The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00073
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00095

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text











BURE AU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOM ICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Nl THIS iSSUE:.
OLEOMARGAR INE: RECENT' TRENDS


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Animal fats

andoil


FATS
POUNDS
I MILLIONS I
200


Soybean 1i
'I "I

1922 1924 -1926 .1928 1930 1932 1I
DATA FOR 194OARE CRELINARY
TMENT OF AGRICULIURE NEG 38069


934 1936 1938 1940

BUII\AUF AG RICULIURAL ECONGHICL


SU 5 DEPIR'


I; ii

C;'i '"'


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.FROM 1926 THROUGH 1936 IMPOjiTED OILS MADE UP MORE THAN HALF OF THE
-TOTAL FATS ~USED. IN MAIRGARINE. SINCE 1936 THE USE OF DOMESTIC OILS HAS
. INCREASED GREATLY. -(In-1940 COTTDNSEED 01L AND SOYBEAN OIL ACCOUNTED
FOR N;EAALY IM) PERCENT OF.THE TOTAL FATS USED. A FEDERAL PROCESSING
TAx bF 3 CENTS PER POUND ON COCONUT 0L,LEVIED IN 1934, qND RECENT
STPATC TAMES DM MARGqARINE CONITAINING IMPORTED OILS HAVE BEEN MAINLY REWr
.sPOuslBLE FOR THE SHIFT FROMY FOREIGN TO DOMESTIC FATS AND OILS. THE
.. ARKED INCREASE "fN *9YBEAN 01L PRODUCTION SINCE 1934 ALSO HAS BEEN A
, OwNTsR8UING FACTOR. .


ur~~~s,~ M~ ~~UATION


AND OILS US ED I N.OLEO MARbGA RI NE, U NITE D STATES. 19 22-40




FOS-49 -2 -

Table 1.- Price per pound of specified fbts and bils, February 1939 and 1940,
Deember-February 1940-k1

item : Februagg__ 1940- 1
: 1939: 1940: Dec.: Jan.: Feb.
:Cents Centa Cents Cents Cents
Butter; 92-score; Chiicago .................!........: 25.5 29.0 34.2 30r 1 30;1
Butter, 92-score, New York ........................: 26.2 29.6 '34.8 31.1 30.8
01eomargarine, don. veg.,'Chicago ......:..........: 14.5 15.0 14.51.51.
Compounds (animal'and veg.'cooking fats), Chicago .: 9.2 9.5 8.4 10.3 10. 5
Lard; prime steam, tierces, Chicago ...............: 6.6 6.1 4.4 5.2 6.2
Lard, refined, cartons, Chicago 1/ ................: 7.5 6.7 6.2 6.8 6.8
01eo nil, extra, tierces, Chicago .................: 7.5 7.2 7.1 7.0 7,0
01ecstearine, bbl., N, Y. .........................: 6.3 6.4 6.2 6.4 6.3
Tallowv, edible,.Chicag3 ...........................: 5.3 5.4 4.6 5,4 5.1
Corn oil; crude tan~ks,.f.o.b. mills ..............: 6,0 6.1 5.9 6.7 6,6
Corn cil, refined, bbl., N. Y. ....................: 8.9 8.6 8.5 9,1 9.l,
Cottonseedlnil; crude,tankcs, f~o.b. S.E. mills ...: 5.6 6.0 4.8 5.4 5.3
S0ttoulseedjoil, p*.s.y., tank cars, :J. Y. ..........: 0.7 6.9 5.9 6.4 6.2
Peanut oil, crude, tanks; f.o.b. mills ............: 5.8 6.9 4.9 5.6 5.3
Peanut'oil,'dom. refined, bbl., N. Y. .............: 9.2 9.6 7.7 8.2 .
Soybean oil, crude, tank-cars, midwestern mills ...: 4.8 5.4 4.5 5.1 5.1
Soybean mil; dom., crude, drums, W~. Y'. ............: 6.3 6.9 6.3 6.9' 6.8 i
Soybean oil, refined, dnrms, tl. Y. ................: 7.5 8.3 7.7 8.2 8.0
babassu-nil; tanks; N. r. ..... *....... 6.2 6.3 5.8 --- --
Coconut ail; crude,'tankts,' f.o.b. Pacific Coast 2/.: 5.7 5.8 5.5 5.9 6,0
Coconut oil, edible, tanks, Ni. Y. ....,,............: 7,2 7.4 6.8 7.0 7.2
Olive oil, edible, drums, NJ. Y. ...................: 25.1 26.7 43.3 43.2 42.9
Olive-oil'f4rt, prime, droms, rI. Y. ..............: 7.1 8.3 10.4 10. 2 10.6
Olive-cil, inedible, drums, N'. Y. .................: 12.0 12.9 31.7 31.2 30.4,
P~alm hil, Niger, Crude,.drums, N. Y. 2/ ..........: 6.7 8.2 6.6 7,4 7.2`
Pain rmil; Sumatra-, bulk; NI. Y. 2/ .......,,.........: 5.8 --- 5.0 5.2 5.2
Rape oil; refined, bbl., N. Y'. ................... .:J'lCL8 13.7 13.3 12.8 12.7
Rape oil, blown, 'obl., N. Y. .....................,: 14.2 17,2 17.5 17.5 17.5
Sesame. oil,-ref~ined, drums, NI. Y. .................:- 9.5 11,6 -- --
Teas~ee oil, crude, drums, N. Y. ..................* 9.0 12.5 17.5 17.5 17.2
Tallow; inedible, Chicago .........................: 5.0 5.0 4,2 4.7 b.g
Grease, A white, Chiicago .............:5.1 ~5.1 4.1 4.8 .
M~enhaden~oil, cre~de, tanks, f.o.b, Baltimore ......: 1*.0 A 'F 4.0 4.4 4.76.
Sardine oil, crud~e, tanks, Pacific coast ..........c: 3.9 4.9 5.3 5.46.
Whale oil, refingd, b.ea~ched winter, drums, N. Y. .* 8.2 2/9.5 9.5 9.5 -9.5
Linseed mil; raw; tank cars, ]Minneapolis ..........* 8.3 10.1 7.9 8.7 8.8 r
Linseed oil; raw, drum~s, carlots, ii. Y. ...........: 8.6 10.4 8.8 9.6 9.6 "
Perilla oail,drums,N. Y. .........................:3(9.6 20.00 18.0 18,0 18.1
Oiticica'oil, druns, N. Y. ......................: 9.8 20.2 19.0 19.0O 18.1
TIung bill druns, N. Y..,.,,....................... 15.0 27.5 26.9 27.2 27.6
Castor oil, deh~ydrated, drums, carrots, N. Y. .....I 18.1 13.1 13.1 13.2
Castor oil, No,. 3 bbl., M. Y. .-....................: 9.2 12.8 9.8 9.8 9.8.
Cod-liver oil, med. U.S.P. bbl.,N.Y.(dol.per bbl.).: 25.5 33.5 72.5 71.7 68.5
Sod oil, Newfoundland, bbl., N. Y. ................: 4.0 9.6 8.9 8.4 8,9
Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, The National Provisionor, andi reports
rf the Agricultural l'arketing Service anil Bureau of Labor Statistics. Pricesqu
include ex~cise taxes and duties where applicable. ./Reported in tuba prior toJ
1940. 2/ Three-cent processing tax added to price as originally quoted. 2/ Revis






FOS-kg


- 3-


T HE FAkT S AND 0 IL S S ITUPiiA I 0 N


Sa;nmary

Lard praiouction has declined considerably with reduced tog market-

ings du~ring the past 3 monnthis, and is expected to continue subStratiallyi

smaller thani a yrear Earlier throughout 1941. Lard prices, after declining

du~rin,7 most of 1940, advanced sharsply in January and February this year.

