The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00073
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00092

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text





THE *c-p~Q




nuREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONd ~t\
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AG. LT UR'E

FOS-9B g 1

-- ..
FLAX5EED: PRODUCTION, CRUSHINGS, #N "*
PRICE, UNITED STATES, 1920-44
HUrMELs
~Grushings








to





so \ ~I II r



qul. Parity prio






;; : ~r L~ I r l I I I I (Pr i p i I I I





1(40 1923 1926' 1929 1932 1935 1938 1941 1944
YEAR SE61NNINC. JULY
aarAs nanuarramRC1Y maRrWrn rma
Eiiiii;;.::~anne. :I .rrr11 PA raD IYI me~ ani rWse mass~ marrecsa r oar 01I sTI
;,2WlllHMMarrlP t15 asTBREua rturgLEclolc


Prpji~i~agath oflaSseed in 1945 will be only about half as large as the bumper crop last
. .. 11Mr4 ia a43 arg hift of acereag this ycear free flaxseed to wrheat and eate, largely be-
.~~~;faoipeprc taNl Idat. ear for flaxaced to comparison with wheat or oats.
i:rob i~prf sgistatrthnralio~l.is recentlyi raised from $3.05 pe-r bushel to $3. 10
e., r all t farmoe In 1944-4Y5 probably will average a few cents, higher than
when the evrage pr Ic at the fare level was $2.84 per bushel.


d' iiill':i ;i:






hable 1.* Whelehgle prse per pooun a has mat eI at spttled amwte, s ~am$t
summrs or prsses any 3esa In ss, mp..anz loaw ,';





s~; ubter, S~ramsor Chiago ........!..!.......................*.: bT.l 41.6a 41.6 4.8 1
Bulttr, I~aB-***, Wa mTo ..,...uk..f........................... s it%; 48.8 48.5 4.8 8
01emergartas,~u de. veg.. ChiUrg4 4.~..........................* 19.0 19.0 '19.0 SA.0 -I918 :;.0
; Compomlas (oanim1Sa~ C dquakg fto), Chicago .............s 7. It.0 17.0 T t.
Irdloe hel ..J................ 11.9 12t. 18.8 11.9 11.6
Isrd, prime stea, thereeshl aseng ..........................,..: 12.0 13.8 1Z.8 -160 ';Y8r.0.
isrt, rtined, eartons. Chiao ................................s 4. 15.61 16;1. 5. 1
01** oil, lo. i, barrels, Wei Torkr .............................s 23.2 1.8I 188 38 15.8
01eostertne, bbl., I. T. ......................................s 10.8 Uhl.6 10.8' 10.5 10.5
Wallow, edible, Chiongo ..................................... Os 9.9 9~ .0 9.9 gg

Carn oil, orude, tans, t.o~b. mills ...........................I 28.7 188 12.81 18.8 12.6
Cor a ol, runined, bl., I. T. .................................s 15.5 165.6 ---
Cottonsed oil. Mord, tanks, t.o~b. 8.L. mill ................s 12.0 18.8 12.81 12.8 18.8
Costanseeod oil, p.e.g., tank ors. 6. T. ........................ 14.0 1.0 1.143 1.
9eanut oil1 arude, Smks, t.o.b. aS11s .........................I 18.9 13.0 18.0 15.0 5.
;keant oil, refined, edible (t~hite), drrum, W. T. .......**... ur 16.8 16.3 85 1. 16.6
Saybeena ol., orude, teak ears, midgetern mille ................s 1. 11.8 11.8 11.8 11.8
80Jbeen oil, edible, drung, 1.ed., I. T. ......................s 4. 15.0 16.0 15.1 15.8

COconut *11, Shils, arde, teas i.o.b. Paific Coah y .....s 10.6 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.0
COoasont oil, Yails, enuds, balk, ed.f~. W. T. 2/ ............us 1 11.11. 11.4 11.6 1.
Ceamatu oil. rails, refined, edible, teak oara~.a.b.l.T. d /w 1A.8 18.8 18.8 18.8 12.8 5'
01weoil. CalI4~Iforndiaele, drums. W. T. ....................s 58.6 68.7 6OI 0.7 00.7 60.7
Samoil. Riger, orude dres, W. T. 2)' .........................a 1. 16 1.
Radpe oil, refined, donatrurd, bulk, e.i.f., I. T. ..............s j 5. 1.0 16.0 16.0 10.0 i:
W8mflomer oil, semria-refne tank ears, f.o.b. 6. T. ...........5 14.5 245 143 1.8 1.

