The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00073
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00089

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text

























































am manIuarIou In 1940 IB INDICATED TO BE SMALLER THAN IN 1939,
CORD ACREAGE. BECAUSE OF THE BLOCKADE OF CONTINYENTAL EuRors,
iOYBraNS ARE EXPECTED To BE GREATLY REDUCED THIS SEASON. HENCE
SIGSWO PROBABLY WILL EXCEED THOSE OF 1939-40 EVEN THOUGH PRO-
MALLER. REDUCED LARD SUPPLIES AND A RELATIVELY STRONG 00MESTIC
ATS AND OILS WE LL BE FACTORS TENDING TD SUPPORT SOYBEAN PRICES
On THE ornan HAno, FORElaN DEMAND FOR FATS AND OILS Is WEAN,
OF OILSEED CAKE AND MEAL, AND FEED GRIlbS, ARE ABUNDANT. THE
FRa SOvBernm DuRine Tur 1920'S RESULTED CHIEFLY FROM THE FACT
R8 WERE PRODUCED MIlZLY FOR SEED IN THDSE YEARS.


Exports
- Prducton rushing ~
Seed and feed


'ad :i;;;UN;IT'ED S-TATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

..- ;.. R OCTBerR 1940




~THE SOVBE~AN AND PEANUT SITUATIONS.
REVISED STATISTICAL SUMMARY, 1912-39.
PER CAPITAL CONSUMPTION OF FATS AND OILS, 1912-39.


()if Pt 5:~~s: PRDCIIU(1ICN. (JTILIZATIOCN, AND PRICE RECEIVED
Eli FAlth EEFIS, UJN ITED STATESS' 1 2 41-40


_


MSUN La






I : 1

60 '


LENTS
PER
BUSHEL
250


200


150


100


50


-~ Price












1924 1926 1928 1930 1932 1934 1936 19338 1940
YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER


.5t i .E I~uT OF AGRICULTURE


:B ..-. Sover
DESPITE A RE
EMPORTS OF B
DMESTiC CRU
I.DEMAMDI FOR F:
AWD SU~PPLIES
wRiewn P61cts
i; ::!:".C ;; T nT~ THE~ gEA


40iii";.i r


0 ,iI


*PRODUCTION INDICATED SEPTEMBER I


SARE PR1ELIMINARY


NEG. 527415 BUREAU OF AGRICeULTURAL ECONOMICS











Cents
27.4
14~.9
9.7
7.8
9.6
10.6
9.2
6.8
9.1
5.9
7.1
6.3
9.5
5.1
8.0


Centa

15.0
9.2
5.8
6.2
7.0
5.5
5.4
5.4
6.0
5.8
s.9

7.1
6.0
5.5
4/7. 0
30.7
9.0
7.4
5.4
15.0
16.0
12.5

3.8
3.8
4.7
5.0
9.5
8.7
9.3
18;.8
18.0
25.6
15.7
12.2
67.5

1.6
20.8
158.0
4.7
82.0


7.0
6.6
7.6
27.9
9.0
6.6
5.6
4/11.5
10.3
12.0

5.9
6.2
3.7
4.2
&/9.1
9.1
10.1

19~.7
26.6
12.6
8.8
3Y;.3

2.1
22.1
175.0
5.2
87.0


Table 1.- Price per pound of specified fate and oils, and oil-beatzing materials,.
Sep~ter.ber 1938 and 1939, and July-September 1940
Item: September : 194
Item: 193 : 19.~t


_


Com.piled fromn Oil, Paint anrd Drug Reporter, The i'atcional Provisioner, Chicago Daily
Trade Bulletin, M~inneapolis Daily Mark~et Record, and reports of the Agricultural M~ar-
:-eting Service andc Bur'eau of Labjor Statistics. Prices quoted include excise taxes
and duties where applicable. 1/ Preliminalyr. 2/ Beginning July 1940 reported in
ljound car-tons. 2/ Three-cent processing tax added to price as originally quoted.
R revised.


FOS-44


- 2-


Genta t~
27.0

9.0

6.1
-7.0
5.2
5.3
7.9

5.6
5.r
8.7

6.9


5.3

31.6
8.7
6.8
5.2

16.0
12.5

3.2
3.2
4.7

9.5
7.9
8.8
17.7
18.0
25.8


67.5

1.
19.5
150.0
8.7
81.0


Cant s
27.-6
14.5
8.8
4.8
6.5
7.0
5.7
5.2
7.8
4.8
5.6
5.2
8-4
4.1
6.9
5.8
5.3
6.8
34.8
8.9
6.5
5.2
15.0

