Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00020
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00020

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text
a "'


SUPPLEMENT TO 5

COMMERCE RE
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS L
i L a ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 1M -RCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.


Annual Series No. 63a


March 28, 1918


ALGERIA.
By Consul Arthur C. Front, Algiers. February 5.
Algeria is preeminently an agricultural country. Since 1910 the
cultivation of the vine has increased to notable proportions. The pro-
duction of wine, which is for the most part exported to France,
easily exceeds all other agricultural products combined and is espe-
cjally developed in the Depa'rtment of Algiers.
Output of Wine-Agricultural and Forestal Products.
The 1917 wine production was smaller than that of the preceding
year, showing a marked decrease in the Departments of Algiers and
Oran. The following table gives the official figures of production by
Departments for the past four years:
Departments. 1911 1915 19ir 1917

Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. G.lll,'o.
Algiers ............................................ 172,587,141 ~1,743,5t9 119,4,,,411 i6.41G, '2
Oran ............................................... 67,45-1,265 41,4ll11,'2 92, 42,:,67 ri sii;, 71, ;
Constantine......................................... 27,423,195 ilp.6i1,L 222 1'),b3.,1 jr. I l '. 4 7
South Territories.................................... 20,949 10,0J3. S,13 6.-,!T
Total......................................... 267,485,550 13.7 5, 7, 2231,974,740 16-,T")", 192

The cereal production of Algeria is important and consists prin-
cipally of wheat, barley, and oats. The Departments of Oran and
Constantine have large tracts devoted to these crops, which flonrishl
particularly in the high plateaus between the Atlas Mountains and
the desert regions. The hard wheat is cultivated by the natives and
soft wheat by the Europeans. The production of iarley, much con-
sumed by the natives, about equals that of both kinds of wheat.
A flourishing feature of the agricultural industry in Algeria is
supplying early fruits and vegetables to the French market, but
statistics of production are not available.
Algeria has a forest extent of about 7.500,000 acres. The pro-
duction of wood and charcoal is sufficient for domestic consumption,
but before the war a large quantity was imported for industrial and
construction purposes. Austria-utingary furnished the greatest
share, followed by the United States and Russia.
The leading forest product is cork, which covers a total of 1,112,000
acres, 680,000 acres belonging to the State. Cork and brierwood are
the only products entering into trade with the United States. Cork,
while exported in larger quantity than the previous year, was far
from attaining pre-war prosperity, because of the closing of the
44841--18--3a






AI *..
aii... .


I




d .

'2 -PPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.
-: 1
S Russian and.oflir markets of Europe. It is exported.almost, entirely
in the raw sta.n. The forest receipts in 1916 were: Cork, $256,999;
wood and barik, $193,0000; dther products, $57.900; a total of $507,899,
-s compared with a total of only $362,570 in 1915.
The Live-Stock Industry-Mineral Resources.
In 1913, the live stock inl Algeria numbered 15,000,000, with an es-
timated value of 96j,5U0.i00. Since the war the stock has suffered
considerable diminution, due in varying measure to increased domes-
tic ci';lsumiptii.on, exportation for army and civilian use, and climatic
condition. In 1913, live stock and products occupied secondd place in
the list of Algerian exports, with a total value of $1G,9q-1,000. The
Mhallrmedan population owns herd,; ten times as large as those
belonging. to the Europeans. It is initelr.-ting to note, however, that
in the .201 years from 18)0 to 1910 the herds in the hands of the latter
nearly doublled, while thno-e of the former remained stationary.
Sheiop raising exceeds i iiimnportance all other branches of the live-
sto.k industry c-'nmbined, the normal exports amounting to more than
a nmill ion head per year. Owing to the high mortality of the previous
winter, 1916 exports fell olf one-fifth from this figuiire.
Cattle exports in 1.915 amounted to 58.751 head. far exceeding the
annual average since 10090, while in 1916 the total was l2..4. head, the
lowest average since 1900. Algeria is not adapted to any large pro-
duction of dairy products. although some ,development may be ex-
pected after the war.
Algeria has rich mineral resources, especially iron and phosphates.
Copper, lead, zinc, antimony, and mercury are also mined to some
extent. Much exploration remains to Ibe done to show the extent of
these resource,. It is claimed that liiere i, a vast coal field in the
southwest on the M'loroccan border at Colinib- Bc,'har. Another prod-
uct of which there are excellent prospects is mineral oil. In the neigh-
borhood of Relizan neo company i. said to have produced 7,000
tons of a very high-grade oil since 1901. There are many companies
engaged in prospecting for oil, the most inmportai t being a French
Company.
The mining indu-try has been forced to considerable activities by
the needs of national defense but has suffered from labor shortage,
transportation difficulties, and loss of markets.
Few Factories in Algeria-Maritime Movements.
There is little manufacturing done in Algeria, consequently the
country is dependent on France and other countries for most of its
manufactured goods. The tobacco industry, is of chief importance
in foreign trade, finding a market in the French colonies, principally
French Indo-China. There are 70 or 80 Hour mills, brick and tile
factories, furniture, lime and cement, vegetable fiber, and native
shoemaki ng, establishments, and various others devoted to produc-
tion for the local market. The general statistics for Algeria have
not been published since 1912, but, according to a recent. investigator,
there are about 716 establishments in the country, with a motor force
of 16,252 horsepower and 23,584 workmen.
The tonnage of vessels entering and clearing at Algerian ports and
the tonnage of merchandise disembarked and loaded have progres-









