilding Works paid divida&l
aggregating 40 per cent. The reports of other public eSL iare '
not yet nva able, but indications point to a general 'isE~Ci MlM
Rubber investments have depreciated during the year ia qpaqthy
p;


I



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Piteen at a higher figure. '
smaller orders were also placed in the United States, and
Eted expenditure to be incurred in 1918 amounts to approxi-
iT $1,500,000.
iai Building Activities-lbpen-Air Azsements.
.pepite the high cost of construction materials, building operations
siq 1917 continued unabated. There were 13,030 permits issued,
iSguast 12,776 in 1916. Among the more important buildings com-
tAr nearing completion are two large Chinese department stores
SabJiotel, a block of shops on Nanking Road, and a splendid con-
,building on the Bund owned by the Yangtze Insurance Asso-
r (British).
tish firm (Hall & Holtz, Ltd.)' operating a large department
baa just completed a modern, up-to-date bakery. It is built
tti t and brick, with cement facing and floors. The interior
are covered with white glazed tile. The ovens are said to be
latest patterns, with a capacity of 9,000 pounds of bread an
Tihe ovens were imported fromlEngland.
elow Road'as a place of entertainment for the native popula-
has declined in popularity and, following the success resulting
the construction of a very large building for the entertainment
eee a year or so ago on Nanking Road, the principal foreign
I ireet of Shanghai, another building of the same character
| ed during the year on Avenue Edward VII, another im-
i:'E. The open-air'amusements connected with these new
.'th. is -go-rounds, aerial flights, etc., appeal to the
aitre rspi ly drawing them away from the old-style tea
SChinese theatrical performances and cinematography
w:jo." pmisements. These latter forms of amusements are. to
tit;w buildings, but the outdoor amusements provided
I lar ~attractions.
....... ..." "


S iii!!'iii~F
iii ":Uiiiiiii!!ii,.:ii' :












i n Amlerican Kerosene uraae. ie imports or uns proaucn sEll e mu
United States decreased. during the year by 4$5%981 gu i the
decrease in value being&41,580%86 B Sumtra absorbed
part of this loss, its gain being 10,780,595 gallons. War-tiit S -
tions tend to interfere with established trade of this nd tmbtia -
larly in cases where British employees have been called to ti o.id
In this way the staff strength of the chief agencies for the sale t.
American kerosene has been seriously impaired. So far as praiti-
cable matters of this nature are being adjusted consistent with actual
war-time demands.
The imports of steel during 1917 show some improvea ent.ove
1916. but the volume falls far short of a normal year's Ca0smpti.
.Buying was irregular. The more venturesome native dealers bought
heavily before the substantial rise in steel commodities, and realized
hamlsome profits. Striking evidence of the prosperity of the native
iron and steel merchants 'is shown by the fine fireproof warehoanbs
and shops that line the Soochow Creek (North), and other slbetan-
tial establishmentslin the French Concession. The net rest of the
year's trade has been the material improvement in the credits oP ll
native merchants, which should react favorably on the further intro-
duction and larger purchase of American steel products. ,
America's entry into the world war and.subsequent embargoes and
conservation lists have hindered the freer purchase of steel, for had
American exporters been free to ship during 1-917 the importations
in this line of business would have reached their normal level
American hardware, though only recently.pushed, has made tre-
mendous headway, and there is no question but that American prod
Aets in this line will always be in demand in the oriental trade.
The Lumber Trade-Food Products in Demand.
The imports of softwood lumber declined more than 2SQ,000Q00
square feet in 1917, but the value remained about the same as in
1916. The imports of: Oregon pine during the year .were appro9i-
mately 20,000,000 square feet, and were sold at profitable r'.t_ in
spite of high cost, as the demand was greater than the supply. Native
lumbers, principally from Antung, were brought in to replace the
shortage of Oregon pine. It is the opinion of local dealers that,
when normal times return, Oregon pine will take its place ain m
the lumber trade, as no wood has been found "that can. rep e it
satisfactorily.
In food products American goods have enjoyed a good trade with
a steady demand throughout the year, and it is felt that from now on
American products will more than hold their own in this maket
The shutting out of European foodstuffs has extended the.oppo
ties of the American producers, but they, in turn, are now conf
by the same difficulties and are not able to meet the demand on acqp
of the embargo placed on practically all foodstuffs.
It is the opinion of local American wholesale houses that .
food products will always be in demand, that the Chinee p k;
eign consumers appreciate their value, and that the unfo udedi rej-
dice which had been the stumbling block to the introduetto of


.. ... .... : U .


























