Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00019
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00019

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text




SUPPLEMENT.: TOWS4

COMMERCE: REPUn TS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED XY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COB&R
DEPRTMNTOP COMMERCE, WAS=IGTON, D. Q.



AUSTR.ALTA.
MELBOURNE.
li 00"ul WH101am C, ITagelomen, Decemiber 17, 1917.
"iriie, the gqapital of Victoria, being the maritime and dis-
'eanter M1'the consular district which includes the three
VicoraSouth Australia, and Western Australia, has
.on account of disturbed shipping conditions. The declared
rtIronm Melbourne to the United States fell from $14,150 067 in
tp $519,86950 in 1916. This fall of trade occurred in the 'second
41 4oF:1916, as the records of shippingg between Victoria and the
VStates show an actual increase in both imports and exports
fia Eca year, 1915-16 over 0'94-15.
T Mdade of Victoria.
30 tho following table is shown the relative value of Victorian
orts from and exports to all'foreign countries during the fiscal

bunkWWs imports. Exports. Countries. Imports. Exports.

Engom.. .S30, 12,511 3,23 649 Chile.................... 369,216 1
--------...... 23,3013271 M10,217,10 O Sumatra.................. 815,9m2 74, 6W
Burma). 3D 975 ............. Egyp .................... 19,M8 30D 555
.... .... 0,231,461 1,22,200 Noetnelands .............. 46,587 1,2
.4........... ---- 4,633,672 5,456,441 Borneo ................... 147,698 50,097
-- --- .. .. I 932 .. ..... .j Peru ...... ............... 23, 598 .. .
....... 2) fi 7A4 170,624 Agnia. ... ... 38,071 23,096
1103 83 12,410 8outh 'Afrca Union ..... 2,370,934 3,287,00
41 8 0 13,787 Canary Islands ........... 761 ,067n'3 4 665160191
-. 71 30,88 pai --.......... ......... 5335 743 124
.. ... 3,6885 1,178,068 rmi Ppine Islands ....... 373,372 163,5M3
.. 15 2,753,782 Asha Minor ............... 51,3N6 ........
7. 1 $5 71,922 Austria........ ........... V7,08 W
....... 5= 2 178,570 Chn..................... 386, 288 2 D, i80
047 080 203 056 All other countries........ 2,243,714 7822, 713
i... im0 401 ma
t""j. 45i0 34815,365 TOWa.- ........... $130,3^8511 71, 7-W,32

nof the recent deelinte in the trade between Victoria
ieTStates is, tht many of: the Pacific stasilines,
$Otf ew'nomizing in passage timec have madelyA e
=,aad do, not now continue thir Yvoyage. to Ml
Tod*+ ,however, Melbourne and the whole State of
I"tj-ttht 1-shaft in the benefit of -increased tiath vWithj
'19 666rh is a leading manufacturing center and so -
ranihtg &Ate$ of the.Australian Comnmonwealth wifh









r SUPPLEMENT TO COUXMZWE Z sEUrOB.

Leading IJpo J4 aUited States. ...
The valulf ethe principal imports into Victoria from the UAli
States in 191-16 is given below: ,

.Artile. Value. Artiles. Value. Articles.


Adcds.............
Alkalies..............
Apparel...........
Arms and ammunition
Bags, etc..............
Bicycles and cycle
panrs................
Blankets..............
Book~.................
Bools and shoes, etc..
Brushware ...........
Bull rcr..............
Uhllltons..............
('an vas and duck...:.
Carpels ...............
Sementts and prepared
adhesives.........
(locks and watches...
Concctionery........
(ocon and chocolate...
C'ordage ......... ...
Corscls................
Cot t on and piece goods
4utlery.............
rug ...................
le......................
FElet rical supplies....
Fleet rical machinery..
F.ngiis.. ............
Fancy goods.........
F'i.h, preserved.......
Fr-uits:
Dressed and pre-
served.........
Fresh.............
* Funrniture.............
Gelalin..............
Glass and glassware...
;loves ...............
Glucose ...............


