The Fats and oils situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00073
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00099

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text









OF AGRICULTURAL ECOI


AR3D, INC.LLIDIPCLfi6RIk : 15AT: PRODUCTION. STOCKS
DECEitf&~iBE 31. EXPORTS AN T-rm-u S TO U. S. TERRITORIES,
AND DOMESTIC DISAPPEARANCE, 1919-45


I '
%i0


r Direct civil on use*


rExports and / -
I~ishipments" \. )

jiri L919 1923 1927 1931 1935 1939 1943 1947
*DOMESTIC DISAPPEARANCE MINUS MANUFACTURlNG USE AND MILITARY PROCUREMENT
I" .ii i A ICLUDES MILITARY PROCUREMENT FOR RELIEF BEGINNING IN 1944

am i; MayM;:;~~i~. ENT OF .unicuL7uRE NEG 45458 BUREALJ OF AGHRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


;IExpo~t~s ~nd domestic use of lard will be reduced in 1945, as a result of a sharp
iss~dtput.The civilian supply of lard in 1945 is indicated to be II to 12
er.tapi,; copared with nearly 14 pounds in 19VY. Factory and warehouse stocks
;W~tred Pgrad fat reached a peak of nearly 700 million pounds in mid-1944~
e4~l gtn,(ly alpout 100 .mi Iion pounds.





































































168
101

100

013
184
188

95'
10L
105
141


1180
115


Prices compFiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter. The National Prviioner, The Journal aiF amero Csou YorkJ,. and
reports of the Offiae of Malrketing Services and Bureau of labor Statisticel. Eai~se taxes and duties included where
a; pplicable. Index nunbdera foar earlier years beginning 1910 are given in Teahnical Bulletin Ho. 757 (1940) and The
Fats and Oils Situartlan beginning December 1940).
Three-cent processing tax added to prioe ast originally quoted. 2/ C.i.i. Noer York. 3/ Tanks only. ;li


numbers of irices of fate sat oils, June198 10and IM$I. April-d lne198
II. 1.- ~rr,~,~- r nl. PRICHa~~ *w-cIu


~P -;--


__


ZHIDEE WHIBER (1924-29 = 100)


__


IC~


I JbDe I 1DI66


s
I


42.7

IS.0
17.0



13.0
10.5
9.9

18.8
12.8
14.0

16.5
11.8
15.0



11.0
11.8
62.7
11.4


8.4
8.8
8.8
12.5
3.6


15.3
86.2
59.0

15.8
13.0
17.7
56.5
12.0

11.5


19.0
17.0
11.9


18.0
10.6




12.6



11.8
15.1



11.0
11.8
60.7
11.4


8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9

3.6

114.3
15.1
20.2



13.0
17.7

11.7

11.6


19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8

13.0
10.5
9.9

13.8
16.6
18.6



11.8



11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7
11.4
11.6


8.8 -
8.9
8.9
12.3
3.6


15.1
26.0
39.0

13.8
13.0
17.9

11.5

5/ 9.8


Cramb

41.5
19.0
12.0

15.8
15.0
10.5
9.9

12.8

16.6

12.8

16.5

11.8

11.1
11.81
60.T
11.4
11.6

8.1
8.8
8.O
6.g




15.1
24.0


39.0

18.0

11.5

3/ D.8


Butter. 92-aeoore. Chicago .............................. I
Butter, 92-eeore, Rear Tok ....~...*.....**.*...***.*************
01eamrprine, don. re., Chircag .........................s
Shortenring containing anim1 fat, 1-pound eartanal Chicago .1.....s
Isrd, loose, Chioago .................................. .....ne .
Isrd, prime steam, tieroea. Chioano .............................s
Lsrd, refined, I-pound eartrna, Chicago .........................s
01eo oil, extra, tieroes. Chicago ..............~~..~.............s
Clenatearine, bbl., N. Y. .......................**..............s
Tallow, edible. Chicago .......................................s

Corn oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ............................s
Corn oil, edible, returnable Artag, 1.o.1., N. T............. .s
Cottanseed oil. orude, tanks, f.o.b. 8.E. mills .................s
Cottoneeed oil, p.e.y., tank care, N. T. ........................s
Pasanut oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mille ..........................s
Peanut oil, refined, edible (wrhite), drums, N. Y. ...............s
So~ybean oil, crude, tank care, midwestern mill .................s
Soybean all, edible, drumar 1.edl., I. T. .......................I
Suntiewr oil, semi-refined, tank care. C.o.b. i. Y. ............s