12.8

3.5
3.6


9.5
7.7
8.5
17.6
19.0
26.3
13.6
10.8
72.5

1.4
22.2
148.0
4.9
81.0


Fats and oils: :
Butter, 92-score, Chicago .........................:
Oleomargarine, d~om. veg., Chicago ..............:
Compounds (ani;:al and veg. cooking fats), Chicago .:
Lard, prime steam, tierces, Ch~icago ...............:
Lard, refined, tu'os, (cartons) Chicago 2/ .........:
01eo oil, extra, tierces, Chicago .................:
01eostearinle, hbbs., N. Y. .......1.................:
Corn oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ..............:
Corn oil, refined, bble., Nv. Y. ................:
Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. S. E. mills ..t
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., tank cars, NJ. Y. ..........:
Peanut oil, crude~, tanlts, f.o.b. mills ............:
Peanut oil, dom. reiinedl, bbls., N!. Y. ............:
Soybean oil, crude, tank cars, midwrestern mills ...:
Soybean oil, refined, dr-ums, I:. Y. ........
Babassu oil, tank-s, N~. Y. ........................':
Coconut oil, crude, tanlks, f.o.b. Pacific (loast /:
Coconut oil, edible, tanks, NL. Y. .................:
Olive oil, ed~ible, drums, N~. Y. ...................:
Olive-oil foots, prime, drums, H. Y. ..............:
Palm oil, Niger, crude, drums. ;d. Y. 2/ ...........:
Palmo oil, Sumatra, bulk, NT. Y.: 1 .................:
Rape oil, refined:, bbls., U.. Y. ...................:~
Sesame oil, refined, d~zrus, N. Y. .................:
Teaseed oil, crude, drums, IR. Y. ..................:
Tallow, inedible, Chicago .........................:
Grease, A 1:hite, Chicago ..........................:
MIenhaden oil, crude, tanlks, I.o.b. Baltimlore ......:
Sardine oil, cude,, tanlks, Pacific Coast ..........:
'!hale oil, r~efinedi, bleached w~inter, drluns, :6. Y. .:
Linseed oil, ra;7, tanki cars, :inneapjolis ..........:
Linseed oil, rawJ, durums, carrots, N~. Y. ...........:
Perilla oil, dr.Iun's, N'. Y'. ................... ......:1
Oiticica oil, drums, N~. Y. ........................:
Tung oil, drumls, 1P. Y. ............................:
Castor oil, dehydrarted, drumas, curlots, N;. Y. .....:
Castor oil, N~o. 3, bbis., i.. Y'. ...................:
Cod-Uiver oil, med. U.S.P. bb's.j Nd.Y. (dol. per bbl. ) .:
Oil-bearingo materialss:
Ccpra, bags, f.o.b. Pacific Coast .................:
Cottonseed, Dallas (dol. per ton) .................:
Fla::seed, Nvo. 1, ;Minn~eapolis (per bu.) ............:
Pean~uts, shelled, runners No.1, f.o.b. S.E. mills .:
Soybeans, EFo. 2 Yellow, Chicag~o (per 'bu.) .........:


Cents
25.5
16.0
10.2
7.8
8.9
9.3
7.9
7.0
$.9
6.5
7.8
6.8

5.2
8.0

6.1
5.9
8.2
25.1
7.2
6.6
5.8
(/10.3
10.5
7.5
5.2
5.2


8.2
8.1
.9

10.8


9.2
26.5

1.9
21.1
179.0

8$.0








THE FAT 8 AND 0' ILS 8 ITUATI 0N

?;: iSummary~

Soybean production this year is indicated to be 81.5 million

boaihela, approximately 6 million bushelss less then in 19g39. Despite the

smaller output, domestic crushings of soybeans in the 1940-41 season are

' expected to be about 5 percent larger than in 1939-40, mainly because ex-

ports to continental Europe have been virtually eliminated by the British

blockade. Approximately'lli million bushel of soybeans, representing 13

perount of the domestic crop, were exported last season.

Rleduced lard production and improvement in domestic demand resulting

from increases in industrial activity and consumer incomes will be factors

tend~ing to support soybean prices this season. Weakness in foreign demand

for edible fatal sad oils, and abundant supplies of oilseed cake and meal, as

well eal feed grains, on the other hand, will tend to limit any price advance.

Production of peanuts for 1940, indicated to be j1 percent larger than

in 1939, i's the largest on record. But with an expansion in the program for

diverting peanuts to crushing mills, and with improved demand for peanut

products, prices of peanuts are likely to be maintained at or near the

relatively stable level of the past 6 seasons.

Prices of some a~ninal fats, notably tallow, greases, and oleostearine

advanced materially in September. Prices of all animal fats and oils, except

butter, however, were roughly 35-40 percent lower than a year earlier; while

prices of domestic vegetable oils generally were 15-20 percent lower.








The usually low price level for domestic fatal sad oiled in as ata

months is a reflection of the record large output of tallow, greasseb. and

soybean oil this year, the abnormally large supplies of lard erailable for

domestic consumption as the result of the loss of export markets, and~ thie

availability of large supplies of low-priced vegetable oils in the

Philippines, Netherlands East Indies and other surplus-producing areas

now cut off from the important continental European market.

Domestic demand for all fats and oils in 1941 probably will be

stronger than in 1940. Decreases in production of lard and grease are

indicated, but increases in production of cottonseed oil, soybean oil, and

peanut oil are expected. The general level of domestic prices of fate

and oils in 1941 probably will be higher than the extremely low level of

1940, but there will be considerable variation in price changes among the

several fats and oils.

-- October 14, 1940.

REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Prices of some animal fats advance
in September

Following several months of successive declines, prices of some
animal fats averaged higher in September than in August, scoring gained of
2 to 12 percent. Lard and oleo oil were major exceptions. The swerage
price of prime steam lard at Chicago in September, at 4.8 cents per pound,
was about 2 percent lower than in August, wIhile the price of oleo oil, extra,
at 7 cents, was unchanged from that of a month earlier. Prices of inedible
tallow and grease (A white), on the other hand, averaged g and 12 percent
higher respectively in September than in August. The price of oleoa-tearine
at Naew York was up 10 percent, and butter prices rose slightly.

Prices of some imported oils also advanced in September, largely as a
result of difficulties in obtaining supplies of such oils from abroad. The
price of edible olive oil at New York; was up about 10 percent. Cod-liver oil
prices advanced further to new record levels; while prices of oiticion sad
tung oil scored moderate gains. In contrast, prices of domestic vegetable
oils, babassu oil, coconut oil, palm oil, perilla oil, and coator oil were
steady to lightly lower than a month earlier.





li;l
r;;
L:
L;
:
L "'
r;


i~~*?
I:'
iiil
r ...
r;;

F


5-


.Pries of most domestic fats and oils much lower
than a year earlier

With the exception of butter, prices of domestic fats and oils in
September were roughly 15 to k0 percent lower than a year earlier. The
price of butter was slightly higher in September this year than last. But
prices of other maimal fats and oils, reflecting the record large supplies
available and the shrinkage in export markets, were down 31( to lr2 percent.
Prices of domestic vegetable oils were 15 to 20 percent lower than in
'September 1939.

Prices of several of the imported oils, including babassu, coconut,
palm, oiticica, and tung oils, also were lower in September than a year
earlier. Oitieica and tung-oil prices, however, were still relatively high,
mainly because of the difficulties involved in obtaining supplies of tung
oil from China and the rather limited supply of oiticica oil available in
Brasil, Other high-priced oils in September this year included codliver,
olive, perilla, rape, teaseed, and castor oils, all of which are mainly or
-wholly of foreign origin,

Lard stocks reduced

Cold storage holdings of lard, which on July 1 reached the record
tote~al of307 million pounds, declined 72 million pounds during the summer
months, with most of the reduction taking place in August and September.
Lard stocks on October I amounted to 235 million pounds compared with 79
million pounds a year earlier and an October 1 average of 78 million pounds
for the 5 years 1935-39. of the total stocks on Octo~ber 1 this year, ap-
-proximately 65 million pounds were being held for the Surplus M~arketing
Administration, which from December 1939 through June 1960 purchased 135
million pounds of lard for relief distribution.

Production and price of soybeans lower this
`r .sacabbitthrias~t

According to the October 1 crop report, production of soybeans this
year is indicated to be about 81.5 million bushels, or nearly 6 million
bushels less than the record crop of 87.h million buebels in 1939. The
acreage planted to soybeans was larger this year than last, but yields on
the acreage harvested for beans are running substantially lower than a year
earlier. Soybean production will be increased in some States, but in three
of the six major-producting States Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio production
Probably will be reduced. Increased production is indicated for Iowa, North
Carolina, and Hissouri.

Despite the decrease in total production, the quantity of soybeans
available for crushing is expected to be 3 or 1+ million bushels larger this
season than last. An increase in crushings of this magnitude would mean
that soybean-oil production would be increased by 30-35 million pounds, or
roughly 5 percent. Principal reason for the increase in supplies of soy-
beans for crushing is the loss of exports resulting from the blockade of
continental Europe. Last season, 11 million bushels of soybeans were ex-






FOS-64


-6 -


ported, chiefly to the Nuetherlandg and (by way of Canada) to Scandinavi~ani
countries. Experts this season may total no more than 1 or 2 million bushels.

The average farm price of soyb~eans in mid-Septemsber was estimated a~t
69 cents per bushel, or 4 cents lower than in mid-Septemrber 1939. Last
season, prices r-se fairly sharply during the fall and early winter months,
partly as a result of a. strong export demand. Although export demand
probably will be weak this season, domestic demand, particularly for soybean
oil, is expected to be stronger than a year earlier. Improvement in demand
will result not only from increased consumer purchasing power, but also from
reduced supplies of lard. The reduction in lard suplesi te 944
marketing season probably will be greater than the increase in output of
cottonseed and peanut oils which is in prose~lct.

Soybean output increased in Manchuria
and Southeast Eur pe

Production of soybeans in Ma3nchuria for 19603 is officially estimated
at 161 million bushels compared with 145 million bushels in 1939, according
to a report of the Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations. The exportable
surplus of soybeans or^ the' 1940-1 season is expected to be somewhat larger
than a year earlier, although the carryr-over of oldr be nrs at the beginning
of the season is believed to have been smaller this ye 02 tha~n last.

Because of the shortage; and high cost of shipping, and the British
blockade, exports of soyrbeans from Ml nc~huria t Europe are likely to be
extremely small this seson. Some beans may be transportzd by rail to
GCrmazny,, but the quantity moveJd in this mranrner is not likely to be large.
Germany in recent, years,, before the outbreak of the present wrar, had been
'unporting 20?-4r million tushele of soyb~eans an~nuallyI. 'The Netherlands
and Scandinavian c_untries also took fairly large quanltiies.