$14,409
72, 11
855,291
160,813
46,582
153,036
32,211
133,726
87,003
39,185
456,244
57,390
294,754
8,107
11,800
176,722
5q,052
27,125
39,219
168,706
433,210
27,257
235,368
12,326
174, 801
779,871
35,521
64,393
199,453

58,427
5,066
53,594
18,288
72, 870
32,668
11,032


II


Grain:
Oats ............
Greases..............
Gums..............
Hats ................
Hay................
Hops ...............
Insecticides...........
Instruments:
Cinematographs..
Musical...........
Pianos and parts..
Surg'cal...........
Iron srdsteel:
Bar and rod.......
Girders ..........
Hoop............
Pig.............
Ingots............
Corrugated........
Galvanied .......
Plain...........
Wire............
Jewelry ..............
Lampsa..............
Lard...............
Leather..............
Leather manufatures.
Licorice..............
Lumber...............
Machines and machine
tools................
Medicines.............
Mining machinery.....
Motor cars...........
Metal manufactures...
Oil:
Bensine...........
Benzoline........


Oil-Continuad.
Kerosene..........
Lubricaths.......
NaBlths........
Other..............
Oilmen's atoe.......
Paints..............
Paper.............., .
Perfumery...........;
Photographic goods...
Pictures...........
Piece goods...........
Pitch nd tar.........
Plaster of Paris.......
Printers' machiner...
Rubber goods..........
Sausasgoe camss .....
Sewing machjne.....
sewing silks ......... .
Shoe polishes........
Soap..................
Spe8otales and tframs.
Spirits................
Stationery ...........
Stones, lithographic..
Tobacco, cigars, etc...
Tools (not macline
tools)..............
Typewriters .........
Varnishes.............
Vehicles (other than
motor cars)........
Waxes................
Wood manufacturers
(other than furnl-
ture)...............
All other articles......
Total...........


10II
13:; a
it 655



114


ii6f




41%






1M8u

57,1Z

ega%


Decreased Shipments of Wool to United States.

One of the items showing a very heavy decline in exportation fw
Melbourne to America is the staple product of wool. In the caleSCd :.
year 1915, 42,355,050 pounds of unwashed wool, valued at $11,5883 ,i:;
and 3,909,755 pounds of scoured wool, valued at $1,728,585, were rat :
to America. In 1916 the exports of this commodity were 10,8 hN.:ri
pounds of unwashed wool and 4,167,821 pounds of scoured wool, iiii
ued, respectively, at $3,330,514 and $2,096,087. At one period it.:j :l
feared that. the exportation of wool to America would entirely Iei
as the British Government negotiated for the purchase of the e~asi::
Australian clip. It was, however, arranged that American wai .-.ii-
porters should be permitted to obtain from Australia some quantitiu.
of the burry" wool, which is not acceptable to British woolemlTn -i
facturers.
As matters now stand the British Government commands ptr..
tically the whole wool output of the Continent, with the exceptri
the "burry" qualities above referred to, and this arrangement i
probably continue until the end of the war. Latest develop iK
dicate that, owing to the shortage of shipping on the E
route, the export of wool to England will be a decreasing
Facing the position, Australian manufacturers have been
oring to increase the production of tweeds in the local milk.


i :


I


8%,325
1,470, 442
83,184
16,263
281,434
52,981
21,588
11,752
9,382
197,774
54,675
856, 479
194,450
61,789
4,160
40,168
72, 800
4.,060
297,377
601,421
18,519
65,225
90,185
765,213
39,355
19,957
1,175,444
751,095
73,474
126,071
1,190,598
478,532
350, 99
319, 38







