The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00073
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00088

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text

ayv 14, 1940


IN THIS ISSUE:
*CONSUMPTION OF. DRYING OILS, 1935-39.


1931 1932 1933 19'14 19?5 IJSL 193' 193 1




AS A RELIuLT OF INCREASED INDusTRIAL. AND BuILDING ACTIVITY, TOTAL
CONSUMPTIDM OF OILS IN THE.DRUNGC INOuSTRIES IN THE UNITED STArTs was AmouT
18,Psarcrro LAnCen IN 1939 THAN IN 1938. DESPITE DIFFICULTIES IN1 SECURING
auPPrLILs or TVNo oIL FRou CHINA, MORE TuNG 01l wAS CONsuMED DDMESTICALLY
In 1939 TnAN IN 1938, Anrnoucw sucH CONSuuPTIDN WAS LESS THAN IN THE PRE-
CEDIN G IVE YEARS. PRLESET INDICATIONS ARE THAT TOTAL CONSUMPTION OF DRY-
Inc oItS 1n 1940 wILL as AT trAST As LancE AS IN 1939.


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CONSUMPTION OF OILS EN THE DRYING INiDUSTRIES.
UNITED STATES. 1S31-39


600*D


R


li: .p SL. 11 r


oi B U REAU O F AG RI CULTURAL ECONO M I C
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRIC


T UAT ION


S
CULTURE




- 2 a


'OS-30


Table 1.-Price per pound of specified fats and oils, and oil-bearing materials,
April 1938 and 1939, and Febr~uary-April 1940
Item : April : 1940
Item : ~1938 : 1939 : Feb. : Mar. Ar1
'at s and oils:-- : Cents Cent s Cents Cents Cent s
Butter, 92-score, Ch~ica-o .......................: 26.9 22.0 29.0 28.0 27.1
01leomargarine, dorm. veg., Chicago ...............: 155 .'. 5 15.0 15.0 15.0
Lard, prime steami, Chicago ...........: 8.2 6.,3 6.1 5.8 6.1
Lar-d, refined;, tubs, Chlicago ............ 94 7.3 6.7 6-5 6.4
Compounds (animal~ and veg. cooking fats), Chicagjo: 10. 3 9.2 9.5 9.6 9.4
Oleo oil, extra, tiercef,, Chicago .....,.........: 8.0 7.5 7.2 7.1 7.0
01eostearine, bu;s., T!. Y. .................,...: 6.7 6.,2 6.4 6.3 6.1

Corn o~il, crude, tan!:s, f.o.b. mills ....,....,...: 7.2 5.961 6.1 6.2
Corn oil, refincd, bbls., if. Y. .,................: 9. 7 6.9 8.6 8. 8 8.8
Cottonseed oil, crude, ted~:s, f.o.b. S.E. I:ills .: 6.9 5.5 6.0 5. 9 5.9
Cottonseed oil, p~.s.yr., Lank cars, IP. Y'. ........: 8.2 6.6 6.9 6.7 6.8
Peanut oil, crude, tan :s, f.a.b. mills ..........: 7.0 5.5 6.9 6.6 6.2
Peanut oil, dom. refiner:, bble., NJ. Y. ..........: 10. 1 9.0 9. 6 9.6 9. 3
Soybean oil., crudei, tm<:l care, raidwestern mills .: 5.9 4.7 5.1+ 5.7 5.5
Soybman oil, refin~ed, dmas~, N. YI. ...,...........: 8.8 7.5 8.3 8.2

babassu oil, tan';s, Na. Y. .......................: 6.4 6.163 6.2 6.2
Coconut oil, cruce~. tanks, f~o.b. Pacific Coast 2/ : 6j.1 5.8 -- -- -
Coconut oil, edib:le, tan':s, I. Y'. 2/1 .........,...: 8.6 ?.4 7.4 7.4 7.2
01ive oil, edible, bbls. (drur.s), M1. Y. .........: 25.7 25.1 26.7 26.0 25.3
01ive-oil ra~ts, prime, drum;s, UJ. Y. ............: t6.6 7. .3 8.3 8.2
Palm oil, crad~e, caslks, (drumiis) HI. i. 2/ ........: 6.8 6.5 8.2 7.6 7.5
Rape oil, refined, bble., N. Y. 2/ .............: 16.1 1j.3 18 .2 18.2 18.2
Sesame oil, refi:-ed, drums, N\. Y. ......,........: 10.2 4.1 11.6 14. 7 16.0
Teaseed oil, crude,I druri~s, II. Y'. .....,...........: .6.512.5 12.0 12.4

Tallow, in~eclbla, Chiicago .......................: 4.6 5.0 5.0 1+.6 4.5
Grease, A \IhitE, ChlicaLgo ........................ 5.0 5.1 5.1 I*.6 4.6
Menhaden oil, c~rude, tan':s, f.Lo.b. Baltimnore ....: .7 4.2 4.7 1?.6 4.4
Sardine oil, cr~-ide, tankls, Pacll ic Coa~st ........: 5.4 4.4 .9 5.0 5.1
Rhale oil, refin~ed, bleachF3ndt~r winter l, druns, U.Y./: 9.9 E.2 12.5 12. 5 12.5

