The Fats and oils situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00073
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00087

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text































































WORLD PRODUCTION OF eOTTONSEED, SOYBEANS, AND PEANUTS HAS
INCREASED SHARPLY SINCE 1923, WITH COTTONSEED PRODUCTION IN 1939
AeouT 50 PERCENT LARGER, AND SOYBEAN PRODucTION NEARLY 70 PERCENT
LARGER THAN IN 1923. PEANUT PRODUCTION (IN 1938) WAS ABOuT 2.5
TIMES AS LARCE AS IN 1923. THE RECORD LEVEL OF COTTONSEED PRO-
ouoTION IN 1937 WAS CHIEFLY THE RESULT OF A RECORD COTTON CROP
IN THE UNITED STATES IN THAT YEAR. FLAXSEED PRODUCTION ALSO HAS
BEEN LARGER, UN THE AVERAGE, SINCE 1923 THAN IN EARLIER YEARS.


POUNDS


Flaxseed






I~ll II II II II I II


IMILLIGSI1


1(11 i
F:je .97: 35










t- FOS-35


'i

;'' '


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AusIcutTunt EconomeCs
WASHINGTON
JANUAny 16, 1940


T HE F AT S A ND OIL S SIT UrAT




ESTIMATED WORLD PRODUCTION (EXCLUDING CHINA) OF O
SOYBEANS. PEANUTS, FLAXSEED. AND PERILLA SEED 90948


'9120 1 925 19.
DIATA FOR 1988 AND Isas ARE PRELIMINARF
,* ANCHURIA AND GROSAN CNEF


30


91 5


19140


__


11 BDEPAITRTEN OF AISHICULTURE


NE& 559551 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICL




rOS-35 -2 -
Table 1.- Price per pounda of specified fats and oils, and oil-bearing materials,
December 1937 and i1938, aNr. Octob~er-ecembl'ler 1939
: December :~ 1939
Item
Fat s anid oil s: : ClentS Cent~s Cents Cents Cent s
Butter, 32-score, ChlicagFo ~...................: 37.3 27.4` 21r.5 29.5 29.5
01eomargarine, dom. vie., Chicago ..............: 15.0C 1E.i 1C.0 5. 15.o
Lard, pri-e steam, Chica o .....................: 8. .7 c6, 62
Lard, repfined, Chica30 .........................: .5! 6.0 7.2 7.1
Comrpolundsc(animal2 and v~eg.rcookinlG fr-ts), Chicag~o.: 10.4 4.6 9.7 I9.5 9.5

Corn oil, cirude, tanks, f.o.b. miillse ...........: 0.5 6.4 5.9
Corn oil, refined, bbls., NJ. Y. ................: 9.4 9.3 0.3 8.6 g.6
Cottosnseed oil, cnude, tank:.f.o.U. S.E. mi~ll .: 5.i 6.4 L.8 e .6 5.9
Cottonesed oil, p.s.:.., 11. Y. ..................: 1.1 7.6, b,8 b.5 b.9
01eo oil. extra, Chli,-aco .......................: 11..3 E.2 10.07 E.5 7.4
01eostea;ine, jbls., IT. Y. .....................: Z.1 ?-9 .9 7.9 7.0
Peanut oil, crud~e, thanks, f.o.?. ?ills .........: 6.6 t6.3 6.5 6.6
Peanrut oil, dom.refined, bbls.,lT. Y. ...........! 10.0 1.0.1 10. 1.6 10.1
Sobean~u oil, crede, tark~ ca:-s,mi d-Re rtr Om ills~: 5.2 :..1 4.9 \.8 '.1
Sogbezrn 3il, r2-ined, 1!. Y'. ...................: C8.4 7.9 6. .0 8.0