ATSTRALIA-VB AMELBOURNE. 8
ii this line of trade Melbourne occupies an emineitt position. The ma-
jority of the Australian mills are situated in and around the metropo-
lis, and some of the more important of them belong to the Common-
wealth Government. Present and future trading operations between
America and this center in respect to the wool trade lie rather in
the direction of importations of machinery for woolen manufacture
than in the direction of dealings in fleece.
I caaet for American Woolen Goods.
4, Always dependent to a large degree on the importation of manu-
factured lines from Europe in exchange for raw products exported,
Victoria, South Australia, and West Australia, like the other Austra-
lian States, felt the shortage of woolen goods arrivals when British
manufacturers restricted the exports of these goods. The situation was
relieved to some extent by fresh supplies of cheap textiles from Japan,
but a marked inferiority in the relative quality of goods from this
source made an opening (which still exists) for a supply of tweeds
of varied textile and high grade, such as are not yet made in Aus-
tralia, from the United States. After the war a demand is antici-
pated for a renewal of supplies of best woolens from England. Some
time must elapse, however, before this trade can be restored to the
old basis, as the British home market will demand first attention and
after that has been met the restoration of shipping itineraries will
have to be arranged.
Xotor Trade Difficulties.
It was anticipated a year ago that Victoria, in common with the
other Australian States, would turn to America for a normal supply
of motor cars and parts. This expectation has been realized, but
owing to the difficulties of shipping imports have fallen far short of
the demand. Shortage of tonnage has also been responsible for a
very heavy decline in petrol supplies. This has been such a serious
feature that the Commonwealth Bureau of Science and Industry has
been endeavoring, in response to urgent demands from the Govern-
ment, to find means for the production of alcohol at a price to ren-
der it usable as a fuel for stationary engines and motor cars.
Nearly 5,000,000 gallons of pure alcohol are imported into Australia
and manufactured in the country; this spirit, together with con-
siderable quantities of rum produced from Queensland sugar cane.
should be converted into engine fuel. In normal times the cost of
alcohol as a fuel would make this enterprise impossible. Under
present disturbed conditions, however, it is thought likely that alco-
bhl fuel will find a market. Steps are being taken to adapt petrol
engines to the use of alcohol fuel. Even if the whole available sup-
ply of molasses in Australia were used for the production of com-
mercial alcohol, only about 4,000,000 gallons could be obtained.
whereas the normal imports of petrol are in the neighborhood of
17,000,000 gallons. The total average annual quantity of molasses
available in Australia for distillation is about 50,000 tons, of which
12V500 tons are now used for that purpose. Opportunity therefore
exists for the supply of modern machinery for the distillation of
alcohol from molasses.










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Value of Exports from Victoria.

Below is given the value of the principal articles exporfed i-frl
Victoria to all countries during the fiscal year 1915-16:
-----;--- ..


Articles.


Ammonia............
Animals:
Horses...........
Sheep............
Apparel.............
Biscuts..............
Butter................
Confectionery ........
Fodder, compressed...
Fruits, fresh, dried,
and preserved......
Glassware.............
Gold bullion, ore, and
specie..............
Grain:
Wheat............
Oats.............
Flour...........
Other...........
Hay and chaff.......
Jams and jellies.......
Jewelry and precious
stones.............


Value.


Articles.


Value.


I'--- -~ II I *II


$183,715
123, 658
63,424
81,397
364,107
3, 502,191
83,203
52,918
1,792,395
64,024
1, 50,384
13,406,086
217,927
3,180,209
251,885
81,884
958,598
110,771


Lard and refined fats.
Lead pig.............
Leather and manu-
factures...........
Machines and ma-
chinery:
Agrn cultural ......
Other............
Manures..............
Meats:
Lamb............
Preserved in tins..
Rabbits and hares
Other ...........
Medicines............
Metal manufactures..
Milk .................
Oilmen's stores.......
Oils...................
Onions ...............
Ores (other than gold
and silver)........
Piece goods..........


142,416
1,191,499
2,409,497

4,371
394,571
410,6 9
230,419
60,077
440, 846
26,717
57,264
288,671
73,256
53,700
248,766
58,048
550,245
110,888


Rubber and mansl-
tures...............
Baasage easIrgl.......
Seeds...............
Silveare..........
Skins and hides.....
seoap.................
Stationery ............
Taow ................
Tea...................
Timber..............
Tin ingots............
Tobacco, cigars, etc...
Vessels...............
Wines..............
Wool...............
All other articles......
Total ........


VManM.


Exports to United States and Possessions.

The quantity and value of the principal articles invoiced at the
American consulate at Melbourne for shipment to the United States
and possessions during 1915 and 1916 are given in the following
table:

1915 101
Articles...
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Valse

TO UNITED STATES.