|kvwas high during the year, and very little found its way to this
;iAs stated above, Japanese cotton manufacturers have made
Ierable progress, as practically their only competitors were the
~i ills which, as mentioned previously, have made a very good
I% during the year. The arrivals of American piece goods
iben confined to a few light-weight sheetings and some cotton
la.S


fiB total exports o6f silk from Shanghai in 1917 amounted to
bies, against 77,642 bales for 1916. Of the quantity exported
1i;B. Vi ited States took 9,016 bales white rereels, 13,220 bales white
Sla.: filatures, and 9,105 bales of tussah silks. Great Britain bought
"9t-9bales of white raw and rereels. France absorbed 4,044 bales
of white raw and rereels and 2,243 bales of raw yellow. Quantities
wire also sent to Italy, Switzerland, India, and the Levant. Hong-
6; nEi' and other China coast ports"and Russia took the remainder.
..'Thie season, as mentioned in previous reports, commences June 1
: 4 endis May 31. The results of the first eight months of the raw-
s k trade have been disappointing :and threaten to continue so for
Sti.e -rest of the season. The quality of the silk was excellent, but
Sneews were excessive and, at certain, periods, impossible, owing to
I ett :riaordinary high price of silver. Shortage of tonnage has
d exporters from carrying stocks, with the result that large
:iow were left in the hands of the reelers.
The following table, compiled from the Chinese Maritime Cus-
Fd records, shows the quantity of raw silk exported to foreign
n"(ides during the past three years with an estimate of the per-
I ejtage taken by each country in 1917:
'fiii; ^' _________________


S 1915 1916 1917 Percentage exported in 1917 to-


a ......................


, Including from da-
................


S,...............


: :.L:L' ib:.:; .. ..


Pownd.
723,080


Poand. Pounds.
636,400 380,825


1, iB2,I 11,627, 000 [ 1,658, 200


2,787,3860
4, 8188
3,178,089
4, o830


2,061,467 2,M050,357


4,352800
1:4, 33
243,067


3,4e0o,800 u1,176,93s3


4, 88,776
1,570,285
4,02, 210
9,f18, 71


S5,h4l,760 5,587,467 3, 647, 687
I5,41.4, o 3,lss;,3? 267,4,917


France, 33; India. 261; Turkey. Persia,
etc., 16; Great Britain, 11; Italy, 2j;
Hongkong 4.
India, 70; 'urkey, Persia, etc., 15;
France, 101.
United States, 541: France, 24; Great
Britain, 16.
France, 54~; Unitdd States, 404.
United States R: Japan, 9; France 7.
Japan, 44; France 31; Italy, 10;
United States, 5' Oreat Britain 4.
France, 1; Great Britain, 20; Itly,
13; United States, 12.
rance, 51; Italy, 321; Japan,9.


.... :.... .
.. ..... .. ...
.ii :il .....""i .....


... ... .. ..
.:EEE
:...E .." ..... ....
ii~~. :"......... ... ........ .i ., ..... :...


. ;


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Ie question o01 coal supply during tne year napDeen tale S
considerable correspondec inrt caai.p.esi. Owing to
price the Shanghai build (a Chinese association)ha
criticized for taking advantage of the public as proven by b .sawrd
stocks held at the end of the year, which are said to be in hnMsi -
borhood of 300,000 tons. In November the chairman of the aj i
Coal Guild made the following statement:
The total consumption in Shanghai amounts to nearly 1,500,000 tew9 80 per
cent of which must be brought here by steamer as the following figures show:
Japanese, 800,000; Kaiping, 500,000; Indo-China, 50,000; and ShanElt Hankow,
etc., 150,000; total 1,500,000 tons. About 70 per cent of this ttal is sned *as
bunker coal and by factories, 20 per cent is reexported or used a. h ear-
rounding country, and 10 per cent used for domestic purposes..
As long as freight rates remain at their present level, the oy.anI, by
which prices could be brought down in Shanghai would be to bripg to our .sax-
ket large quantities of Chinese coal, either from the neighborhood eir TYra4 ie
Yangtze Valley, as it is impossible for the small proportion which wm.refre
now to have any influence on prices. Unfortunately, mining; espel~ in
China, is a very slow proposition, and it is impossible to expect any relief fseon
the mines near-by. To start with they are few in number, and miot of thia
are worked by crude processes; the outputs are small and orders umointimg to
tens of thousands of tons can not be filled. To increase the otputl o these
mines would entail a considerable amount of work in getting new machinery-
if enough of it could be produced.
It will be a long time before coal can be brought in sufficient quantities to
relieve the situation. To replace actual stocks of Japanese coal would eott
c. i. f. 34 yens at present rate of exchange (about $25 Mexican), to whieh has
to be added duty and other landing charges. It must also be remembered that
coal as received contains a minimum of 80 per cent dust, which is sold at $10
Mexican per ton. Indo-China coal-with the exception of Hongay coal-costs
$23.50 Mexican c. i. f. plus local expenses as stated above.
The fact that somebody can sell Hongay (Tongking) coal $3 Mexican cheaper
than the guild does not by any means prove the existence of a squeeze when em
knows that forward contracts were possible. Anybody could have placed an
order for forward delivery not so very long ago when coal was much cheaper
and not only undersell us, but now even make a much bigger profit than we do.
For instance the Municipal Council contracted a year ago for the whle-tV
1917 and are now being supplied at a loss of 10 taels per ton to thaeContrator.
With these facts placed before the public, it will be perceived. tat unprece-
dented industrial activity, lack of tonnage, and high wages in the mines are the
only factors responsible for the high cost and shortage of coal.
The high cost of coal used for household purposes during the year
affected the cost of living in Shanghai possibly more than the ad-
vanced price of any other one article. The price per ton in 1915 for
the best grade of Japanese coal was $12.50 Mexican ($5.50 gold), but
in 1917 it rose to $28 Mexican ($19.50 gold) per ton. The increased
cost of coal has also caused increases in the price of gas and electricity.
by 30 and 40 per cent, respectively.
Increased and Decreased Imports. i'
Imports of, automobiles .and accessories, chiefly from the U'b i
States, increased by $190,065. The number of motor cars' and tir
motor-driven vehicles in the International Settlement if~Si SIwMBbi
up to December 31, 1917, were: Public cars, 96; trade was 19
lorries and vans, 29; private cars, 713; cycles, 132; maldkg Aotal
of 989; to these should be added about 200 in the French.