In the latter nonth the average price of prime steam lard at Chicago was

about /O r~erent higher thian in De~ce bjer, although only slightly higher

than in February~ last year~.

The price of sardinep oil arlso EadvanTced fairly sharply in January

and FebruaSy in response to reduicsd output and to a strong denland for

vi tamin oil s. Prices of other fats and oils have not changed greatly in

recent months. The general level of prices for fats and oils in Februarsy,

at 68 percent of th~e 1S1214-29 averag.~e, was one point higher than a month

earlier and one point higher then a year earlier. Domestic de~a~nd for fats

is now stronger than it was a year ago aund is expected to improve further

thzis year. 32t th~e effective fo-reign demand is wea~ker than at this time last

Yea~r because of the blockade of most of continelta~l Europe.

Rising costs for ocear shiipen~ts, since January 1 hive been refl-cted

in higher prices for coconut oil an~d copra. A shortage of sh-ip:ing space

for coconut oil exists ats a result of the withdraiwatl of some Britishb -vessels

equipped. with d~eep-carrgo tankTs from the Philinpine-United States run.Im

ports for coconut oil in JinuaTry erler about 70 percent below the a'.rorage

monthly rante maintained in 1:340. Difficulties in obtaining shlipmen'lts from

abroad also havIe usulted inl reduced impo0rts of olive oil ?nd tung oil




FOS-;C


- 4-


Production and consurosi~on of manrgarine were moderately Inrge~r in

1980 than in 1r33, and prrices wre~l sliFrhtl; higher. Hiher~c prices for

butter were chiefly resp~onsible f"or the improved donend for me-.rgcnrine.

Noa~rly S0 percent of the Irats used' in unrcin.rin~e in 1340 consisted of cotton-

secd -nd saybFern oils. Importecd oils accented for 11 percent of the total

compa2red with 75 percent in 1933. Taxes imposed on imported oils andn onl
ma2rgarine contanining such oils, together with in~rcrse domest~ic ou~tput of

so:.acr.n oil, ha~ve been the factors pri-marily responsible for the nacrked -in-

c-Lease in the use of domnestis vogcte~ble oills and the decrease in the use of

imported oils r'uring the pnast few: ;'ours.

-- March 14, 194'1

RTEVIE ,7? RECEPT DEVELOPM~EITS

Lard prices no, sherr Iv in Februar"

The rverage 31rice of~ pr~ime ste:1 12.rd at Ch-icnao in .F7bruahy at
6.2 cents per pc~ur.0, wa~s 19 pe:1co.-t higher than in Ja~nuary.~ ad 41 percent
Above the recent low in Dcciaoor 1900~C. The sharp-1- tiance~c in l.-rd prices
has ncot bccon accon-panuied b;. colrresp~:,d ding bgins in prices for other fats.
Prices of so.-rdine rand n.i?nhden oilr :Idvan7ccd fairly: Shar3ply in Tobruary,
and prices of enconut oil and tang~ oil alvanced moderartely. But prices of
tlllow -nd gracses, oiticica. oil, :nd- cod-live~r oil vwere .moderately loner
than a month earlier, and prices of mother fat-, and oils showed little change.

The no,0k~ly rate of hoe slaughter continued to decline in Fobruary,
and for the rmonth a~veraged ab~ou~ X pel~cort less than in January. The number
of bogs slclugtered under Fnderal inspe-~ctionl in Febcruary, totaling 3,725,000
hezd, ?wars 13 p~ercent smaller thrn.n in February 10~.st yoc-r. The J~nual-y slaught a
wa~s 16 paren':t sna~ller thanL' a 700-:. earlier. Hog slcaug-hter is expected to
continue sl:.b.stanrtiallyr below last :.crtrs l;eels throughout 1941, The narked
reduct-i~in lin In.rd output acco~nan~vnngir the decrease in ho% slaughter has boon
the factor,1 prinarily- responsible for the -dvance in lard prices during the
past 2 months.

In the case of rardi~ne oil andt rmetho.den oil, thle price gains in re-
cent months hav~e bee~n the result Irlinly of a snalll s7.rdine e~t~ch this season
together w7ith a relatively strong demand for vitccain oils for use in poultry
feeds.

The general level of fats andi oils princes in Tob.ruarr, nt 6PI percent
of the 1924-29 average, was one p~oirrt higher thran in Februar last yea~r.
Prices of cod-liver, olive, and sn.r ine oils wecre substantially higher than





FoCSks 4


- 5-


a yesar e.?rlier, and prices of corn oil and butter were moderately higher.
Lard pri~es were up slighltly. On the other hand, prices of edible beef
fats,` soybeain oil,- cottonseed oil, linseedf oil, oiticica oil,.perilla oil,
inedible tallow and greases, palm oil, pe;nrut oil, and castor oil were
roughJlyr 5 to 25 percent lower in FebtruaryJ this",,ear than last. ?rus effect-
ive world lena~nd ~."r fats and oils is nowp co~nsidierablyr weaker th~an it was a
year ago, whe-n anop of continental Europe wras still open to world tr-ude.

Copra Diriccs continue to advrunce

The price of co~pra in bags, f.o.b. Pacific Coast, averaged $1.a2
per 100r pounds in 3eb'ruary, percent higher thna a month earlier pad 3 per-
cent hi~rher than c.yeatr earlier. Prices received by farmers for cottonseed
.and pean~uts advrunced slightl;.' in Febru~ry, but remained below last year's
levels. So.lybeen aend fl7.xseedl prices declined in February and were consider-
ably lower than In Febr-uary larst year.

Th~e compar~a~tive strengthn in cou~ra prices has been dae chiefly to in-
creased~ ocean~ shlippinjg coT.sts. Russian and Japanese purchases of copra, in
the Phiilirinieis also may have been a, contributing factor. According to
trade rep~o:s, 23.,287 neitric tons or rapp7roxim~atel 51 million pounds of
copra nere exp~orted from the Philippines to Chnese, Jrqpanese, r-nd Russian
ports fr~om TIovemb~er 1940 through enrly February 1941.