Animals: Horses........................ ..number ...........
Books and printed matter............................... ............
Casein..........................................pounds.. 144,669
Grass seeds ........................................ do... ............
Hair, animal .................................. ....do.... ...........
Hides and skins:
Janumber.. 535,232
Sheep, dry ................................ pounds.. 3,712,4
S/numbern.. 3129,986
Sheep, pickled........................... u 325 377
Rabbit.................................. ... ............
H ide cuttings ............................................I............
Household goods and personal elects.................................
Manganese ore...............................tons.. ............
Sosmiridium ....................................ounces.. 42I
Oil, cucalyptus.................................ounds.. 142,101
Onions........................................bushels.. 15,913
Precious stones, unset.............................................
Sausage casings..................................................
Tin bars........................................pounds. .............
Wha ............................ ........... bushels........
Woo.l:
Tnwashed................................. .pounds.. 12,35,050
Scoured............................. ...do.... 3,909,755
ZiicEroernlrmTas .................................tons.. 1,1741
All othrr articles............ ............................ ............
ol. ................................... ... ........... ....
TO PirllprIP R IS..LANDS.
Ili.-citis ......... ... ... .... ... .. ......... .pounds..I 21,065
Buller........ ......... ............. .... .do...do ... 12,568
Fliprr.. .. .... ..................... do.... ..........
F crJI.-r. m t ,Iplre [ c li ............... .........long tons.. 270t
Friril. lrr-hl ......... ...........bushels.. .........-


$17, 752
9,297
............


584,729
31,978
88,183

...........
2,734
1,7401
38,521
25,280
36,'46'
......;....

11,538, 46
4,728,585 S
39,662
6,105
14,150,067


4,440
4,278
............
10, 62D


3
o............
3,226
20,157

'""3i4,'iM'


...........

I
118,318
13,542


i9,730
10,834 874
4,16:7821
..........
...........


48,300
3,97, 377
12,357
I'09


am




401,
.. ...... '








'a
30=

Ma













II,
--3








AUSTRALIA-MELBOURNE.


1915 1916
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

TO raUIqzItE ISLAND--continued.
Jam .......... ............................... pounds.. 21,808 $1,881 30,142 12,740
16d sheetand pipe............................do.... 9,553 553 ............ ..........
r ................................ ..........do............................ 507 822
nery ........ .................................. ............638 ............ 10,821
NaUs...........................................pounds.. 5,203 448 5, 31 484
Onins......................................bushels.. 18,704 21,235 15,093 15,735
la ........................................pounds.. ........................ 21,45 2,937
to ware pipes....................................... ........... 6,272 ............ 12,282
other artfles....................... ................. ............ 2,30......... .......
Total ............................................. ............ 57,095 ............ 267,401
TO HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.
Batter..........................................ounds.. 2,500 .....................
Ononse........................ .............bushels.. 1,261 1,93 1,00 1,680
Paint...........................................pounds.. 7,840 442 3,808 297
Total.................................... ............ 3,239 ............ 1,977

Silos for Grain Storage.
The Victorian Government has introduced a measure authorizing
the expenditure of $4,258,187 for the construction of 140 grain-stor-
age silos along the main railway tracks of the State and at the ship-
ping terminals. In a large measure this enterprise is an emergency
effort to install the grain handling in bulk system. Owing to the de-
pleted state of the finances of the country, this work would not have
been started under war conditions had it not been that very large
stocks of wheat had to be held in the country in consequence of
shortage of shipping. Action was precipitated by the serious damage
done to the wheat held in open stacks by weather and birds and
mice. It is estimated that the damage caused by the mice alone
amounted, in a few months, to more than $486,650.
Out of 4,000,000 tons of wheat held in Australia, Victoria had
1,700,000 tons; the value of the whole was $145,995,000, and Vic-
toria's quota was worth $58,398,000. Most of this grain was sold to
the British Government, to be held at the country's risk until De-
cember 31, 1917; after that date the risk was to be assumed by Great
Britain. By arrangement the Federal Government agreed to lend
the States $13,869,525 to facilitate the erection of silos. The Govern-
ment obtained a report from an elevator-construction firm which
stated that the silos would return the money invested in them within
seven years. The total cost of the bulk handling scheme is estimated
at $10,706,300 in Victoria alone, so that the erection of expediency
silos costing but $4,258,187 is but a small contribution to the ex-
tensive constructional campaign which the State has in view. Opera-
tions of a similar character are to be carried on in South Australia
and Western Australia.
The construction of these silos would appear to be of very great
importance in the development of steel trade between America and
the. Commonwealth. Australia is deficient in steel. Iron ore ob-
tained from South Australia is being milled in New South Wales,
but practically the whole of the present output is exported to Great
Britain. Even if these supplies were deflected to local use in the con-
struction of reinforced concrete silos, they would not nearly suffice
to meet the requirements. Importation of steel from Europe is pre-