Linseed oil, rav!, tank~ cars, bEinneapolis ........: 9.3 U0.7 10.1 10.3 10. 3
Linrseed oil, rawl, car~lots, bbls., ;!. Y. .........: 9.6 9. 10.L, 10.7 10. 9
?erilla oil, -nines, II. Y. 2?7 ....................: 15.1 1. 24. 5 25.5 24. 4
3iticica oil?, drumiTs, :.. Y'. ......................: 10).7 10.1 202.2 19.8 18.8
CungT rJil drint~S, N. Y. ..........................: 12.5 16.0 27.5 27. 4 25.4
Liastor oil, den d-rited, druns, carl~ots, F:, Y. .... 1. 18.1 18.1
"astor oil, Ii0. j, bbl-s., II. Y. .............,....: .28.b 12.8 12.8 12.8
iod-liver oil, Ib.d. U.S.P.tbbls.,NJ.Y'.dol.per bbl.): 2 5 21.5 33.5 33.5 48.4
=od oil, Newfounrdlan~d, bbis., UI. Y. ,.............: 61.7 4.3 9.6 9.0 -
11-bearine1 materals::
Cop~ra, ba7se, f.o.<. Pac-ific Coast ..........,...,: 1.9 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7
=r0ttonseed, Dalles (dol. p~er ton) *....,... 22. 1 23.0 29.6 28.2 26.5
Zlaxseed, I'o. 1, MInneuapolis (per~i bu.) *i 109. LC9.0 214.0 208.0 211. 0
Toybeans, rlo. 2 Yell~ow, Chica,-o (por b~u.) ..,.....: 92.0 89.0O 106,0 114.0 1D9.0O
nmpiled from Clil, Paint and Dru, Reporter, The rl=tional Frovisioner, Chicagqo Daily
'cade- Bullet~in, Hiinneiapolis Dail; MaErket Rieco:-d, and 1reorts of the ATricultural. Mar-
asting Service and nBureaul of Labor Statistics. 1/ P'reliminary. 2/ Includes excise
oc of 3 cents beginning ~.iay 10, 1934, 2/ Includes excise tax at 4.5 cents beginning
.urned. 2.1, 194 A' Incindles Pxcise tax of 3 cents beginning July 1, 1939.







705-39 3-


THIiE ?AT S A ST C 0j IL S S IT U ATI 0 IT




Factory pr~oductiojn of fats and oils in the first 3 months of 1940~,

totaling About 2,247 million pound~Is was 17 percent greater then in the

corresponding period of 1939. Lard and greases accounted for the mnajor

part of the increase. Net inportsS of fats, oils, and oil-bearing materials

in terms of crude oil, totaled aFpproximately 345 million poiunds, 19 percent

less than! in the first quarter last perr. Stocks of primary fats and oils

increased during the quarter, and on March 31 were 7 percent lar-ger than a

year earlier.

The German invasion of N~orwayr brought about a sha3rp rise in prices

of medicinal cod.-live~r oil in domestic markets. More thanl ha~lf of the do-

mestic requirements of cod and cod-llivor oils usually nre obtained from

NSorway, Germany, the Uhlited K~ingdom, ,und Denlmark, countries wh~ich now are

not in a position to suply.'l this market.

Prices of most other fatS and oils in April differed little from those

in March, althoughl they~ were higher than in April 1939. Lard prices in April

recovered the ground lost in Marlch, b~ut pricr-s of lard, Zreases, beef fats,

and coconut oil ve!re solmewhart lon~r in April this ye-zr thanu last, reflecting

increased suppylies of lard. and gSrerrses in this count ry and of copra in the

Philippines.

During 1939, 811 million pounds of fats and oils were consumed in

the dryingi industries. This quantity wasr somewhat loss than in 1937, but

otherwise was the largest~i since 1929. All the principal drying oils, includ-

ing tung, shared in thre general incrns.so in consumption, which occurred despite

relatively snall world su~ppies and high prices for the principal drying oils.






- -


FOS-39


Increased residential building activity and inilustrinl pro:iuction in 1939

were mainly responsible for the increases in consumption. About 60 porc-

cent of the fats and oils cons~umed in? thle drying industrion in 157:9 woro

imported, or wecre derrived from imprtdc~~c materials, as compared with about

70 percent in 1938 rand S0 percent in 193t.

REVIEW OF RECE.TT DEVELOPMENT~JIS

Price of fats :Ind oils litt)0 chan~ged in Aniril

Except for cod-liver oil, little change occurred in prices of most
fats and oils inz domestic m .lrkets, auring April. BEutter prices wecre season-
rally lower than in Manrch, an~d prices of tung, perilla, .and citicica oils
dleclined somowha froma thle rel-?ti-lclr highi levels prevailing in recent
months. Lord pricles, on t~he other hernd, roganined the gran~d lost ia March~,
with the asverage price of prim~e stream lard zt Chicago RiLv;nciing from 5.e:
to 6;.1 conts pe~r poundr. The p-ic-? of sesre oil also radvacedc, evidently
becsause3 of difficulties in securin2g SUpplias from 2broad.

Caincidentanlly with the~ C-cr:-n invuasionl of Nlorway-, the price of
medicinll codl-liver oil advan2Ce~d tlh .rply at Newr York. The price of this
oil avor-cmi: $'4.40 per barrel in April comp~aea with! $,33.0 in Ma~rch, a~nd
$21.50( in Apr~il 1!79. Proz'nlt in~ications are that imports of cod anrd cod-
liver oils will be sharpllyf curtile~d as a result of the: rnr in Europ~o. In
1938, 6;3 percent of t~he 8,286,L497 gal'lorns of fis:1liercr oils imported by
the~ Uiited. St-tes or~iginate~d in- :!o1~rl;', G--ms:y, t~he Unitedl Kinrgdom, and
Denma~rk, which in view of prisnl!rt ho~stil~itic-s in Tnd aroU-n the N:or~th Sea
are not likely to be in a pnsition. to supplj this cTUn~try ;ithI fic~heliver
olile for some tino to come. Iccl--nd, Japan?, Norfound~l~an .Ind CaLr..end
supplied most of the rcnnining; imporFts In 1933. If prices for cod-liver
oil con~tinlue high, it; is probiole th .t grcator care nill be tzlkenr b, Uhited
States anrd 3innadian '"ishling flec.ts to prcecrve f~irh livelrs in a cond-ition
suitable for the prot~uctirn of nod~icir.0.1 oils thzn nt present, although it
is dothtful if n.uc~h of the Orald-1ist supply will be 2.vil?-btle to this country.

Prices of 10.rdi, greacJe, a~n7 boof f?.ts in April ;rrro sonoChaklt lower
tha a yearI earliC1r. The prieo of cjconut nil also as c~lig-ht~ly below that
of a yourr ago. But prices of othe-r 2:ats and oils wecre ,-nor".11y hi~lhor in
April this year tha last, writh~ domestic itemns 5-23 porcont hlirhor aznd in-
ported itons 2-125 ~porcted hihr. Among the domestic fa-ts, "outter nad lin-
soodr oil s'howed~ the g~reatest re:l-tive f;-ins ovecr I yronr c 'l~icr; t;hile amsong
the imp~ortel fiatn, codc-liver, ciit~icica, perill.3, tune, Irnd~ sesano~l oils sholr
ed the greatest g-ins.