i ,




FV: E7 ... .
it ;": '" '




.sm g a total of 1,189. In 1914 the tah in the two settlements did
it he sedl 600
i .-hdened andwyther forms of canned milk, chiefly from the
tt d dStates, adigEced by $159,874. ElectricaL material imports
About XstiOt ryT the ] iteni worth mentioning being
..eid vulcanized wire, whie improved by $176,766.
power station machinery increased by $361,078, most of
thm Ibeing for the Shanghai Municipal Electric Station; cow
A-r"om Hongkong -and the Straits Settlements by $293,024;
Sp.hliich came chiefly from Great Britain and Japan, by $819,351;
d*aleln manufactures,, coatings and series increased by $268,617,
Siie from Great Britain,.. though increasing quantities are
.oming from the United States.
S anthracite coal decreased by $139,364, due to high
A '~lan the higher price at which it is sold, and consequent
.. economy by consumers. Cotton and spinning machinery
by $194,140, difficulty in securing plant and parts ordered
ting for the decrease. Plain galvanized iron sheets dropped
i$06,119; printing paper decreased by $672,216. In general, the
s are attributed to the difficulty of procuring supplies due
shipping situation.
following table shows the quantities of some of the articles
i ted, the increased or decreased values of which amounted to
o or more:

SArticles. 1916 1917 Articles. 1916 1917
3 Jii D IMPORTS. DECREASED IMPORTS.
....housands.. 3,8 7,636 3,976,311 otton:
.ls.....-tons.. 834,482 909,746 Shirtings, gray, Eng-
lish ..........pices.- 1,258,726 1,252,562
Japanese, Yarn-
......... 141,665 263,775 Indian...pounds.. 77,025,333 74,805,733
261,150 329,474 Japanese....do.... 51,048,000 35,942,667
te. ft black, imber, softwood..sq. ft.. 74,930,999 45,421,100
............... 663,206 693,093 Paper, cap.......pounds.. 13,127,007 2,483,333
fast -pieces.. 182,300 655,945 Kerosene oil, American,
-:,i- -- .gallons ............ 32,091,716 17,839,455
:" yg ......do.... 214,303 655,126 bacco le ....pounds.. 11,728,267 10,635,733
.....do.dj.. 154,877 243,417
:,.AM::' t nd velveteens,
:., 1,012, 816 2,628, 095
iar........on 8,207 9,976
6,610,846 17,31,441
A o.. 124,134 141,775
'tin ationl of Tea Shipments.
41.i m. results to native tea merchants, on the whole, were better than
Ati:: ~ ipated, owing chiefly to the teas sold to American buyers.
'e": e'~Mh go placed on the importation bf Chinese tea by Great
:iltain, early in. February, caused considerable confusion among
-h tea exporters and, naturally, affected the native sellers also,
tlk result that large quantities were diverted tb the United
l he shipping problem and the high rate of silver values
bes additional burdens to the tea trade.
| *P.wing.table shows the quantities of tea exported to the
~p foFI eimu countries during the past two years:

r ii'i ::= !,i -

S l!'i]; .





















ind Chosen............. 4,800 361,333 Ai other contrite ......... 23; 8a8m' 4l H W
Russia ..... .. ........... 16,314,3 8,32,400
Untld S tates .............. 6,4000 9,691,867 Total................ 3Sj 8517,0
AJ other countries......... 1,752,800 187,099
Total............... 30,812,267 22,301,733 LEA, TABLT, ANlD DUST

...g........ ........ 2................. .
ORIEN. Hongkong ........................ i:
gkong........ ....=..... .... ....... Japan u............... .......... .. ..41;1' i"7..
Russia ..................... 4k4Wr 4M 7
India...................... 1,487 nited ttes ......... I
n7.........33 A, other countries ......... 181

Total ............... 53,757,e00 27,25,600 Total................ 4,310, q8 3,fi .

List of Principal Foreign Articles Imported.
The gross value of the principal foreign articles imported into
Shanghai during 191B and 1917 is shown in the accompanying table,
the figures being taken from the Chinese. Maritime Customs:

1916 1917
Articles.
Quantity. Valle. Quantity.. Value.