Embassu oil, tank, i. Y. .......................................
Cooonut oil, Manila, crude, a.i.f. Pacifia Coast 1/ .............s
Cooonut oil. Ceylon.~ anrade bulk. It. T. I/.....................s
Olive oil, California, edible, dnrum, N, Y. .....................s
Palm all. Conga, crude, bulk, N. Y. If ..........................s
Rape oil, refined, donatured, bulk, lne Orleane .................s

Tallow. No. 1, inedible, Chicago ................................s
Grease, A White. Chicago ........................................
Nenhaden oil, crude, tanks, N.o.b. Haltimore ....................s
Sardine oil, crude. tanks, Pacific Coast ........................s
Whale all, refined, bleached winterr druma, N. T. ...............s
Cottonseed oil foots, raw, (509i T.F.A.) delivered, Best ......... a

linseed all, raw, tan cara, Minneapolia ........................s
Linreced oil, raw, returnable drume oarlota, N. T. ..............s
Oitician oil, drumae, f.o.b. H. Y. ................................
Tung oil, returnable druma, oarlota, N. T. ......................a

Castar oil, No. 5, bbl., N. Y. ..................................s
Castar oil, No. 1, tanks, N. Y. ...............................s
Caabor oil, dehydrated, tanks, N. Y. .............................
Cod-liver oil. mad. U.S.P. bbl., N. T. .........................g
Cod oil, Newfoundland, drurma, N. Y. ...................~..........s

Glyoerrin soaplya, basis 80L. drume or tanks. N. Y..............s


Gklg
48.8
19.0




13.0
10.6
9.9

18.8
110.6
12,8
14.5
15.0
16.5
11.8




11s@1




















18.


11.5

340.9


L ight domesto fats and oils (1910-14 = 100) ....................s
Si glt domestio fata and one~ ....................................s

All fate and oils (27 itema) ....................................s

sa..............................................s
Narine animal oill ..........................................s
Vegetable oils, domesstia ......................................e
Yegetable oils. foreign .......................................s
Gro ead g use a
eir ~.~.............~.....~............. ............s
Butter, seaonally adjusted ...................................s
lard .................................................s
Other food fate ............................................s
All food fate ............................................a
Soap Fate ...............................................s
Drying oila ..............................................s
Miscellaneous oil ..........................................s
A~ll industrial fate and oil ....... ........................s


144 141
102 100

109 107

98 95
152 182
132 154
157 156

990 SS
104 10B
105 BS
139 141
104 102
120 120
150 149
117 116
152 131















**


.. 11 :






t critical

before mid-1946. Imp

may afford some relief

easing shipments o

into the Uhited States in the see

in July-December 1942, wh

lion pounds of fats, oils, and



ons that production from.domestic materials

half of 1945 than a year earlier. Inventorie

early 1 billion pounded (36 percent) smaller than

will remain at ceilings at least through the first ha



for 1945 is now indicated to

and margarine in terms of fat

in 1944, and an average of 45 po

supplies of butter, compared -

of 1945, as a result of a

in butter o























Out~put of odible vegetable oils Un. the~ first ,6;.$.p 8 ae add

is likely to be less than in the corresponding period W~:E 195

a result of the 10-percent reduction in co~tton aoreage this ear~~j

production in the spring and summer of 1946, howevergs,.maybe .1

year earlier, refloating a prospective increase in theo 1945 fk

Flaxscod production In 1945 is forecast at 52.7 mill

.9.2 million bushels more than in 1944. Nevertheless supp~ike;:

oil from domestic sources will be smaller in 1945-46 than.ia

season, as .the increased crop of flaxseed doon not fully cmqpa

reduced carry-over of flaxaced and linseed oil. As an offsetus aj

.. linsleed oil will be materially less in 1945-46 than in 1944-.45,

equivalent of about 9 million bushels of flaxseed was expFto~frtema

Russia.

Little change in the level of production of inedible tallow*4g

grease is unnticipated for the rest of 1945- and the first half of 1

The supply of those falte is anall in relation to the strong; de~amed NAi~~

and stocks are at a lolw level.