Production of fa.ts ?nd oils incron~sod, not ionorts
rseinced in first quarter

En~ctoryJ prof~uctio~n of fats anld crude oils, including crczoroy butter
an~d estirntate for oloo stock~, totaled approximately 2,247 million pounds in







- 5-


F08-39


the first 3 months of 1940 comp~r.red with 1,9;14 mil.ion pour.els in *:he corre-
spending; period of 1939, ac~ord~in.- to reports of the Euran~a of the? Consus 1/I
na nd ricultural Ma-rkotinlg ServJice. 2/ Prodjuction in the first qlucrter~
this yea-r thus wa~s 323 million yor~.s or 17 percent glre to th n~ in the
first quar~l t3 r of 1939. Production from d~omestic m~aterials c.ccounltd~ for
aLbout 89 prcont of total fa.ctory! prIOC:u.ctioL thlis yealr co~mpe-red. wth CS perc-
cent; le.st yea.r.

Lclrd and gr-:asesCP aLccounted for theF major pa.rt of the incrosrso in p~ro-
A.ction. -Lard showe~vd L. gainl of 1;C2 million pounds, or1 142 ?ercent, ovecr a?
yor onr~l_;iar Othe~r fats show7i;G sabctantial inc~reeeos in outp-ut in~cl~uded
so~ybonn, cocon'ct, l~inszrad, acttoJnsccd, nnd c,7stor oile. Protatiton of t-allow,
pearrut oil, and; fish oil, onl thel other han~d, was, retaiced somewha~lt.

InPorts, of printry fats andl oils during~ the. first qua~rter of 1940
tt~otld 215 million; nounicr, 63 million poun:1s losr. than in the? co~rsrespnding
period of 1?39. ExpoCrtne, iclue1ing Ehip~nonto of butter '1nd 1:..rd to United
Statoc, territor-iou, ;Ind reexpo-to~t of foreign nil0 impo-ted free of in~ty,

No~t imports of fate :1ndr Cilfs t.1:1. :7;." re ducci fromn 129 nil.ion! pouc.ls in
thle first quar~ter of 1.3 3: to 9\ n~ill~icnr pounds ini thel first qua-rrter of 1940.
Not imports of~ cil.-bor,.:in,-T notorinl.0,, in, terms of crudeo oil, how;,vor, in-
coreased fror! 238i to 25-2 Lbil.1ion nor:.ds~ over this nezriod. The continued not
imports of fats, a7lla, :?rt cri~lbc .rin natori11s in :.crnIs of crudLe oil,
nevertheless, areI S1 n~illiojn pound~ls, orz 19 peTCrc.t, '1.1llorC in the first
quarter this ;rour than Inst.

Subst:anti~l1 rduction s in imports wreor recordecd for palm oil, cotton-

Jiuctionsr wore part~lyr offaoo b- -;:in~s in inplorts of tungT oil, copro, and


The n~ost pronounced the:; in r.czorts occuurcre in soyboo~nnc mn sayb5con
oil, coconut oil, and cottons;:.1 oil. ExpForts of lard in t~ho first qu,-rte7r
this ;o.::r vcer littl.- -lifferzent "roi those of n year oarlicr.

Fac.rtor;.* ruii nrcha~:na stocks of prioryr f?.ts cznd' oils inrcresed dur-
ing the quartr undl r review, and1 on Mar?1ch 31, 1940, totaled aprosximately
2,563 million po"unln, 157 nill.ion poun3.'s, or 7 percent, noro7 than a year
coarlior. St~clrs of lard., ta?.llo, ant~ greerrscn were consider?.bl~r in forces
of those of a your~ on.rlier, but rstocks of butter andr wha~lo oi1 l are slnallor.




1/ Proli;aine~ry statistics of tlhe factory p~rclu.-ction. andr consumptionr, in-
ports, axport, and! Jocks of .7ancinl rand vaotable fats a~nd oils for thle
3-nonth p~oriod endi:ng March 33, 19?40| ,-lso, Aninal~ and~ Vactable Fats antd
Oils, marual.
2/ Oroonarry Butte~r nan Anolrican Chooso~ Prrducticn Estin-.too, nonthly.~






-6 -


FOS-39


TH~E DRYING OILS: RECENT TRENDS

Consumption of Alging oils increased for
all classes of products in 19139

Appyroximate'ly 811 million pounds of fats and oils were used in their
saying industries in the Uhited States in 1939. This quantity was about
138 million pounds, or 20 percent, larger than in 1938r, and was the second
largest since 1929, wh~en over 900 million pounds were used. Consumption in
the drying industries represented about 8 percent of the total domestic
consumption of fats and oils for all purposes in 1939.

Paint and varnishes accounted for a~bou~t Sk percent of the total
consumption of fats, in the drying industries in 1939, linoleum and oilcloth
13 percent, and printing inks 3 percent The use of fats and oils in the
man1ufacjl L~tur of linoleumOI andU ciIClclot showed~ theI greatest relative gain in
1939 over 1938, with an increase of 26 percent. Utilization in paints and
varnishes increased about 20 polrce~nt, avd in printing inks 5 percent.

The upswing in residenrtln buildings, activity thast occurred during
1939 was mainly responsible for the marked gains in consumption of drying
oilsr Increased activity in cer~talin industrial lines wrheroin drying oils
are fairly wridoly used also was a -factor.

The gonoral strength in deanmd is indicated by the fact that the 20
porcont increase in total consumption of drying oils in 1939 was accompanied
by signifiican~rt prica a~dvalces. Thne average price of linsood oil was about
2 percent higher than in 1936, whiile prices of perilla, citicica, and tung
oils avcrnged 9. 35, and 56 percent higher ros-poetively.