Babjassu oil. TI. Y'. .............................: --- 6.1 7.07 6.7 .
Coconut oil, aieLll:Ltank1sl,f.o.. Pacific Coast 2/.: b.7 [.3.5 6.5 .
Coconn~t oil, edible, 11. Y. 2/' ..................: ?.2 --- .1 7.9
Olive oil, ?ditle, ~tls., TJ. Yi. ........... 35)351 002.1 ;17.7
Palm-kernlel oil, -natured, bbcle., N. Y. 2/ ....: 7.5 .
Palm oil, cred~-e, ensk~s, IT. Y. 2} ...............: 7.i? F.7 --- 8.07 G.0
Raple oil, refinrd, bbis., U.. Y. f/ .............: 16.; 1. 1EO3 1Z.0 18.2
Sesamle oil. refineGl, diruns, I!. Y. *....... :1?.4 10?.5 --- --- 1'2.0
TeAsepd oil. crude~, IT. Yi. ......................: ?. 3313.1 17.5

Tallow, inedib1 Chlirago ......................: 5.1 ". 55 5.3
Grease, .A whiite, Chicago~- .......................: li.5 r.3 F. .4 5.4
Menh~aen oil. crude, thanks, f.o.b, EcaltimorP ...: 4.3 4. b. &5 ,
Sardine oil, cruinP, tanks,- Pa~cific Cocat .......: .1L.6 4.2 L. 2
Whale oil,r fl:iined~l. ached~ winte~r,tblz.,17.Y. 4/. E. .2 2 12.5 127.5
Oliv~e-oil f-r't;, Iwline, dlraLn, 1.. Y. ...........: 3.i* 7.2 1I. 0 9.3 E.7

Linseed oil, !r.wJ, tl.i- cer~lots, .:~innmliarl~i ....: 10. 23 10.0j 9.4 9.9
Linsced oil, ran, crlrott, tbl,., II. Y. ........: 103 .6 10.2 9.9 10.j
Perilla Oil, Iranli !II Y. 1I/ ...................: ?1O. ~16. 14.0: 16.7 1$.7
Oiticica oil, FT. ". .................. ..........: 1'10 11.2 21.0I 20'.6 20.4
Tung oil, d~u--~, ii. T. .............:1.3 5. 28.2 26.2 26.5
Castor oil. IFo. 3, b:-ls., U~. YI. ................: l10.2 i.! 1.1.1i 12.0
Cod oil, Nerfroullndld bbls., 11. Y. ............: 6.0 i;.i 9.0 .
Oil-bearing materials::
Copra, bP~s, f.o.b. Pacific Coast ......:........: 2.3 1.7 2.3 2.1 2.0
Cottonseed,U.S. fnrm price (dol. per ton) ......: 155 3. 2.9 3 24.8
Cottonsecd, Dallas (dol1. per ton) ..............: -- 3. 0 20;.0 =6.5 27.6
Flanedd, 170. 1 Mlinneapolis (per bu.) ..........: 210.4 19, 0. 09207.1
52Zbot~ans, ITo. 2 Yellow, ChicagTo (n~er bu.) ..~....: 95.0 561.0 37.0 95.0 11Cj.0
CompiledJ from Oil_, Painlt and Drug. Rep31orter, 11sltijnal Provirsioner, Ch~icag~o Daily
Trade~ Bu!lletin, Hinnieapolis Da~ily~ I.farke~ct Reco~rd, and~. reports of the Agricultural1
MaI~rk-t~ing Servicr a~d ~ureau of Lab~or Statistics. P/ Prolimi nary. 2/ I nclude os
excise tax of 3 cents beginning 1.lay 10, 1954. 1/ InICludCos ex:cise tax of 4.5 cents
be~ginnringp August 21, 1936b. 4/ Includezs evcise tax of 3 cents beginning July 1,
1939.
































































~111_


FOS-35


- 3-


THE FAT S A FlD 0 I LS S IT UAkT I ON


Surmiary

The United States returned to its pre-drough~t position as a net export-

er of food fats and oils during 1999. Prom 1936 through 1934, the United

States had been a net importer of food f'a.ts as wyell as technical fats, largely

because of the- adverse effects of dr~ought on domestic production.

Difficulty in finding suffiicien~t p~rofitable export markets for the large

domestic surplus of lard and saybear oil was one of the p~rincipal causes for

the general we~akness in prices of 4.creatic food and sc7an fats and oils during

the past year. Approximately 8,400 million pounds of fats and oils were pro-

duced fromn domestic materials in the United States in 19~30. Such production

was abcut 400O million pounds larger thatn in 193.8 arl.d was the largest on record,

Despite sharp gains in Septemb~er, prices of most domestic- fats and oils

averaged lower in 1989 thlan in anyr of the pcrocedinf 5 or 6 years. Prices of

several of the imported fats and oils, on the mother hand, averaeed about the

same as a year earlier, whiile some of the imported items scored share advances.