;I. *













planting was hindered by excessive rifa51 ll;~I;'-Oggr~~r;redne~tioas v
North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. In additipn-to the Ihfaor
prospective soarcity o~f Inbor for oultivat~in.~ qn~aitrvestihg t~he cr
factor in limiting norenge;: .. i

The estimated acrou~ge of peanut grown n oane for all purposes tdl
year, at 3,953,00l0 aores, is only 1 percent Smpaller than a year eth
Aercage declinedd 14 percent in Alabamna but insteas.ed in all other Red
States except Florida, where acrseage declined alightly.- On the ban~.ia~
!*normal relationship to hcrenge grown alo~o, the mocreage picked @ad thrq
this yea~r would total about 3,150,000, the same~ an in 15944. *: if:";i,
Reduction oaf 2 percent in the noteage of so 68Kns grown alph
all purposes is reported this year. The national 'to~tl-.ini 1945:5e 1
million acrea.. A late, wet spring delayed planting in much~of to~
producing area. In the Nortdi Central'States, totd1 morenge of sa
alone is about the same as last year, but in other areas there ils a
cline ,of about 10 percent. On the basis of grrowrs'ES inltetions'
indicated acrengeb of-soybeans to be harvested for. beans this e
million, compared with 10.S million in 1944.

The acreage of flaxaed planted in 1945 wras 4,149,'000
cent more than last 'year, but 11 percent less than the na nqt;"
5,000,000 acros. The indicated natiornal output is 32.7 mIa~iljo
percent more than in ~1.944. In the four loading producing Stat
North Drlkoac, Southr Dekrota, and ).Iontann -- the increase ove~r-ta
1.2 million acres (49 phrgent). Acreage was sharply reduced in;
and Arizona, but was increased in Texas. Plaintings in these S
place last fall and minrter. Preliminary estimates of productio'j
three early Strates total 2.7 million bushels, compared with 5.5
bushels in 194~4. .

Slight Decline Probable in of Edible Oils Guai Frts in the
Letter Half of 194~5 ;:I':

Production of futs and oils used principally in food products ma~y I
totlll roughly 3.5 billion pounds in' the second half of 1945, compared wi h4
3.6 billion pounds in the first half" of the year, and nearly 5.7 billaP,im;
pounds in the last half of 1944. Output of butter and edible vegeta~ble~i
probably will be about the samre in thE latter half Of 1945 as a year i~
1srd production will be smaller, reflecting a 34-peroont reduction kn;~
pig crop of 19;Q and a 7-pe~roint reduction in the spring pig crop of 19gi

The 10-peroont decline in cotton acronge this year wFill be refly
in a reduced output of cottonseed oil in 1945-46. Mlost of the redutq
likely to, occur in the first'half of 1946. Last season, processing o
seed wats dol~lyod by a la.te ha~rvest, ri'th the result that a Irrrgar-thrm
proportion of the oil w:.s produced after January 1.

Incrouse~s in hog slaughter and lard production are probable in
spring, and sunnor of 1946, cas c result of a prospective increase in;;
fall pig crop. ...


































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B~~tter, actli~~l:'u~~el'g;ii.t '; ~~
I 1. .;I


~~


lr'.11171 '' '"";`''
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19~ 1.935 1937 1 39 -1941 1943 1945* -14

.~~~: *Parrrorc

ori~ cT oiRICULTUR~E NEG. 454161 BUREAU OF" AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICSB



tjag r educed prduction .oat r sn anoils. increased ilitary precuremet,
14~iirge~ exports, c viliaan supplies of food fats-will be materially srial~ler! Z
a~yer goalie. Avra~ge stypites per capital are expected to be about
40/~:"~'ji atq~nt) ~o~~ilupred W~ith 42 pounds laist year and an-average of 4C5 pounds. 'in
eatrefiiFutions this year are in lard and butter. The 4ivilian supply orf;
ght i that /.~in 9..


M~rargarie,
a cctual .weIght
rglra so mmm
am a sm am a mm Im a mm smm e mgo














piles in IY4e la due mainly to reaucea proacuorton ann stocks o arag
gether with large military requirements and a strong Europena~.dm
fats and oils.

On1 the basis of latest indications, total military procur~papoph:;~il ';
food fats in 1945 (exclusive of procuremeqlt for European relief) wep)4
approximately 150 millied? pounds more than in 1944. Takings in' ~thf~:~e_@eced
hatC of 1945 probably will be somewhat smaller thzan in the first i;~1;;;
larger than a year earlier. :...I..4

Exp or ts and s hipme nt s of fo od fa ts and o ils. i n 1945 wil be hen,~?f~Z:;! j
stantially analler than a year earlier. Following the term~inat~o 0h
war in Europe, lend-lease; shipments of fatal were materially redne~iit; p
demand from the liberatedi areas of Europe is strong, but ex~ports fro
United States to such aress will nost be sufficiently great t9off
pletely the reduction inl lend-leese. The liberated countries
take as much fat r-s could be mlade available. Total imports of $4
and oilseeds in terms .of oil into continental Europe, cexud
averaged about 4.5 billion pounds annually before thle war.
of the world shortage in fats and oils outside the F'ar East,
than 2 billion pounds will be imported into the Continent fro 1