Under rGerman encouragement, soybean production in Southeast Europe
has been expanded considerably during the past 3 yea~rs. The total 1960
soyrbean produict~ion in Bulgaria, Hungcr'l, and Yugosla1vi9 is more than double
last year's harvest, according to information available in the Office of
Foreign AIgricultural Relations. Production in these three countries is ex-
pected to total about 1,900,000 bushels this .rear compared with 840,000
bushels in 1939., Production in Kirumania, -on the other hand, is indicated at
only 704,000 bushels compared with 3,532,000 bushels in 1939. But approximate-
ly 80 percent of that country's soyrbean acreage is unreported this year due
to the fact that with the cession of Bes,-arabia large areas planted to soybeans
fell into Russian hands. Nlo informatrion is availabDle to indicate whether the
soybeans produlced- in BEcssarabia -11i ll bexported to Gennany this year.

Peanut production ue prices maintained b diversion
program and imp'roved dlema.nd

The peanut diversion progr'rm probably wi~ll ba conducted on a more
extensive scale in the 1940-?r1 marketing season tha~n a y~ear earlier, since
the 19h0 production of peanuts is reported to be about 360 million pounds








.3~tgy9 tha~n ~that ~in 193 ap4,,is the largest on record. Last season, when
pabbuit production totjl~dd 1,~180 million pounds, slightly over 70 million
,poun~ds of farmer's' atock were crushed for oil and meal. Crushings of farmers'
at~$ock peanuts in the 1938-39 season, when 1,306' million pounds of peanuts
we~re produced, amounted to 260 million pounds. -According to indications
ii8,: ofT Octobejr 1, peanut production this yecar is expected to total 1,5k0
l"';;~~~ion pounds. But with the diversion pro3grur., and with improved demand
6l~;~~ peanut products, prices of peanuts this season are likely to bes maintained
Iilpl~;r near the relatively stable level of the past 6 seasons, despite the
al';;: 'dreased marketing in prospect.
::'i',, Note: A discussiahi of the cottonseed E-nd flaxseed situations, and the
opt ,,,l~~~tiook for fats and cils generally was given in the Se-ptenber issue~ of
C;,: I-i~ report),

ReVT'ISION OF STATISTICAL SUMMARY, 1912-39 .1

('" Beca2use of revisions in the production :ndr disa~ppea-rance estimates
ffCt? inedible tallow and greases, published in the August issue of The Fats
. haid Gils Situation, and sover-l other changes of a minor nature, it has been
necessary to recalculate the annual totsls fo7r production, trsde, changes
in stocks, and disappearance for all1 fats Ind oils, 1912-39. The original
4ctals were given in Statistical pnll~tin NO. 59 ind in the Julyv 1939 issue
ofa The Pats and Oils Situation. Th, revissed to-trels are given in stable 2 of
this report.

According to the revised figurre~s, total production of fats and oils
ih the Unit~d Strte~s insre-sed from 5,85? million pounds in 1912 to 8,979
million pounds in 1939, a gaiba of 53 percent. Production of animal fats
and oils (including ma~rine oils) ?ccr.*untecd for 65 percent of the total in
1912, 66 percent o~f the t.otsl in 1939. Th-; prep-rtio~n of vegetable oils
produced from domestic .m.:-terinls decrrasjed from~ 31 to? 26 percent, while the
pro~portiomn-f vegetble oils ;1roduced fromr imprrted r.:.t -rials incrossed from
4 to 8 percent of the total during the 28-ye:r p~eriod.

In 1912, th~e Ulnitedi Staties had a net. export balance of approximately
771 million pounds of fats znd oils. In 193-3, 625 milliononl pounds were im-
ported on balance. TotfL disappearance of filts ,d oils rose from 5,085
million pounds in 1912 to 9,665 million pounds inl 1'39~, an increase of 90
percent.

PER CAFITA CONSUMPTION OF FATS AD"D OILS, 1912-39

Estimates of the per capital disappearzance or con~sLanption of primary
fats and oils in the United Sta~tes for the years 1312-39 are given in
table 3 of this report. Total disappearance per cap~it1 7;s :plproxirnately
20i pounds larger in 1939 than in 1912, incre--.sing from 51i to ;7L pounds
annually during the period. Increased consumption of inedible tllllowh a3nd
greases, coconut oil, soyvbean oil, p.Rr. oil, lard, :nd fish oils accounted
for most of the go~in. O-ther item.s sholwine increasedr consumption per capita
include butter, cornoil, edible tallow, wha~le: oil, b.-bassu-oil, :nd peanut
oil. : Thpr- carpita conIsumIptio~n of cottonseed oil, 1inseed-oil, a~nd 01eo-
stearine wzs somewhat smaller in 1939 thanr in 1912.









I


FOS-44


--O


Among the major items, trends in~per capital consumption have $eyed,,
materially in the past 28 years. The per capital consumption of buttd% has
been relatively stable, although a pronounced decline occurred in 1917 agai
1918, a decline wh-ich was not recovered until 1922. Lard consumption per
capital has shown two major peaks in the past 28 years, the first in 1t923
and 1924 and the second in 1932. A sharp drop in lard consumption Qccurxr~ed
in 1934 and 1935, as lard production was reduced following the severe drought
of 1934. The per capital consumption of lard recovered almost to the pre-t
drought level in 1939; it is expected to be of record size in 1940,_partl-y
because of the recent loss of export markets.