Comparative strength in late 1939 in prices of fats and oils Emported

chiefly for technical uses apparently was due to increased cosets of ocean

transport, and, in some case, to difficulties in securing shipments. Strength



: The 1"40 Agricultural Outlook Char-t Eook for:
: O~ilseeds: Flax, SoybeSans, Pcanuts, and Cottonseed is:
: now available to resaders olf Theo Fnts and Oils Situan-
: tio~n. An:. reader zlo wanzts a copy may3 -btanin it upon :
: request to th~e Di~visionr o~f Economic Info~rmationr,:
: Bureau of Agricultural Economies, Wlashing~trln, D. C.:






FOS-35 -4 -

shown by prices of dr-yirg oils throughout most of the year was due partly to

the restricted movement of tung oil from China, an~d partly to increased demand

for such nils in. the UInited States.

Ex~ports of lard and soyrbeans gained substantially in Nlovember. For the

3 months 'Septem~ber-l'ovember 1933, lard exports wmoun~ted to nearly 70 million

pounds compared wvith 56 million pounds in the corresponding period of 1938.

Exports of sovbeans totaled over 6 rlillion bushels compared writh! 2 million

bushels a year earlier. The Ulnited Kingdo~m toak somewhat less lard than in

the previous year, but other counries torik considnrablyr more.

Lard exports for 1939, in-luding shinmenrs to noncontiguous territories,

are estimated to have totaled more than 300 anillion c~ounds ccmparerd with 234

million pounds in 19139, and a pre-droug~lht (1929-33) average of 666 million

pounds. Domestic produ~ct.cjl of sc.bem.:s for 1989p is now Jst~imated a~t about 87

million bu~shels compared w~ith 63 mcililon bush:els in. 1938 and a 5-~year (1929-33)

average of 14 million bushels.

Annuval datai tlfr. 19019 to 1939 on p3roduc-tion of cottolnseed, soybeans,

and peanu;lts by countries, presented in this report, indicated that a marked in-

crease in world suppy.lies of these oilseeds has taken place since 1922. Data

also are presen~tejd shoplinE production of f'lanced~d ad pe'rilla seed by countries.

EVEVIE OF R;ECEPT DEVELOFMEETSI~

Prices of falts 2nd oils in. 1939 lowerst in 5 years

Prices of domestic fats and oils in. 1C39, with the exception of linseed
oil and tallove, overagned- the llo'r:0Ct inI 5 :.nd, in. scm. enscs, 6 years. During
the first 8 months of :1939, the general .trenld in lprices wa7s downwarIVd. With
the oultbrerlk of wvar in Eu~rope in Sep-tembe7r, prices~ or all fats and oils ad-
vanced fai rly sh-arply. "u~t this aLdvance Is fo~llowed~ by: a tendency for prices
to decline during the remaining months of the ye -r.





- 5-


POS-35


In December 1939, prices of most domestic fats and oils were about tha
same~as or slightly lower thanr those in Decembesr 1938. Prices of imported
fats and oils, on the other hand, were generally higher than a year earlier,
withr babassu, coconut, o~liv~e, a~d. sesame oil pri-c'-s upj about 10 percent~, palm
and rape oils up about 20 percent, castor oil. up about 30 percent, tenseed oil
up nearly 50 percent, and cod oil prices upF more thany 100 pe rce nt Boath
domestic and foreign drying oils also were up in. Decerlber 1989 compcre-d with a
year earlier linseed oil by: about 20 percent, per'illh. oil byr about 40 per-
cent, and tunG and oiti~cica. oils byr approximately 80 percent.

A markepd increase in the do~mestic croductionn of fsts and o~ils occurred
in 1939. Approximastel:. 8.4 billion pounds of faits and oils were produlced in
this country~ compared with 8.0 billion pounds in 1938t. The 1",39 production
was the largest on record.