Automobiles and accessories............................. ......... 448,789 ............ 138,54
Bags:
Cotton.................................. number.. 5,011,762 234,168 6,319,542
Gunny......................................do.... 12,64,874 1,089,224 8,545,984 I"
Belting, machin........................... ..... .......3... 7161........... .r
Benuine .......................................gallons.. 243,297 84,035 651,802 ,;V
Books, printed................................. ..... ..... 169.,166 ........... i, 16
Butter........................................ pounds.. 704,667 262,654 636,800 .8-0547
Candle-making materials: Stearin................ tons.. 1,029 301,351 76 48,745
Candles......................................pounds.. 1,548,607 144,311 3,28 3,73 4 170
Canned goods:
Fruits and vegetables ............................... ........... 8,047 ............ ,4
Meas s................................................ ............ 40,194 ........... 2
Milk, condensed and sterilized, and evaporated
cream................................... dozens.. 322,090 458,074 437,33 ,S 40748
Cigarettes, first and second quality..........thousands.. 3,,636 12,797,604 3,976,31 ,14 6 N54
Cigars...........................................do.... 24,047 397,562 30;, Go6M
Clocks........................................number.. 113,107 148,130 18407 SIW
Coal:
Hongay (Tongking)......................... ons.. 25,934 257,774 9, W. ;I o1
Japan................. .....................do.... 834,482 4,147, 209 90 74 9, 4
Coffee..................................... pounds.. 672,288 105,246 2,380,1.4 ,,%2
Cotton, raw.....................................do.... 51,967,067 6,453,686 36,77,'00 .
Cotton goods:
Brocades, italians,satins,etc., white.........pieces.. 46,916 161,020 118, 6 61i 00
Drills-
American...............................do.... 74,535 261,904 2,6 ,
English..................................do.... 8,717 15,895 ,
Japanese.................................do.... 141,665 380,5594 28;7 t ,
Dyed cottons-
Italians, plain, last black ..............pieces.. 683,206 2,774,134 Ol;w s'a i
Lastings, plain, black...................do.... 42,419 149,678 63 3 410
Venetians............... ............. do.... 302,243 1, 85,049 M,; 1;,7 1
Italians, plain, colored...................do.... 52,961 1990,18 11s 76 m -
Venetians plain, colored................do.... 66,180 421,542 71,41
Satoens, psin, colored.................. do.... 65,130 290,385 11 9
Venetians, figured....................... do.... 22,288 156,366 3q, 6 0 i
Flannelettes, plain, dyed, and printed 30 yards: '
American.................................do.... 141 406
English..............................do.... 2,58 6,607 ,W
Japanese................................do.... 261,150 79185 aa4.;
Handkerchiefs.............. .............dozen.. 1,181,377 402,287 912,0 a















































mIuM uM vLumMuuBAM wu... .... ... ........
Smp ad aeoassmres ..............................
t gad parts ....................................
b ,ware: Basins .........................dozens..
Jtad .......................................tons..
irhmat...................barrels of 196 pounds..
ad suapenders.................................
. .................................... gallons..

y, ...........................................
R an sooemore.. ............... e........
w lampa ...................................
r:
f, kid ad oklored..... ..................pounds..
Ir(Feaao g sand Strits) ..................do....
^ Bifi;;;; ..;.. ..... do..
.d*Adw ..... ...............................cu .. ..
;................................squbi feet..
.... ......n.....................sqare eet..

imd spf ...............................
sta...... .................. .... .........
S.... ........ .............. ..........
nbn r o ................number..
I li:. P.affi Wax..............tons..
Aandta, d mwI a ...............gross...
S.................................... .......
aH anatatures of:
l ..... -.t ;. .. ................ .on.
.......... ........do...


.. ,nd wi........................do....
Aig.t..iB. ...t'. ..................... do....
.. ............................to..
... ..............................do....
In BwiBr .. .....................do....
A tle en .................... do .....
..................do ...

=....................k....... 0...
X.. ... .....................Sc...
A .............do. .
b-as


98,913
17,268
11,669




22, 463
1............
1 59,816
222,463

2, 867
2,491,407
231,467

975,360
'7, 930,99

............
------------



8 207
2,761,121
..-..--****.*
113
105
122,
3,271
12,388
3,10B
11,539
2,838
12, 376


wIa, in
858, 783
74,416
124,876
78,1%94
565,364




143, 809
920,374
100,655
117,844
331,235
1,986,091
1,081,413
89,021
140,938
28,444
190,793
127,369
1,071,498
804,462
834,885

L8,420

44,180
56,585
172,54#9
883 48
335945
1,184,53
977,485


1' 4 3 78,057
4,103 624,545
3,432 388105
3,675 98,60


1iii; r .i; i;


74i261
20,466
15,922

128,8s0
..........

84,306
............
87,067
3,335,1733
637,067.
............
1,333,345
45,421,100

............
............


7,044
9,976
2,330,101

18I
314
213

8793
3,161


me28
MIT

3,314
IL,791


272,710
511,207
95457
278,905
93,12
22,049
277,418
1,21 ,38
344,707
85,013
578,005
1,990,091.
887,273
450,099
45,00
30,402
249,298
210,944
1,784,873
790,035
1,1 7xS8

116,857

142,15

50,274
430 IM8
1, 19,895
28,784
1,905,619


'I
-I;














Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quntty.