ALGERTA. 3

sively declined since 1914. The most significant change noted since
the war is that Oran, with a vessel tonnage in 1914 of about one-half
that of Algiers, actually surpassed Algiers in 1916 in total tonnage
of vessels.
The maritime nioveinent for 1914. 1915.. and 1916 is given below:

lEiintrel. Cleared.

Nct Goods Net Goodtl
tomula of unloaded, tonnace of lidld,
1c.'oCl. tons. c' ls. tons.

1914....................................................... 4.911.670 2,060,817 5,723,601 3,286,906
1913 ........................................................ 2,. 01,341 1,733,724 3,240,812 2,13-, .13
1916......... ....................... .... .......... ... 2,2C, 213 1,477,007 2,801,481 2,7v i.S

Foreign Commerce of Algeria.
As in other countries in a state of early development, the foreign
commerce of Algeria consists principally of exports of natural prod-
ucts and the imports of manufactured goods. In 1916, 69 per cent
of the imports were manufactures and 75 per cent of the exports
were vegetable products. France, with which Algeria has vir-
tually free trade, enjoys the greater part of this cominerce. Of the
total imports into Algeria in 1916, 73 p)er cent came from France, of
which nearly four-fifths were classified as manufactured good,'.
Imports from France, however, include a considerable percentage
of goods having origin in another country which pay duty in
France and appear in customs statistics ;'- French good,. As to
exports in 1916, 79 per cent went to France, vegetable products con-
stituting more than four-fifths of this percentage.
The following table gives the total value of Algerian imports and
exports for 1915 and 1916, by classes of goods, and the share enjoyed
by France:

1915 1910

Item_. Trade Trade Trade Trade
wit It with all with with all
France. countries. France. countries.

IMPORT.
Animal product ........................................ Qi,1 1,0i)0 1.4.3.9,OOn $3,734,000 f,5. ,.'100)
Vegetable products................................... .. 9,54,000 153. 4, 000 10,783,000 J 7,ti-2,'0iJ
Mineral products....................................... 1.367.000 no 3,q ;3,000 2..3 1,000 '5 ,i, )0
Manufactures...................................... 41,299,000 47,65,000 ,,. 522,000 71,494,000


Total................................... .....
EXPORT S.
Animal products.....................................
Vegetable products...............................
Mineral products............................ ........
Manufactures.............................................


53.,111.000 |72.7,00000 75,410,0001 103,035,000

1.3,;6,0010 1 220,000 13,369,000 15,141,000
.55,107,000 t63.'298,000 77,660,000 90, i7-3,000
1.1144000 1,767,000 2,312,000 8,708,000
1,673,000 4, ')45,000 1,.S17, 000 6,260,000


Total ............................................. 73,4 .,000 91,230,000 93, 13,000 120,784,000

Wine occupies a commanding1 position in the Algerian export
trade, constituting over half the total. Although the quantity of
wine exported in 1916 fell off more than one-third of the volume of









4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


the. preceding year, due to lack of transportation facilities, the total
value of wine increased from $40,000,000 to $50,000,000. Before the
war a large part of Algerian wine consumed in the regions of Paris
and eastern France entered France .through Atlantic ports and
rivers, principaIlly Rouen, being conveyed to interior ports by canal.
The war Ihas dlcfceted much of this commerce to Mediterranean
ports of France.

Chief Articles of Import.

The quantity and value of the principal articles imported into
Algeria for the years 1915 and 1916 are as follows:


Articles.
Metric tons.