Per capital consumption of both butter and lard was moderately higher
in 1937 than in 1912. In contrast, that olf cot~tonseed oil was somewhat lower
in the later year. Consumption of cottonseed oil has fluctuated widely
since 1912, mainly in response to changes in the output of cotton anid cotton-
seed. Consumption per capital was unusually high in 1916, from 1925 to 1930,
and again in 1937, but was relatively low in the years 1920-24, 1931-33,
1936, and 1939.

Consumption o7f inedible tallow and greases has increased sharply
since 1912, advancing fron 3 pounds per capital .Ln that year to 8.2 pounds
per capital in 1939. MaJscr gains in consumption occurred from 1912 to 1924c,
und again fro7m 1933 to 1939.

Another pronounced gain occurred in the consumption of coconut oil,
which increased from 0.9 pounds per capital in 1912 to 5.4 pounds per capital
in 1929. The per capital cojnsumptiojn o-f coconut cil has declined moderately
since 1929. A major peak in consumption of coconut oil was reached ia 1918,
wrhen large quantities were ilnpo~rted to supplmeltnt domestic fats and oils in
the production zf food products and soap for domestic use and for export.

The consumption o~f linse -d oil has tended toj follow changes in the
building cycle, refle-cting ch:-snging requireme-nts for drying oils for use in
paint. During the past 28 years, censunptionr of ;lnseed oil per capital
has shrwn two~ cyclical speaks, in the years 1913 und 1922-29, and two cyclical
troughs, in the yeirs 1917-19, und 19?1-35.

Except for the pe~riod 1916-2'0, when fairly large quantities of
soybean olil sere imported, the ccnsumnption of srybean oil per capital was
negligible until 19-35. A~ sharzp rise in consumption. began in that yea~r, which
is still und r way. In 1939, 3.5 pounds of saybean oil were consumed per
capitn compa^red with 0.2 pounds per capita in 1934.

The c n~sumption of pgagm nil per czpita incronssd fairly sha~rply after
1921, rising fr m 0.2 ;.eunds in thxt year to 2.6 p unds in 1937. Another
important gain has occurred in thet crse rf the -srine animal oils, con-
sumptio~n ..f whIich increased from 0.6 p unds pe3r capital in 1921 to3.0 pounds
per capital in 1937.

A general upward trend in per capital co~nsunmption rlso has been
characteristic of corn cil, tung .il, perilla ci;, caster oil, edible tallow,
:nd, more recently, babassu ril.


: I! iii ''I:f
:i~:6e:~''3:






















1,920
1,821
1,627
1,e09
1,286.
1,651
1.251
1,296
1,680
2,092
2,202
2,312
2,030
2,062
2,o61
1,838
1,911
1,720
1,531
1,612
1,846
2,148
2,377
2.2349


. 227
'477
752 9
'360
'124
'521
'565
504
633
689
646
Too
1 030
924
so?
620
d7)
734
1,390
1,322
1,542
1,ooo
870


- 391
25
35
501
4lo
-1,ook
- 452
- 640
- 631
- 204

- 102

178
237
206
16
221
276
1,594
1,340
1,512
832
625


i;. .



7 .

1928



1831 9


?393g

19~39 6/


Compued from production, trade, and stocks given in individual commodity
tableau, United staten Department of Agriculture Statis~tical Bulletin No. 59t
"Ihei Fata and Oils Situation, July 1939, and subsequent monthly issues of that
itbli~Lcation. Items have been rounded to million pounds without adjustment to
'91otals.B
/ Includes oil equivalent of imported raw~ ma~teriala (net imports) for produc-
tion of oila not separately reported by the Bureau of the Gensus, including the
(1 equivalent of imported fle;seed. (The latter has been deducted from the re-
ported factory production of linseed oil to obtain the estimate of production
at rinseed oil from domestic materials included in column 2.)
1 912-~21, partly estimated.
4 ackjls of marine mammal oils in bonded warehouses have been deducted; such
024~e not reported sinee 1936..
2401rieudea butter and lord only.
ilXIsludeae butter, lard, and cottonseed oil only.


. Wa a R.-fz~at productimm.a, no~t rade, yfusge la stocks, and apparent dis-
oPpw~r~ers aPSP; of gr$((7 th# @pt il in-the' Unilted.SBtates, 1912-j9
(Net extparts are indicated by a minnra sign)


~ ~ ~ ~__


I_ ~_ _


Mil.1b.
5,os5


6,136
6,083
6,374
6,177
5,s54
5., 997
6~, 00
7., 266
7,455
7,819
7.,972
8',1s7
8,420
8,723
8,385
', 336
sr,ool
s',177
8, 612
8,661
9,075
9,267
9,111
9,665


r~ "Procduationr from
a d$oneja~t= .ma~tieriaa


: tion a


ts a Total
S: Chaingear p-
1 5 in parent
Tor~ta:atocks: disap-
a : J/ : ear-
: : : nce


' ~Net import
: noet expor


r ? i from al
jkniy;fAmals Vege-' im- :Total: fats *
Sfaita i~ otlportedipod> a~d
'*18 -- arial : -a : l
: :~n I 1 I a