Imports red~uced by sh:iaing difficraltics:
ledJ ec~orts show mode2rate gain

As a result of d~ifir''culties in obtaining shipments from the Mediter-
ranean sarea, impo~rt.s of oli:e oil totaled only 1 million pounds in January
compatrd wilth rcr? ge imporlts of bout 7 million pounds monthly during 1940.
Imports he!.i up fairly well through August last yea~r, bat fell off to about
half the norm,-l razte diuringr the finalz 4 months,. A ftur~ther markced reduction
occurred in Jranu-ry this ye:.'C.

Inshione~nts, of tung oil f:ro Chinas also wrere unusually small in
January, to~taling ?nl;; 1 million poun's compaIred with. 16 million pounds in
January a .'-ear a go. Aproxrni rmately7 97 million. pounds of tung oil vere im-
ported during 1910; more thxn~ 31 pe~rce~nt of the total, however, walEs brougt
in d~uringF the first 8 nonth~s of the :'e-r.

Copro shipmecnts we;-e sell maintained in January. But imports of
coconut oil, totaling 22, million pounds, were about 30 percent below thne
average monthly rate~ last year. Sev-eral1 Bri~tish vessels equip--.ca with doop-
cargo tanks riecentl:- were withdrawn front the thi~lippine-Uhit~ed Stactes me,
creating~ r short''.ge of" chipinge cop.co for coconut oil. It has been :reported
that some coconut oil PUrchased~ in the Phiilippines for December shipment will
not be shipped:i' to the3 Unitecd Statesa be~fore April. A few British as well as
Americun uad Japenese ~.-33Gsels equiliped waith~ deep~-cargIo tanks rerncin in trans-
Pacific ser~vice. Scyrcra-l Danish- .esci3ls for~ne;l~rl Fngaged in carrying coconut
oil from thle Philippincs are now tied up in Amearicanl Ports.

L?.rd exports in J-anuary, totaling 14 n~illion pounds~, were ,-bout 2
million pounds 10.rger than in December, bu~t were 14 nillion pounds smaller





F05-49

than in Januraryv last year. The Uhited Kingd~om, formerly our nost important
forei,.n nar'let, has, taken no lart since last Arugust, although Britic~h in-
quirie~s ,or led recently;icv have en reported. Cubta and Mexiico are n:ow the
two porincipasl l'oreign-.~ outlets. D~rjring the past j months, Japan! 'lso hasC
been a buyerr. Approxihatel;, 1.1 million pounds of lard. were exp~or:ed to
Japan in TDecemblner anld. 1.6 nillilon pounds in Ja~Tu~nua. These shipmnelt s were
unu~sual, as Jap~an ir~nzrilyr is a no3t exp~orter of fats and oils. About 18
million pou:.d~.s of ledi; were shlip~pd to Finla~nd in l1940; shzipnents to Finland
in Junury th:ris l'eer totaled 771,C000 po~unds.

Excojrts of ColTbCeanrs 17r the 1940-c41 season to date have joen negligible.
In 1339-lc0, nearl: 11 million oushels were e::prted, largely to the Njether-
land11s aznd Scand.inzvia~n countries, wh~idh are nowr cut off by bledk:ade.

OLEOM~vARGAiRI1E: RECEIT TREEDS

FroductioLn-con cumnt i n of -marrarin~e
increaped aLs butteI TPrices advance

Consurption of 0100merpnrine tota.led 319 million pounds in 1940, 6
percent ;7ore- than in 1939I, but 20 percent less thlan thle reco--d consumption
of 317~ million ~pound~s in 1037. Proinction of margari1ne, which is closely
relatrrd to consrumption, amounte-d to _120 million pounds in l1;0, 6 percent
mo~re than in 1 39j. Increz-ed prices fojr butter o7ypplarent~r were chie~flyr re-
spornsible for the increased output :and use of margatrine. The~ m'ol~eale pr-ice
of qZ-score blt~ter at Chlisago in 1?4C, a1vejraging 26.7 cents per poU-.nd, wats
j.j cents Ilriither thanll in 1939. In contr~ast, the price of 01eom7.rearine
domesticc -.egetab~le, uncolored3), at 1h.8 cents per pound, was onl:, 0.1 cent'
higher thanY in the ?revious year.'

Foi'CTr capt= co~nLunstion o~f I-a.~rgane totaled 2.4 pounds in 1"L0, 0.1
pounjd h~ieher -thl inl 1)?9 tu~t 0.7 pound~r below1 the: r.cent yeJk in 1337 anrd 1
pound. btelo til 1019~-20 1ecord perl 7' pit3 el.l Por capsita consumption of
butte-r declinali. i.2 p~ouri, fron 1:1 3 to 15.40. Th~e combined cor.aur.p~tion of
butter rand can~ririr per ccpit?., a~t 1'I.S pounds, thirs wa; 0.1 pound me.11or
in 1940O thuan in ll~..?. The~ low pr~i~ce ?sd iuousully large consump!tio~n of lard
may~ have~ been rnortl: re~onsibla =M-r thiis r.eduiction.

Use of na~rr.r-.inire ?s nacookin, f7at

In re~cent years, margarine has been used as a cooking as well as a
table flt. According to the Consus of Ldanuf~zctur-es, 31 million po~unds of
marga~rin~e, or nore tha~n 10r percent of total consumption, -:7eri; usred in the
breed and. other belkery products industry~ in 1439. Ad.dlit~ional quiantities are
use~d in ho~usehol~c, an~d rerntaur-nts, for cooking purposes. Ida~rgerine resentles
buttefr in~ coolrin" pmroporties. Effo~r~ts recently have bee~n na el by, nanufa-ctuT res
to inprove its Iltility for frying purp~oses.

Production rad us? of idargarine
varicrs videly b States

The nianufncture of nargarine is~Eonfined largely to a fou States.
Approxi:!.tay~ S8 percent of the tortal output in the fiscal year 1939-40





FOS-b9


was in Illinois, Ohzio, and Indianas. .Crlifornia, Kansres, e-n3 1!3w Jersey
followed~ with 26 percent of th-e total; most o~f the 16 percent: remaining
was proiducal in I.ichignn, Texa~s, Mai:lrylan, a~d. I.:issouri,

Data concerning cojnsumpytion of argas-irie by States areo not available.
But judgi-lc from thle numbers of L:etail dealers: licensed to sell 01eomarga~rine,
consumption varies, widely. In 1933-10 the numer of licensed dealers3 per
million population va~ried from nione in Wicon~sin and North 3Dakota to 2,837
in Kan~sas. The t~otal number of de'l~ers decreased in most -Sthtes in 1? 39-80
although s~ignificant~ increases occurredd in Connecticat, Alabozma, M~ississippi,
Arkansas, Lrouisians, anid Yashinagton. .(Table 5.)