Civilian supplies of butter in the United Statoa in the 4`
1945 may be moderately larger than in the first half of the yea ,
curtailment of lend-lease shipments. But other food felts will-b
supply than before. L',ith; inventories of these fats approachinRg
working levels, requirements must be met largely fran current pro
Increasing tigh~tnerss in supplies is reflected in recent reductions.,
facturers' quotas of fats and oils for use in margarine and other
products. After allowance for seasonal variation, July-Septemhor q p
for maargarine are 14 percent less thus~ in April-June; those for othe3';~';; ''~
edible products (shortening and cooking and~ salad oila) are down 4..perangd~8
The supply of lard available for civilian consumption for the rest of
1945 will continue relatively small.











Mars) June 1 June 1


168 70 31 70
an andqred t 398 655 226 117
r stible s 852 626 728 710
bit a 1/180 1,131 998 832


dB from 14po of the Bureau of the Censue except butter, from
d*storage haAdings.

So plies th pmain Tight


66r A 8 warehouse stocks of inedible tallow and greases on June 1
11194 pounds, 134 million pounds less than a year earlier and s
6 Khde'June 30, 1943. On thEbasis of prospective slaugger of
bb st -prod4ttion of'inedible tallow and greases if the 12 mother
91 1945 is likely to be about the same as in the past 12 montas.
Ad uoicivilian-requirements fee soap impossible by late 1945
thp'present tight supply situation~in soap fats will depend
64 of imports of copra from the Philippine Islands. A
Abindment 6 bD WFO-42b), requiring manufacturers to use addi-
fierdf water-softehing builder materials, in household package
ptakhde:s, pdwders, granules, and similar types -- will extend
byggly of fats available for making soap. The amendment, ef-q
st ?,.will limit the Rahydrous (dry) soap content of the types
dhotted to not more than 90 percent of the anhydrous soap content -
bducts in the 30 days ended July 17, 1942.

f Einseed Dil Shorta e Dependent


Supplies of flaxseed and lidseed oil from domestic sources may be
idss in 1945-46 than in 1944-45. Crushing of domestic flaxseed in 1944-45
aquded 6 to 7 million bushels from stocks on hand at the beginning of the
kg year. On.July 1, 1945, stocks of flaxseed were at a law level. Factor
ad warehouse stocks of liaseed oil on July 1 this year were 160 to 170
lion pounds less than the 336 million pounds on hand a year earlier. Thi
equivalent to a reduction of 8 to 9 million bushels of flaxseed,

Partly offsetting the reduced carry-over of flaxseed and linseed oil,
notion of flaxseed in 1945 is indicated to be 9 million bushels greater
in 1944. An additional factor is the reduction in exports of linseed
a Russia, from approximately 180 million pounds in 1944-45 (equivalent
of 9 million bushels 20 flexseed) to negligible proportions in 1945-46
0 the linseed ofl shipped to Russia last season went out in July-


















.RECENT DEVELOdEMNTB -- ',

t.:.Pr.gduction of FntS and oils Mloderately .
*Fncreased in May; Stocks ..
?.1 C ont-in ue De line

Factory output of fate and oils ia May totaled 725 millio~j
65 million pounds more than a month earlier, bujt lf1 8 ill-io ou
than a year earlier. The May.ourtput of soybean oi~l, anounting 4.
pounds, was the .larLestt on rooord, approached closely only on~cel
in April 1943, when production reached 132 million pounds. h
dcines in production fran May 1944 were'i~n lasd;' greases, and:B

j~;"''.Inventoride of fats and oils in factories an~d who~~~~~'i
million pounds during May. At the end of the month these
1,729 million pounds rudeue basis), 965 million pobunds.e
earlier. Stocks of inedible tallowr and greases dea~li~ned:59~
";' in Mary.-to 198 million pounds, thec smallest ainee June 1945...'.
inventories were down 22 million pounds. to! 188 million p'oundri,
"'i since September 1943. Chief declines from a1 year~ earlier were: ;Ii
edible tallow and greases, linsood oil,aand soybean oilr .i..'I~

USDA Purchases of Fats and Oils
~Continue Small

Purchases of fats. oila,an~d soap by the Department of A~grid
June totaled 43 billion pounds, including mar-garine nd soap in-e
fat content. This was about the samse total ils'a month earlier. h
~~. : commodities purchased in June were lard, butter, and mlargarine.