All the important drying oils shared in the gonoral increase in conl
sumption in 1939. Consumption of linsood oil, at 549 million poundas who
69 million pounds groator than? in 1938. Consumption for drying purposes of
tung oil an~d oiticic,- oil was up 14 million pounds, fish oils 13 million
pounds, perilla oil and soyboonm oil 3 million pounds, nnd cnstor oil (dow
hydrated) 5 million pound.s.

Parilla, fish, soyrbon~n, oiticion, and castor oils conlcetively mado
up 19 porconlt of total consumption of fats and oils in the drying industries
in 1939 compared with 15 percent in 1938 anda g porcenlt in 1931. The porcent-
~go contribution of linscad and tung oils docroased. Linsood oil mado up 68
percent of total consumption in 1939 compared with 71 percent in 1938 and 77
porcont in, 1931. Tung oil accounted for 12 percent of the total in 1939 com-
pared with 13 porcont in 1938 cund 15 porcont in 1931. (Table 8.) The in-
creased use of substitute for the two prinicipa~l drying oils, linsood and
tung, has boon made possible by the rapid progress of choxical technology in
the drying irdustrios in recent years.

MairE D9 9} drying oils imported

About 60 percent of the fats and oils consumed in the drying industries
in 1939 were imported, or nere derivod from imported materials. Slightly moro





709-39


- 7-


than half the linseed oil used, nearly zl~l of the tung oil, anld all1 of the
perilla oil, oiticica oil, and cantor oil was of foreign origin. (Tible 3.)

Imports of tun~g oil, valuable f'or its high1 waterc-:proofin~g and quick-
drying properties, wrere restricted to = co.l~ideriblle exten1t drling 1939 by
military operations in China. riet imports of~ tunG oil declined from 168
million pounds in 1937, largest oIn reor, L'o 103~ mill~ion poJundJS in 1538 and
to 71 million pour-is in 1933, nupino ugoi,-.t -il ev
rrithdrawanls from stocks, waso lageir in 11939 thaln a yea~r earlier, though not
so large as in 1937.

Requirements for a quick-dryinG oil formainG a harda UnLteCrlresistantn
film, wlere tgrrantor in 1933 thanr the available supplyl~ of tunge oil, writh the
result that clonsumption of oiticica oil an~d dehydrated custor oil, rhich
possess drying properties some::hat~c similar to those of tung oil., waI~s in-
crensed sha:rpl~ly. Linsce-d and other drying oils apparently alsor nre used
t0 some extor~t, either in mi-tures with tung oil or alone '7itl resins, to
supp~lomant tung oil in appFlications fcr whkichr that oil is e-spcir;l~ly -roll
suited.

World rup-cuELE of EL~yng oil.s belou averal2

A combination of actors h-r becn respronsible for the compnrn~tively
high prices for dr::ing oils in the Ujnited Sta.tes in recent months. The
domestic demandr for such one~c has boon rcl-.tively strong, occan.-shipping;
costs hav~e boonl hiigh, and~ avail:blo :;orld supp~!lires haver bcon- below- avo-rago.
fLetorioration in t!.o fl-.::scad cr'op in Argonitina and the pr~iilln weid crop in
Mnnch~uria las~t fall, ~-and diffi~-cultiecs created by~ the JaT~nCnone w:ith respect
to exports of turng oil. from China, have been mainly respo~nsibtlh. for the
limited empp~ly, situa~tion.

World production of flanrccd (excludinZ production ir. t~.h Soviet
D'nion end Chi~n, for which recent data zre not availnblo) tot-led about 100
million bush!cls In 1939f compared w7ith 99? million bushels~ in 1938 nrnd an a~vor
age of 112 million busho~ls for the p~revious 10 years. Production in Argentina,
totaling about 44 million bus~hels, use.r 11 million burnhols Il-ss thn.n the rela-
tivelyr low p~ro~tuctio in 1338 nnaJ ?7:'3 the lovedc~ in mnY yeai~rs. Proi3acction
in the Uhiited States, hoccever, incrc-ssed charl~3Y in 1339, withh thec increaso
slig-htly more thern offsetting the reduction. in Argenrtin? in that you.
(Tazble 9.)

The latest official report for Man~churia. placLes the 1933 crop of
perisllaz sodcc in tha~t counrtryr .t lik million pounds comprard with 256 million
pounds in 1938, anda an ave.CrLrag of 247 million pounds for the prervio~us 5 yearrs.
(No dats ,are available for yours prior to 1933.) In add~itionr to production
in Manchurinr, 10-12 million pounds of pe-rilla sood. are produced annu?.lly in
Chosen and Jr~pria. (Table 10.)

Total exports, of tung- oil from China, including exports to Hong Kon,-
for transshipment to the United States and other countries, ?mo~unted to only
74 million pounds in 1939 compnred writh 15j million pounds in 1938 nnd a
10-year averagSe of 156 million pounds. Tle1.





509-39


- 8


In the following table, seed-production figures have been reduced
to oil equivaleents,ynd the foregoing5 dcta are summarized together with pro-
duction figures for oiticica oil in Bra~zil. Despite the rharp, increase
that has taken place in oiticica oil production during the past 5 years,
the quantity produced is still small in comparison with world production
of other drying oils.

Table 2.- W~orld production or exports of specified drying oils,
and oil-bearing materials in terms of oil,
average 1925-34, annual 1935-39

:Flaxseed, produc-: :Perilla seed,: Oiticica:
Perod : tion ex:cl~uding : ngil : production, : oil, :
and year : U.S.S.R. andF : excrt s* Mnhraad:pouto Total
: China 1! Chinar Chosen 2/ :Bra::il
: Mil.lb il. 13 il b. M;il. lb il b.
Ave rage:
1925-34 : 2,181 131 3f 50 4/ 2,362

1935 : 1,?59 16) 152 1 2,275
1935 2,107 191 133 14 2,445
1937 : 1,e66 227 102 5 2,200
1938 1,530 153 98 32 2,113
1939 :/ 1;r8% 74 61 6/ 37 2,020

Basic data. compl3.i from officirc1 sources and reports of the International
In stijtutec of Agri cu!.ture. Production of flaxseed. and perilla. seed by come-
tries,, an~d exports of tuasL Oil from Ch~ina, by countries of destination, are
shown in tables 9-11.
If Oil equ~ivalent, 33 percent of thie actual weight of flaxslsod.
2/Oil equivalent, 37 percent of the actual weight of" perillaa coed.
1/ Avrnfge 1933-~34. Production data for Manchuriz are~ not avarilable for
years prior to 19) .
4/ Loss thazn 500,000, pounds.
$}Prolimina~ry.
b/ ou~gh avroximation based on unofficial data.

