Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00013
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00013

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text



|g /8 .' /o .,
I 22 MAR 195
SUPPLEMENT TO 22

COMMERCE REP
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 10a May 15, 1919

NORWAY.
CHRISTIANSAND.
:.. By Consul George N. Ifft.
The American consulate at Christiansand, Norway, was opened
February 19, 1918. The district comprises the administrative Coun-
ties of Nedcnes and Lister og Mlandal, with a combined area of 6,415
square miles and a total population of 168,500. These Counties con-
:stitute the extreme southwestern corner of Norway and have a coast
line more than 200 miles long. The land surface is a mass of solid
rock shoved up out of the sea. Small patches of soil have accumu-
... lated in narrow valleys and along the rivers, but only about one-half
S.of 1 per cent of the total area is actually under cultivation, and the
Sfarm land, including hay and meadow lands, constitutes only slightly
more than 2 per cent of the total land area. The people live from th,
sea, as fishermen and sailors, and large shipping concerns have grown
.... up in the coast towns, whose fleets trade on all the seven seas and whose
vessels rarely see their home port. There are no cities, and all the
towns are on the coast, the larger ones being Christiansand, with a
population of 16,500; Arendal, 10,700; Risor, 3,300; Mandal, 3,000;
Flekkefjord, 2,500; Grimstad, 2,250; Farsund, 1,400; and Lillesaind,
14100.
SEven under normal conditions separate statistics as to the trade and
commerce of this district would be almost impossible. Most of the
imports are entered at Christiania and Bergen and thus are never
credited to this district, and a very large part of the exports is
shipped from those places.
L osses of Merchant Fleet During 1917.
During 1917 the shipping concerns of the district lost 35 per cent
of their vessels and 40 per cent of their total tonnage from sub-
-marines and mines. In spite of this enopmorts loss and of the high
insurance rates and other increased expenses, they were unusually
prosperous, earning almost fabulous dividends. At the opening of
the year, the merchant fleet of the district (taking into account only
vessels of 100 tons or more) comprised 93 steam and motor crafts,
aggregating 137,366 gross tons, and 133 sailing vessels, aggregating
185.310 net tons. This was 6.4 per cent of the total Norwegian steam-
ship tonnage and 65.9 of the total sailing-vessel tonnage. During the
year 29 steamers, aggregating 55,781 tons, and 49 sailing vessels,
aggregating 67,276 tons, were sunk by submarines, mines, etc. There
were built or purchased during the year 7 steamers, with a tonnage
of 5,399, and 14 sailing vessels, with a tonnage of 17,538. The mer-
1153S3'-19-10a




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2 ".s1PPFEMENT TO COMMV~RE REPORTS.

chant fleetC at the close of the year thus comprised 71 steam ajd
4notor cafts .of 86,984 gross tons, and .98 saying tesels. of 135 $
uet tons. ,Thiiis was 5.5 per cent of the total Norwegian steamship'
tonnage and 49.3 per cent of the total Norwegian sailing-vessel on-
nage. On December 31, 1917, the home ports of the merchant fleet of
the district were as follows:


Steam and mitw Smiting vWs h?
ee. Sa vessels.
Ports .
Num- Gross Num- Net
ber. tonnage. ber. tonnage.

Christiansand..................................................... 22 28,637 55 85 910
Arendal....................... ................................ 25 22,168 10 7 654
Tvedestrand.................................................... 7 12,044 9 15,671
Flekkefjord...... ......... ................ ..................... 5 9,175 ..... ..........
Fa d.......................................................... 2 1,277 9 12,997
Grimstad........................................................ 2 5,799 7 9,423
Risor.......................................................... 4 3,965 1 629
Mandas........................................................ 1 ,253 4 1,731
Lillesand....................................................... 1 410 3 1,757
Lygor.......... ............................ .....2 2,25 ........ ...... ......
Total................................................... 71 86,984 98 136,572