5 d~








6 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS. 5
eluded at the present time, but importation from America wi le b
possible and necessary if ships can be obtained to bring the itaI ..
across the Pacific. Recent events appear to indicate that the Palii '.|
trade will be revived by the use of the Commonwealth Govetrma :en%
commercial fleet of 15 vessels to carry surplus Australian grain to
America. In this event American steel will be a very a p l i1
return load, if supplies can be made available in the United
Railway Electrification-Trade in Pianos. *li
Only slow progress has been made in the conversion of the *1 3
bourne and suburban steam-railway service to electrical propuklmio.
The carrying out of the contract has been greatly hindered by a
breakdown in arrangements for the supply of electrical gear. The
manufacture of electrical equipment in Victoria is in its infant,
Large supplies of copper wire are obtainable from South Austria i
and porcelain insulators are freely manufactured in Melbourne, but
other necessary lines have to be imported. The war has so disturbed
the trade that those parts that do come to hand from abroad are
mixed in character; a movement is now on foot to secure the stand-
ardization of all electrical goods. When standards have been adopted
the schedules will be made available by the Commonwealth Buresn
of Science and Industry, and copies will be very serviceable to Ameri
can manufacturers intending to compete in this trade.
The breakdown in the large German-Australian piano trade tf
fected an important industry in this country. For the past three
years piano firms have been endeavoring to work off their stocks of
German-made pianos, but the trade has been carried on under the
strict supervision of a Federal Government department. From time
to time dates have been set at which it was decreed that sales of Gea
man goods, such as pianos, must cease. Merchants, however, ham
found it impossible to clear their stocks in the period allotted to them
and several extensions of time have been granted. Meanwhile the
manufacture of Australian pianos has been slowly established, end
an attractive instrument of the commoner class is now being pro*
duced in fair numbers. Otherwise stocks have been reinforced by 4
imports of the better class of instruments from America. The Ause
tralian purchaser appears to be reluctant to accept pianos of Amei..
can design, as they differ materially from those of Germans make
The local instrument, generally speaking, has not the refinement eof
tone and quality which the best American pianos possess, and Ihe
latter, consequently, command very high prices. If American nma-
facturers made a study of the designs of cases most favored in Aun-
tralia, they would materially improve their market.
Cargo-Lifting Plant. '
A mechanical coal-conveying plant for the handling of coa al ii
goes at Port Pirie, the South Australian port where Brokea Ea MR :ll
spelter supplies are shipped, has been completed. Coal to wor
Pirie smelters has to be brought several hundred miles by aee !.
Newcastle. Owing to the demand for spelter in Europe::- l
the unloading of a collier at Port Pirie occupied a week or a:
night, it was deemed necessary that something be done to
shipments. Difficulties were first encountered in respect to titl
supply of steel available in the country for the construction .