Proa~ction of hcapseed is an important factor in the world supply of
dry~ing oils, cven thcrugh plrzctically no hompseed or hempseed oil is now im-
portedl by the United States. U~nfortunlately, production figalros for the
Soviet, Union a~nd China, the two lar~cod producing countries, are~ not avail-
able for recu;nt years.

Largely because of the r:1atively short suplplios rrnd high prices of
the principal drying~ oils, increa.sing~ use halS boon mad.e in the past year of
sayb:Cr. oil, fish oils, and c-etor oil (dohyd2rated) for drying purposes.
Produ~c'ion of sayboonls in the Uhited States, has increased sharply in recent
ye .?rs, -nd iiromises to increrase further. Co~stor bean production in Brazil
alrso hrzs show~n a sharp upwrd~~ trend. However, if weather conditions in
ArgentinaL and Man~churi- are more non~rly normal this year than they wore 1last
yo-.r, it is possible that the nood for semi-drying oils to supplcmcnt linseed
and perillsz "ils will be somewhat less pressing in 1941 than at present,
rclthoubh there mray continue to be fazirlv large requirements for tung oil
subs-,titutis.






ros-39


-9 -


rn
r-1



,'
a .,o
p 0


O co C



0 -
d -1


*r





,C O



No r



01 O r


d 5-1
a- I o
OldM
Mb
m -0
- r M


a, r- O


C, e--
5 o li

ad *M I

a o

. d .e-s


a o
Fn 8 r

-9 .,1 &


cl C
o ..
=do
,Ca
mm,- n
cd C


aH rl

or c:

0 -=- rd,

*r-1 C C

c- LC

C o

r-r *
C -~
O'e+
v 04
rr S.>
.sh -


r: O


-P O I,

SFCo
ton a p
bo o
CIC O
-r- *i O


ar

da~ 1


O


m0 a
.0 a ,Cl
0 *I -0





ka, 5 r-

X *r- O
.0 0 +
re a


4-1 ed, a

ad k




0- 0~ H #"

a *ri 01
0 o
94 140 O,~~,,~~, 6


-9 LD r-4 00 rl H On O 0 O
O Ln L.0D P~ -- f-D 00 LO ~LD




l rci [~-.2- O L C*3 LO O
rl -4 a LD LC1 Ln C} 1 '"-- toL CO
r-4



r CJ c~ r -- Mo on OH r
I-r *I rJ C'J r-1 r-- CJ r-1 rJ CU r~




i\J LA r -4 t' M TW Ll" Ln -
r -Yr -.-t POL r"<. P O
r-1 r' CJ PA.. Ln1.11L *. 1"A


~a









rlP,- L"1 Ot ll






. m rlrl e e--r(..ro





4 ?"* CJ Ln CJ O -1 0 MA
c J oJ oJ (1 on -td NT t-
*,- p
** r j


rd
c




48 r
r I


Ra
4 c




r a


a





r d
rn .r
-I *-I
.,-4 c


on
o-t -
c6rl k
p,--I
Er 6
t *M


c r
o

-0o
a
.,-1
cli




cd

m
w.I
I

a


r
c

c0 E-
-~



cu o


so



O H
I



...*

cj r-


(6 -r
Do


rcdI
D r



dI



d I


I r
,C
pre.
po
.. *


Hl r-I Lnt,- O Lnt\y 0- H
r-1 r-1 CJ C0.1 L O ?"1 1 L1








IL *-- N"- rJ--LnM-- O
~IO re ed rlM ~3

O -P 0 .t"LD >' r -O


O's a r-I (13 lr- .-1 3 LT






TJ H e-1 r--4 r,-1 r-1 -4 O


* i


,-4 N to -t LETLD r-- to O
rn r re to PA HO PA re
01 ON 1 01 0 01 0101 01


+




F..


o
p z


* ;


r-I I
O I
,-lp
*,L

O d
0








Table 4.- Estimated total consumrrption of fats and oils in the
irying industries, United States, 1935-39


Item : 1935 : 1936 : 1937 : 1393 : 1939

:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.

Linseed oil 1/ ..........: 465,0121 478,086 570,798 479,813 548,690
Tung oil 1 .............: 124,174 115,125 143,470 87,405 100,980
Perilla oil 1/ ..........: 60,890 105,260 38,776 41,487 50,938
Fish oil ................: 32,470 39,636 44,340 29,791 42,570
Soybean oil .............: 17,871 17,419 17,157 18,847 28,220
Castor oil ..............: 4,058 4,990 8,368 6,796 11,844
Oiticics oil 2/ .........: --- 2,892 3,631 5,301 18,867
Coconut oil .............: 581 772 1,126 424 710
Cottonseed oil ..........: 49 49 210 352 843
Rape oil ..............: 192 181 139 134 79
Corn oil ................: 329 123 89 118 155
Palm? oil ................* 2 3 3 10 6
Olive-oil foots .....: ------ 3 6 3/ 14
Sunflow~er oil ...........: 910 97 4/ 4/ 4
Other vegetable oil 51 ..: 1,929 11,378 1,524 2,133 7,158

Grease ..................: 426 562 659 565 497
Tallow, inedible ........: 115 4 158 181 102
Marine mammal oil .......: 39 28 18 35 40
Neat's-foot oil .........: 158 8 16 11 28
Tallow, edible ..........: 2 2 2 2 1
Lard ....................: 4 5 3 2 2
01eo oil ................: --- --- --- 2 --
01eostear~ine ............: --- --- --- --- 2


Total ........70?,819 776,692 830,47? 673,543 811,146
Compiled fromn reports of the Bureau of the Yensus, except as otherwise noted.
Data for earlier years beginning 1931 are given in The Fats and Oils Situation
for hWay 1939.
1/ Since drying oils are used directly as well as in factory consumption,
these figures represent total domestic disappearance excluding anall quantities
reported by the Pureau of the Census as used in soap, shortening, and miscel-
laneous products.
2/ Imports for consumption from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and
DoJmestic Commerce. INot separately reported prior to January 1936..
3/ Reported as "olive oil, inedible".
3/ If any, included with "other vegetable oil."
5/ May include some citicica oil; hence some duplication.