Importance of Fishing Industry.
Next to shipping, fishing is the most important industry of the
district. The latest available statistics of the fishing industry are for
1915. For that year the fishing fleet of the district consisted of 32
sailing vessels of over 18 tons, 137 sailing vessels under 18 tons, 229
decked motor boats, 223 undecked motor boats, and 2,287 open row-
boats. The catch for the year was valued as follows: Codfish,
$96,741; herring, $14,240; bristlings spratss), $9,493; mackerel,
$142,407; salmon and trout, $17,979; lobster, $80,396; and haddock,
flounder, halibut, eel, and oysters, $19,165; a total value of $380,421.
This catch, with reference to quantity, was about normal, amount-
ing to 4,359 tons; in value, however, it was higher than usual, be-
cause of the war conditions. It must be noted that the mackerel catch
includes that of a considerable Swedish fishing fleet that up to that.
year fished in the North Sea and landed its catch at Christiansand
for preparation and shipment. The North Sea fishing was closed.
during 1917, owing to war conditions. The normal Norwegian mack.
erel catch is about 10,000,000 to 15,000,000 fish, about 15 per cent of
which is taken in this district. The year 1917 was, so far as the
catch is concerned, reasonably normal. Gasoline for the motor fishing
boats was expensive but up to October 1 could still be had, and by
that date the mackerel season was practically over. From October 1
on gasoline often was not obtainable at any price, and for the rest
of the year fishing operations were reduced by about 50 per cent.
Experts estimate that the fishing activities were about 20 per cent
below normal for the entire year, owing to this shortage. The large
herring (storsild) catch, the fishing season for which commences
about October 1, was about 70 per cent below normal.


Agriculture and Stock Raising.
Agriculture and stock raising play trifling parts in the industrial
life of the district. Farms are usually scarcely more than garen
patches in extent. In 1917 there were -under actual cultivation in


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NORWAY-CRIEISTIANSAND. 3

the district 21,770 acres. In addition to this area, there were 51.000
acres of hay lands and wild meadow land. The combined area is
just slightly in excess of 2 per cent of the total area of the district.
Of the cultivated area, 38 per cent was planted to oats, 27 per cent
to potatoes, 12 per cent to wheat, 10 per cent to rye, 7 per cent to
barley, and the remainder to beans, peas, turnips, and fodder stuffs.
SThe farm yields for 1917 for the district were: Wheat, 34,225 bushels;
rye, 40,550 bushels; barley, 98,750 bushels; oats, 592,000 bushels;
potatoes, 2,777,000 bushels; and hay, 129,195 tons. The potato crop
Swas about 50 per cent in excess of the 1916 crop. The live stock of
the district, according to the census of September, 1916, numbered
7,334 horses, 60,549 cattle, 50,052 sheep, 3,011 goats, and 9.184 swine.
Mineral Deposits of the District.
.This district has some deposits of nickel, molybdenum, nitrates,
feldspar, etc., which, under war conditions, are being prospected or
worked feverishly. The nickel deposits in the Saettersdal, near
Christiansand, are by far the most important, and the refinery at
Christiansand is now turning out 75 to 100 tons of refined mckel
per month, with small by-products of copper, silver, and gold. This
plant was seriously damaged by fire early in 1917. As a result of the
S fire and, perhaps, also by reason of the fact that its product. had
been contracted for by Germany, the plant remained idle most of
the year. During 1917, however, 311 tons of nickel and 5 tons of
copper were shipped to Germany from Christiansand. An aluminum
refining plant at Vennesla, near Christiansand, owned and operated
by British capital, shipped 2,540 tons of refined aluminum, valued
at $2,595,312, to England during the year. Molybdenite glance to
the amount of 6 tons was exported from Christiansand. probably
to England. Deposits of this mineral near Mandal were worked
during 1917 and the concentrates shipped to England, but these
shipments were made from Flekkefjord and no details as to the
amounts are available. Norway has no facilities for refining these
ores. Feldspar to the amount of 635 tons was exported from the
Hogetveit mine in the Saettersdal to Germany; 300 tons of nitrates
were shipped from this port, but the destination is not. given. Other
exports of minerals or ores from Christiansand were 2 tons of
precious metal slag to England, 3 tons of steel (destination not
stated), and 500 tons of cryolite to England. The cryolite was of
Danish origin declared here in transit.
Paper apd Lumber Kills.
Aside from the nickel and aluminum refineries, the district has no
important manufacturing interests. A paper mill at Hunsfos ex-
ported 1,740 tons of print paper, valued at $243,600. The greater
part, if not all of this, went to England. Two lumber factories, one
at Tveit and the other at Liknes, operated at full capacity during
1917. Statistics as to output are not available; 7,327 standards of
lumber and 35 tons of ply wood for aeroplane propellers were shipped
from Christiansand; 64,330 cubic feet of wood pulp were also ex-
ported from this port. During the year 1917 the coast towns of this
district exported 125,000 cubic meters of lumber and timber of all
kinds, or nearly 13 per cent of the total export of timber from
Norway.
-