Acid. t rtari c........ .... ....... ..... .... .. ........... .. 1 ;
Alcohol .ani! spirits ......... ................. ..... a 0, 722
Animals'
Hore3s. ............................................ 621
Mhu ............................................. b241
C'al Io .............................................. bl.576
Sheep.............................................. b51,349
Armr nnl armmunit ion................................. 13'1
Beer................................................... a 31,\ 77
B utter ..................... ....... ................... 7 !,
Calcium learl.ide. ....................................... 2, .2
Canli i ............................................ ... 2, 127
Cement ................................ .............. 2- ,..62
Chee-c ............................................... I 2.i,"'
Chicorv, liirnt or ground...............................
Chin -jrc .................. .............. ........... .
Chocolate ......... ................................ 1, .1i
Col .............. ................................... 31SI i
roiTre .................................................i 7. 20",
CopprG .............................................. 24.1
Copr.crsulphate ......................................... 4,217
C'rIlj e ................................................ ,07t;
Dye ................................................... ,
Fat, nniimal .......................................... 774
Fertilizer-:
Clichnicl ........................................... ..7
.r eanic. ........................................... 2 -2
Fii, dry, s1. c 1. prreserve ............................ I ,s 'i
Footwer .............................................. e 16., 3,9
Fruits:
Fre h ......... ... .. ............................. 4,.31
D ried.............................................. 7 4
Furn ture............................................. 330
Glassware .............................................. .247
Grain:
Corn ............................................... 2, 6' I
Wheat ............................................. 35,331
Flour ..... ......... ............................. 932
eoriunlina anid I. .l -................................... 5,0
H iles, taune .......... ..................... 1,071
Iron and steelbar;, ire., heeLt,et c.................... 21,617
Jewelry an.I clork- ................................... .. 32
Lead....... ............................... ........ 2,934
Leathergoods.......................................... 13.
Lim e................................................. 32,750
Liquors ............................................... 25,9
Lumber:
Rough ................................. ..... .... 13, 403
Sawed.................................... 7,'
Machines, machinery, and parts:
Agricultural. .................................... 60
Other.............................................. 2, 175
Parts.............................................. 97
Metal products........-........................... 7,,;2
Mat and basket work ............................... 5 9
Meat:
Canned............. ............................. 337
Salted............................................. 4l
MediLinal compounds................................ 170
Medicinal roots nnd herbs ........................... 195
a Gallons. bt Nuiml:e.r.


I


Metric tons. Value.


Value.


SlI 9, r,,.0
310,717
119,l660
41,302
9.f, 72i
341,224
2.3, 954
167,717
523, S02
1.3',3q1l
946, ~665
21n, "27
, 174,072
133, 5')
2,.44;
0"-, 3.3
3, F ,4, :''
2, 1;0, 42

801. 29
F0 l, 5.'9
41 "4 ,'4
1,3,4'U
1'i), 21.0

14, .(,q
.7,.2
5'04, .'f6
21:', S14

400, 64'.
17t. 2';i
IS2, :?4
67, 036

12'. 721
1,2's, 5150
83, .,55
5',,479
2,0'2, 120
924,0:- 4
19i, ',24
230,442
332,925
125, 450
70, S31
241, 759
,03,559
493,519
899,344
772,772
2,015, S85
321,345
312,392
151,505
233,337
117, 151


S10., 273
421,705

235,400
120,818
131,240
898, 994
636,514
159,611
409,353
194,930
971,176
171,382
1,080,414
194,737
113,291
617,600
3,772,764
2,776,691
201,106
1,014,601
565,490
43,232
172,928

68,129
33,389
518,398
1,050,499
195,316
217,318
192,771
90,009
1,153
2,895
32,038
137,030
2,540,073
1,369,142
268, 270
72,761
210,563
117,151
96,500
1-14,557
267,831
713,135
958,438
594,826
1,983,268
264,603
462,042
124,871
429,232
141,083


c Pairs.


.'W


121
a 347, 808
b 6r4
6741
hl,41
b 136, 692
4S9
a 357,740
593
3,310
2,471
22, 218
1, c39
5;62
19')
!, 2-.n
318, 9 4
7,613
337
.5,,344
1,4.,56
57
.17

2, (04
1,152
1,562
c394,r.61

3,062
1.071
311
3,159
n2
40

I, 175
26,365
54
567
109
30, (93
a 35, 2-0

7,140
6,149
970
2,176
865
7, 201
tos

452
334
215
229




I l


ALGERIA.


A\rt icle.