- 10 -


FOS-3 9





FOS-39 11 -

Table 5.-Est~imatdc cosuponn:~-~ir of' fats adi oi~ls in paints and
var~nishes, United StLt~e3, 1Cll3-39


Item; 193, 1 936 193 193 1939


Linseed: oil 1/' *.... 408C,946 412,~782 Llt2,29 .C761 !1.6-5,1A1*
Tan~g oil' 1 ...........: 111,,, 0,6 1350 0,90 95,11.2
Perills oil 1/ ........: :c, ,312 ;5.,603 ""' '7L 32,. 3126 5
Fish oil .......,.......: 1P,251 2316 27,.2;7; f, 2-.,98JL1
Soybean oil ...........: 1 3003 :.,.1 1633 1,13 2,2
Casto~r oil ....~........: 3,_O 3,6 ,1.55 5, 2 :3 11 9
Oiticica oil 2/i .......: --- 2,29~2 3,631 l,301 19lo
Coco~nu~t oil ...........: 379 7 ,2 422 7077
Cottonseed oil ........: 36 34 L3 1 51.
Rape oil ..,............: 168 163 138 131 79
Coirn oil. ..,,.....,,,,.: 329 123 8 9 113 15 5
Palmr oil *....... 1 1 --- 1 1
01ivs-oil. .. cots ....: ----- 3 0 1$
Sunflowers o~f 1 *... 310 f)7 L / L./ L/
Other vetFeE:.ble~ oil 2/I : 1,729 li,614 1,,981,91 5J116

Grease ................: 77 51$ 15 &&A
Tiallovr, ine:dllse ......: 1C06 135 1') 11 9
Marine mamm.al oil .....: =4 17r 11 2.' 36
Ne-atsfoot. oil .........: 1;7 7 1J, 9
01e3 oil ..............: --- --- --- 2 -
Total ............i 608,"ES 55!I60.; 1,0 56:, 097 680,552

Coljlnled from! reports of the Pulreau Of the Cons~u;, ulze-pt as otheitrris
noted.


factory consumption, these3 fi"'ures. rl-resent tet 1i J10a.:actic di:appearanceiTLC
exclu~~~ing qunite rprtdoytoEureu of t,;C '::c;anS me fa~ctCe~~r3,- n--
sunrrption L,, l~i~no~le.n, oilclcih, ad ~r int ing~ ir', -a~i c!:C.1 i- abstitics
usedI in E~ap~, rho~rte~i-l., andl misceIl:laeou~s ?or-uct.s.
2/ Lsorts forl ~cormanl~p,ion, fromT oficial~ rcccids ojf 'Ihe ,-.:Gru of Fo`--
eign a!d. Dr!;st. Ic rnonnerLe. i'Ot. sepratel;?G1 c.:.po~rtld :Tior1 to Jan:i??uar 1936.~
2/ Rpre s oieol insc'ibl= ",
247/ Lr an;1;, incllude itith "other vegetabb~~r oil".





1~ 1_11_


of th: Gen_s.


o~f the~ Cenlsus.


12 -

Table 6.- Factory consumlption of fatr; andl oils in the .m~anuracture of


Fos-39


linoileum and oilclo~th, United


StatJe, 193"-39


1936


Item


1935


1937


1 000 1'-.


68,151

7,39 i

1,653
---


19?38


1. CD lb.


1939


Sr13 00 b.


:1 Que lb.


I ?1~ 00 .


Linsced oil
Fish oil
Perilla oil
Tlung oil
Soybsan oil
Castor oil
R.1-e oil
Other vegetable oil

Grease
Tallow, inedible

Total


50,076
16,235
17,717
7,131
2,886
1,066

6,758


68,023
17,385
10,758
3,763
6,r,38
88


41,809


10,331
477


13 ,395


L,171
3,005 T
1,313
2
115

1


81,0?31


101,832


1C\2,763


c5,362


107,721


ComTp~led froml :sor,-t, s 3i' the~ 3Ureau


Table 7.- Factory corsamption
prfnttng~ inlzs,


of fats snd oils in he
Unitedl StateJs', 1f7-3:.


.n.-v: irture of


Item


Lin~seed~ cil

P'ril~la oil
FL.3h Oil
C:.:ter ~il
Cojt .:.nceed (il
so-,-ae cil



GtLi v~Egeable oil

GrJ r.se
1'--- ne rmammail oil
Te lowv, inoibl~e



31eostca:in-:

Tot.al


1935
. r* I b.


1936
1,0. i;.


.l o 'J


1979
1,', a le.


ls39
1,0CUj lb.


354

13

1


15.
15
C2
2


2909

23


16,000
2,CSA





183
57
9 ~


17,526
2,105
1,9315
204
31.7
192
62
5


: 360



: 1

:~ ---


11


539
? r
?
2
3


410
5
I
2
2
9


669
4
&
1
2
1,
2


22,873


20, 2:6


25,213


2.1.886


Compiled frcm reports of the Bureau























































20.8
2.9
12.7
?.1
.2

100.0


6 17.1 15.9
6 11.9 17.4
S12.8 ?.0
5.9 .8
S.7 7.7

S100.0 100.0


16.5
7.8
7.0
.9
1.7

100.0


16.2
8.1
4.8
4.2
1.8

10j0.0


16.1
10.0
3.5
6.0
1.3

100.0


18.9
8.3
16.9
8.1
.7

100.0


19.E

19.0



100.0


Printing inks
81.1 79.3 .1
10.7 11.2 11.5
374.6 9.6
4.5 4~.9 4.8


Linseed oil ...........:
Tung oil ..............:
Perilla oil ...........:
Other fats and oils ...:


88.7
7.3
.3


8;.0 O
6.8
1.4
4.8


77.6
10.5
6.7
B.2


76.8
9.5
8.1
B.6


76.6
9.2
8.4
5.8


81.0
11.3
3.1
4.6


Total .. .. .