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Ii l I IIllli I HIIIIIIIIIH fllllllllDl IIIll IIIt
3 1262 08485 1863
4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

The Norwegian timber export for the year was 973,349 cubic u1 -: I
861,102 cubic meters of which went to England, 53,797 cubic, metera
to Holland, .27,559 cubic meters to France, 13,930 cubic metea i ..
Sweden, and 12,059 cubic meters to Africa. England thus receiv0dl ...
nearly 90 per cent of the total.
Tobacco Factories-Abundant Water Power Available. '
The district has eight tobacco factories, one in Christiansanidd he-
ing the largest in Norway outside of Christiania. The output 'of
these factories is almost entirely smoking and chewing tobacco, made&
mainly from Virginia leaf. In 1917 these concerns imported 'i ,I
aggregate of 269,812 pounds of leaf tobacco, of which 260,663 popuds
were from the United States and 9,149 pounds from Holland. In
1916 the imports were 488,185 pounds, 468,564 from the Unitedltates
and 19,621 from Holland. This was a decrease of 45 per rcentt
in imports for 1917, and by the end of the year the reserve stock.was :
almost exhausted and the retail price of tobacco had practice .y I
doubled. The manufacturers report sales for 1916 at 468,509 pounds :"
and for 1917 at 417,910 pounds. Since January 1, 1918, there has i
been an actual tobacco famine in the district.
There is abundant natural water power in the Christiansand dis-
trict, which as yet has scarcely been touched. Taking into consi4-
eration a minimum development of 500 horsepower, recent statistics
show that there are exploitable power sites of 659,000 horsepower in '
the County of Lister og Mandal and 362,500 horsepower in the
County of Nedenes. These, with the return of normal times, offer
considerable possibilities for the development of artificial industries,
for which the raw materials would have to be imported, as, for in- :!
stance, the present aluminum reduction plant at Vennesla.
During 1917 coal to the amount of 33,144 tons was imported at
the port of Christiansand from England and sold here for domestic
use at $75 to $100 per ton.
Exports from the Port.
Statistics of declared exports from the Christiansand district are
not available and could be compiled and segregated only at the
Central Customs Bureau at Christiania. The table below gives "ta ,i:
exports from the port of Christiansand in 1917 and may prove intbt* ii
testing as a war-condition document. Only quantities are givel ay.: i,
values and destinations being withheld. Most of these .items h,4e m:
been discussed earlier in the report, and where values and destinca-
tions have been indicated they have been obtained from privatektt
reliable sources:
Articles. Quantity. Articles. ty.

Aluminum........................tons.. 2,'40 Timber................... standaidg 7,3 ".:
Feldsp:ir ...................... ... 6., Wood pulp..................cublojerl... 64 80
Cr nine ........................... lo.... r:n) yi wood ............. ...... ..tons.. iD 5
Nickel.........................rdo.... 311 rTnt paper......... .............do.... *
Sodium nitrite..................do.... ,OO I erriag boxes.................. ices..
.oll.blenite glance............. d ... 6 Fish nes. ....................... tons.. ".
Coper..........................do.... 5 Lobsters......................... pieces.,
Sl .............................do.... 3 Fresh fish................. pounds. .
Metal slag ......................do.... 2 Salt mackerel........... ... .barrels.; :

N kind to the United States were-declte
T^--dfitcfic.por the year 1917. .',' ':,:i
FWASHIN GTON: GOVERNMENT PRINTING OrBFICNi
P-Q
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