Cottonseed and so -Dern oils
disolace coconut oil in margarine

Cottnnaseed oil In 1940~ made up .45 percent of the tota"lnfts used in
the manufa"ctur-e of unr-grine com~pared adth 10 percent 10 years earlier. oy
beam oil, which accounted for less tha~n 1 percent of :the total fat~s ^I0 ';*ears
ago, mad~e u UJh pe recent of the totnl last year. In contrast, the use o'f
vegetable oils o' foreign origin, chiefl;,r cosonrut oil, has dec'Tijnedl shar-ply
in rec-nt .-earls. App~alrziatellyr 64 percet~x of ;ihe total fa.ts us'ed in 15930
uid 75 pe-cenlt of thle total iin 1953 consisted of foreignz oils; such oils
mande up, only. 22 percent of' thle tot-al ijn 15139 and 11 percent in 1940.

A Fedeoral exI~cis t-l:: of i con~ts per pound was levied in. 1934 on the
first domestic nrrocessing of coconut oil irmorted-from the Philip~pines (5 cents
if impoltrte fro n t,:er counrtlieS) rznd similar taxes were im~posedr on the p~ro-
cessin= of polm-kernel rnd pnlm oils. These taxres tended to increase prices
of the imported oils in relation to prices of domelstic oils. In addition to
the Fe~deral procssing taxes, severaT~l States during the palst fews years haver
levied e;rcise te:.cs on cleomo1-r~rrrin containing imported oils. The various
tax neasures -doted h .voe ~c:n I~rrgaly r~sporiible for the tendency of a rge-
rine manufacturl,; to ,-ubstitute coton~seed oil and soybean oil for coconut
anrd other imported oils, a~lthoughj tle? markedCJ increase in domestic -productionz
of soyrbpan oil since 1954~ has b~can 3L contrib~uti;C factor.

Silcr I93-', 3rzilir Ln take~rar oil has been used to sone extnt in
marga~rinc in cn:100tition sith coconut oil, which it resemles. Bhut aro-
duction costs fo~r b::blssu oil -.> conpparntively high, and writh taxes in some
St-.tcs discriminating ,-tir.st~ Ia-rg ine containing bazbassu ,7s we7ll "a other
imported oils, ~lech sbstitutionr of b hotlrss oil for coconut oil hras beecn of
ninor imp~ortt-nce.

Importanice of cargarine ?s ?.n outle"t for f::ts

A total of 2'i7 million pou~nds of fa.ts and oils (exc~ludirrg lilk) was
used in thea no~nufa.cture of na~rgarino in 1341?. This wa~s equiva~lent to about
3 percent of the t~ot:1~ co:?sumptioni of fat s .and oils for all purposes, and to
n~bout 5 Tjercent of the~t total cons~u~ctionr of edible fats; 7nd ones, c:.cluding
btutter and lrard For iiv'idual~ items;, the percen~tages of :-totl use r~FpreCsent-
ed by nargarine in 1940~ wore -.pproxpinztel;, as follow: 01co oil, 21 percent;
sayboan oil, 17: baibaisfl oil, 10; hostcarirne, 9; cottonsced oil, b': coconut
oil, 4: peanut oil, 3; and 13rd, C.3 ocrcont.





FC05-49


- 8


Table 2.- 01eomrargarine!: Production, withdrawin for export, and
withdrawn for consumption, United States, 1930-40


: With~rawYn for
Withldrawn
: : consumaJtion
for
,' export Total 1/ : ca.pita 2/
1,0700 pound s 1L,000_L ounds P oundsa


Calendar :
year


ProdJuction


: l~1,00 pound s


325,t660
22g,y2

245,1672
266,410

3931.93

'385,23,4
300, 857


1,s69
1,847
1,621
1,4?99
1.595
1.429
1.197
334
151
258
1,1SC


321,262
229,935
201,688
242,sys
263.237
379,920
390.995
397.301
385,1E66
jr01,215
j18,585


2.6
1.q
1..6
1.9
2.1
3.s
3.0
3.1
3.0
2.4


1930
1931
1432
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940 c


.........,:


*--------*=
..........:
..........:
I/ .......:


Compiled frolm annual reports of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue. Data
for earlier years beginningg 18E7 are given in the Dece~mber l1958 issue of
the Fats and Oils Situation, p. 7.

1/ Figu~res ar~e for quantity withdrawn for -;eneral use, tax oaid (Federazl
tax, 10= centc pcr noun~d on colored and one-fourth cent on uncolored) Dlus
quantity r-ith~dr7wn free for use of the United States in prisons and other
Federal institutions.
2/ Eased on J'uly 1 nopjulartion estimates.
1/ PreliminarJy.






FOS-49 ..- 9 .

Table 3,- 01eornargarine: Production inr the hit~ed Stztes, as reported b~y the
ALgricultura.1 Marketing~ Service ani thle Sureau of Internal Revenu,



Cal- : Uncol.rored :___ Colored. : Total :Iena
endar :7Jegetaole: combined : vegetablel: Combined : :uircolored eeue
yer and : animl : al l: and : animal = oa n-- total
: nut : and :: nut : and .: 'colored unooe
:oil : yere table: : oil : ve gatable. anl colored
:, 1,000 1,000) 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000O 1,000 1,000
poundd pounds Fo-.l p pounds poll Eounds 20~ur" pounds


1930
1931

1933

1935
3936
1937
1938
1939
1940


211,130
162,931
155,674
199,008
207,468
329,764
34o,137
349,477
340,300
265,901
277.375


29i;,147
21'; 8r7
194,278
233,727
2591979
375,851
386,227
389,797
378,5~7
300.393
312,256


4,749
2,150
971
703
792
936
1.252
9t55
1,026
1,ok5
1,942


13,608 -311,755 ` 325,;660
S6,14 6-221,95.) '229,927
S3,43s 197.716 20~3,23=
-2,504- 242,231 2L4 ,472
2,921- 262-,900 26.,410
2,826 378,677' 381,633
2,671.-390,898 393,293
1,703- 391.500~ 397,3E0
1, 5=6 3P0,093 325,234
1,437 301,830 300,857
2,416 320, 672 $20,332


s7,o17
52,876
34,604
40r,719
52.511
46;,087
4Fs,ogo
ICo,320
38,267
34,492
4o,881


8,aJ59
.3,996
2,46;7
.. ,i801
2,129
S1,890
1.'419
748
500
392
474


Compiled as followJs: ; .0
Agricultural Manrk~eting Service, reports of manufacturers. *"
Bureau of InternalE1 Revenue, annual reports of the Comnmissioner,
Data for earlier years begFinning 1918 are given in n01eomargarine: Statistics
of.Production, Materials usod in Manufactu;re Consump tion, Trado, andrice s,"
Bureau of Agricultural EconomLics, Aug~ust 1936 P. 2. ***
Production reports to the Bulreau of Internal Rev-enue are required-by law i~nd
are considered to be more accurate tha reports to the~ Agrioultural Marketing
Service, which are vo~luntary:; Che latter are useful because thieyj a're''roken
down into special classifications,
1/ Preliminary.








~ _


F"OS-49


S10 1

Table 4.- 01eomargarine: Production, by States, 1935-39


: Year beginning Julg
:19320 : 19)36 : 1937 : _1938; : 1939


S000 lb. 1000 10.