l aj i WUM Li 15 UeLtU LtIARL U1e ilw CUUvetyUr, WIICU oUperaIes
Bs of large grabs and running gantries, will reduce the time
i.t an ordinary oillier's cargo to two or three days. The
thlis improvement will be a very large increase in the output
from the Broken Hill Works and a great expansion of
in the port of Pirie. Many extensions of metallurgical works
nlied in Port Pirie, and large port improvements will be neces-
l The near fu ture.
min Coadittios. Unsatisfactory.
iPAn- untsatisfactory : feature of the Australian-American shipping
"*Sie is the continued high proportion of American ships leaving
Aiistraliaa ports in ballast. Exportatimo of raw products, such as
o::i~i, wool, and wheat, was checked soon after the outbreak of the
I~i openly war by embargoes.
r r pa~rt from primary products, Victoria has not a great exportable
W!i plus.of goods of any kind that would be acceptable to America,
iit the State is in great need of many American mercantile lines now
niob&tiabie from Europe. The maintenance of the Australian-
,itsiri~an Seet on the Pacific is, in fact, a matter -of vital importance
!ti t e mm~ewfactures and commerce of the State, but it is generally
I~~itted that if the fleet is to be kept in full commission sufficient
iii/trem cargoes must be found on this side. Heavy freight charges
iimngt about by the war are in themselves a serious detriment to
I-:.fAtradoe; but when the cost of return trips in ballast has to be
illie the costs become extremely burdensome. This unsatisfactory
_4'.jtal has resulted in Australian merchants resorting to Japanese
mi:. P LI rampplies. The serious nature of this Question in the Pacific
trAade is shown by the fact that while 48 Amercan vessels, of 47,547
total tonnage, entered Victorian ports fully loaded in 1915-16, 41
iO~ thee ships, with 36,260 total tonnage, left for America in ballast.
%ni cargoes were carried in 5 vessels. The proportion of Ameri-
:iat all nations shipping in Victorian ports is light; against the
i~tsels,o l47,54 total tonnage, arriving from America in 1915-16,
arrival from all countries were 2,307 ships, of 4,646,887 total
The .reduction of shipping from all over-sea ports into
in 1915-16, as against 1913 (the last normal peace year),
.to approximately 1,000,000 tons. British shipping still
i .iac in Victorian pert entries, with 491 vessels, of 2,160,-
tat~~l.t.snage, in 1915-16; Japanese vessels entered in the same
iuber 45,. of 114,284 total tonnage. These were all steamers,
lw9p the 48 American vessels were sailing vessels; only 19
Ma'vessels, as against 41 American, cleared in ballast.
....nn. operstoms.
i6ot-.agmnent the supply of ships in Australian waters, the
S i i .i Government has decided to establish a shipbuilding yard
ls -of their Yarr River, near the sea and the ordinary
Akthe decks will be cut into the banks, it will be necessary
and probably rock-drilling machines. There is an







UPI'PLEMENT To COMMERCE REPORTS.


opening for the supply of machinery of this character from America,
possibly for this particular work and certainly for general excavating
contracts in connection with irrigation in Victoria and other States.
It is probable that vessels of both steel and wood construction and of
medium dimensions will be built at the Melbourne yards, but the
whole of this material is obtainable in the country. Not only in. Vic-
toria but in each of the other capital cities of Australia shipbuilding
projects are afoot and the Federal Government is prepared to back
the scheme financially if assurance is given that the work will proceed
without undue delay.
Having decided at the outbreak of the war to change the currency
by withdrawing practically the entire gold issue from circulation and
issuing paper money, the Federal Government has proceeded with
that policy without wavering. The face value of the paper notes
now in circulation is $229,345,852. The authorities appear to feel,
however, that the margin of safety has been nearly reached, and they
have been withdrawing a quantity of the notes from circulation. The
amount of gold coin held by the treasurer as a guaranty of the stabil-
ity of the note issue is now $74,954,139, representing 32.68 per cent
of the notes in circulation. The result of a large increase of the paper
currency is seen in a very general diffusion of money among the
people. Savings bank returns show a large increase of deposits, due
probably to the unwillingness of many people to take risks in the
ordinary channels of investment during the present unsettled times.
There has been almost a cessation of mining speculation and invest-
ment in land and buildings since the war began. To the natural
hesitancy of investors the Government has added some pressure by
closely restricting the flotation of new companies. It is still neces-
sary for every flotation to be submitted to a public censor. In decid-
ing whether he shall permit the matter to go forward or not, this
official is guided by its utility under war conditions. Generally
speaking, any industry that is likely to produce good merchantable
lines is encouraged, but other financial schemes are set aside.
Trade and Shipping of South Australia.
Internal trade throughout the State of South Australia, which is
part of the Melbourne consular district, could only be classified as
fair. The total trade of the State for the year ended June 30, 1916,
was valued at $54,934,438, made up of imports, $25,073,181, and ex-
ports, $29,861,257. The share of Great Britain and colonies in the
import trade was $16,925,005, and that of the United States was
$4,893,348. Of the exports Great Britain and colonies received
$16,506,637 worth, and the United States $6,315,743 worth. The
average total trade in normal years is approximately $80,297,250, so
that during the period under review the shortage was more than
$25,000,000.
The figures above indicate that British possessions supplied South
Australia with 66 per cent of her imports, while the United States
supplied nearly 20 per cent. South Australian exports to British ter-
ritories were 55 per cent of the total and to the United States 21 per
cent.
The total revenue from all sources for the year ended June 30,
1916, was $21,203.180, and the total expenditure amounted to $23,-
073,906. showing a delicit on the year's operations of $1,870,726.