Oils:
H heavy ............................ ..... .....
M mineral .. ... ... ... ...
O live...........................................
From seeds................................
Paper, and manufactures......... .............
Perfumes ............ ...... ......................
Porcelain ware.....................................
Potatoes........................ ..................
Pottery .... ............................ .........
Rice and rice flour................................
Rubber goods.....................................
Sausage............................... .. ....
Seeds and fruits, oily........ ...................
Seeds for sowing...................................
S ilk ................................................
Sirups, candies, cake., etc..........................
Skins, green, fresh, or dried........................
Soap...........................................
Staves............................................
Sugar:
Raw .........................................
Refined ............. .................... ......
Sulphur............................................
Tea.................................................
Textiles:
Cotton..................... .... ........ .
W ooler ...................... ............... ..
Other.........................................
Thread:
Cottou................................... ...
Other.................. ........................
Tobacco, leaf ......................................
Toys................... ............................
Vegetables, dried and meal.......................
Vehicles:
Automobiles ...................................
Other...................................... ..
Vine plants .......................................
Waters. mineral...................................
Wearing apparel...................................
W ine..............................................
Wood products....................................
W ool ............ ................................
ParLel-post shipments.............................


Metric tomn. Vali, .Meli[i,n tun, V.1i.


.. 2.72', i 1323,012 ;4, ,..,; .i 7
4, 1.32, 275 i 07, !') 2 .. l :,. 9'.ji ",22-)
... 330 79, -32; 1,1 i i 41 '
... 10, 3 2,101,577 5., 07 1, 1s;, ,,
... 11,936 3. 9u2, 1.l 12, 43 l, i'.n I
2 1 2., Oi.I 43S 117, ,)
... 20i,i5i 4 117 1 ."01 .3iiit tI:1
2,45, li0,O i. ,I7J I 5ik)iO
... 7,037 4.3, 497 I, 130 -'.7, ;in
... 197 6.90, li, 0 1, ":1. 1')
... l 'l, Isol "i l i .'..i
S 2, I 21..., 3 1'. 27
... I 14,3, 1 27.3 .i.22
... 57 30;j .-.,"13 ( ij 1 ,',1
... l '. 4 -17;,93 2,12,s U,97
GC 0 325, i1 i .. 1' i5i
... 12,1036: 1, 6.3,24 11 ,2'2 2-, 4 ', ". I
.:3,701 Isi,701 ..,09: l 7. .1
.... 2, 13 3 9'I ". ;12 i ;. 112
... i30,3. 3 4,471,211 2.. 721 4, 221:; 2
. 21, 6.8 !S S4 ,,ij42 *.l, :)7i'1 I,) I4i ', I, % .')
...2 22i,ijS7 3',-, 2:1, s.',N
I. 11, 59'); l ,I 4, 4 ,17 17. 21 r121
... 120 1,.21,0 31 17, 1., 112
... 7, Sj7 1, (,77, 55U (,7.'.5 I. .2. Ill
... 291 3S5,03"3 -'n ; .11, 1
... 7 3139,2'94 7 )9 ., 1,
... 1,327 2,9,307 1,0. 0 7 :, I
.L5. 1,217,251 *Ul 1, 7 ,
7, 110 t.4, :4392 l, .i92 ,i.l
It... 359,7352 145 11\,s'N
I 55,970 202 '7.42'
... ......... ............ I, '2.1 1 1, 2
... 2,251 In 41i3 1. .,:J 79, "1l'
... 317 2, I05 ,4l 0 5.34 .1,', I I
... a 473,737 511,95') a 41.-l 5". ,:C'
1... 17, 87 5,090, 1S2 6S,5S9 .3, 1,3. 11
67't 237,969 9 1 2.,,0ii4
66 1,0@0 12, 228,sb.0 771, 13 11, i3,lJ7


a Gallons


Import Trade Principally with France.

Owing to existing conditions, the statistics of Algerian cominerce
with countries other than France for the year 1916 have not as yet'
been issued. As before noted, France, while still enjoying the larger
share of Algerian import trade, has furnished a decreasing per-
centage of the total of imports since the war. To indicate the ground
that France has lost to other countries, there is given below a table
of certain products in which France possessed a virtual monopoly
preceding the war, the period from July 1, 1913, to June 30, 1914,
being taken as the basis, when conditions were normal, for com-
parison with the corresponding periods in 1914-15 and 1915-10, or
practically the first two years of war. Military purchases have been
excluded from the calculation, and the values of 1913-14 are taken
as a standard for the two following years.
Of these products. France. which supplied 97 per cent of the total
in 1913-14, furnished in 1913-16 only u67 per cent. Great Britain
made the largest gain in this trade, followed by Spain, Italy, and the











6 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


United States; The most notable gain in the British trade was in
cotton gc(odls.