20,587 19,374
64,543 50.934
40,?16 33,162
93,699 893170
g1.788 16,573
761 5sk
8,300 e,j87
22,9?cS 20,868
9,e99 9,827
30 2
--- 480
1,599 2,937
521 397
7,252 10,068

1,427 1,424
41,702 38,631
,'32,973 303,717


State


Total colored and :1,0300 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. I
uncolored:
R. I. ...........: 29 -- -
11. J. ...........: 26,116 24, 21.9 29, 857
ohio ............: 84,094 86,285 79.733
Ina. ............: 30,oo3 36,549 42,223
Ill. ............: 129:393 129,531 133,924
MIich. .........: 13,119g 14,626 19,572
Minn?. ....,,.....: 1,129 1,215 1,287
Mo. .............: 9,435. 11,115 11,229
Elans. ...........: 23,;"45 25,1-45 21,830
bEd. .............: 6,555 7,940 logos
N. c. ...........: -- -- -
S. C. ...........: -- -- -
Ga. .............: -- --
Ala. ............: --- --- 150
Tex. ............: 5,021; 5.557 6,9&3
Colo. ...........: .1,042 1,199 398
Oreg, .....,......: 1,40 1809 2,j86
Calif. ..........:_ _10 TEL __](1, 38 49,126
U. s. 1] ......: 371.73a 389,26~4 15,400


Colored :
11. J. ...........: c59 46) 217 193 213
Ohio ............: 102 75 4 29 412
Ind. ............: th 55 57 23 3

Mo. .............: r95 j33 247 12129
Kan~s. ...........: 2 270 7l$ 353 236
Ed. .....,......: 102 3 20Cr 126 400
S. C. ...........: --- -- 26
Ga. .......,,,...: -- 525
Tex. ............: 10 jo 29 8 -
Colo. ........... : 22_____. 13 5 ---
U. S. f .~.....: 2,7r3 1,4;1_ 1,6j49 1, js1 1, 860
:Total colored and uLncolored perentage
:of Untited St::tes production in~sgecified Stntes
:Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent

Ohic ..................: 23 22 19 19 17
Ind. ..................: 8 9 10 12 11
Ill. ..................: 35 33 32 28 30
Mich. .................: 3 4 5 5 5
Mdo. .........,.........: 3 3 3 2 3
Kans. ........,........,: 6 6 7
Md. ...................: 2 2 2 3 3
Tex. ..................: 1 1 2 2 j
-Calif. ............,...: 11 11 12 13 13
Other .................: 1 1 2 '2
Total ...............: 100 100, 100 100 100
Compiled from annual reports of thie Commissioner of Internal Erevenue. These
data are not available on. a calendar yeanr basis. Data for earlier years be-
ginning 1899 are giveni in 01eonargarine, op. cit., pp. 5-9.
If Totals of unrounded numbers.




rc0e-49 1

Table 5.- Iuumber of retail dealers licensed to sell uncolored 0lr~somergarine
and number per million pop~ulation,.b y States, year beginnings~ July, 1937-33
: etail d~ealers per million
State etail dealerrs 1/ _8Ijp.~ltion ff

: I~Jrmb er H~umb'er Humb c~r IE;b- umber' 1~ Thr~7
Maine ......: 2, lj7 2,165~ 1, ia 2,426' 2,550' 2,335
1r. HI. ,,....: 1,4 1 S 2,.471 1, c99 ,4
Vt. ........: 451 :; 57 1,;206 1169
Mass. ......: 5,011 ih,192 3,624 1,4296 39
Ri. I. ......: 1 ,057 i 5 724 1,527 1, 259 1, 015
conn. ......: 1,436 s:2 o66 831 473 565
IT. Y. ......: 15,g52 12, 272 11,1i54 1,063 923 828e
N.T J. ......: 6,96~0. 4, ir6 3,7 4 1,160 1 ,128 902
pa. *.... 4,622 '1,372 3,9122 459 473 335
Ohio .......: 18,61). 16,115 14,?7:; 2,448 2,357 2,16g
Ind. .......: ?.939. 9,a ,st61 2,8578 2 ,J71 2,614
Ill. .....: 1662 15,555 147 2, 114 1,970 1,807~
Mlich. ......,: 12,50 11,7971067 2,523 2,310 2,02b6
W~is. .......: 50 17 -- -
Mdinn. ......: 2,?21 1,16 1 2 662 495
Iowa ........: !,9j5 ?, 3C 2i 1 ,5E7S 1,546 90o6 622
Mo. ........: j, 092 E,750 3,171 2,324 2,273 2,199
N. Dak. ....: 1 6 2 -
5. Dak. ....: 51 27 5 75 41 s
17ebr. ......: 21"5,9 2, jsE 2,5;1: 2,195 2,2)-12 1,953
Kans. .....: 5,464L 5,310 510 2,?:4 2,908: 2, 837
Del. .......: !37 1125. St) 1,668g 1,610 1,3;22
Md. ....: 31519 3,5 ,og5 2,040O 1,851 1,700
D. C. ......: "7 91 6 1,539 1,515 1,14s
Va. ........: 4,141 $,01 il, 21 1,5142 1, l96 1,464
Wv. Va. .....: 4,S75 6,5 2 ,449 2,611 2,420 2,339
N. C. ......: 7.,146 2,866 2~,E1 897 00793
S. C. ......: 1,2 ,5 ,)9 1,024 926 915
Ga. ........: ,1,491 3.. j9 3,20'2 1,130 1,075 .. 1,025
Fla. .......: ,,13 5,160 },SS 2,362 2,-L0 ;2,047
FKy. ........: 4, j0:4 4,167 ,4 1,492 1,.524 1,5285
Tenn. ......: 775 17250~ 130 .109 856
Ala. .......: 2,428 2,'715 2,E 47 918 965
Miss. ......: 635~ I?? 1,.C2 321 -313 573
Ar-k. .......: 23 2,15? 2,267 1,176 1,091 1,1b)
La. .......,: j,006~ 2,v'1 3,214 1,363 1,239 1,360
Okla. ......: 716 604 251 290 165 120
Tex. .......: 3,150 8,735 E,723 1,467 113 1 1,360
Mlont. ......: as 2 31 52 58 55
Idaho ......: 7 4 14 --
W y-o. .......: 397 751 369 1,6. ,27 170
Coo,....: 2,551 241 2,355 2,367i 2,20C- 2,097
N. M~ex. ....: 671 82 53 1 462 16b 1,227
A~riz. ......: 953 ,3 1,'59 211 21 2,1,22
Utah .......: 2;6 252 259 40 6741
Nev. .......: 162 14~3 .151 1,5,58 1,3100 1,373
Wash. ......: 7 59 2 .- 34
Oreg. ......: 2J,693 2,T35 2,741 2,51i ,512, E15
Calif. .....: 1,22216 12. f4j 12,2Jk juE2ji 1,15? 1,J771
oetal ....: 18 ,901 173, h26 162,4)U 1,41 1,527 1,2i;4
10mile rom annual rePjorts of the Conn;1.iscioner of In ernal rDevenue. 2/ Basoe
T fODlu.1 at 0.Ro lst iat esil S s, a ars Ith n193 ,~.19, Eureau of Agri-




























