Metals, and manufacturers of-Continued. .
Tin in slabs ...................................t ns.. 35 ,36 3A
Tinned plates ......................... .... do.... 14, 33 1, 246,
Zinc sheets.......................... .do.... 356 137,240
Needles............... .............. .... .thousands.. 285,055 18,10 4
Oils:
Lubricating ..............................gallons.. 2,589,915 677,B 1 1, I,
Kerosene-
American........................... ...... do.. 32,01,716 5,568,784 17, ,4S
Bomo....................................do.... 2,319, 10 A 298,147 2,7IS 11 -
Sumatra. ................................ do.... 6,610,946 R2R,73 17,31 ', ,M !
Opium (Malwa, Patna, and Benars).......... pounds.. 135,041 ;7,s581,268 m s M 5
Paper:
Bank note ........................................... ......... 1,, 18 1... ,, .
Cap..................................... pounds.. 13,127,067 88, 731 2, r 4
iO p re.tte ............... ... .................. ........... 262,781 ...... 4
Enameled.................... ............ ....-- ........... 320,889 ........ ,
Printing-
Calendered and sized ................... pounds.. 12,M67 701,349 4,
Uncalendered and unsized................do... 1,208,533 1,061,300 -a 461
Paper-maling materials: Wood pulp.............do.... 7,268,400 243,477 8,45,906 8,00
Photographic materials........................................... 139,332 ........... .,Wa
Piece goods, miscellaneous:
Artificial silk fancies................................. 141,41 .......... ii M1 B
Canvas.................. ..............yards.. 40,795 106,000
Cotton duck................................do.... 440.900 76,680 ESm
Gunny and Hessian cloth ...................do.... 6,248,852 507,240 3,551,818 *0,
Silk piece oods-- 2r
Brocaded.................................................. 443,11 ........... 4,0g3
Mixtures-
Plain ...................................... ..... .......... 301,070 .. ..- ...- .. 1,
Brocaded.......................... ............... 71,583 ............
Porcc'ain ware. all kinds................................ ............ 1I2,772 ....... .,2
Printing ink..................................pounds.. 6P5, 87 181,202 070,98S M
Provisions............... ....... ........ ..................... ,25............ M
Fing:ets and drawers, all kinds...................................... 19,326 ........ ... 9 ,
Soap.............................................-..... ............ 1,CDS, 90 .......... ... 1,9 ,5
Socks, otton..................... ..........do7en pairs.. 5.0,059 447,600 M 274,SM 6, ti
Soda ash......................................... tons.. 12,861 639. 16 11,032
Stationery: Account hooks, blank books, etc ............ ........... 247, 30.........
Rugar, all kinds..................................tons.. 124,134 10,679,091 141, 75 5,
Te'cgraph and telephone materials...................... ........... 9,07 ...........
Tobacco. lear,.................................pounds.. 11,728,267 1,682, 313 10i,35,738 A
Typewriters and accessories....................................... 12, R84 .......,,
Umbrellas................................... number .. ............ 40,154 ........... 7 71
Watches......................................................... 75,991.......... .. ,40
Wines, all kinds......................................... ............ 909,722 ........... 88,
Woo'en and cotton mixtures:
A Ipaas, lusters, and Or'eans ..............yards.. 144,93. 48,506 237,501 11i2,B
Union and poncho c'oth.....................do.... 84,15 52,047 123,02 JI15.,lp
Woo'cn Roods:
Coatings...................................do... 87, 12 126,690 168,877 S.
Lastings, plain, figured, and craped ......... pie.es. 7,860 12fi,: 3400 1, 7
Berees......................................yards.. 94,244 1i, 198 149 0m ,
Sitin....................................... do.... 91,248 13R,293 8.0 2 :!w
Wool. erin................................ pounds.. 291,00 257,440 24206 7 i. l, I
Parcel po:t (not classiqed)............................. ......... 830,332 .......... R1 I
All other arti'ea................................................. 3,32323 .......S
Total...................... .............. .......... 171,86,875 .....,,,
..--.....:....E... ...
Imports of Chinese Products Into Shanghai.
The accompanying table of gross imports into Shanghai t t 1 -."i-
nese products is submitted. These came chiefly from northern an~i4l
Yangtze ports; about two-thirds of them are reexported to cuii
countries and are included in the table of exports from 0tl.-:
-------- ...* L -.... .. :;i!!;'
Articles. -
Quantity. Value. Qumanity.i.. i
Antimonv, regulus and crude....................tons.. 23,427 39,227,129 I,:N0
Beanm, all kinds..................bushels of 60 pounds.. 5,10,902 3,686,270 4,
Cereals: t heat ............................... do.... 916,280 3,531,906 5,
(igaret Les................................pounds.. 3, 826, 533 1,085,69
Coal ............................................ tons.. 080,777 2,5 8,772








































S f..................................... ...... .... ,7 ,W .............. 2 ,91,1 7
*f Ib#s--:-, ~.~~~~---------------------!-------------- I" ^0w
AW I Exports Irom Shanghai.
i, R; :ihB flowing table shows the principal articles (including re-
expotts) exported from the port of Shanghai:

i ,; :. 1916 1917
Articlws.
Q tity. Value. Quantity. Value.


