Supplement to Commerce reports

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00015
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00015

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text







SUPPLEMENT TO


COMMERCE REPO
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS j
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMI ENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Annual Series No. 10b December 21, 1918

NORWAY.

TRONDHJEM.
By C'olsul Mlilo A. Jeweltl Oclober 2':.

The year 1917i in tihe district of TrondllhjrOii. tlhuglh enerally
regarded as a good year commercially. was n'ut a- .ood a- 19111.
Both the amount of business done and the net profit- n11;1:I were
less than in 1916, which va, a year of exceptional gain for Now;ay.
In this part of the country. shipping and the fisherie- anre tih chief
interests of the people.
Importers did a large busi ness, e'-pecially in thle first lalf uf the
year, but exportation was hampered Iy tih.i scarcitv of tomnaii;:e aniil
the dangers of navigation. The scarcity of coal :;id iraw materia1l-
was a serious drawbac-k to indui-trial work. In thie lntturi purt of
the year the various restrictions imposed by tihe forei' n andil hlome
Governments tended to seriously restrict imports. The home trade
also was limited diiuring the latter part. of the yea r by the No lrweLia lI
Government regulations, whliicl established maxim lli prie-, for
certain inmporltant commodities. chief food:tutffs. Tle St;ate as-
sumedc some of the functions of commission m'r-'chants alnd wliole-
sale dealers, thus reducing the activities and profit, of tlle-e Iu -i-
ness men.
Banking Returns-Shipping Statistics.
Though the banks did a largLe ilbisinoe- in 1017, the Nvnlume was
less than in 1916. Money was abundant and mo-t of the ba;nk-.
paid 10 to 1. per cent dividend, on the -hare capitall. Tlhe chliref
bank of Trondhjem, together w itli its ('hri.tiinnia Iirainch (the
Norske Handel-bank). on a share capital of $2,14.,il 00O didi a total
business of about $4,288,000,000, with a profit of $1.0jU.0 (0.
* The older ship companies, generally, did very well in 1917. Some
of the smaller shipowners also made good profits but in imIo-t case-9
they were less.tlan the fabulous gains of 1916. Some steamers
that were lost had not been insured at the advanced valeiise of -hip-
ping and, consequently, did not get the amount of in:urIance money
required to cover the inflated valuations represented by the ship
shares.
94208"-19-10b









SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


The following table shows the number and tonnage of Nor-
weiI':tii vess-el- wAihow home port was Trondhjem. on December 31
of each \vear from I11 to I1i:

Steam and molor
'Y ,I. '-
vr.- -. .-ailuig vessr .

NI1r1- N lc ton- NIul1- N t ton-
tjT.r. tIg.. L.Tr. n] .

191' ................. ....... .............. ....... i IS' 2 2. 5
191. ....... ............................................... .... I I ".. O *' 2. 9
14... ............. .... ..... ', I ;l, I, ., 3.2,
14 14 ..................................................... ..... 312 I '* 3 3 .22 5
19 1 ........... ........................... ...... .....1... 1 1 3I 23
l'Jli; .................................. .... ... I ;11 .-41 .jj l t ,u
1. ...................................... ..... ... 1

Troidle t l lj do 11l l'.'pe il u n i-.-l- its OWil f(l r it- I ,li))ppilg,
ii-liin ;i i.1 ililli.- ri il Inl-i le.--.. T it- tm iin 2' a: rri\'ing i nll deplart-
wi A it t l. ptil 1 i'. 'iri ii lli i I. i atlimilln t-i t. I1111. i: ill liui piI .I Mn11 nl1 1.
Tlil toit;ll :I!11l 'll( (t f (tlll: :: i'. ll lovoiel IbetLwir TI l1on llj ii ar11nd
foreiL"iln ji) rs iIl 19117 \ :Il, Init -*11 0 b p1' p eni les ti'hiit in ll 1 0. Only
onRe '-tii, -lil;i) ( 1,.'.'- (I t(ois In Wel'1-it ) w\v i 11ili at Trortllijell
in 1911; :I'i in' ('.'2 i tolls d(,'adl Aveilght) il 11,17.
Poor Ye:a ior Fisheries.
T)'. fi:1ier1.-, 1t 111o-t itij'rtiiiit iiilli-tirv and oinitiirciral in-
tere-t of ili-, rCi-t-lir l'li-trict. 11llicli einbr;!ae- all thle lorthiwest.
coa-it of N in iv ,il i!s tn!iivy luin .mi l of islamis amnl fi-hinp
ports. exaVi-iel(c1d '! p'or yeaI" in 1017. The fi-dhermvln lost a great
111mont of 1:',terj.l !it iI n't. ;it l otid lier hsliip tackle, on auccont.
of I(i we'atlier. TIh ind1 st \N Nv:l-, a\ l- ratlhe1 Seriotisly liipiiered
by the la:;k of pIet ioleitn for tIlh motor filling bio)ats and by the
difficulty of replan:ciii tlhe lo-t a iil worn-out tackle.
Tle total atcthi for' the South Tromlhiem Comuniy. in which this
con'-ulate is lornted, w;a- 1.l..-11 il !.t:'ic ton ill 1:17. Tih amioulnt
of fish anil fish products ha:nd(iled at 'roldlijeni wa. : 38.738 metric
toni -;.
The following talde -.how- tl'ihe inol'it lof tel' principal varieties
of fi-ih a1 i fih Iiroduct' I't rceiveil :it Trondlijem during the veairs
1910 and 1'17:

Fl l n 11.1 I '-i prod.lucti l '; Fiii and fi;b pridel,d :;. 1916 11917

It-it irir AfriVn .- iI Pni O i Ni. AlFrI 'c 11d ric
'n 'Iinr .. trn IIans.
C'a neil ....... ..... ... ~ 2 1 ,'. ....................... ,.1.3. 13
Dried, -m l e-., r re'.i- rit.lni!rt. .............. ....... 9. 291
D rii d. cliClil eC l ............. .ie I'! 1 il
K lip......................... 1.7 It' clilit inal.................. ... 9 20
S Ilt.rl- li hale.................... .... 17n 15
Ierrilg. ................. i .,i 2-' .11 O their irts .................. 553 1.5S
O il r .. ....... ................i .... ............... 2"5 1.700
S-lluun, ranked .............. .3 5 ,
I'resh:
Hl rrille ...................... 1.742 2,711 I
Salnozl ....................... .24 3J73
Ulner......................... t1, I i,9 .
iv.................................. 1

The chief fisheries of Trondhjem :and the rest of the northern
Provinces of Norway are the herring and cod. Mackerel and bris- t*
ling are found in the southern coast districts and whmle fisheries
are operated chliefly from the southern ports.








1NORWAY-T NON DIJ EM.


Herring Catch in 1917-Other Fisheries.
Official statistics of the catch of 1917 are not yet publihlcd, but
the following uno-fficial figures were published by the fishing aUso-
ciations in periodical, devoted to the interests of Norwe.gian fisheries:
In 1916-17, one of the best years on record, the total catch of
large herring was estimated at 725,600 maal (1 maal=150 liters).
Of this amount more than half may be credited to the Trondhjem
consular district, and the greater part, about 800,000 barrels, was
salted and exported. The total catch of lare1' herring in 1915-16
was 640,000 imaal; in 1914-15, 507,700 nmal and in 1913-14, 219,100

The fat-herring fisheries are rather exclusive industries of Trond-
hjemn and the northern coast towns, and 1917 was a very poor year
for this branch. The catch amounted to 228,133 maal, while the
1iiiil annual catch is I,.tween 400,000 and 500,000 maal.
Of the total catch of fat herriing 159,982 barrel. of .:alt.d herrinffs
were packed, 57, 9(;t maal were sold to the herring-oil factories,
21,60. maal were sold to caning factories, and 1.232 maal were frozen
for shipment to other countries. Trondhjem has a factory employ-
ing a new patent process of fish freezing which, it is claimed, freezes
the fish in such a way that it is preserved almost like fresh fish. The
value of the catch of fat lhrring was estimated at $12.SiSO00 in 1917;
$1,340,000 in 1916, and $3,561,000 in 1915.
The total Norwegian cod catch of 1917 was a poor one, 27,700,000
in number, against 51,400,000 in 1916 (which was also a bad year),
6(,S800,000 in 1915, and 81,500,000 in 1914. The salmon fisheries, in
which this district is interestedl to some extent, gave a net result for
1917 considerably below the average. The amount of salmon ex-
ported during the year was 712,000 pounds, against 793,000 pounds
in 1916, 1,404,000 pounds in 1915, and 1,745,000 pounds in 1914. No
whaling \es-cl, are owned in this part of Norway, and Trondhjem
.does not, normally, handle whale products to any great. e.xt nt.
Fish Canning Chief Industry of District.
The canning indut rie- of this district, which handle chiefly fish
and fish prodwct-, did very well during the first half of 1917, but
later the shortage of tin plate restricted the output. Some canning
factories niahde a very good profit by selling the olive and other oils
they lad in stock to the mi;ar,.;arine and soap fa'torips. The finan-
cial results of the year's work in these indilu-trie~s were very good,
owing to high prices obtained. In 1916 Trondhjem prodWiril 153
metric tons of canned fish, and in 1917, 214 metric tons. From the
port of Trondhjem the amount of these goi'd., exported by sea in
J115 wqas (6 metric tons, in 1916, 419 ietric toi.-, and in 1917,
4S0 inetric, ton'.
Trondhjem, although in size the third city of Norway, can not be
called an industrial city. Its people are largely connected with the
shipping interests and the fisheries, and in past years the idea of in-
dum-trial work was quite foreign to the-e people. They drew their
supplies from industrial countries possessed of the raw mnaterial-N,
the industrial training and experience, and the technical knowledge
required for that line of work. Since the war began all stocks of
manufactured articles, as well as foodstuffs, have gradually run