Artit le '- -.'d
cou'iltri i.


1913-14


Food: 1ilT.:
Fi.-,nce ....... ?5, 250, 000
G(;ret nriitain 3,000
pain ..... ... S ,,
ltal'. ... 4,000
U n iJ I Sl taI t s ..........
Olthr COtui!-
Irie ....... ,(' 000
Iron. cit iron,
and st il:
Fi. ntr... ..... 305,00 )
Sr,.- it rnt.i. n 41,0')0
'p :lln .. ........ ...

I ll; ....... 3.0001
Chemic.l p-rod- i
UCt. 1 *
TF i .,e.. .....I 4,. hi',0
nr- Briitin 32, C)1)
S .... ... 1, i J)
Ital,. ....... 4, 00

Uthir iUll-
II "... .. .. 10, 0
Soan .i c.inilnlles:
F r, .'.... .. 2,017, ti i
r l'i..t l!itlni 10,000

It ,l........ t, I0t)
Other couil-
tr:.e ....... 3,000'


19141-15


$ 1,193,000
7,000
1, 001)
2S, 090

215,000


150,000
5., 000
,l000



1", 000


I, (HI)

5', 0i)l
I",000

2,2.54, 00
3,0 (,


I1, x")
1.5, OC0


1913-14


II


Export Trade by Articles.

Tlhe following table gives the ,iuantity and value of the principal
articles expori-ed from Algeria to all countries in 1915 and 1916:


Animals:
'atle .................................
Goats....................................
Ho.rgs....................................
Mules.....................................
She-.p .................................
Animal i ir.d i ... ........... ...... ..........
B rn ....... .. ..............................
Brierwtnd rand sanIm::r od' ...................
Cl:r.: ............ .............................
Cicrvt es5 .....................................
Cot k
Crude.....................................
1\c rked................................
Cotton, ginned.................................

1 id11. frrlsh, driited, anned, etc .................
Frrier ............... ..................... ..
Footwear......................................
F II iI ':
Fresh.....................................
D ried .....................................
Fn rlrit re.and w, .jcrd rrrndtf I.. ..................

I ,, il.
.'.!:r v....................................
.Hlj .......................................
W heat.....................................
Flour, wheat ..............................
Groats............................................
a Number.


o 5.,751
a lo0. 14
n 15,012
o 4,(.0;1
a3, 1'52
a l, 0913, :3

0, 1 Is
*/, 4'
a 11, 172, 5)l.10
1,545

1?,191
216
73
3, 424
41,577
b UL:'1, .22

36., 109
11,1'.19
S91

36, 7i9'
58,,210
!i 14.23
17, 90
3, .2J


V-.-i u.


52,772.45S
193.386
:j:3. Sy)
13,3. 184
503J, 344
8, l0, S17
37-, 245
."2,)091
21'.i, 350
171,577
?, _!'1, 345

82S, 3-6
135.679
2, s95
309i, 229
701,169
621,931
4.31,548

1..%0,026
st6i, 616
59,058

1,420, 094
2,447,292
6, 71 1. 909
!, .51.0, 74
337,171
I. Pa is.


1914-15


1915-16



$3, 709, 000
18,0003
419,0C00
11, 000
345,000

215,000


131,00')
29, 000
25,000
64,000)

3,001)


099, OCA
304, INN)
5. 000




2, 5)-1.0fi0
27,0 C(n
21, M)
20, 000


1915-16


Articles and
countries.


Cotton, woolen,
andjute textiles
and thread:
France.......
Great Britain
Spain........
Italy ........
United States
Other coun-
tries .......
Paper:
France .......
Great Britain
Spain........
It aly .. ...
uther co!lln-
trie'; ......
Leather and
Jclther goods:
Franc .......
Great Brit.t-i
Spain........
Other couii--
t ries.......
Oiher merchr n-
disc:
France .......
Great Britain
Sp in ........
It l' .. ...... .
IUniied States I
Otii.r coun-
tric ......


Value.


$1,143,332
46,573
457,603
83,376
233, 337
6,202,055
478,254
425,565
225,231
245,303
2, 59, 723

1,085,046
492,536
62, 725
1,039,691
1,121,137
1,396,548
805,389

1,826,938
1,119,014
85,885

6,584,581
4,789,488
4,571,977
1,070,571
1,344,824


Metric, 10cii_5.



a 22, S42
S9,06353
a 20n,15
a 815
a 5,579
a 807, 571

16,962
2,142
a 16,93, 100
1, 874

If.,226
7%5
141
1,924
6,256
78, 862
t 231,841

33,712
12,712
1,252

170,585
124,077
78,962
13,052
15,4S3


85,753,000
51,000
3, 000
1,000

26,000

2,332,000
3, 0000


3.090

1, 23,000
1,000

5, 000


1,706. 000
19,000
123, (O10
123,000

73,000
47,0000


$3,724,000
240,000
510.000
8,000


19,000

1,941,000
1,000
4,000
..........