Computed from data shown


100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100,0

in preceding tables and from similar data given in


The Fats and Oils Situat


ion for May 1939.


__ _


_I


: Paint and varnish


I


Linoleum and nilcloth
2 56.3 47.2 47.3 51.6 49.2 66.3 64.9 63.1


___


FOS-39S 1 13 -

Table 8.- Percentage contribution of principal items to the total
weight of fats and oils used in the drying industries, United
States, 1931-39


Total drying industries


:1931 :1932 :1933 :1984 :1975 :1936 :1937

:Per- Pe- er- Per- Per- Per- Per-
:cent cent cent cent cent cent cent


:1938


:1939

Per-
cent

S67. 6
12.4
6.3
5.2
3.5
1.5
2.3
1.2

S100.0


Item


Per-
cent

71.3
13.0

4.4
2.8
1.0



100.0


Linseed oil ...........: 77.1 74.6 69.0 6
Tung oil ..............: 14.7 15.7 18.8 1
Perilla oil ...........: 1.8 2.4 4.6
Fish oil ..............: 4.4 4.1 4.1
Soybean oil ...........: 1.5 8.4 2.6
Castor oil ............: .3 .9 .5
Oiticica oil : -
Other fats and oils ...: .2 .5 .4

Total ..............,100.0 100.0 1.00.0 10


65.7
17.5
8.5
4.6
2.5
.6

.6

100.0


61.6
14.8
15.6
5.1

.6
.4
1.7

100.0


689.7
17.3
4.7
5.3
2.1
1.0
.4
.5

100.0


72.0
19.2
3.7
2.3

.5

.2

100.0


67.2

8.2
3.0
2.1
.6

.5

100.0


16.1
13.1
3.5

.6
.4
1.0

100.0


Linseed oil ...........: ?8.4
Tung oil ..............: 15.6
Perills oil ........... 2.0
Fish oil ..............: 2.3
Soybean oil ...........: 1.2
Castor oil ............: .3
Oiticica oil ..........:--
Other fats and oils ...: .2

Total ............. 100.0



Linseed oil ...........: 65.;
Fish oil ..............: 20.1
Perilla oil ........... 1.(
Tung oil ..............: 9.'
Soybean oil ...........: 3.i
Other fats and oils ...:.

Total .............: 100.(


76.9
16.3
2.3
1.9
1.8
.4

.4

100c.0


78.0
19.3
4.1
1.9
1.9
.4

.4

100.0


68.1
14.0
5.6
3.7
3.2
1.7i
2.8
0.9

100j.0


68.8
19.0
4.1
3.0
2.3
.9
.5
.5

100.0


72.0
14.3
5.8
2.8
2,7
.9
.9
.6

100.0


2
0
9

6





- 14 -


Fos-39


Table 9.-Flaxseed: Production in specified countries and estimated
world total excluding UJ.S.S.R. and China, 1925-39


: Esti..ated:::
Year :world total,: :tna British : United
:excl. U.S.S.R.: : India 1/: States


iUruguay


Canada


: and China
: 1,000 bu.


1 000 bu. 1 000 bu. 1,000 bu. 14)tVbu 1,00b


21,160
i17080
17,L0
15,080
14,080
16,840
16,640
18,160
17,600
16,080
17,920
16,640
17,800
19,440
18,800


6,237
5,995

3,614
2,060
4,399
2,465
2,719
632
910
1,667
1,795
775
2/ 1,259
2,169


1925
1926
1927
-1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
19~3r
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939


:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
3/ :


137,000
133,000
1$0,000
126,000
96,000
136,000
132,000
101,000
97 000
113,000
106,000
114~,000
101,000
99~,000
100,000


75,113
80,7"3
c2,672
78,377
50,004
78,32
89067 0
62,595
791720
59,445
76,200
60,604
55,509
s4,368


22,331
18,531
25,174
19,118
15,924
21,673
131,755
11,511
6,904
5,661
11, 520
5,273
7,089
8,152
20,330


2,030
1,970
1,954
2,030
3,216
5,056
Lc,841
1,475
2,876
3,402
3,007
3,011
3,728
4,425
4,693


Compliled: front off'icial scu:-ces ar.d r-eports of the Interntional Insti-
tute of Acricullture. Available data for m~ost flaxseed-producing coun-
t~ries f'or years ':egirning 1909 are given in T'he Fats and Oils Situation
for Jan~ua~r 19L0.
1/ R~epor1ted promotion pllus In~dian offjCicial estimates for unreported
tracts.
/ r~evised.


Table 10.-Perilla seed: P:.oduction in larnchuria an" Chosen, 1933-39

Year not al Mlanchuria Cho sen
1,00 lb.1,000 lb. 1,000 Io.

1913 :122,5,2? 110,230 12,297
193' :L 19,L6 3 1382,2 s9 11 ,201,
1935 : L09,541 309,033 10,508
1936 : 333,609 323,139 10,550
3937: 275,632 264,552 11,080
1938 : 265,9899 '255,734 10,255
1939 : 1/ 105,000 2 154,322 32/


Compiled 'rolnt official sour-ces.
Japa~n is -reprted to total about
other coun.tries is negligible.
L~Tentat ive estimate.