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


lower and lower, and it was realized that something should be done
to make the country more independent of foreign supplies, that home
indu-tries sh( illd be further developed or created.
Money for :.-il' enterprises was obtainable, though liany preferred
gct-riclh-fliiik shipping lshars. but technii'al training wais lacking,
and raw imaleri;lks 'were scrcer nr W altuo'ether wanting. A very seriou's
hindrance to Ii dlevelolpennt of new industries was the lack of
building i!iiieriil foir fitories. as was the dilliculty of getting lua-
chinerv. O(1-lher hindlrli:lnccr we~e Ihe rising sca le of wage, fur labur,
and tlie -,ciali -l.-i ;a~i ltii n wh!li'll jiput capiltl;il in a pri llt i, if not
tinllid, .t'ill O.f litii l.
The Wood Industry-Manufacture of Seaweed Meal.
Tie Woo(l i ndi-tr 'v. ploi tih i ii' clli n iii 111111 (' j)- nd o W o.l pulp,
en1joved 1 ver\ Lf ii r 11 insut in 191f ait, it woiull l; ite lieen ;it ex-
celehint year if if haid not lnti-i frli the dilthiilty of ohiiiiii!n' the re-
quli'red t'ol.liin:'e.
Exii'riie.-nts w*\ere im lpe at .-'even pie- iIn this. ditr-iit. notably
by the North Atlaiitic C('auiin! C(.'., at Skjii'l. N!d the Noiske Trril-
indtlu,,ri, it H;ilr.t:ild. to iiiiil fiacti ure c"lttle feel froill :,-ea 'eed.
The iirdiist'r did n<.t level(p nilimc li r llyn thie experiimentrii l staige,
but, accordin.i- tI reports of repire-entative of llil' e colililminies, tlie
pro-pelcts of slciiceC.', wcl're ery rood ;mnd luite ex;tlcn.-ive failtorlie.s for
n;l;ing sen vted lllnl were proi'cetr'd.
The meal i i madie froim ordinary va re., or wr'ik.. whicli is first
dried aind tlien g'roind to a fine powderi. One reiorl of ;n I aiiinasis
of seaweed mienl 'ile at Hanst il tgave tlie following re'iutii: Ca 1nbo-
hydi'ates. ,'.4 7 per cei; t: ach, 19.07 per cent; pr: otein, 7.04 per cent;
water', .49 per cent : wood lfiler, .(.l6 per cent: ;Ild frit, 2.77 per cent.
The protein i snid to be lill little dige-tcd ;m iieul the iilineriil con-
tent is too Inrge. hut expIrimnents aire lveiii c''onllld ted to illpl)rove the.
meail in t he.'e respcl.v. Sioe inei 1i-,;d o form ;i ltfil iddi-
tion to lhnv for 'cnttle feeding alnd is cex Smill Increase in Crop Acreage.
IMot of the Trodlllhjoni c onsul.1lair district lie- ;1ililo\e lte Norith P olr
Circle and nllhoicgh tl1e temperaiture i ni modera ted I by tile (Gulf
Strennam the dli-trict is little :dlapted to extens:.ie I.lriciiltuire. The
country is nilulitainoi.s ind rocly. thle -.iil.li-!!er se-on is slilO't aid,
:iltlouli~' inl miiid~llllitner d:1yli2flt is extenleil d alm st to luidniglt.,
there is litile h' eni ,Nnyishmile owinl- to tthe predolmintince of riliny or
cloudy weatlier. The crop ., for 1917 were reported is fiirly i good,
about an avenr:i.'e. ill this ri't'ion.
The followiu1 table show\- the nil'renlge of lan d iiunder the vari'ious
crops in the .-ix northern Pro'vinces. in 1916 anid 1917. The i~erease
of a reti"'e under cultivar ,tion from 1916 to 1917 w:is 11.5 per cent:

Crops. 1916 1317 Crops. 1916 1917

.Acri. .Itr,. .4cres. Acras.
W hi 'a .......................... it 10 P.: oators......................... 2 .123 .33.482
Rv'............................. 253 322 Turnip ........................... 4.27 4.375
Barley ........................... 9.7. 3.. iV, i2 re n fI.ddEr .................... 10.72 10.052
0( ts ............................. 4.73n 51.772 Othor Filld crops.................. 302 252
Mixrd craln..................... lbl i 970 -
Pe ............................. 252 2 0 Total...................... 123,0 137,920








NORWAX-TRON DHJEM.