T~allo. Ho. 1, Saudible. Chiange ...............................s 8.4 8.4 8.6 8.4 8.6
Orease. A. hIte, ~Change ......... .................. ...........s 9.0 8.8 18.8 1.8 8.8
lmbedea oil, orade, tanks, r.o.b. Baltimore ...................s 8.9 B.9 8.9 8.9 8.T
Bar; Sdine oil, Mrde, emake. Pacitle Coast .......................s 8.9 8.9 6.9 8.9 0.9
W~ Ihale oil, ratised, blesched winter, drru. Y. T. ........;......5 11al 18.8 12.3 8. 18.3

Linseed oil, rear, teak war. Minnepolia .......................s 12.6 14. 1.5 4 14.3
Linsee8 oil, raw', drume, earlota, I. T. ................r........s 3.8~ 15.5 15.1 15.1 15.1
Ditioles oil, tank ear, f.o.b. 1. T. ..........................r 26.0 85.0 20.6 19.2 19.0
T1 un oil, derma T. .......................................s 18.6 39.0 39.0 39.0 30.0

Cantor oil, Ho. 3 bbl., II. T. ..................................s 18.8 13e6 18.8 18.8 13.6
SCantor oil, 1o. 1, tanks I. T. ................................s 13.0 1.0 10 150 10
Cantor oil, diehydrated, tanks. W. T1. ...........................a 19 6 1.T 17.7 17.7 17.7
C od-liero oil, ma~d U.S.P. bbl., W. T. .........................s 56. 8.6 36.5 54.5 31.6
Cod oil, lawoudland drms i. T. ............................s 18.0 18.0 11.7 12.T 11.
2~HD IUMBER (19842C a 100))
IhtI domesio ths cand pils (1810.*16 ='100) ................... 133 148 14 141 141
.Ight damentie fate *aa oils ...................................s 94 101 100 100 100 '"

All61 fats and oil1 (BT itoam) .....................,.............I 102 108 D 1071 1071. I
Gran ed b orl an
Ammal rats .............................................. 89 98 8586I
lbrine anim oils ....................................;.... 187 132 818I
vegettble oils, dameetta .....................................I IrS 188 13 14 8
Vegetable oils, foreign .......................-...............s 148 187 156 15615


r: Butter, somonaolly adjusted ..................................s BB 101 108 108 101.

Other food fta ........................................... s 186 159 141 1C124
All food ftet ............................................ a6 10510 18
gosp rate ............................................... 180 180 28D 120 'I g
Drying oiLs .............................................. 1186 15 14 38
MIanellaneous one....................... 116 117 114 .
All industrial fat ad oto ,.............. .................s I:. .. 152: "18
Sarlos campiled tram 011, Rint and Drug Reportelr, The gattanl Provistanr, The Joitrus at Commr
reports at the War Pood A~dministratican ad Boureau oflabar statisting. Pr~ices ati~~ Saabledi ZEi~p
where applinable. Index nlbers far earlier Ioear beginate 1910 sa% ghan in. a .
The Fate and Oils gituatim on einnina Dmembr 1940. n; ~:
Re fleetsl aopen mart sales anl. Carrlantfiue refer to. all tyjpes at wholesle fo~0~i7ir estab
raidit. 2 T2hree-eat processing~ tm added to prise as origially qubiete. L/ Qubbed in pumesf audaett';
Consed to present basis at quwotaton.









* ...... ..... ...---- '-~-I-~- -

I 8- Contenta -

.: Sunnlary ..................-...-...... j
i Recent Developments ..:.......---..... b
: Recent G~overnment Actions ............ 7 :
:Outlook .........** .---* 8~ 1
: .Sa'pbeen Processijag Gapaecity in -, ,~ -- :


,Summary;

6 ~~Pot 1 suppliqu of fats and oils in 1944-rc5 may be 7oo to soo million ~3

-pounds less than in' 1943-444 Factory and warehouse stocks of primary fate

an' d Oils oln July 1 totaled 2,710 million pounder (crvde- basis) about 700 mfll.
i' :.lion poundsB more than a year earlier. Most of this increase over.a jryear

e~: arlier wi 1 be carried forward to the beginning of the new crop-year on

":; detao'lr 1. aProdn6ptiop fgom domestic materials, however,.ie-exspected tod be I
; r~dednoo ~r p-the 1943- level of 11.3 billion pounds to around 10 billion

-ponds., an~ no;'major increase in imports is indicated.

ea~": nd frt~ae anad it's in 1944-~45 is expected to continue attong.
i~~~i[: ~ ;o'erf itoaifieda' ,in propehahuld end during this period, temporary ::


hePro~~qspective reductioll of oves.n.agbillion pounds in output of la~rd':
d rendaypork fat in 19i4 -45 will' mean soehtless lard;.for; domes;tic

1~-;1phiga ISpI 9)-44,i scha~eule export nreeds.are me~t, Howreve~r. wiirii
:Sd9c lan~teId in' the first half of 1944-, a stringency''ig" up

ea & etoa~dolop in 31. defl into 1945-.* Inventories of la A's
ad6 e rk ft 904 J~~ 17~ 1, 1944~. as reported by the Blureau df the Canoss
Ai lqis 9 p~t :on isco .





1944

Softean prootssing capacity
iq 1944-kg is expected to exceed
14 that area for crushing. In the
ship substantial Quantities of a
processing. Wit the addition in 1
tion.of around.17 million bushels
capacity for'the coming season.



RECENT DEVELOPMENT

3ADEGROGED.- Cutput of fits and oils from
in the pfesent crop year (1943-44) pyobat
11.3 billion pounds. This is about 600 mill
cent) more than output in 1942-43 and 4.1 billion
(about 55 percent) more than the 1935639 average.
the 1944-45 erop year, however may decline to
10 billion pounds, largely As a result of-a 7
to 30 percent in the 1944 pig crop and indicated
flaxseed, saybean, ad cottonseed production.

reduction 0 Fats and Oils L rge
it AprilwJude: Stocks Up ..