In ads:'ition! to~ the abocve, production in
L00,000 p~ounds annually. Production in













: United : Uied"ether-
'Year :Total States : Gemn igo France ad

:1000 l'o 1,0003 lb. 1,000O Ib. 100l. 100l.100l.100I


15 -


iExpor~ts from China,by3 countries
.nation, 1912.-39 ];/


Table 11.- Tung o~il:
of desti


1912
~1913
191r
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
193r
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939


:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
3/:
2/:


77,709
61,820
5c8,607


53,515
6j5,180
81,794
72,095
55,940
99,609
111.,585
119,472
119,210
99,758
120,173
165,907
142,623
155,63L
115,315
107,035


:162,e90
191,223
227 ,C27
153,391
73,858


41,057
41.,4399
35,406

53,93


41,221


82,176
79,150

94,1b66






73~,283
60c,10,

137,317

12,538
1,538


6,940
3,7j9
5c,850

8,06
S,318

11,651
10i,335
6,365
6,011

9,860

7,138
17,82&


7,390




19,2E6
13,265
56,912
123,039
66,284


9,162
4,F83
5,568





2,162
9,440
5,071
8,671
101571
8,463
6,134
7,253

3,192

3,6?73
2,578
3,169
4,959
6,379
9,1,70
3,k38
3,266
626


?,854
3 ,3.,5
5,156
5,984


3,956
6, 93
?,761
5,0686
2,3L7

7,121
5, 1.'5
6,r,8
5,'957
13,3.6
11,2?5

13,2PL

10,117
6,902
8,058
c2,344
8,119
4,L67
1,375


2,]14
1,062
1,103
532



1,9J9
675
439
1,397

2,192

2,671


3,339

2,127
2,30s
&,950
7,1,21
6,869
8,166
8, 90
2,380
11


3,902
2,680
3,083

112


328
712
3,315
700
685
1,063
1,388
2,075
7,680
3,LA3

4,908
6,062
7,914
9,070
6,848
4,563
3,621
1,3231
774
233


Continued -


FO-39












:'~ Norway











lb

---
---
---
1.



75



l~172
90
181


1,3000
13.

4,390
2,383
2,127





750
294
317
99 j
353
'55
L63




b33
--- 0
---
---


L1,000
lbu.


1,317
963
934
391
400
1,928
7,726
17,200
831
47
258
250
1,264
1,593
379
223
266
749
764
918
718
886
840
935
1,043
3,576
5,269
2,946


552
33
79
96
173
52
'178
49
186


8s19
594
rBO~L
733
751
903
815
735
528
583
736
1,187
?I06
1,1$8
250
24.0


12-
---
---
---
---
---
---
---


Compiled from


official so~urces.


1/ Inrlludes Man~chur~ia prior to July 1, 1"'32.
2/ Includles Hawii prior to 1'',2.
~i'Prelimlinary.
!/ TDeludes Taiv'an.
5/ Includes New~ Zealand.
I/ Includes British India, Finland, French Indo-China, Kwjantulng, Danzigs, Poland,
Canada, Spain, Net~herland?s In-lie~s, Straits Settlemesnt, Urnion of Sou~th Africa,
Mascao, and Kwangehowwa ~Leasled Territory.


: Other
Argen-
tia: coun-
tiatries 6,
1,000 1,000 .
lb. lb.


Table 11.- Tun, oil: ExpForts fromr China, by countries
of destination, 1012-34 1./ Continued


:Itzly :


__


1,000
lo


13











-.--
---
---

---
---


-


I


- 16 -


F03-39


Aus-
tr?11a
5/

lb.

t3


123

16

;3

i2

132

7398
l6
25
2?57



;?$1



1,254
128


:9elgium


: Sweden


Year :




1912 :
1913 :
1914 :
1915 :
1916 :
1917 :
1.918 :
1519 :
1920 :
1921 :
19322 :
19323 :
1924 :
1925 :
1926 :
1927 :
1928 :
1929 :
11930 :
li191:
1932 :
1933 :
1936 :
1935 :
19?36 :
1937 :
1938 /
1939 ?/


Japan
L/ '



385

1~22
71~7
3,7,55
12
2,2j5

1,217
66
56

53
c0 r


1,37
1,183



1,31

3,2,04 1
1:,7
2,?1


:Denmasrk


?b





116

'217
468
236
399 ,




~735





1.643
1,~605
1,755
1,921

37 r






















































2/ Total of unrounded numbers.


Table 12.-01eomargariner Production and materials used in manufacture,
United Stat~es, March 1938 and 19391 January-March 1940


SMar. 3940 5'
Item
S1938 I 1g9 Jan. t Feb. Mar.
:1 000 lb. 1 001 lb. 1 000 lb 1 000 lb Igb.
Prolu action:
Colored ............: 161 137 150 169 138
Uncellored ......,....: 40 ,813 29.210 29,2CV~ 29,309 26, 503
Total g/ ........: 40,1974 29.')48 29.'54 29. 77 26,641


~


: 19,370 15,384 19,300 19.100 16.425

* 9,555 4,729 2,o51 1,811 2,464
: 1,145 1,596 692 770 526
: 1,238 173 --- --- ---
: --- --- --- --- 1
: 17 --- --- --- ---

: 11.955 6,498s 2,743 2.611 2.991


, ,


708-39


-17 -


Idateerials used: s
01eo oil ...........: 1,35)
01eostearine .......e 264
Lard, neutral ......s 155
01eo stock .........: 109
Total. ardanal 1. 881
Cottonseed oil .....: 16,327
Soybean oil ........: 2,514
Peanut oil .........: 525
Corn oil ...........: 4
Vegetable gam ......: ---
Total domestic


1,326
271
112
(5 8
9,678
5,452
203
F1


1,144
265
241


10o,077

166
;4


vegetable ...

Coconut oil
Ba~bassu oil ....
Palm-kernel oil ..
Palm oil......
Rice on1'...........
Total foreign
vegetable ......


1,337 1,317
261 242
333 301
105 96
_2 QM 1,5J
10,200 9,022
8,657 7,169
153 146
89 87
1 1


Total fatal sad:
oils ...........: 33.206


23.686 2381) 23747 21372


Milk ...............:
Salt and other
miscellaneous .....:

Compiled from Bureau of
Bulletin.
1/ Preliminary.


7,605

1,773


5,861


5,696

1,307


5,761

1,332


5,074

1,166


Internal Revenue records and Inlteral Revenue




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