".it. ............... ...................tons.. 7,41 $185,140 5 ,19 $19,299
iB .. ...................................do-.. 80 814,578 14, 73 567,08
...: i ................................. do.... 56,548 1, 2,713 6 21 2,176 06
-............ ..................pounds.. i5,9838 3,2M,960 6, 42,257 4,450,657
................................................... .... 4 840,121 ............. 7,106,809
S ...................................do.... 106,000,267 13,465,479 112,492,800 S0,48,282
Nankeens................................do.... 13,415,200 4,07,22 13,107,200 5,181,294
lItO ............................... ple.. 9 48 8, 0,9 1,068,780 5,515,688
; at."'.r~~l.............................pounds.. 10, 97,33 22,17104 13,161,7 3,70,
I SliMiom yoik... .......... ......... .. 31, 80,010 5,6 44,108,66 10,493415
I "i B .an .............................tons.. 2777 2 716 1456 3,9 3
|i L66ilgtefllE,1hiet..barrelofll6 pounds.. ,?541 8:99, W 2, 02 6 I1, W7,
Sit...............................pounds.. 6,516,067 849,799 6,440,93 91,748
11& s ir. ai,4303... I,0 8, 3,07S 30,400,SS 12, ,537
iygu andra de......... toa.. 23,417 9, 222119 37,37 5,4S,W
L .p.. .................... .. 4a,3 90 1129 ', 8M
.. .................................. .... t.d .. 4 s401 42 Ms7 al, 2,008,1
Sc..l......................... ... G@.WM F, K, GM 4 il0 91w
.................. s
...................... do.... 251,346001O 6, 068 9 21AP .X. St
.... 40 4, son 40 1
m........'............8 1,, 47,5, 4,,







.ij.* .*. .... ...
Bi:V f|~B.w^*"***"*****tO BUc~t &8,B 11539 Xl~ly"















Silk and manufactures of:
Piece goods ...........................pounds.,
Pongees.........................................
Raw-
White .............................pounds..
Yellow................................do....
Wild .................................do....
Cocoons.................................. do....
Waste, cocoon rehse ......................do...
Skins, got untanned........................pies.
Straw bra...............................pounds..
Tallow:
Animal ................................ tons..
Vegetable.................................do....
Black .................................. po ds..
Green..................................... do ...
Wool:
Camel's hair ..............................do....
Sheep's ...................................do....
All other articles ....................................
Total.........................................


Quantity. Value. Quality.

1,498,400 7, 140,206 1, 2B,2W.
............. 4,000,000 ...........
6, 11,200 6M,e601, 6, 3#8
2,340,800 975,2 2, S0;
1,44, 27 3.011,065 1,M2,M
3,1190,733 1,683,592 3
18 43, 600 65,274 787 12,B f
4994,33 1,81, 461 2, 0313
16,161 2,824,332 7
18,103 2,S03,233 3,4.
29,651,200 6,185,407 m. Sir
39,495,200 12, 067, 319 ,;
3,113,867 708,341 3,38,4
33,746,133 6,077,08 29
............ 5,12,06 .. ..
............. 208,163,929 .........


Increases and Decreases in Exports--Silk, Beans, and Cotton. ::
The exports of- silk pongees increased in United States cur iir
by $758,277 but, expressed in the local medium, show a decaremase
422,814 haikwan taels; Hongkong, Great Britain, and the tnlt
States were the largest buyers. :""::
Silk piece-goods exports declined by 246,133 pounds, though tia
value in United States currency showed an increase of $8190"."
Hongkong and Japan were the leading importing country l i
certain quantities went also to the Straits Settlements and Dii.Of
Indies. ,
Yellow beans, more commonly known as soy beans, increased-I
2,643 tons, and in value by $543,353. Most of these, however, weae
transshipments from northern to southern ports.
Bristles advanced by $1,197,697, the increased quantity being only
85,334 pounds; quantities to the United States more than dmoubkti)
and other large buyers were Great Britain and Japan. ...
Raw cotton rose from 106,000,267 to 112,492,800 pounds, a~d th
value from $13,465,479 to $20,482,282. The high prices r. i
throughout the world has stimulated the exportation of thhis !i!
modity; shipments to America almost trebled, and large-quant&$
were taken by Japan.
Cotton-yarn exports increased in value by $14,287,988, and' h: sn-
tity 24,764,134 pounds; Shanghai practically supplied theF whlei
China with its yarn, and quantities were taken by Great rit
Hongkong, and Russia.
Egg albumen and yolk advanced $4,846,517, and the qu
12,158,626 pounds. This increase would surely have b
greater had it not been -for an order against im ortatiaow
United States, which went into effect during the latter part
year. America and Great Britain were the largest pur
Flour Exports Increased.
Flour exports increased by 160,555 barrels, and...
$2,845,827. In the flour trade the foreign article has bemi~.i
cally eliminated. While, for some time, native lour had bOee


.." ..




