Production of fats and oils declined seasonally in the
quartyr but contiRued at awhigh level in relation to earlier y
Tuethf produdtion of primacy fats and oils in that quarter tot
million pounds, 10 percent less than in January-March and 7 perc
in OptaberDecember 194), but 8 percent more than in April-June 1
high rate of production was chiefly d.ue to the targe gla.ughter o
Output of lardial rendered pork fat, at 695 million pounds, ps
larger than a yegg eaflier, and factory production of
godad;s. was up 25 percent With cattle slaughter also
factory production of inedible and edible allows, i
taid 01eo wil, totaled.JOB million padds 1
Greamery bultternoutptt, at 480 million powds, showed
but was 11 percent less that in April-June 1 by

Tacto y and warehouse stodes ef fata shd ol
stdcks of Isrd and rendered pork fat out
million pouhas (cade basis O million
increase was contrary to the usual se
of 59 million pounds during the oe
once between this not and.1ast in CA
quarter in largely accounted for by th
rease, tallow, and Unseed oil 8
estic edible vegetable oils
during that period.,

The June factory output of
85 million pounds less thki in May.








Ass~n pounces grng auner. zan maaerase sipor~eapse 1 LpvarJa~ of vuv "' I" '
\lard anrd'And rtiid pork fat, lins'ied off"; and inedible tallok and grease more
than offeettl~la a edbeCtential seasonal decline in.cottonseed oil stodkst

Eare 9pasiss!Les go:;Eard Held .
Outside~ ushr~3, gagfes odf
A goldLStorage Space
Monthly' da~ta published by the Bureau of the Census on total factory
and warehouse stpdks of lard andi rendered pork fat, January 1, 194j, to Julyrj;
1944, are shown in table 2 i~uth comparable. data publishedd byr the are Food
Administration on eq8-setorage stocks. The Department of Commerce data are
based on reports from producere,. processors, and users of fate and oils as
well as fromn warehouses and include inventories outside cold storaige. The
Figures puiblishel ~by the War Food administration are based pn reports from
dold-storage` warehouses where lard is normally 'held.

With~ lard; prD~0UcionL at a record hiigh level from November 1943 to
June 1994~, storage facilities for lard became overcrowded anid substantial
qpantities were stored in unlusual places. Some lard was placed in unusual
types of'cold storage, suchi as apple warehouses, and in outside tanks. Large
inventories -iof lard vers accumulated by soap manufacturer and were reported
to the B3Orestk of the Census but were not ~included in cold-a~torkge reports.
A 1arge qCu~Ptity of lard with a preservative added wa g lggg n.dryges in
ojrdiaty dry~j s.torage. The differennee between reportei;~t'i-bdP~ff71RTR~af40 report
cI i olid-shoarage, stockss in.the months from December 198c3 to March 1944 probably
gij492i~~ ept .IAd.outside 'cold storage. Reported total stodke.franm Apyig t.,to
thatare8 ~3ii1ievt "to represent a nearly complete. phyainal count of all factory
0.4 pr~~OieC e itodkws in the country." Her Food Admhinistration inventories .in
;tfa sit aib:-;i6 prsehse or ports are ~not. included -
ThE third. solumn of table 2 indicates commercial stocks of Lardsn the
es '.~j~rt of "eat'c mnth s ince 194j,' as estimated by the tWtar Food Administration.
Shook omiba Mr By r ood Administration and.byi soap maanufactiuers atB~e;reeclude4.






























































aF

i ~ .'
::I
; :i
.,
+::I
*
*' i'

3r ,.. ; "' -' ;"
I ;

!' !


C~old- stoarage- :
stocks. War Food
Administration

1,000 pounds


varehoup~e she k hammercial 44
:Bureau ef toli '
Census :9~;;;"


1 12,0 08:'r~l
124,998
187,386
197,965 '--:
166
-!.. 2 7 : i


Date .


,v~.L
'~.:~L '


'19 :
January 1 .. .:
TFebruary 1l .c-.?
March 1 ......:
April 1 .....:
May 1 ........:
June 1 .......:
JulFy 1 .. .. ..:


I I












F''
;f'~

I






;r
*'
I'
I*

;li;

,:

rr

:;.
if,
r.. ..