992,000
5,000
35,000

8,000


473.000
12,000
69,000
12,000

47, 000


52,951,000
3,274,000
580,000
559,000
1,000

59,000

2,249,000
2,000
15S,000
16,000

37,000


1,089,000
76,000
10,000

14,000


550,000
9,000
99,000
10,000
8,000

49,000


I










ALGERIA.


Articles.


Hides and skins, fresh and salted.............
Leather goods................................
Machinery ...................................
M atches..... ..... .. .................. .
Medicinal herbs, flowers, and leaves............
Mercury...............................
Metal products........................ ..........
Mineral pi oduct ..............................
Oil:


Metric tons.


3,921

21,2
242
........... .


Geranium ................................ ..............
O live ................. .................... 5,.4 2


Ore:
Antimony................................
Copper....................................
Iron................... ................. ..
Leadd.....................................
Zinc................................. ...
Paper. and manufatuicre ....................
Phosphates, iintiral ...........................
Potato:. ...................................
Preserves and picklc ...........................
Salt, sea...................................
Sc rap:
(.opper....................................
Iron ind steel ................... ........
Seed. sowin .z.................................
Semolina arin pa ite. ...........................
Skins, prepared ................................
So.ip..........................................
SpiritH ........................................
Sur pe'rphc.-phate ...........................
Ta! hark..... .................
Ta'rt r, cride and WiLii? Ices ....................
Textiles.
Cotton .....................................
W oo:e; ....................................
Thread..................... .. .............. ..
Tobacco, lear ........................ ........
Toys. ............... .......................
Veget b e iber................... .............
VegetalI ics. dried andwl va,.%t- e nm .al..........
'egetables.freh ............................
'eeta1bi pro.l'ct;., vr: ......................
Vechicles..................... .... ...............
Wearing apparel ...............................
Win. .. ................................. a
Wool........ .........................
Parcel-poat shipments .........................


9,022
......i .. .
SI', 7115
15,04 6
l!;, 79q.
1 .2
22 ,'2*
9,1911t
712
1, 173
31100

1.

1,014
'31,1127
22,122
9, 12}

lql
13,
6,47'{
73
23, l.1
7,6;75
18,1097
.... ... .....

244
219,3,S!,t .,l
11,627
307,984


Value .


31, r,)n, I ',

20.1,
S15,411
123, 9015

141,713
71i ,732
31.' :'7
1, i2.2 .'.3
2'.3,517

2, 241, -s
9491, r:9

9', "144
5l), "S:.4
51 l,';1,
I2 1 '.17
II, :21


154, 7";
11, 773
1 ,)', ;78
i.'; :.'
2, 1 ''.,, "97
3%4,4.47
"17, 1, 'J
913,107

22;,.17
12,,29j1
S&l, I' .
1,230,1!47
109,1:.24
J'i,6.47
1:,I, 143
1, r,''.l -1 ;7
1,4 11,909
99, 54 4
suin, Si
40. 137, S24
3,910,3 3
41;6, 1'0


Mctrk 7Lns. Value.


4.137 1,767, 494
11' 139,-23j
-"I 204, ( l
'--7 108, 5.2
91 20' 141
:2 *', ;22
fl, 170', '.4
S 176, S.'J5
............ 700, :.'.,

......... .. 347,786
8,21' 2.1,..703
2.. 7.3 857,306
1,0I C11.,, 572
hQ 2 ",7 ull
23,7:1 .1i, .29
2,. 93 1,398,092
1.35 53,268
>1.211 1," 1,465
14.411' 11.,717
', 4-1 371,911
3, 9 30,108
90,324
.,0 (:2 231,793
1, "". 452,971
,. l 96,500
7 121,204
.1 129,117
2"<, 74 11.1:,627
,' 7 118 888
S, 172 294,325
-1,1-10) 1,018,654

!'. l 170,033
21 54,233
11 77.313
3,,71) 71';, '''0
7" 114,256
'21,'.<, 600,809
I 1i -1 1,025,795
1 ,, 1 794,774
.............. 1 '_ 010
1'12 .,113
24l 831,444
a 133, 7, 4N 50,132,327
7, !I 2,379,499
311, 4.; 449,111


0~ I;1(f5


o Gallons.