Vege-
table
oiled


'iai.l1b Mi~l.1b Yil.1b
1 3,825 1,826 5,651

S3,917 2,220 '6,136


Mil.1b Mdil'.1 Mril.1b Mdil.1b Mil.1b Mil.1b
209 5,857 672 -99 771 ---


-- 5,827


228 6,364


- 582

- 618
- 452
- 717
- 980
- 769
-1,127
- 973
-1,205
-1',134
- 838
-'818
- 748
- 796
- g52
- 687
- 601
- 604
- 652
- 458
204
17
-29
-- -168
246


46 537


4,258
3,826
4,188
4,420
4,467
4,842
5;297
5,895
5,949
5,34e;
5,469
5,527
5,630
5,806
5,534
5,676
5,754
6,070
5,754
4.569
5,205
4,911
5,472
5.902


'6,179 '
'55647
'5,815 '
'6,230 '
'5,753 '
'6,496 '
6,54; '
'7,191
'7,628 '
'7,439
'7,672 '
'7,g39 '
7,660.
'7,868
7,596
'7,513 '
'7,665
'7,790
7,285
6,1so
7,o52
7,o59 '
'7,850
8.252


364
424
531
503
615


730
542
560
726
736
706
885
663
698
468
674
620
748
717
931
667
727


6.542
6,071
6,347
6,733
6,368
6,859
7,ok2
7,921
8,170
s ooo
8 398
4 576
8,366
8,753
8,259
8,211
8,133
8,464
7,905
6 929
7,769
7,990
8,516
8,979


4/+15
/+13 r
5/*55
* 104

- 211
S15
-24
9 296
+ 286
- 151
+ 208
+ 110

+ 142
* 507

- 139
+ 34
+ 235
+ 237






















ii
r


specified fatal and c4 (pr:
1912-59 '"i


.....- ~


-


__ li


Table 3.- Apparent disappearance per capital of
rudee basis) in the United. States,


Total
all
fats
and
oils


Land animal fats and oils


Cal-
en-
dar
year


STallow:
Tallow- inedi-:
edible:ble and:
:Brease :


Butter,


.Neats--
Lard foot :
:oil .


Stear-.
ine :
edible:


Wooal: oa
gre 8e : a68~
(anima~~l


01eo :
oil :


::Pounds Poundl

1918 : 53.5 16.7
1913 : --- 16.6
1914 : 59.5 17.8
1915 : --- 17.4
1916 : 60.9 17.5
1917 : 59.5 16.0
1918 : 61.5 13.9
1919 : 58.8 15,3
1920 : 54.9 14.8
1981 : 55.4 16.8
1928 : 61.9 17.1
1923 : 65.1 17,9
1984 : 65.9 18.1
1985 : 68.1 17.7
1926 : 68.4 17.5
1927 : 69.3 17.5
1928 : 70.2 17.2
1929 : 71.8 17.4
1930 : 68.1 17.3
1931 : 67.2 18.1
1932 : 64.1 18.3
1933 : 65.1 17.9
1934 : 68.1 18.3
1935 : 68.1 17.3
1936 : 70.8 16.?
1937 : 71.9 16.7
1938 : 70.2 16.9
19391. 73.9 17.6


sPounds Pounds Pounds


Pounds Pounds


11.4
10.9
10.9
11.8
12.0
10.5
12.3
11.0
12.2
11.1
13.5
14.5
14.5
18.5
12.4
12.8
13.3
12.9
12.7
13.5
14.3
13.9
12.8
9.6
11.3
10.6
11.3
12.8


0.1
---

.1
---
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1


0.2


.5

.5

.3
.3
.4
.4
.4
.5

.4
.5
.4
.3
.4
.3
.5
.4
.4
.5
.5
.9
.7
.7
.7


5.0

3.7

4.1
5.8
4.5
4.4
4.8
5.3
6.4
6.5
6.7
6.2
6.3
6.8
6.4
6.1
6.0
6.2
6.3
6.1
7.5
7.2
7.2
6.9
7.3
8.2


0".8 3 2.6

,2 355.6


.1 Sh;.&
.1 5;2.,
.1 5.

.1 385.4a
.1 538,B
.2 8.9
.2 40.7,'
.1 4.
.1 58,1
.1 38..1
.2 50;.6
.1 98.4P
.2 59.9
.1 7.5
.1 59.,3
.1 39.9
.1 59.1
.1 40.1
.1 55.7
.1 57.3
.1 55.9
2/ 7.2
.1 40.5


0.3

.6

.7
1.1
.9
.9
.5
.2
.5
.6
.5
.5
.5
.5
.5
.5
.4
.5
.2
.4
.5
.5
.7
.5
.6
.5


1/ 0.7
--- .

1/ .7

1/.7

.5
.5
.4
.6
.6
.6
.8
.6
.5
.5
.5
.4

.2
.3
.3
.4
.4
.4
.4
.3


Cont inued-


Pounds gg




















Pounds Pounds

0.5 11.4
-- 12.1
.8 16.2
-- 11.5
1.0 13.1
1.1 11,7
1.1 11.8
.9 11.2
.8 8.5
.7 10.2
1.0 8.8
1.0 8.0
1.0 9.3
.9 13.1
1.0 13.0
.9 13.1
1.0 18.6
1.1 13.0
1.0 12.9
.9 10.6
.9 9.9
1.0 10.3
1.0 12.4
1.0 11.3
1.2 10.5
1.3 13.5
1.2 12.8
1.2 10.8


0.2



.1.