91 033

122,240
128,264
149,1 1
166,129
220 83;1 '


~:,~ri ;:,
'W:!"r


:.ii.:.LI


AngusTi 1 ......:. Ll~3 24.5 284
September 1 ..: 260,00 6),2,ff
October 1 ....~: 1951.351 = 19., 240
November 1 ..: 157.16~3 6,1

December 1 ...: 130,9811 160,337

January 1 .,...: 161,791 200,200i 00
February 1 ...: 248,0Jd 26 7 1560 i ,
M~arch-1, ....- 31. 395,696 209,0,oop
spi 3 ....: '432 .3359 539.96~8 173~r,000o
,Mly.) ..'..... :- 498.235 604,036 14t ice;ddb '"
.fade ......: 490,281 6 68 8,9
3/ihg' ..-..... 420.3j01 68 ,;600 1 ,~'odd ":"
Angits 1 .~....:- 345.705 '' ; '


Government Purchases of Fats and-
I 1 ~ ;
Oils Rledu~ced in July

uily purchases of fats, oils, and nosp byr the ~War Too4 Adm~inji
totaled 1'34 million pounds (in terms of fat content) compared ~i~th: 1~l5
pounds in June and 226 million pogonds th ]Kay. 'The principal itaen~
in July were 59 million pounds of sogBean oil, 32/m~i Rlon pohdnds. of i:
rendered pork fat, 36 million pounds of soapp (equivalent.:$ 0 an es~stim~~
20 million pounds of fat), and 17 million pounds of lirndeed oil. P
of lard in the first 3 weeks of august .were very small. .l












$,ar~ 1 : 34 120 .4 4 97 i"
"'ad1 rend~ Pork fa~t .,. a 882 32 '
ora~iimed f pand aile s'* 30 61 212
fiikiZSe~ed oil .I i..;. ...4 : 7 91 8 '171 1712'
SofloanU oil. ..- -.".; .. ..-.; .: 17 22 ---/59 7' ;4
0144rvegetable~ dis.s. ..l.' f;"'~. I.' 82 / -
Sho ~i rtmaing p;. .........' .........t 4 6; 62 -- 3 --..
;l.Mar~garine (f at content) '3/ -: 77 72 ---' 1 56 ;:
Si. oap (4at content) 1/ .........:. 16 23 21 20 2
'''. 'otal fat equivalent ..;...: 1,026 1,682 ''?77) .. 1,170)i'

Iil@piled from reports o the War Food Administration.
lt Itnialudes fidh--r,~iver andeied ils.~ ,g Le. Itlhai. :5do,doo pounds..
9~~t ; feat atl~ 6tthdaste t.si ~pdreintr fol mafrait~ises. 55 pereen~t 'for 'sonic
I d~iles lE inflk an aj~l~~: d'garaLlaeble by the C~asio bityj Gr dist 'Cerporation. ~

~-. Pr~'~ one. j~st~n: I e :


I PGP B can dfpme team lard, tank,ear lots, Chicago,.dellinqd slightly
m- ~id.c-Jul to 11.37ri cents per pound ceampred wicethpl. entrS rler in the
mop~t atgdh 1he) ~Ceilizig price of 12.8 cents .per polind. However, reflecting a
gqi ...i~J~tnrJ1aj~I~aL..llyB e hg -la t in July prise ; rose in.the latter part of .
iF~ilrthtme cotneithincresise lin early.Angus t ...:dr.A~ugust 1~1 the.-bid
lit~;:~ ime was ."fg odki ar~. pound.... Pricida' of poorer- qualities of .grease 'also '
r~~~.:I seJ-~; f;:is;~ te asiti-ii pdices of all-g~r~ades ~ol'greease are. now at ceilings.'i
:i.: ;,':' Singe mid-al~y, a range of. prtp~es from 8.25 ,to '8.90 cents per Pound
hasi been quoted for crude menhaden dil, tanks, Baltimore. Previously, the .~
r, Dis-rip gag io vae the ceillag of d.90 cents per~ pound;( The price of -oitial~
65 il (~3 1. \i.. it durms: New York, increased in 'bite ~a~ftef~pai*; o-f. ide~
.P :~i4e)J .~r~ :14to t about 20.8 cents per pound. Wtht~ prices'' for the~r 'fate I~
o~~-f a e{ 44 pa z orl,nqqcr oei~l so t, hS inldex number of 27 major
ema ed aJrbt 10~tt~ oeist ofh .1 4249. average; ;q6qpared~



;.... *


ag~~~R~~~i- I iq(e W s 1 t Mgeaolis Whd other Northweetern
as~~~;::t,~B~t a wa~E~s 3petE~ee on.ijif et14 t S- 310 per bushel. 5 cenfl
a i ac oA as ak~gp ,i Amndmnt 5 to M'axi~mus












Reason for.'the higher' ceiling pyice v4 tei (a:incc rdyseighe
for flaxseed from-5S2-75 per bushel on.June 15.~~~~~:ta 194j to 2*(1s
June 15, 1944. Thbd Unite4 States average priae bv4
seed on Jlune 15. 191c4, was $2.85 per bushel.. h:iiel,@asps userake)~:~
L94j-We was $2.83 ;mer bushel. The ht~k of the 'f~Ylea:pped~i ietn
States is: in the Niorthwestern sh~ea and will be~ sij14 in he ahyte~~222~~~~~is~
ceiling prices were rained.' '