Suggestions to American Exporters.

The war, which very largely shut off Algeria from its customary
European sources of supply for manufactured goods, presented a
splendid opportunity for the increased sale of American products.-
Although somne American goods have sin',e found an entry to this
market and many others have had con.i ratively a marked gain,
the opportunity has not been used to the ftille-t extent.
Most American houses seeking trade in this country write letters
in English and in submitting terms give American quantities and
measurements and prices in United States currency f. o. b. New
York or other port, and sometimes even prices at the factory. These
letters very csldom receive serious attention and in normal times
would receive practically none. English is little used or understood
in business circles, and reliable translation, especially when technical
terms are employed, is not only expensive but very difficult to obtain.
Measurements and quantities should be given in metric equivalents,
and trade terms and abbreviations should be explained, as they are
often misunderstood.


S






SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Local dealers, as a rule, prefer to buy from firms in France, with
whom they have a common language, under conditions with which
they are familiar, rather than to purchase directly from the United
States, even with the chance of greater profit, if obliged to deal with
the uncertain factors of foreign language and units, of freight, in-
surance, exchange. and delays. The opening of a credit in New
York ties up the business man's capital for many months, during
which time local conditions may undergo a complete change.
Steamship Service Needed-Trade Opportunities.
The most serious drawback to American trade with Algeria, how-
ever, has been the lack of direct steamship communication. Most
goods are transshipped at Marseille, and occasionally at Atlantic
ports of France. with the resulting additional delays. From the
time of placing an order until the receipt of the goods, an interval of
six or nine months may be required, and in one recent instance a
full year was required.
A regular steamship service between the United States and French
North Africa, operating in the beginning once a month or even
every six weeks, would be a potent factor in developing American
trade and is believed to merit the early attention of exporting and
maritime interest in the United States.
The number of products for which there is active demand in
Algeria is extensive, and the greater pari could be supplied by the
United States. Of first importance is agricultural machinery, of
which American makes have been firmly established and should have
a rapidly expanding market following the war. There is, in par-
ticular, an excellent opening for tractors, ;s there are many million
acres of land adapted to their ue, and the shortage in labor has
called attention to all labor-saving machinery. Binder twine is in
large demand.
Among oilier products which the local market requires in varying
quantities and which may interest American manufacturers and
exporters may be cited the following: Cotton yarn and fabrics; hard-
ware, including nails, shelf goods, and garden tools; machine tools;
leather belting and other leather goods; drilling machinery; iron and
copper wire; pig iron and steel bars, plates, sheets, hoops, and rails;
timber for construction purposes; coal; copper sulphate; paper; to-
bacco; linoleum; gasoline motors; motor trucks and automobiles of
moderate price, including delivery wagons; footwear; cheap jewelry;
toys; and chemical and pharmaceutical suLpplies. Mineral oil, of
which the greater portion crime from the United States before the
war. now comes entirely from that source, as the Russian and Rou-
manian supply is cut off. In food products the demand exists espe-
cially for sugar, lard. dried beans, unsmoked bacon, split peas, rice,
cottonseed oil, and canned good. The niarkct, for preserved fruits
is not, large, as there is usually fresh fruit of some kind in the market
the year round.
Imports from United States.
Most American products imported into Algeria in 1916 showed
gains over the previous year, especially mineral oil, machinery, metal
products, spirits, chemical products, boots and shoes, and parcel-post
packages. Wheat was imported to a considerable extent in 1915, but











ALGERIA. 9


the imports fell to almost nothing -tlih following ylc;r. Coal. cotl seed oil, New Zeallnnl flax, wood )products, and kit-irn ware were re-
ceived in snallr anlount-.
Tlhe follow inlg ta llel, fr',im i)l'nli iniII'ry figures fm ii:- d thi., c Im-
sul]ite Iv l iy I t'I customs ;llthrli.r-ii, s of .\l, ria. give-, t1l11 ii; li ty ofC
the prinlcip:tl tntici-: iiiilprlted f'rioi' ti'..- united States during 1i 13
and 19.1. Statitics of value are not yet avail ible.


.\ rl i. ..


1013j [I.


to.n?.
Automrobil .................. I
Boots tandi shoe............. 77;
Chemnkic. 11 ri,. r ........ ....2
Co I .............. .......... 6, 1.:
Copper silp .it ............ .........
Fert ilizer .................... .......
Fla. N %c v > .1 idJ ........... 5.4
Food I)! i' .................. 5
Hoop iron ................. ............
Jute : s........................ '2
Kiitehr!. .r .................. 1
L nr, i .......................... .1
I.ur n l I,;ilHi. ............ 7
M achi:l. i i1: ii r", ., 'l
pIj rl "- i
A.\ r if tl i' .............. 44
M il n .............. ..'1
e e L, l 1%ii ................... .........
1'.ir; ..................... 3'
T ujl ...................... 3


II
'+ I'
ric
t .