Preliminaryi.
Partly estimated,


Compiled as follow.-s:


- 12 -


FOS-49


Table 6.- Total anrl per cap~ita disappearance of butter an~d a1eomargarine,
United States, 19123-1;0

Calendar .oa iapaa lePr ~it id-aac
: 01eo- 01eo-*
year Buttar Bu tter J .o~ta~l
: :marar e :: marrgarinle.
: ,00 t. 100 l. b. L. Lb.
*'


1912
1913
1914
1915


1918
1919
1921
1922
1923
1921
1925

1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1936

1936
1937
1938
1939
1940


: 1,=84,L64
: 1,ir06,310
: 1,o85,530
: 17108
: 1,766,3500
: ,63-,~221
: 1,iL63,38
: 1,605,021
: 1,5~77522
: 1,757;1'0
: 1,85;131
: 1,9953276
: 2,053-,103
: 2,029,728
: 2,006~;392
: 210643~93
: 2,0163,3305
: 2;117,1)3
: 2;134;195
: 23266,516
: 2,262,145
: 2,254,252
: 2,312;01,0
: 2,=07,U140
: 2,13C,02'

: 2,1933775
:2,1301


16~.7
1;.6

17.4

16.0
13.9
15.3

16.2



17.7
17.5
17.5



18.3




10.7

17.0
2/17.6


1695919


la3,387
283?;17
346;851


214;628

226;207
230;40
2312;32
240;&91


352;99 9
323,22
22'?,9935

242; 78



:Iis3;73301
rO0 1,;2 1 5 tt
318,535


1.5 .
1.6
1.k


2.8
3.3
3.6 .

1.7 .
2.0
2.0

2.1
:2.3
?.6
2.9
2.6
1.9
1.6
1.9


2.1

3.1


18,2
18.2
18.6
18.8
19.3

17.2
18.7
18.2
14.2
18.8
19.9
203.1
19.7
19.6
19.8
19.8
20.3
19.9
203.0
19.9

-20.4
** -20.3
-- 19.6
-19.8
-19.8
-- 19.9
19.8


,






ii


Total apparent disappearance -
Butter, computed from d~ata on production Lnd stcjrls, kgri~cultlral M'arket-
ing Service, and foreign trade, Foreign Comme~rce and; Navigstion of the
United States. Exports include s!-i-pments to Uni~ted States territories.
01eomargarine, from annual r-;ports of the Commnicssonzr of Internal Rev-
enue. Figures are for quaantity withd~crsan for gen--Tral use, tax ?aid,
plus withdrawn free from tax for use of; ,the Un~ited States in prisons
and! other Fide~ral institutions.
Per capital diisappearance based on tota~l disappearance and July 1 population
estimates.





- ly -


Table 7,- 01eomargarine: Mat~erials used in manufacture, U~nited States,
1933-4o


, 1933 1934 193.5 1936 97.138.13 194o
S1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000


Item


poundR ERBRA


po81 unuds pounds pomd ounds pounds pound s

18,227 18,330 12,278 13,411 11,866 14,332
2,612 3,550 3.375 3,282 3,067 3,386
3,oo5 2.199 1.748 1,464 1,355 5,100
2,390 1,930 1,318 1,532 1,042 1,260
1 ~~ ~ 6 -- -- -- -- -
----- --- --- 69 es 7
26.235 26,009 18,719 19,689 17,399 24,242
99,504 10s,106 173,.617 142,858 98,656 115,946
1740 14,261 31r791 39,885 70,822 87,103
.369 4,14o 2,sso 3.593 2,445 1,730
32 1,28 1796 566 4s9 421


01eo oil ...........: 15,095 21,872
01eostear1ine ...,....: 3,120 3,878
Lard, neutral .....,: 8.959 7,486
01eo stock ........,: -829 1.454
Butter .............: 7 11
other animal fats 1/: -- --
Monostearine .......: -- --
Total -animal ._..: 28,010 34,301
Cottonseed oil ,....: 17;997 54,778
Soybean oil ........: 7 24
Peanut oil .........: 2,635 2.744
Corn cil ..........,: 341 4


Other vegetable:
3ils 2/ ...,.......,: --- 1 40 --- --- 27 12 11
Vegetable gum ......: --- -- --- ---- --- 2
Total domestic:
vegetable ......: 20,980_ 51255). 105,685 127,745 210,084 1846,929 172,424 205,21)
Coconut oil ........:150,oo6 123,678 174,315 150,465 73,806 89,520 38,519 21,780
Babassu oil .......,: --- --- 1,838 16,114 14,607 11,547 13,942 6r150
Palm-kernel ail ...,: --- --- 425 2,401 7,946 4,746 473 ---.
Palm o il ...........: 544 66 3 1,400 1,063 --- 1 4)
Sesame oil ....,,.,,: 77 58 1 --- --- ---
Other j/ ...........: --- --- 100 456 --- 69 --- ---
Total foreign:
vegetable .,.....:1501640 123,744 17'6.758 170,894 97.423 105,882 52, 93 5 27, 934
Total fats and:
oils ...........,:199,630 215,5962 308,678 324,648 326,226 312,500 242,758 257,j89
Milk *****..--....,,.: 58,417 61,903 83.307 76.386 72,846 73.169 58.655 60,961
Salt and other a
miscellaneous .....: 14,806 16, 619 22, 520 21,,386 19, 073 18, 235_ 13,855 13,786
Total .......,...: 73,22j 78,_E22 105,827 97,772 91,919 911404 72.510 741747
Grand total ....,:272,853 294,118 4lk,50 4 22,420 418,145 403,90rC 315.268 332,136

Alnanal totals on a calendar-year basis are not published the Burea~u of Internal
Reevenue but are computed by the Bureau of Agricultural Economies from monthly data
.published in the semiannual eumulations of the Internal Revenue Bulletin. Data for
eaZrlier years: beginning 1913 are given in 01eomargarine, op, cit., pp. 14-17,
/j Includes beef fat and oleestearine oil,
4/ Includes cottonseed stearine, soybean stearine, vegetable stearine, and miscel-
laneous vegetable oil,
3/ Include= ouri.cu~rl oil, rape oil, rice oil, and sunflower oil.





4.1 4.9 5.6'
.1.1~ 1.31,.
-.5 .. 6 2.0C
.5 ... ..A. --..
7.2 9'.'


- 14 -


FOS-h9


Table 8.-
to


01eomargarine: P'ercentage contrib-.itedl or principal items
the .weight of, fats anrd oils used in mntlu-fac'ure,
SUnited SCtates, 1933;-40


Item 1933 1934, : 1935 1936 'i 1937 i 938 i 1939 1940
:Percenlt Pe-rcen~t Percent Pecrcent Peracent percentt Per~cent Percent


O1eo oil .........:
01eostearine .....:
Lard, neutral ....:
01eo st~cke .......:

Total animal ..


4.5-
.A.