Support Prices Ann~ounced
for Tun Nuts and Oil
In late July Commodiity: Cred'it ~Corporat~i~itdigh'9 q$ a qf
1949~-o~rop tung oil at 36 cents per pound, f.p.Y.'b miil'I ';i~~;~rem.dega
growers.niot leap than.$10l? per tonl for sup~.Iinuts basia~~.s 1;9~ 5 p
tent. Th2 the 7pre'edlng two seasons C00 bdugpht ~the Ra3~~; ;~o2Gttri nesic
tung oil, but this year crushers may sell. direct to.t@a bpade, i
of selling al~so to 000C in accordance with the spgs~ o.S the of ~er
T~he average price reepir~ed by farmers for 19 }t~-i$Np'~i do-ui~.:ita to a~~
per hton..i~. 1 .-.i
;pecific ^Erice Ceiing .Established .
for Specialty La~rd ..
Amendment 31 to Miaximum Price .Regulation 53, effed~tive Angadi~
:lished makidum prices tor specialty 1%ird at .a level'O.Q;1 cent. Per~i~pon
'' h'e ceilings for standard commercial refi'ked :lard,:. I p~di:ectily ~Thr~ i~~
alnd deedori.zded lard that may contain an ~ant~iloxikidt tah^toimproval

OUTLOOK

Suppl of Fats Gi ils to be ...-ci
Reduced 1~:i~~~~~
.'total. .fahtery and warehouse stocks of pirim~earyt a a at bisJ;!
~;~' a't d;''~:'idiP':bn iid tojob$ s e~e 719 million pounds 1L~srigou es
were the 1prgest ch records. These inveiatoriis wil~ ~dl Abitese#
the July-September ~quarter-. With a mateript reudcti~oA exp~ecte las~c
output Ibf fate and aile froam domestic mate ins and nIoippttg
anticipated in Jdigarts, the total supply of fa~ts and ofils~ ~i&q~~
700 to 800 million 'pounds less than in 194Ij-4y42 ; i
Total demand fPor fate and oils igl94c4-45 press~~3 tr~~i
high l~eeel... An end-ofa h;qt~iliti~es in .~ope.5 -in
.sunad b'e fdllowed\a "bFI' tinporaryQQ~~Q pdiod of ;iser n~i
`Stocks now held~rin *F.gtahAts of thyA'z@
cont~ingencies might 1 .Yid.~~lied. to leelsc~:j 'o~~o~'ad 6T~~:~~j~
Under this condition deanrad in wholesarle marrliets aritP Ib: 1 '" f
the level of actual demand by consumer sa WaR kggtte~r.












oaf:th e uropg of the war.
~I'!. Outrpaggo G Ofttonseed and~ Sofibean Oils
.MaJg: Decline S'omewat~ in 19424-45

Desp e~ a.l-~percent reduction this year' in cotton acreage, production
of` cottonseed mayr be lC,572,000 tone, only 2 percent less than last year. The
indicated yield of cottonseed per acre, on thd basis of Augulst 1 reports, is
264 ponds; 5 percent higher than last year.
The 1~941) orop of soybeans is forecast at about 179 million bushels,
1J million bushels (9 percent) less than last ye'ar. This-forecast is' made on
the basie of crop conditions august 1 and the acreagee farmers intended on
A1 ~rggest,l to harvest for beans. The indicated yield per acre: thief year in 16.5~\ '
by:' h~Jela, .< at~ g percent from last year and' under the 193}-42. average by. 4
percelt. .,

Who forecast for 1944.production of peanuts picked anrd thfreshed is
2,3}2' milli.gn pounds, compared with a crop of 2,200 million pounds in 1944.
Higher yields per acre than last year are indicated in all States except
Alabama, Floirida, Tennessee, and Louisiana. On the basis of Augcst I con-
ditions,' the~ indicated per-acre yield fon- the United States is 679 o~Unds,
11. percent higher than last year.

If~.-:gpodgesignk pf cottonseed and soybeans turns out about as now indi- I
qqk B..66 obiped orrtput of cottonseed and soybean oils in 1944-45 may be
);:? .snt :90: l.jagich gaunds less than in 1943-44. Production of peanut oil in
19 5~~ ma ,liot. be mudh if any greater than in 194}-44, as the demand of the
e~.d lespei daytin~ trade for farmers' etock peanuts seems likely to continue strong

C~~~ij (lan -3ktrir. Snapld,y to Decline:
ej ~: MisprTrt ri Will Increase
i Wt rut+er pro;Sdnation at .its seasonal peak inithe April-June quarter,.
wapp8ha 61fo civiliap. consumption; v r~e relatively plentiful.
D~:::~~i)Pji~~isapparp ; fo ciflian cons~umptio'n.i s est imat ed to have b een t .1. pounds
imWapia papawith 3.2.po-unds in ~January-Mardh this year, the pie~E since
dgk24l'(It~ ':autg;t by lprp:gptian declines s eas onally 'from June to Nov emb er, ~ad this
431-3.:':ifj a 1 edS~:~i;Bd in deClinling supprlies for civilian consumption.

he Putaadt~ of batter in Jan~uary-June this year was less than in the
a frespi.~ondijtng egriod a yehat earlier, but this.reduction was not reflected .in..
";v":.l~-lj;;~~,i~lips appie :, b~ecatae 4 a mallpr .payoean:tage of t~he .otput' wais purchas ed
oV~,;~~;; magabrE~~rtiageci -.tfuh~in..the corres~ponding pe tod of 1943. In the last
pt;i~~ :ghyP,;:;fppo~' veg r ~th peycntagee gf *ourtplut purichised by.*the Government
j~.i'i~4) .:'~.gSp,~ rbtW4feten~t OIP amthat a year earlier.. upso utr
da~~~rittPi~tags eq expected to be about 4 pirent smaller thian in the last hal
9 3 andf~~p thre addilest for~ July-DpSeanber in over Ij0 years.