On~e of the mjin reasons for the general vastzlness in price-s of de~mostic
food and soup fate in 1939 was the difficulty in findings profitable~ ex~ort
markets for the largo surplus of such fats as lord and SOybean~r Oil produced in
this country. Prom 1935J through 1938, the United SCtates had been a not irn-
porter of foo~d fc.ts as well as technicnal fats, lame-ly becaucee of thei ad ecrse
effects of droughts on domnestice production. Cut during 1939 the3 UnTited States
returned to its pre-drought position as a not exporter of faood fate. and oils.

The comprai~rtive strength in late 193.9 in prices of fats and oils im-
ported chiefly for technical uses apparently was duie to increassed costs o~f
006ea Ltrnsports and, in sorr cases, to difficulties in szcur~ing shipme~nts.
The strength sh~own by prices of drying~ oils throughout mojst of the yearT~~ w;a
due partly to the re;stricted moverment of tung; oil frolm Chin-a, zid partly~1: to "n
increased demand for su~ch oils in the Uinited St::tes.~

Lard production near prc-dro-ugfht level

Production of 1l1rd under Fedcral inspection during thes first 2 months
of' the current hog-marke:tin~g yea~r, which began rlctober 1, tojtC.ld nearly, 241
million pou.ndE, 23 pcreent mo~re thai-n in the suame period D. yor.r earlie~r. Such
production wars the largest for th~e period ;inec 1933. Fsr the 5 pre-dirought
year s, 19 29 -3c, i ns pe ectd lard pIr odu action fo r t h-- ct ober-N ovembcr per o d
avorcrgcd 244 r;Lllion~ pounds.

According to the Docomber 1 p~ig crop report, the number of pigs saved?
in the 1939 sensonl, spring and fIll crops com:bined:, to3t-aled about 84; million
head, 19 percent more tha-n a yea-'r ourlier, and the- largests total for~ the 17
years of re-cord. Breederlrsl intentions re~porte-d about Docombecr 1 indicated
that the number of sa~ws to faLrrow in the spring season of 194CI (December 1,
1939 to June 1, 1940) would be about the samer as in 1939B.

Inspected hog slaughter for the 1939-4n marketing year is oxpcotid to
total about 47 million hand~r, 20 percent more thanrr in 1988r-39, and a( little
more thn ther pre--drought (1929-3E ) avocrage. Although the :Lvercge we.ight of
hogs slaughtoered during the current marketing yc.-:.r mayC~: be~ about th: s:.mc~ ns





FOS-35 '- 6

that in the pre-drought period, the average lard yield per hog may be slightly
less. Lard yields in recent mnon~ths have been larger than in any ot the past
5 years, but have continued smaller that. in the pre-drought period.

With snmew~hat larger marketings'of hops, rut whith smaller yields of
lard per hog, lard prodtuctioin in 193U-40? may total almnost as mu~ch as in the
pre-drought period. Dur'in thle 5 years, 192:'-S0 to 1933.-.0, inrpcted lard
production averaged 1,562 million pouvnds a-nuaclly. Su/ch production totaled
only 790) million pournds in the 1914-25 m~arkecting year, but increased to 1,232
million pounds in 1938-S9,

Althcugh1 lard production for 1930-410 will be almost as large as in the
pre-drau~ght period', exports ?robalbly will be smaller. Total expsort s and ship-
ments of la rd fromn the Un~ited States averaged 666 million pounds annually in
the years 1929-33, but are niot expected to be mulch in ex~cess of 400 ni11ion
pounds for thze current year. (See Decembor issue of this reportt)

Exports of lard and soyrbeans showN
further incea.se in Nevrer~bsr

Exports of lard to the United K'ingdom, which had decreased in Getcber,
increased substantially in Envembe;Zir, tOtaling~ 12.8 million pounds for the
month comp~ared with 8,5 million pounds in N~ov.embe~r 1CTR. For the first 3
months following t'he outbtrea~k of wrar in Europe, lard exports to th~e I'nited
Kingdom totaled about 25 million pounds compared v.4th 29 md11ion pounds in the
corresponding period of 1938.