I o


21
2, 17


23"
211
2


C;)
,





13;


Articles. 1915 1916


i .11 r .

N i l ...................... .........
fI..-


I ,n I .:.. ...............I
h i'i : l ................. .

'Pol' l I' .. I ................

i 1 I F. i'l;. I ................
T I. 1] : ......................
Tl'iiii l r .....................
T .,! ,, I. . . ..
' Oi..........................
i\ .ol I....................... .
' ir"', lr.. ..................... .
\V .,jI .' .. l : ...............


1I


1,21,7
41


*'1

1i, t
I I



I..n
1" 1 '


1. 11
I,-
lir,
,: .'? p4

4



21


I .1 :.
Shipments to U1ited States.
DIeclar1..d '.: pi;rt'- to ti-' Unlited State-, from Algio:'. d'ifa.' d ll
froii Li.- s. i-t.- in 191i to S.:::;,74- in 1917. Tlihere w-, a mnaril:-'d in-
crease il export froti ()ran t tthe Unit:td Statc.-, the value being
$o23,59;3 in I'.i; and $s:2,;,53 in 1917.
Below alre i''. i ii,, (qulianitty and value of the principle atrlik-:,
as dlelua -.d ;: t tli ,')nul:te at Ai ers and the consoiill:r l',n i.y at
Ora'n or 'lhimi:int ftr th!, illiited Stati:, for the past two years:


1916 19


Quantity. Value. .ti l .'.



Argrol, crue; tIarl.:r, a:,1 ..;:.0 II ........ .......... .i 1,834,505 $328,635 840,143
Bone c................................... ... .............. ...............
B rici" vK o, d ........................................... .... .. ..... I'.- ".'' I..........
Capers ............................................... .i 1n 22,046 2,., ... .......
Cork w:. lr: ............ ........ ............. .......... .. 9, 812, 05 12n. 1PI 5,063,642
Corkwood.......... .......... .................. .... .. 2,905,261 1i1 3, ; ;'
D vC o. oo 1 ................................ ........... i .. 1, S "' ,'* ....
E ticalyptlu., I,'.1 11 ................................. .,:, : 1 I i 1,778 64,518
Glue stoIl ..................................... ....... ....... 1,511 ..........
H air, roat ........................................ ItI;!l .. 4,392 3 5 ...........
IJcrlb i. c. s..................................... .... .......... 2, 335 ...........
il.d .Jnd -1 in;i ...................... ............... ................ 6,1.1 7 ......
Oil:
; Ir.'!!ni ;!1 ..................................... p5.111 : ,,r.. 6 ,684 4,527
Olive. ........................................... ::lr.'-. 1 ; 1,572 ..........
R S;: :
W onolen .................. .................... .17-111P l 45,761 9,007 ...........
Otllher. ..........................................I ... I 375.50A9 f .'7 ...........
RopeFt watlc ......... ........................... .. 3 ...........
Sausage c'I':.. ...................................... 1'...
Vegetable ib; r. ...... .............................. l.T .. I i ,753 ..'51 ..........
Zinc ore............. .................... ............. t ,57 2 7 ...........

T o .Id ................................................ .......... 1 ... i ...........


Value.



'17'. r177
;, 11s
''.,614
*., 137;
139,180
......,, i
l'J, ."5' I

2,822
42,631

13,776
...........

...........

3,5~)

. 36........

536,719


I











SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles.


1916


Quantity.


Value.


ORAN AGENCY. I


Argol, crude tartar, and wine lces................pound ...........
uone ..................................................... ...........

1intie -tock .............................................. ... ...........
1laes .............................................pounds..1 77,0539
Skins, heep.........................................do.... ...........
Skins, moist ......... ...............................do..........
Vegetable fiber...................................... tons..l 643

Total. .........................................................


" 3,i ili

1,267

19,215

23,593


Quantity.




1,617,816
...........


46,4292
81,611
...........

...........


Value..




3147,739
...........
2,849
914
...........
15,406
15,645


182,553


No American goods were returned from Algeria during the past
two years. There were no shipments to Porto Rico, Hawaii, or the
Philippine Islands.


























































WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: S11


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1111111 11111111111111 H 11111111111U111111111111
3 1262 08485 1350





















U.S6 D O O