Housing Conditions-Population.
The lhouisiiig problem at Tronllljenm lhs been kget ting morI e and
more s-erions since the l)egnning11 of the war. The population, aside.
from its natural growth, has considerably increa-edi by the tendency
to drift froni the 'country to thet city :a ilndlstriail c' editions ('lng .I,
and by a ion-idtlrable inimigr:ition dI1uing t-'!. war from disturbed
countries. At the mine tilne, builling e.xpeisi~-, having grac;tly in-
creased, new c, instruction has 1,'i po:tpon.ed to a more favorable

The pernuineint population of the city of Trondhjem at the close
of the ycr:, 191.1 was 19,702 and at the clo:e of 1917, :3,500. In
adlilition there wo;i- a rather large floati!,)g population. In 1917
the i'min'cipality of Trolnhjemll pIut iup a nllber of ( :i. tiwo, and four
family tiei'i,-i-t, hon s for working people, but not 4-1.o gh to re-
lieve the o\vci i-owded c'.'O!lit ion. and for the ulppe el ivs-o the condli-
tion, have not been :ai(-lior:te(d. Office room beeamni very scarce,
largi-ly be-;ii e of the e tablishment of nim uirous brokers' ,iliri'e,
chiefly for dealingd in ship -h:re-.
Exports to the United States.
Exports from the ditr'ct of Trondlijeii to the Unitdl States
during the year 1917, as :lho\vn by the invoices ctl.' fi.-'l by the i.,in-
sublr ig.'ii y at Trondhjeni, were valued at $503,127, ni ii creni:!- of
-$57,5.3 over 1916. Exports of fish products, c-lecially cod-liver
oil, dliiiiiii-lid oon-i4lerably. Hides and skins were exported to
about the somiie valin., hut the (jiiu-iitity va.; considerably less, while
the value of unbleached wood pulp shipped to the United Stat6s- was
more than double that of 1916.
Tie following tpble gives the value of the articles exported to the
United States in 1916 and 1917 as declared at the consular ;i ,"rv' at
Tronudhjem:

1916 1917
Articles, -
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Valur.

l.'i-h I. in-
I1hrriL nrnd sardines......................... pounds.. 40(.5 6f $42. 175 67.450 $10,931
Cod rw ........................................ .. 2,.493 6, 736 2.500 340
Fuirs undressed:
Fox............................... ...... pieces.. 32 300 1.0s 14,9)2
I'olr bear................................... pounds.. 10 .580 7339 2S2 133
Oil, cod lver ................ ............... .......... ll i .. 27 637 117 Cs) 121.350 59.210
Skin., call a.d cuoat..................... ... ..pi,.lll.. I I' 938 129.751 16h0,507 131403
lii I'r pll-.. ............................. do. ..... ... 5 40 1 090
SpijL'; ,.i till:- .............. .................. llnns 7 212 12.075 .274 11 85
W\uGl pulp, chemical, unbleached................"irnl 2.800,000 131 624 *..44.000 273 202
Total................................................ 445532 ............ 503,127

No .-tatistics slowing the quantity or value of imnport- from the
United States to this district are available. The iiiports froi
America to this district are largely indirect, coming through, Chris-
tiania and Bergin.
The port of 'Trondhjem was utilized as a port of transit for large,
quantities of inaterial destined for Ru-ssia and when conditions in
that countLry lbeeame such that the goods could not be sent there some







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


of this material was sold locally. The foreign trade to and from
Sweden through this port is quite important.
Amnerican goods, especially metal goods, house hardware, office
appliancee, agricultural implements, machines and tools, preserved
fruits and meats, and cattle feed, are highly esteemed in this district
and colnmand a good market under normal conditions. There is
every J)r.-ljpect. that the United States will sell larger quantities of
goods to this country in the future.


WASHTNGTON : COVnr N NMTPNT PRINT OYPTCE : 1919









































Digilized by the Internet Archive
in 2011 with funding from
University of Florida, Geoige A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation


hllp: www.archive.org details supplemenllocl0191821unit




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
S 11111111iii1111111 1111111 111111i 11111111
3 1262 08485 1160
























- -s
























....:
^ ~ s; ^o ^ -7