_.i4,000; to Daijrn, 15,100; to Hongkong and Canton, 11,500;
to ahnd Amoy, 29,750; and to Wenehow, 7,700 sacks.
Sof teanats, Skzims, Straw Braid, amn Sheep's 'Wool.
t exports decreased by 33,69,267 pounds, rape seeds by
1Ai pounds, and sesame seeds by 151,828,267 pounds. The
lg situation would account ifr the decrease of these xport
as shipping companies give preference to such good as
t ., which pay better rates of freight.
Zxports of goatskins advanced by 1,861,538 pieces, valued at
19, and the value of shipments to thdaUnited States was
Pn leR large as in 1916. Demand was not so brisf, and prices were
inek especially at the opening of the season, though closing firm
sI: h nd of the year.
I 'S .!l r-braid exports declined $501,546; Japan, France, and Great
Britpah were the principal buyers. Animal and vegetable tallow
!iepjrea:sd by 16,871 tons; shipments went principally to Russia,
Sl6a. tBritain, the United States, and Italy.
i ":Sheep's wool exports dropped by 3,885,600 pounds, though larger
nntities went to America. In spite of high prices in the United
*. Chinese dealers did not benefit, owing to the appreciation of
i fer value.
hel fenue.
: ,lT Shanghai Maritime Customs revenue for 1917 showed an in-
!ds= : i in united States currency of $2,058,766; in haikwan taels, a
S"eae of 109,945. The following table shows the sources from
l ::'. &the revenue was derived, the total being given in haikwan
: ai wel. as in United States currency:


Sources of revenue.
i i___________


1915 1916


1917


"':...3o e,am usso, a, m
.......................................... ........ 1, 74 5,381 ,0 ,332,
... .............................................. 741 4015 1, 0W7900
.. ............................ .. .......... d31,708 10,829 18487
....8....... I6)1 0, 466
iiaie.,. ....................... ........................ 7W 9 ,li-- u ,,--
i .lt... .. .... ............. ............ 304,988 3115,046 3W,17
i| l.*j A i ....*......h ...n.. .. .. .* 0,961,3 00 j 9,8308, W 11,438,8K
S. ........... ........ ............ l A1 ,


w fi k:e ros in. 1916 to aW thea unprecedented level it at-
a point almost incredible in 1917, being higher than the





.. ...
..... ... .. .












The highest point reached was $116 in september. ",
Gold imports into Shanghai, practically all from Japan,.
to $12,958,990, as against $16,204,871 in 1916; exports
from $6,080.271 in 1916 to $3.698,308 in 1917. Silver ia
$18,904,597 (chiefly from America, Japan, and Hog
against $6,138,115 in 1916; exports were $42,783,071,
$37,432,189 the year previous.
The outstanding feature of the year was the increasing p
of Japanese in all classes of business.; new Japanese bat k:
branches here and were keen buyers of export bills, for
rates were cut to such an extent that, at times, competition '4
by the other banks was impossible. In this connection it'
stated that the International Banking Corporation (head i.
Wall Street, New York) has been established in China for
years and transacts all kinds of banking and exchange busiW ia.
Scarcity of Silver-New fecimal Coins. "
The scarcity of-.silver has been the subject of negotiations,|
tween the Chinese general Chamber of Commerce and the Sha
General Chamber of Commerce (international). The foreign
were of the opinion that there need be no anxiety, as the local ho I h
of silver on February 13, 1917, were 22,000,000 taels and $15
Mexican, and assured the native merchants that nothing
done that will injure the local money market; and that no Ai~o n i
silver from China will take place, if the Chinese themsel-es ...,l
refrain from gambling on exchange. *. :"i
New coins of 50, 20, and 10 cent denominations were repo~.~i dl .
have been put into circulation during the year, and they weretp, he,
accepted by all Government offices at their full value, no .~disoot
being allowed. They were to be distributed through the Bfonk of
China for circulation in Chihli, Shantung, and Honan, but ~bsa i
be accepted anywhere in China. They were, however, not seen t ii
any extent. in Shanghai, and it is doubtful whether the ic8l ".
change shops would accept them, as it would practically 40, .ilW. ".Yi
with their means of livelihood. In this connection it ntay1hst ii'
that for one Mexican dollar the exchange is generally 1l12 tol:
cents small coin in Shanghai.
A petition was submitted to the Taoyin of Shanghai, Ig:tls
Special Envoy for Foreign Affairs in May requesting thati. iq'smI
bargo be placed on the export of silver, as the continual stitwar4'
shipment of silver seriously affected the tea and silk trades. It also
requested that the mint at Nanking should turn out mor6 *:li*
dollars, and suggested that at least $4,200,000 should be tu r _i.
at once. monthly, so that by the beginning of July the m
would have enough silver to make their purchases of silk and s.tAw1.
Declared Exports from Shanghai to the Uhited States.
The articles of declared export from Shanghai to the Uilt1
and possessions for 1917 are given in the following table:
": ""














































................................... do se ..
S i .......................... ....... dous.
.! A .................................. pounds..
A ........ .............. ::.:.............do. ..

gras.........-.........................tons..
,.. .. ...............................do...
bt ...... ......................... ....

S..e.............................ns.. .







:.:: .......... .............. ..........
................................ do....

SH: ]lai .... ......................... d ..
Alndt: i b ...Wa .:. .. ............."............ o...

,dtS m ..................................







:.... ----...-- ...- .--
.......-.....................................
-,ar d... ........................................
Itarmaot. ......................................
i';;I'i;; abibit.............................. .....
......................................

...........................................
........................................


............................. o d .. ..........
w......;. ............................. 1 0


..ombu.u ...................do....
i.. .......... .. .......



...... .. ......... .....
: a..............................



pii. .,c .-..
L ..... .... .. ..................
...... ...... ..iii:. .i.


A d..






l ,.L ...aL.... ... .. ..