10,1
1.6
3.5


.9
1.0
.3


5.05 3.8
1.1 1.0
.7 .5
.6 .4

8.0? 5.7


8;.6


16;,L


15.9


9. 0 25.4 32.2 33.3 53.2 .AS,? 40.6 le5.0
1I 1 .0 L.1 9.8 51,..8. .29.2 33.8
.31.3 1.4 1.3 .9 .1.1 ... 1.0 .r7
.2 / 1 .h.6 .2 .. .2 --.2

101.5 25. 3.2 3? i 4.5 '59.8 71. 79,7


Cottonseed oil ...:
Soyjbean o'il ......:
Peanut oil .......:
00rn oil .........:
Total netic
vege abe....:


:75,2 57. 56.5 hS. l 22,6 28.6 15.9 19.5
: -- ---.6 .0 4.5 37 5.7 2.4
: .? 2,/4 1.5 .2 -
: .3 11 1,' .h .3 _-_-- 1/ 1
75. 57. 55 .2 '.6 29.8 ~33, 21.8 -10.9


Coconut oil ...
Babjassu oil ......
Palm-kernel oil ..
Palm"1 il .......
Total foreign
vegetable
Total fats and
oils


1C00.0


-LC U 100C. 3 100.0 100s.0 .c


11100.01 100.0 100.0


Based on'figures-in table` 7, To'tals include 0.2 pcarce~nt 0:-19 iscof butter beef
fat, oleostearine oil, monostearinel, cottonsteed stearine, saybo-~~an stearine, vege-
table stearine, miscellaneous vege~table oils, vegetable; gum, se~sagne~il, ouricuri
oil, rape oil, rice oil, mud sunflower oil in certain years. Data ~fqr ~earlier--
years bsgnlnin 1913 are give~n in 01le~mar~arrine, op. cit., p3. 13.
1/ Less th-an 0.05 percent.





-15 1

Table 3.- 01eomnargarine: Salt uand othe-rr miscellaneous materials uised
in manufacture, Unitedi Sta~tes, 1930-403


:
:


: Soda :Vitamnin


:Derive- :


:
4 :
:
:


Cal en~dar:
year :





1930 :
1931 :
1912 :

19334 :
1935 :

1939 :
1940 :


Color-: JSu arl : te: LPci-- : (ben- :
ing : : f : thiin : =oate :


p!d rounds 29984 ESSf; R'Zggis pounds


co'n-


Salt :

:, C0
: ~d


:otal


trate: :

counas.





---
---
---


1,1


1,000~
ggggds

27i,400
17,5119
1 2, S91
14, 806
16,619
22,520
21 'i6
19 ,073
18,235
13,&55
.13,74G


27.365





12,.09
1.,725


1,222

1.2,5
1,059
The


---
---
---
85
196
---
---
---
---
---
---


Compiled from Internal Pevenue Bulletin. Data fo~r earlier' years beg-inninrg 1913 are
.given in 01eomargarine, op. cit., p. 18.

.Table 10.- 01eocrargaine: ImPori'ts, exports, net imports or net; eixporto,
United States, ~1930-k0
(!jet exports are indicated by a minus sign~)
: Imports :
.Calendar : Fro7m ::: .- : -et irsorts
year : Philippine : From other Total 1/ Exports: or
:Islands, : sources net exports
: frsee
: 1,00lb 1200911.' 1,0 11. 1,0 b 100lb


1930
19131
1932
1933

1936
1937
1938

.1939
1940


10s



264
1, 030


- 54F;




61s
2,2?9

2,345


125
150
'68
106 ~
'19


2,312
3, 27

1,745


2,295
2,609
"1,764


Compiled from Foreign Camerce~ and U~nvi,-ationr of-the Unitedl Stastes. Imports, by
Countries, not published prior to Jun~e 19j5.
/ 1935-4i0, imported morstty into Puerto Riico and the Virgin Islands, preslumably for
consumpFtion in those territories.


205-49






-. 16 -


FOS-i?


:Table 1'1.- 01eomargiarine: Average price p~er pcund Ch~icago, 1930-1.

Wh~-ite, animan~l fat 1,/
Year Jan.: Febj. I sr. : Mr.i~ M'a; :June :July Aug:~:l. Sep 0Ot.': ove D3ec. Av.
:CentE Cents~ C~En:2 Cents-c Centi's CeniP 2en~ts Cenrts Cents Cen'~::rt Data edu Cents

1930 : 19.5 19.5 19. 19.5 1. 951. 18.5 18.5 18.5 18.; 17.7 19.0
1931 : 17.5 1. 13.E 12.8 12.5 12.1 12.0 13.0 16.1 14.8 '4.9 14,0
1932 : 14.2 1, 11.0 11.1; 11.0 11.0 10.6 10.8 11.0 1 11.07 i110 11,2
1933 : 1. .5 9.L 9.6 109 11.0 11, 11. 0 11, 0 10.9 9.2 8.5 10.2
1934 : 8.5 8.a y.5 .5 9.2 9.5 9.5 10.5 131151. 9.8
1935 : 13.4 14.0 15.5 5. 15.2 15.5 15.0 21,.5 14.5 15.7 16.0 16.0 15,$I
1936 :t. 16. 1 .0 1 4. 581.5 16.0 14.0 1. 15.3 15.; 15.5 15.6 15 r3
1937: 6. 10.5 16.5 16 .5 16:.4 15.4 15,0 15 f.0~ 15, .0~ 14.0~ 15.0 15.6
l?38 : 15,.0 1$.5 14. 1. 5 13.8 17. 4 14.5 15712.51.0191.216
1939 : U0L .0 1400 13.5 13. 351, 241. 281, 3-
1960 : 12.0 12 .0 12.0 12, 120 1. 1 20 11.3 .5 12 12.5 11.5 11.- 11.-8
1941, : 1 12.CI

Hdut 2/

193?0 : ?C1.0101701. .01, 1. 17.0 17;.0" 17.0 16.0 16,9
19 31 : 16.0 15.5 14. 13. 1. 20 10.2 100 1.2 12.i 12,.0 12.6 12..7
19?32 :11.6 9.2 3. 52 .5 9. ;.2 8.0 8.8
193;3 : 20 75 .2 7. 97 9. 9.0 9.0 8. 7.6 7.5 8.2
1935+ : 1161251.5 c713.5 15 13.5 12&12.0 11.9 12.4 12.1 12.1 12.6

1936 : 11.5 11.5 11511.7 11.1 1. 11.2 11.9 251. 301. 12.0
103j~7 /: 15.0 15.0' lt.L 14.0~ -3.9 12,9 12'.5 12.2 11.8 --- --- ---4/13.5
1938 1/ --- -- 9 0 -
19339 : .5 a.5 8*5 8.5 8.0 8.0 E,& E.5 10 7,1 6 9.9 9.1 8.9
1940 : 8.6 3.4 .8.2 8.L 8.5 e.5 8.2 8;.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.2
19$1 : 8,3 8,5