Although lardrl exports to the UTnite d. Ki ngd om for the S ep~tembe r-!!ovemb~er
period of 1927 we~re smrallnr than a year earnecr, exports to most other coun-
tries werre larrger* Expo~rts to all foreign countries for the period amoncunted
to more thanu 69 million pounds, a pain of about 16 parccnt over the 56 million
pounds exported in the Septemrbe;r-Hjovemnbe period of 1938. Among thle countries
whlich took substantiallyr Inrger quanntities of lard tanI in the prev-ious year
wetre BElgiun,' Swezden, "anada, Cu5a, rcolr~..bia, Vc??cnola, 3^nd ~Cundor.

Increased exports of lard in the 1-atter p*:rt of 1939l were expected be-
cause of the relatively large suppli :s :.nd lo: o~ricns of lard in the United
Sta~Etes. Delays and uncertain-ties involved in s-couring shipments of other
fats, oils, and oilseeds to neut~ral ard bellipcrllnt ocrurtries alike apparently
have stimulrated the lard -:::pocrt movJrent to sarr: c extet.

Snybean production in the Uinited States for 1C30 is now cstimatod at
about 87 million bushels comnpared writh 63 million buch:1s in 1935, and a 5-
year (1929-.35) acvorage production of rbout 14 rrillion! bushcls. Exports of
soyeans in October and Unvembe~sr 1C'3C broke all previsuc, records. (Exports of
old-orop soybot:.ns in Sepltemberur mre negligible,.) For the 2 ncrnths, Octobe:r
and Ilovcmber,, exnorts totaled 6.4 million bushcls compared with 2.3 rd11ion
bushels in'-the corresponding period of 9988, and 4.4 million bushcls the total
for the 1938-39 m:rketingg season.







FOS-35 -7 -

Ta~ble 2.- Expsorts of lard, soybeans, andl cottonseed oil1 fromt the United States
by countries of destination, SeFt embe r-INocve mbe r, 1938 and 1939 1/


Country
to which exported


_


SLard, : obr~ : Ctt onrseed
- including neutral : Syen 7 ol
: 13 : 19 _:_18_:19 : 1938 1.939
:1,000O 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
lb. lb. bu. bu b. lb.


11



Z/

2/


5/


17 3,408





53

it 2,800








---


8



4/
2E1


Z/



i,5~4
1,100

305

_51

5/

472
50
:8

1,557


..........: 29,142-
..........: 393
..........: 768
g ........: 132
..........: 754
..........: -
..........: 82
..........: 7
..........: 43
..........: 8
..........: 3?
..........: --
Cyprcls ..: 34
..........: 13,404
ic .......: L83
..........: 170
..........: 2,098
..........: 698
..........: 566
..........: 1,399
..........: 183
..........: 16
ds .......: 1
..........: 3,5262


25,102
1,6LO


5,755

105
292

32
2, ,57
651
F19


209
2,5710
1,0322

4,312
L,772
1,0?0
3
570


United K~ingdo .,
'Canada .........
;cermany ........
Poland and DanziC
Belgium ........
Denma~rk ........
Finland ........
Italy ..........
Netherlands ..
Norway .........
S~e den.....
SSwritzerland ....

i Cuba .. .
DEaminican Riepubl:
IFaiti ..........
;.lexico .........
; Costa Rica...
iPanama 6/ ......
Colombia .......
'Qenezuela ......~
Eicuador ........
,Phili~ppie Islant
.Orther countries

Total, all court


---
2,13
---
---
---
3
---
---
10
---
---
---
---
---
---
---


20


5/


1195
1
1
2/
953
/64


ntries 2/ .


---
---
---
---
---
---
2


55,870


69,490 2,305 ,7 1,249 9,239


ICompiled from official records cf th:e Bureau of Foreignr and Domeastic Conmaerce.
Exports of lard do not include shipments to nojncentiguous terriitories of the
:.United States.

i Preliminary~.
2/ American soybeans yield 14-16j percent of their wi; g~ht BT crude oil, depending
,on method of expression, and about 30) percent of their wNeig-ht in high--protein cake
land meal.
'; Refin~ed and crude. R~efinred converted~ to cr;ue basis by~ dividing~ ty 0.93.
/~ Less than 500 bulshels or poulndsj.
If any5, iLncludec; with otherr countries".
Including Panama Canal Zone.
1 Total of unrounded n~umbers.