2,785 415
1,861449

70,
15
480,

509,539
S391,975

572,540
813,182
L............

...........
............
............


av0ooo
83,372
36,34
507g63
425,491

14, 961
4644
15,140

22,340
18,014

44, 78
67,725

175,703
32,678


1,008
154,54
3,14k,669
18,316
17,90
28,545
15, 798
241,432
0,286
32,055
34

............
102,012

6,863
20,207
1, 450
889,2
80 e



522,837



13,416,572
432,110


2,342,487

S881 192
3; 4 101
174
294
438

587,791
1,215,m88
144,549
258,530

............

............

...........


............



75,601
1,203,325

48,725

103,215
463,457







317,107
3,811,149
80,658
6,064,793


434,238
48,078
235,036
1, 5, 66
7683,905
,58,473
84, 927
116,061

33,204
59,867
18,292
20,835

87,739

11,626
559,073
6,873, 503
14,143
24,365
12, 018
1,808
143,646
0,883
78,314
9,948

13, 00
101,908

7,409
57,413


ai, mas
241,M0







............
1,735,8
............
M0,395


50,25

53,.977
275




3,396,212
10,732
627,701

36, 140
4,255,710
63,684
,038203


- :






u o ...... .. -. ..:.......... : = :.. -. *..

an. '..!. .- T-,iii6 i!!*!









H.... .. .i..........,,.,. ........................=..
SUPLeM ......T TO s '.... .....
Arties. \..--:.
Qn btt Year. Qm

TO NmIED W'ATU-OOftl-nued. : :::!. : :
H aehold nd person ....... ...................t............
Iron, pi ................................... .. sM






Bilk and manufactures of:
OSLvegetable; .. ,-





ocons......... .....................poundams 49* 972
eanges................................ ....do. .. 8.... "



Ras..t........ ............ ..................1 w .... ~ ,
Wild..................................Po.. S.. i g I 5 i a M



Waste...................................... .all .. ;aM


tones, semipreous .... ..
astn ornan.... ............................... .. .......
Straw braids..................................... o .... .
s....................................pounda.s 3,7S, ,
PonTea. ....................................do.....a.. 1 ,9 ,9


Tea weep...................................d.... 3.. a .0aw an
Tobacco l ..................................do.... ; 08 1,95 00
Vegetables: .................. ..........bushls. s2;1, l,41< ..


Wool:
S oato .........semi s.........................p ... 3.....0.
Sosoep....Oam... ...................................... 2,0...... .



All otberartiles............................ ............ u ........ ...
T otea ..................................... .. d ... .... 38,6 ...




To PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.
TCandles.................................. ........ ... ....... .. 8 ,1 0




Cotton manufactures:
eCloth.....a ........................... .......... ......... 1, 1




Lacesb.............................................. ... ...... l .
Wool:




ankens................ .................pounds.. 300,04 1 4 81
Flour p .................. .............. 7,7barrel 1,2 8W I
ouseol carpeects. .................................t.. 4........ ... 8' 9710
ron All other articlesnd manuctur................................. .... ........ 8, ..





Meat and dairy products:
Canned m t................................................. 38, 24, ..
TO PHILIUTDI ISLANDS. .....




Candles............................................ ............7 9 0,8
Cotton manufactures: .



lk, steri.. ized..................................... .......... 3,87 .71



Oils:
Lubricatingaces.................. ..............gall ....o................. f
Nankeens ................................. pounds.. 9,W04. 4,816
Flour ......................................... barrels.. 1,337 8,6012 > .



Liquise d fects..................................ts... ....... ... 7...
Iron V egetable, pead mnu cture ....................... ..p. ... 81 7,071
Meat and dairy products: .......





Paper: Cigarette books.................... ....... ..20 .232
Photographic: Cinema films. ........... pouner fee 32,8157,649 70,6
ilk, rawsterilized .....................o...... 12, 677 2,718


ils:k and manufactures of:
Piece goods................................................ ,S91%....
Po ngees........................ ....................... ......... .......
liquid fel.................................... t ...... ........1 18
VegetStraw bride, peanu..... ..................p..........- 30,8 7,03
All other: articles.. boo..................................... ...... .. .8
Photographic: Cinema fElms ................ near feet,. 32,815 421
Silk, raw ...................................... pounds.. 12,619 34M
Silk and manufactures of:
Piece goods ..................................... ............. 2 ....

Pongees............... .......................... .. ...
Soap .............. .. ......... .......... ............21
Straw braids ......................................... ....... .. .00z 4..




iron pig......................................oas....tons 10
MeaL and dairy products:
All other articles.................................. .........44.....
Total............................................ .. .. ............. 0



Oil, peanut............ .............................. .... .... .
rTe...a .....................................os.... 7,600 1,1
Mea and dairy products: = =, *
Canned meat ....................................... ... .. ..... 874 .....
Ham ...................................... pou dl -....-a....... ............. -
Oil, peanut ...................................... do ... ........................ ."
Tea .............................................. do..... 7,1100 1,1in
All other articles......................................... ..... .... .871
Total............................. .............. 10,3o 8 ...


OC? UMnwEMS E ePT



WA wnw"2n .* m ,,


U.S. DEPOUTORY


SI'


~~s~lHlrl~ 11111111111 1111111