Dom~estic,veeal

1936 Z/. --- 1 .5 6 13.0 14 14.9 15.3 15,8 16.0 16.k451/1
1937 : 16.5 16.5 10.j 10~.5 10. 1.L 15.0 15.5 1C,.2 15.0 15.1 .15.5 15.8
1938 : 15.5 15.0 15.1 1'. 14.8 1561. 4 16.0 15.8 15,4 14.8 15.5
1939 : 14.5 1L.5 116.5 15. 1$.5 14.: 1.5 16.5 14.9 15.0 15,0 15.0 14r.7
1940 5. 0 15.0 15,0c' 1S.0 5. 15,0 14. i 14.5 16.5 14.5 14,5 16.8
1941 : 451+.5

Compiled from The Ilational Prcvisio~ner. Average of weekly quotations.
1/ Quoted in 1-rpound cartons, rolls, or prints, Jranuary 1930-?Jay 13, 1'939.
2/' Quoted in 1-rpoundc cartons, January 1930pSeptember 22, 1937.
2/ Prices not available, October 1937-llovember 1938.
&/ -month average.
Z' Pilot reported prior to week ended April 18, 193~6.











: Feb.:
Grrjul: 1111__ : 19;t) : Dc. C


1967-41
: Jan~. :Feb.


__


P05-49


- 17 -


Table 12.- Wh~olesale prices ~f fats and oils: Index numbers,
February 1939 and 1p94, Decenter--Februacyr 1940-41
(1924-2? = 100)


Eight domestic fats and oils 1/ ..:
Eight domestic fats and oils .....:

All fats and oils (27 items) .....:
Grouped by origin:
Animal fats ....................:
Marine anrimal oils .............:
Veyetsble oils, domestic .......:
Vegetable oils, foreign .......,:
Groupedj b use:
Eutter, unadjusted .............:
Butter, adjusted 2/ ..........'..:
Lard ..............;.............:
Food fats, other ...............:
Soap fats ,.....................:
0rying oils ................;....:
Mliscella~neous oils .............:


57 6


47


1001
1102


5c
56
.50



57


1/ 110-4 = 00.2/ djusted for typical seasonal variation.

Table 13,- Prices of specified oil-bearing materials, FebruzaS
1939 and 1940,j December-Februacy 1940r-41


: : Feb. :a 190- 41
Item Unit
: : 14 9 : 1980 : Dc. JaLn. : Feb.
: Dl.Dol. D ol. Dol. Dol.


Castor beans, Brazilian,::
ship't.,c.& f., :Jew York~.: Tn : --
Copra, bags, f.o.b.::
Pacific Coast ...........:100 lb.: 1.71
Cottonseed, Dallas .......: Ten :2.4
Flaxseed, 1Jo. 1, : :
Mlinneapo0lis .............: Bu. : 1.92
Peanuts, shelledd,:
Runners Hon. 1,S.E. mills.:100 lb.: 5.20
Soyrbsans,, ;T. 2 Y'ellow,::
Chicago .................: Bu. :.82


51.00 51.010 51.00


29.63

2.14

5.38

1.06


26.94



5.05

.95


1/ 6.20



5.12

1.~1


1.82


1.75

5.25

.95


Compiled fr-om Oil, Paint and DrugT Reporter, Dailyr Trade Bulletin (chicago),
Dai1 3ly ake~t Record (Minneap~olis), and reports, of the Ag~ricultura~l Mrarketing
Service.
If Preliminary.






























Compiled from records of thie Agricult*:2.1 M~arketing Service.
1}Bagnged, carlots, e-ce:,t for neanulit meal.
2/ 30-32 orrcent protein.


FOS-89


- 18


Table 14.- Price per ton of specified oil-cake meals, February
1939 and 1940, Decei.-oer-Febn~ruar 1980-41


/1 : eb. :1103-LI1
Itm- :1'ji 144O Dec. : a. eb.


: ~~ Tollare" Do!lla~rs .nollPIF, Do llas ~


Dollars


?]. C


21.'55


22.60





2'j.50

25.40

21.94

29.75


24.40

24.45 .

j1.25

28.40

2j.90

20.69

26.60


Copra re3l, Los AngSeles ..:
Cotton~seed meal, hL1 :er~cent:

Cottonseed meal, p~rotein, Chiciago .;.....:
Linseed meal, 77 "crcent
protein, I';?neapolls ......:
Linsee~d neal, .4 percent:
protein, U.:an '-ok ......,...:
Peanut lea.l. 45 percent:
protein, f.o.~o. S.L. mills.:
Soylbean ne3.l, 41 Dercent:
protein, C1icago ..;.......:


22.20

28.95

35.2,

28.90


21. .0 29.80

27.30 '15.S0 -

;u.75 j1.25


20.99 -

24.70


38.00 2;.60

33.17 22. 70

29.95 ..29.60








Table li.- 1Cllonnrg..rinP: P-ooduction and materials used in rranufactur~e,
-hit ed States, January 1Sj9 and~ 1 1-0, :iovembe~-rJ~i-Janl-.r 19;0-81

: Jain. : 190411
'm : Ilos i 4, -v. : Dec. :J

P loroduct ion:
Colore~d .....,.....1......: 120 150 278 2002/ 412
Uncolorcd ..,.............: 0,295 29,209 _2,2 227 3,1

Materi-l used::
01eo coil ................: 1,187 1,144 1,345 1,477 1,788
Oleast earine .....,.......: 232 265 263 301 227
Lod nura ......: 107 241 0 776 777
01o tok.........: 131 120 107 1~5 15&
Mor~octearine .....,.......: --- --- 19 1_ 16
To tal znimal ..,........: 1,657 1,170 2,1i4? 2, 21 _2, 9156l(
Co ttonseed oil ..........: 9,.M 10,077 1098 13,107 13,4-1
say;boan oil ......,.......: 4, 811 8,97 9,7 54 9,0
PeaLnut oil ..............: 213 16 31i57 182~ 9:4F
c rn oil .............. 119 84 17 34 37
Cottonsend stearine .....: --- --- --- 1 -
SOybeen~y Estearine .,.......: --- --- 1 -
Total diomestic,:

Cocnutoil.............: '25 201 10 ,2 ,8
Bazbassu oil .....,........: 712 ; 56 lbi ---
Palm-kern~rel oil .........: 122 --- --- --- ---
Ttal foreign,:
'egetable ,...........:_ dI,(j_. 2 J 1 O1511,281
Total fats and oils ...: 24_:0 8= 0.0 31rT 2;,505

Mlilk *.......... 51856 5,696 5,54ic 6,o34 6,221
Salt :nd other:
mi scellan eous ... ....: 1,394 1,307 1, 209? 1,341 1,353

Comnilld '1r. Internal Revnuep lrecor~ds and! Inte~rnal IRevenue Bulletin.

2/Inc~?lateS !nnu.faCtur rsr returns whidih were not available for prior reports.
J/ Total rof ino-.anc~ir-4 nlumbers.


205-89


- 19 -




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



3 1262 08905 1691




















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