AUGUST 19 10 ': 13

Disappearance of margarine factq$ i $ 4460444 wiriegsong
in the April-Jung quarter, amoubtibi ho'0 4 apithyoEpipqd?
1 poung per capital ib January-Marph It a pyrabhgg to (JulyaS p
civilian disappearance of margrine ill ich de, aga 4 Eurthey ih6t'
expected in October-December, whed buttet supwRies wil 9 at a 1 le

sto-as use, srosseetive
Requirements for Lard
Also Large s -

Hog daughter and lard production in fegetally in p ct d pp
July .and early August were materially reduced from the 10791 hat had a
maiptained'since October last year. This requation marks Abe @44 of
record mys of higs from thp unprecedentedly large 1943 pig cyop agf4a
of lard outwat to more nearly normal levels. Opput pf,1ard pad Tyade
fat in the 12 months beginning October 1944 is expected to be abott 2. b
pounds, ]K) percent under the total of 3,550 million pchp4p i@hticated to
present season, 194}-44.

If'ptoopeqtive export requirements for lard are me the supp ys
in lard will become tight before the beginning of thy:new heg-marketing
October 1945. However, the very large stocks of laid-built up in the (
4,ionths of 1944 probably will dely'the critical period until we,11 it

SBY3EER PROGESSING CAPACITY IN THE NORTH GESTRfL SQATES, 194# gy,

Surplus Sogbean Processin danacity


Soybean processing plants sip the Norty Gentral States pad Kenty
willbe equip ed to.handle a moderately 1aggerquantity of, sope M.(A
than is indicated to be available from the Inny crop. 1 increagg@n
has come as a response to a rapid expansion since 19 1 $4 toybeggpsh
ghe 1941 soybean crop in the North Central States and Kentucky, ha 7, a
before the Udited States entered the war, totaled 99 millioh.bushy a
following year this production rose:to 171 millionnbushele, a & fa
184 million bushels- Preliminary forecaste indicate, however,.kha L
soybean crop in the seven leading States of the Wor.th Central ppea
about 9 percent less than last year.

In 1942, steel -mad other metals were 19 grgent aeg ed fr per
directly connected with thewar effort.that 1,54414 pould.b4 spaqe
factice of Aew so.ybean processing equipped. A slight ypotea 4
of existing equipm6tt was aphieved.ie 1 42 hr ugh minor pprevy
little or no new metals. Buf capacity is 009 Nork Gentyal St he(
1 19 2-4) still fell short of the Quantiff of'spybea A eva$1 1
The surplus-of soybeans yaw shippedpaytly to $tlantic wa Pa if

S vbean processing captaity in Kentuck is acadbipefAe
North Central States because 'pt is used belly do pygap
Located mainly at Chio River points, Kentspisyg}td Are
in connection with the movetent of doyWeans agE sh 9648 a
market s. it














Vbith al@etter supply 'stuation in metals in 194)~, some new processing
equipment was authorized, but capacity in.194J-kh ihn the Nlor'th Central States
dnd ;gentucky ~ias still under-thbe! suippyly dtof ##yeai ar**for -redib- further
~improement ih steel supplies. in 1944 made i't possible to authorize new say-
been processi'pg installation$. This increased capacity, in conjunction with :
a retauced or X, will result. th a surplus criishinrg capacity in 1944-45 in the
North Central .States and Kenthdkyr.

.- Solven~at. Ipro~iDe Constinues fo-:
Gataln I tan ee
~:z i in the years immediately before the war, there was a pronowrnced trend.
in ~the apybead processing industry toward upe of the solvent process. Around
22 perseadt oft~otal soybean processing capacity' in 1941 was prov~i;ed by -;
so01 eati~-proce ai mi~l.s'. The trend toward solvent'equipment has been continued
in the wa yegr's. Phe annual-emapacity of sol ent-}rbcess; equipment authorized
in 1943 ~dad be first half of 1944 was abon) 41 parent ef'the capacity of all
'equiphe~t~ a Shjofiz~ed .
Wi~l~th ~Tyen t extraction, the yield oS oil is around 11 pounds per bushel
of,a o ggbta~s a ceased; compared with about 9 tolirdnd from screw presses the
.,~; do typd-tot-B~aP-seyrbeanr processing~equi9an~nt. as oil uanally is
aI~ ;i'~f~~it~~~.';:t; abt'inee ras; highbper pomd as 'eal (Ibulk f.o.b. mill s),r th e I:
:t :';::";'ssott `add~dc~'' meal-produced froni-a bushel of soybeans to 9 to 10
:':i~8i~af t~si when solvent exctradt~ior is need than when screw presses are
1:.-,j A Lid"iClsresentptices of' oil and meal' the advantage of the solvent
Wh@@i quabou 1~li~~ .9 cenitsl per bushel of soybeans processed; at average I
rides-hi,-his advantage vauld shount: t'd about "ll cents.