.2
.1
.1
.1
.2
.1
.5
.5
.4
.5


.5
.5
.6
.6
.5
.5
.5
.4


.7


0.6

.5

.6
.7

.4

.6
.9
1.1
1.3
1.2
1.5
1.4
1.6
2.0
1.8
1.5
1.7
1.5
1.8
1.8
2.5
2.9
3.0

3.4


0.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.2
.3
.2
.2
.3
.5
.3
.4
.4
.4
.5
.6

.4
.4

.3
.4
.4
.5
.5
.4
.6


Continued-


Vegetable fats and oils


yR


---









---


---
---
---
---
---


0.5

.2

.4
.3
.2
.2
.3
.7
.5
.7
,S
.8
.6
.8
1.1
.9
.6
1.0
-.7
1.0

1.8
2.1
1.9
1.2
1.6


- 11 -


Table 5.- Apparent disappearance, per- capital of specified fats and oils
(orade.basiab ia the United States, 1912-59 Continued


MAarine animal oils


Tot al :


Aish-
liver
oils


Fish : Marine
oils : masIpmal
.oils


Corn :Cotton-
oil : seed
.oil


Babassu: Castor:Coconut :
oil :oil :oil :


: Pounds

$94- : 0.1

1914 :.1-

)#6 .1
2917 :.2
1918 :.1
 :.1
2$20 :.1
2921 :.1
$$SS :.1
9928 :.1
$$44 :.2
i3li25 : .2
1986 :.3
19i27 .3
19~28 :.3
i 1929 :.3
11930 : .3
1931 : 2
1958 : .3
1933 : .3
1934 : .3
1935 : .4
1936 : .5
1937 : .5
1938 :i .4
1939 2: .5


Pounds Pounds Pound s Pound s Pound s


Pounds

4/0.9
4,/ .9


4/13.0


1/6.0
3.5
3.2
2.8
3.5
3.9
3.6
3.7
3.8
4.5
4.7
5.4
5.3
4.7
4.4
4.6
41.7


3.8

4.6





-, /i


: Vegetable fats and oils Continued
Calendar:H~emI~p- : Kpk: Lin- : Oiti- :Olive oil : Palm :Pa;lm-
year :seed : ed:cc d-:nd- kernel
oi F ed:cc oots oil
:il: : oil : il : ble :ble : : : oil
:Pcu~ds- Pounds Pound s Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounda Pounda

1912 : --- --- L(..8 --- 0.5 0.1 0.2 0.6 0.3
1913 : --- --- 6.3 --- .4 2/ .1 .6' .3
1914 : --- --- 5.2 --- .5 .1 .1 .5 .2
1915 : --- --- 5.1 --- .5 1/ .1 .3_ .1
1916 : --- --- 5.2 --- .5 .1 .1 .3 2/
1917 : --- --- 4.6 --- .5 2/ .1 .3' 2
1918 : --- --- 3.6 -- 2/ 2/ 2 .2' .1
1919 : --- --- --- .6 2/ .1 .l 2
1920 : --- --- 4.6 --- .3 g/ 1 .C }
1921 : --- -- 4,83 -- 5 g/ .1 .2 2/
1922 : --- 5.8 .5 .1 .1 .4 2
1923 : --- --- 6.1 --- .7 / .3 1.1.8 2
1924 : --- -- .2 -- .7 .1 .2 .8 2
1925 : --- --- 6.3 --- .8 .1 .3 1.2 .4
1926 : --- --- .1 --- .7 .1 .4 1.2 .7
1927 : --- 5- .4 .6 .1 .3 1.1 .2
1928 : --- -- 6.6 --- .7 .1 .3 1.5 .4
1929 : --- --- 6.5 --- .0 .1 .4 1.9' .6
1930 : 2/ 2/' 4.4 --- .8 .1 .3 2.0 .4
1931 : --- --- 3.9 --- .6 .1 .5 2.1 .4
1932 : --- 2/ 29 --- .6 .1 .3 1.8 .1
1933 : 2/ R/ 3.0 --- .6 .1 .3 2.0 .1
1934 : 22! 3,3 --- .5 .1 .2 1.4 .2
1935 : 0.1 27 3.7 --- .6 .1 .2 2.3 .4
193~6 : .2 /.1 3.8 2/ .5 .1 .2 2.4 .4
1937 :2/ .6 .4 8/ .2 2.6 '. 2
1938 : 2/8 2/ 3.8 2/; .6 -1/ .1 2.1 .4e


FOS-44


.- 12 -


Table 3.- Apparvent disappearance per capita of specified fats.and oils
(crude basis) in the United States, 1912-39
Continued


Continued -







Table 3.- Apparent disappearance per capital of specified fats and oils
(crude basis) in the UnitYed States, 1912-39 Continued

: VTegetable fate and oils Continued
~Calend~ar: Pea-: : : : : Sun- : Tlea- :un :V~ege- :Total,
year : nt :Prla ape : SesnmeSoybean: flower: seed un :table :vege-
: oil : ol ol 01 ol:oil :ol:oil :tallon:table
::Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounids Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds

1912t : 0.1 -- /. / 40.3 -- -- 40.4 -- 20.3
1913 : --- 2/ 6/ .1 2/ 6 1 -- -- .4 --
11 -: .1 / 6/1 2/ 6.1 -- --3 -- 25.5
195 -- / / 1 / 6/ .2 -- .3 --
19316 :.4 / 6/ .2 / 6/. -- 6.6 24.9
1917 :.8 2/ 6 1 / 62. 6 -- --- 6/.4 26.3
1918 : 1.6 2/ 6/. / &3.2 -- 6. -- 28.4
1919 : 2.3 2 6 .1 2/ 6/. -- 6 5 -- 25.8
190 9 60. 1 2/ 1.0 -- -- .6 20.9
1921i : .4 2/ .1 g/ .3 --- --- .3 --- 20.7
1922 :.4 2.1 27.2 --- --- ,6 --- 21.9
1923 :. 6.1 .1 01 .3 -- -- .7 .1 23.1
1924 : .1 2/. / .1 .1 --- --- .7 .1 23.6
192 :.2 6; .~1 .1 2.2 .8 .,1 28.5
1926 : .2 /. .2 J 1 .2 --- --- .8 2/ 28.9
1927 : 1 2/ .2 2.1 .7 2/ 29.1
1928 : .1 2 .2 .1 --- --- .8 2/ 2.8
1929 : .1 2 .1 &/.2 .1 2 .9 .1 32.0
190 2 6 1 .1 .3 .1 2/ / .8 .1 329.
1931 : .2 .1 .1 .4 .3 6/0.2 g/ .7 8/26.1
1932 : .1 .1 .1 ..1 .3 .1 2/ .6 g/22.7
1933 : .1 .2 .1 .1 .3 .2 2/.8 g/ 24.2
1934 : .-2 .2 .1 .1 .2 .2 2.9 2/ 26.2
1935 : 1.0 .5 .5 .Lc .8 .3 l7. .0 2/ 29.8
1936 : .9 .9 .5 .4 1-.7 .2 6/1 .9 32230.7
1937 :.8 .3 .1 .4 1. / 6. 1.1 } 1 3.
1938 :.7 .3 .1 .1 2.4 2/ /. .7 2/ 30,6
1939 gy' : .6 .1 2/ .1 3.5 gy' 2/ .8 / 30.7

Capputed from total apparent disappeearance given in individual commodity tables,
United States Department of AgPriculture Statist~ical Bulletin N~o. 59; The Fa~ts
and. Oils Si~tuation, July 1939, and sulbsequ~entt issues of that publication. Group
totals have been computed from~ o-iginal group d~isappear~ace estimates and include
small quantities of m~ustarrd oil, 1919-35, and cashaw shell oil, 1937-39.
1/ Estimate. 2/ Less than 01.05 of one pound. 3/ Pr.elliminary. A/ Net imports of
oil and oil equivalent of imported rawv material. Z/ IniclJuded with foots. 6/ Net
import s. I/ Exports from China and H'ong Kiong into the United States. 8/ Not
separately reported.


709 -14


- 13 -




r::- ;i~l~UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
a IIIIIIIIll~llllllllllllrYIAI
FOS-44 14"3~8;8I~51

Table Ci.- 01eomargarine: Prorduction a~nd mate~ral~s ppy ,i &
United States, August i.938and.1 939I, JunecAwcrt Angag6 ';;i~:;


It-em *
S 1938 1939 June .Jur
: 0 00 1_,0 00 1, 0 00 1, .


: gougds


pounds


paruda


Production ::
Colored .............: 125 110 282 .206
Uncolored ...........: 28, 601 21,498 19, 570 1,1

Total 2/ .........: 28, 726 21 608 19 852 2 2

Materials used:
01eo oil "............: 1,00n7 1,060 900 1,123 ,,]i
01eo~steariine ........: 2/,1 274 236 282 .
Lard, neutral .......: 103 125 3323 318
01eo stock ..........: 156 59 70 96 :li;
Beef fat 1..........: --- 20-- -

-Total?' animal ....: 1,507 1,5383 1, 629 1,819q

Cottonseed oil ...;...: 9, 086 6,986 7,392 8,526
Saryb6RD Oil ...... 3,650 5,574 4,463 5,402
Peanut oil ..........: 282 25& '137 65
Corn oil ............: -- 22 10
Cottonseed stearir.e .: --- --- 2
Soybean stearine ....: --- 1 ---
Vegetable stearine ..: ---- --- --- 1
Total., domnestic:
vegetable .......: 13,018 12 ;C36 12,00j5 13,9

Coconut oil .........: 7,282 1,763 1, 575 1,261 1 Zi
Babassu oil .........: 1,202 1.,365 683 595
Palm oil ............: 202 3
Tctal, foreigSn:
vegetables .......: 3, 686 3,108~ 2,261 i, 1856
Total, fats and:
oils ............:23,211 17,482 15,895 17, 670

MB~c..2k ...... 5,483 4,315 3,311 4,264
Salt .and other:
miscellaneous ......* 2,084 1,028 878 973

Compiled from Internal R2evenue records and Internal Revenue Bulletin.

1.. Preliminary.
2/ Total of unrounded numbers.