TaAi : LYL-MELBOURNE.


. "" ssels .trig at Port Adelaide numbered 1,036 in 1913,
hleiup of S12T71; 95i in 1914, with a tonnage of 3,409,368;
t in 1915, with a tonnage of 2,088,436; 539 in 1916, with a tonnage
M ?.'i The majority of these vessels flow the British flag, but
d vessels, 5 Norw~i egi 12 American, 4 Japanese, 2 Danish,
PfretneR vessel entered during 11916.
T: The figures for Port Pirie, the port of the Broken Hill mining dis-
an:' .d &ither chief ports are not available, but they would not
i ythe position materially.
A.trallan E sports to Unite4 States.
","" f. following table gives the quantity and value of the declared
ex..ports from South Australia to the United States for 1915 and
9168:
1915 1916
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

GOhe material................. .......................bales.. ................... 36 S600
Badetrimmin s ........................................do............. 2,921 86 1,240
a ............................................... packages.. ........... 3,400 10 24,046
Pa ti and ntiques..................................cases.. ......... .......... 3 2,920
Perso e cts .............................packages.. .......... ... .. 5 46
Rabbit skin .. .................... ............pounds........... 16,897 49,974 12,617
Red gum aeorodi ......................................bags.. ..... ... ..... ... 1,489 6, 13
Saddlery .....:-.:................................ packages.. ................... 2 87
P. ge :- -------- ---- 2 87
W ool. .... I ... .............p........................ poun .. 2,496,920 527, 818 196, 184
Y a gam...'.. .......... .................... cwt.. .......... 3,665 103 1,539
Zind coaea tratSs.. .....................................tons.. .......... ,847,142 57,588 2,712,077
Total....................................... ...................... 5,370,945 .......... 2,957,492

Conditions in Western Australia.
Western Australia, the outlying State of this consular group, has a
total'area of 624,588,800 acres; but although it is by far the largest
State in the Commonwealth, it is the most sparsely populated. On
December 31, 1916, the population was 309,226. It has a railway
mileage oi' 3,3314 in operation and 2341 additional miles in
course of construction. It is now the best gold-producing State in
the Commonwealth and for the year 1916 had an output of 1,061,398
ounces, valued at $21,940,771. This gold yield was 148,714 ounces
less than that produced in 1915. Having a light but well-regulated
rainfall, Western Australia as a wheat-producing State is advancing
to the front rank. The forecast for the season ending February, 1917,
was 17,245,335 bushels, showing an average yield per acre of 11.01
bushels.
For the year ended June 30, 1916, Western Australia showed a
wool export trade of 28,868,646 pounds of greasy wool valued at
$8,124,865, and 234,808 pounds of scoured wool, valued at $71,080; and
for the six months ended December 31, 1916, 11,662,177 pounds of
Sgeasy wool, valued at $3,278,157, and 56,358 pounds of scoured wool,
valued at $16,979.
SFrom July 1, 1915, to June 30, 1916, Western Australia received a
I.:'revetue of $26,069,782, and for the six months ending December 31,
i 1916t $11,184,097. The expenditure was in excess of the revenue for
the year 1915-16 by $1,694,627, and for the six months ending Decem-
ber f 1, 1916, by $2,778,692.







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


The number of vessels inward at various ports of the State in
eluding interstate shipping, for the year 1915-16 was 1,867, and those
outward, 1,858.
The total value of imports from United Kingdom, the remainder
of the Conunonwealth, New Zealand, and other British possessions
amounted in 1915-16 to $43,715,769; foreign imports were valued
at $4,880,914.
Exports from Western Australia to the United Kingdom, Aus-
tralasin, and other British territories amounted to $89,129,616 in
1915-16, and those to foreign countries to $1,289,596. Declared ex-
ports to the United States were valued at $3,643 in 1916, as compared
with $1,969 in 1915.


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