As $ adrbl~ecentralization of the 'sopeai Prace s~iig indu~rstt hEis
de'ii::,~ arts 4 r..s~~ "the war. .Before 'the far, sof eain Mll's were located dhidfly
a 1$1 ern ~fE cities, with the greatest' teo'de't'ration' of capacity in
Il is.Since:.1942, hioweveBr, a l:a g'e' hink~er of small looki' p~lantat
r~~i:,irtli dd' indalipd or will Be in~s'ak~ed:. tlhese finlud~e plants with 1 ar 2
d q Rd%8fi~ ed kggid a dea nedz cap~acitjr estha;t'ed at about 20' million budhie'ls
h ly pei tlet to (bout 54. perc~ent.of -t ."'ebtdfl do acity :of all~ eq tifp. -
:I..i.Eau qq911 of~~~:'~~ arnthfo~qe 04 Aifp~~g the war. Mo~ls't.b'if these small new plan~ta1
6 1 0mbi ao eqidavit locl et mlls or ontriy elevalfjore$


"?..i~ '~7L*r;;..






bl .A o
indicated c

.. Item


imal f at s and
Greamery butter ... ........
Itypected lard and tendered
grkfit ....,,...,,..,,..... 0
reases excluding wool grahas .
eat's hot oil .....0...,,,..



low, egible .....,,...........F
low, idedibi Lu..... .....,:
001 greake '.,...................f 1.
ish-liver oil ........... ......t
sh oil ................ .....,,
Total animal.................t
.crade hasia
sep....1. ....1...... e 11
too I Pi....J., ............ 9 1
oil ...............e... 1 .7
thousee pil .... .....9...,:, 30.5
see e ...s...(. ,... ....,, 1 -
e oiA edible ....,,:.,; ... ...-

b; ean at ..............:......: 114.8 107 9 96 .
.oi -4,....05,;,..........,;.;s .*,4
yegekable 6ils ........o.,: 8-
ot ye e 616 .,,,,',......,4
Ad total ,...*, g.........





1 e$udi f m .........
ed bed fat, total
ble low see tital Oc

-oleo .2...





we****** *4* weead
***1*** ***




1 ......,..,,.. .. ,,


reportss a
rte to not




705O'-90 13.-

Table 5.- Factory and warehouse stocks of specified fats and oils, crude basis,
June 30, 1342-4L, April 30, and MIayl 1, 1344

Ite : June 30: June j0 C


An~ima~l fats and oils:
B~utto? 7J ........................: 117.1 157.5 69.3 69.7
Lard and rendered pork fat ......,: 114.4 225.1 604.0 654 6
Greases, excluding uool grease ,,.: 96.9 38.8 131.9 150.8
Neat's-foot oil ............,.....: 2.8 2.3 3. 4 3.5
01eo oil ,........................: 9, 6 7.0 4. 7 4.2
Stearine, animal, edible .,........: 6. 0 3.6 4.1 3.7
Tallow, edible ...................: 11.6 17.1 21.6 27.9
Tallol, inedible ..,............... 237.1 111.9 170.6 181.2
Wool grease ......................: 5.2 3.7 4.0 3.0
Cod and cod-liver oil ..,..........: 11.1 12.7ly. 13.4
Other fish-liver oil ....,......... LG 1. .8 2.1
Fish oil .........................: 97.5 C7.5 955 '7.6
Marine mammal oil ................: 5. 6 59.61~ .7.1
Total, animal ......... ....... 612 :. 13.1Si.6 12 zb
Veeta~ble oils. crude basis jj


103.2
6s4.6
165.2
2.6
2.7
2.g
26.1
130.2
3.0
12.4

5.5
~5.1


Babassu oil ......,................= 1. 17.5 2.6 2.6 3.6
castor oil 4/( ....................: 34.7 39.8 61.3 61.3 56.6
Coconut oil ,..............: 136.7 1s7.5 120.6 117.7 123.0
Corn oil ,...,.............. 50.1 32.6 21.3 22,1 22.5
cottonseed oil ....i......,......:... 446.9 301.1 .471.5 ... 23.3 351.5
Linseed oil ............= 225.6 191.9 361.4 308.1 335.9
Oiticica oil ...........= 5/ 6.4 5.3 4.6 4.2
Olive oil, edible ................: 7.4 3,5 2,3 2.4 2.3
Olive oil, inedible and foots ('...: 17.1 4. .3 4. 1 j.s
Palm-kernel oil ................. ..:. 1.3 1.2 ----
Palm .oil ~. ................... .....T! 103.7 77.4 69162.7 61.5
Peanut oil .......................: 20.5 43.9 45.5 4E.4 5.
Perilla oil ......................: 3.0 11.4 .4 *4
Re~pe oil ,,.....,........... .......: 14.~j 24.2 13.f 20. 5 19.1
Sesame oil .~.................... ..: ..1 1..5 1.,7 2.11.
-Soybean oil ......................: 1 59.:7 211.6 2CS.4 291,) 279.1
Tung oil ............. 2.:4 32.0 26.3 27.0 26.5
Other vegetable oils ,............,: 15. i, '.6 2 ,q 21. 23.5
Total, vegetable ..............: 1 '16.1221. 123.-5 122,.2 1 $.57?.
Grand total .............,....: 2 070.90 16,? 2 06.9 2, 2 109!L6_