Total purchases in the first 6 months of 1945, including sboY~
were 299 million pounds (fat content basis), compared with slightly )
1 billion pounds in the corresponding period a year earlier, i1



Ir ;












: : June
Mil.1b. Mil,1b. Mil, b.

34 120 106 15 8 30 '
pork fe 325 654 882 809 18 23. 114
abs and oil 2 30 61 2 1/ 1/
--. 70 591 198 --- -1/ 1
1 equivalent) 15 4 4 9 2 --- --- 35
--- 17 22 100 1 1 5
wishle oil< --- 82 49 15 --- --- Bl
-- 46 62 8 e--- --- 5
(fat content) 4/ 1 77 72 59 2 7 4
(bA 1/ 16 23 13 6 4 38
gpbvelept 1,691 1,312
000 1 000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
bu. u. bu. bu. bit bu. bu.

400 400 983 206 --- --- 3,848


sh oils.
t 9,pounds per bushel.
O percent for margarine; 55 percent for soap.

GOVERNMENT ACTIONS

a R44uced; Oil for.Fish
empted fran Quotas

nfacturers' quotas of fats and oils for use in civilian margarine
ptember this year were reduced by Muendment 16 to WFO 42, ef-
July 1. The no quotas are-set at 95 percent of use in the cor-
dits quarter of 1944, compared wi-th 110 percent-allowed in April-June
y4ar. Permitted use of fats and oils in civilian shortening and edible
also was reduced by Amendment 16, with quotas for July-September
pa lished at 77 percent of base-period use, compared with 80 percent in
rJung. baserperiod use for shortening and oils is average use in the
Aponding quarters of 1940 and 19417.

.Amendment 17 to WFO 42, effective July 12, exempted from restrictions
16 order any oil used to can certain types of fish: tuna, bonito,
ail, and sardines. Use of vegetable oil in packing tuna, bonito, and
6 il4s restricted, however, by Amendment 10 to WFO 44, effective
14 to specified maxima quantities per case of fish packed. These max-
are less that the quantities noonally used, but are based on studies
e-quantity per case required to maintain the quality of the product.
1phibnwnwas placed on use of bil in canning sardines. The high price
9041.ip relation to the price of sardines is expected to prevent unnecessary
%0 011 in packing this fish. Total use of oil in canned fish probably
n,









































u Shortages in napthenic acid, rosin, red oil (oleic acid), adlid-fa'
have resulted in a sharply increased demand for tarll.oil. '::*

LkRD, SHIORTENING, AND FOOD OILS, 1944 AND 1945

Production of Lard ar Peak in 1944;
.Use Encouraged ;;

Production of lard and rendered pork fut, which reached a peaj
5.,215 mi-llion pounds in 194u, probably will be -loss than 2,250 mill$~i
in 1945, on the basis of marketing of hogs and lard prEduction: thro6~
June, and prospective hog marketings for the rest of the year.* h
level of pork End lard production ia not likely to be equaled for asi~
years at least, as it was based in part on utilization of large rseer
feedstuffe.

Output of lard in the first half of 1944 amounted to nearly 1~
million pounds, over 60 percent of the total for the ~year. th3~fis~U( d
rate of production created a difficult storage problem.. RHretria~tionK
of lard in soap, bakery products, and other manufacturred foo2d p
temporarily suspended in the late spring and early summer a )
point values on lard,,ahortening, and edible oila were red~i~i~

























InCr@DISetL In AUG% ,, '".

Primary oila and fats us ed in manufnacto~ry of:~ ;sh p
2,,i~l310 million pounds in 1944, copr" ih 1 ft
earlier (table 11). In addition,. some vWa~tt 'bt& Wita irh
pro:~duect, apparently was used. Production o~f 'sjhiie tlim:it a~
:ii''gamrds in 1%~4. Soyboan oil comprised 47 percentddrrrrrddddd~i~j dO,
*r fata used: in 1'9r4 compared with 42 percent~in'it .
declinedd? rom 42 to 39. paraont of the total.. Thf.is~t
rklative abundance of sqyoyben oil in 1944. and GBo~veramirj
::neat*y 2-1/2 years, refined corttoneqed, sean ~~:. t~oo;~
,':been a3lldesited to manufacturers for ~apcadific uild4v.;ii


























































































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- l sj me ossar W arames"


































































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