C~:omjpiled from reports of the Bureaul of the Censcus; except butter, HCar Food .
administration. Totals computed from unrounded numbers. Includes stocks held by
Gover~nmnt.
IfCold-storage stocks,
2/ ot reported prior to July j1, 1942.
]} rude plus refined converted to crude basis by dividing by the following factors.
Babassu, corn, cottonseed, palm-kernel, and palm oils 0.93; coconut, peanut, and
soybean oils Q.94.
41 1943 und 1944 includes stocks of dehydrated castor oil converted to crude basis
by dividing by 0.84".
(f Included in "other vegetable oils."







e .-
specified

Item


or beans, Brasilian, :
.b. Brazilian ports.....: Long ton 75
onseed, United Statee :
rage ..............,.. ...; Short to 43.20
eed, No. 1, Minneapolis: Bushel 2.46
axseed, United States :
.... ,.......... ...: 2.2 2.83
No 1, shelled :
sh, $ou eastern ,
ing points ...........:100 pounds 11.20 1 .25
s United.States
...................: 5-59 7.15
4, No. 2 Yellow,
.... .......1......: Enshel : 1.74 --r-
s Uni bd States -
age ...................: : 1.62
..*..
from Oil Faint and Drug Reporter,
(Minniapplis), and reports of the Bur

Table 7.- Price pdk inux of specified
.July 1942 and 1943, May-Jily 19


tem 1/
: Do

a meal, Los Angeles ..........-.....: 51-50
Museed meal, 41 percent :protein,
s .....,,........................: 35 8. '
nseed mes ,.41 percent protein,

meal percent protein,




mes percentlyotein .*,
.b. 56utheasterh btils .... .. ...e:
ban meal, 41 percent protein;
ago ......................... ....t 41.80

ed from records of the War 2 od
darlots.
Pity 25; 1944, quated in























f
*"1"
ii.


P



1.
3:"
r

t'
r
v
?:
b'
9;1


11k:~jl .,...;..........~. .....:
8dsi;t .......,.........,......:
:litxj~Bative of~glycerin ....:
"ith~n .... .... .. :
da' (benoiqte of) ....:
Amn ddniontrate r......:
grs...................:

.rpotal o~thgr materials .:
1, .aLl materials .:


~h~;I


June 1942 and 194j,' April-June 1944
It em -- --
_________ ,,-: 1 942, : 593_ :_ _lr. :L, MayL3 :June I
: 1,000 lb, 1 000 lb. 1,000 1%~. 1 000) lb. 1 000 lb
idic n: :
Coalored ...................: 4, 740 13, 234 9,428 14,408 1,8
Ukieolored .................: 22,407 22,822 35, 328 30,051 25. 70s
Total g/ ...............; 27,143 36,056 44.755 44. 459 40,18~~i

kml~-paid witfidrawkal for:.
United States consumption i/: 23,099 24. 511 35,157 31,844 26,989

~iterials used::
01;Gleo'oil ..................: 1.549 1, 006 1. 173 1,655 ',0
01. Oecotearine ..............: 191 193 '712 297 2 / 1L'
Isrd flakes ...............: --- --- 22 50 1
'Is-~rd, neutral .............: 387 5oy 979 895 5 fl
lard steasrine .............: --12 -----
91geo stock ................: 268 197 315 255 16e
, allow ................... ..: 15 23 16----
.Monouterarine .............: 5 28 31 31 3
Total, animal ..........: 2,415 1.966 3,048 3.183 2,17L^

Cottronseed oil. ..!;~........ .:- .10352. 1.7 .15,,93(Z 13 ,728 11. 462
Sidgbean oil ...............: 9,104 15,940 15,905 "'ig~lsl l17,74';
r edusrl oil ................: 68 713 635 246 257
ir Cs'oil -.r...-*l....--... .: 196 1,065 1,498 1,037 764
;'6o;ttonseed': stearine ....-J..: -- 5 --- --- '15
ri.:drleet oil-.........i......: --- '3 --- --- 224
,5 ybean s~tearine ...........: --- --- 6 ---
5 FAjy~ flakes ...............: --- 4 13 5 1
"Potajl'domestic vegetable: 19,720 27,466 33.554 33,ol ..3.

hilow20er Oil .I............: 66 --- --- --- L
_"' ot61.fo~reign vegetable : 66 -----
Tcrtal, fate and oile ...: 22,201 -29.432 36,602 6,217 }2,6iS


5,960
1,181

29
25
7



7,275
36,707


I,




a8,


4,807
ask
51
17
12
7
T

5
5,786
27.987


7, 695
1,430


28

5



45,888


7,421
1,472
65
S37
2&
10
g



15,265


on Intrnil evenue rcrsadItra eeu nltn
ar. / Total of unrounded nrumbere.l Zl Excludes withdrawn free of
a'~~ e ~a:Federal institutions, and withdrawn for export.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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3 1282 08905 1842
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