POS-35


Canada and the Netherlands haver been thle principal importers of
American soybeans in recent ontnhs. Flxports to C."nada have been largely
for trana-shipment to Europe, whcre 'the, American product during the cux-
rcnt season is taking the place, in rpart at least, of soyoecns formerly
improrted fron more dintant Manc3huria.

Exports of cottonseed oil for thle 3 months, Sc'rt ".".b e -!ovember P
1939 also w~ere larger than those of a year earlier. Mi~ost of th increase
occ~urred in exports to Canada (porscibly for t~rllashipment), Scleden~,
Switzerlanld, and the PhilipTpine, Islands.

Pritish whalinF activity reported

According to trade reports, 10 British factory ship- are now
ope~rating on fhe Antarctic whaling grounds, in ?addition to the British
land stat;on in south~ Georlgia. Last yeanr, nine British re::petit~ions were
in operation. The reported activity wold indiicate that fihe UnTited Kingdom,
if successful in tranoaporting~ hale oil to home p.or's, w~ill be som~ewrhat
less deP~Endent on supplies of lord slnd oth-er faits and ones friomr Zoreign
sources, including, the Uhtite States, than Ihas bee~n in'lcsted in recent
issues of "The Fats and Oils Situation". Earlierr reports :iadj indicated
thad British ~whaling activityg -ould be shacrp-ly centailile tlhis year.

In addition to the 10 British expeditions, there are reported to be
10 Norwegian, one United States, on~e Panamaniarc n and El:: Japanirese factory
ships, as well as one Algentine shore station now ope~rati,.( in the
Antarctic. A, total of 234 lle:r to i~rs are sa~id to be employed~ compared
with the 2851 in o: 1ration last year, whien cixc Gc.nanu expeditions also were
in the field.

3ORLD PRODUCTIGII?~l! OF CL'~OTT015E2D 50YHAY~S, PIANUrTS,
FLAXCSEED, AND; PRILL~A SEED, 1709-j9 r

An ipoort~an~t factor tending~t to depress, prican of fats rrnd oils in
recent 7oncth has Ibeen t'hE remarlkable1 incrrease in wo~Crld~ n'oduc~tionr of land
and masrine animal fats and oils, :Ind of vebgetable oil-'o-alinrgr -rctrials.
Datat with regalrd to cuch p~roduiction is far from comp~let A fott
,remedy this deficiency wvas mat~e byr the Internattionzl Ilastitute ofT Agriculture
in its 2-volume wrork, "'Oils and Fats: F'red;uctio7n anld Irnte;rnaional Tra~dell l
Riome,~ 1939.. Statistics given in tha publ'lic.1t-ion, howe~ver, rl1-:to chiefly
to avenrgesr; for th~e pecriods~ 1939-13 3nd 1?;24-1PS, an cont.in zr.nual data
beginning onlyT with 1929.

'From time to time, "The- "-sts and Oils Situation"~ -:ill .giveC sudh world
-,roduction statistics in th~e field of f-its anrd oils as arel -vai'lable from
offi cial sources, by ;.ry as bgciniinf: 1909. In the, Septembe~r 1979 issue,
lata~ were presaented showing exports of copurt ;nd coconut !;il, palmr kernels,
and babassu nuts from primagr.: produc:ing countries. In the Novembet~Lr 1939
issue, dntc, on pro~duction of rhlle.onil byl~ region~s, ;ud by~ "ouLr~tries, weCre
given,~., Avilable data concer~ni! in the -prodluction of cottonsleed, saybean s,
peanuts, flamei~d, and psr~illa3 coed in. specified countries and ,-stimates of
world total prodnetio~n ar-r- prcesentedi herewrith.






FOS-35


- 9-


Although China norimally pro~tuces sJybeans ard peanuts in large
quantities, as well as cottonsee-l and flaxseed in lessor ar~lolounts, datat
concerning the production of most c-ops jin that counrt~ry are availath
only for a few years. Helnce in the corld! productions estima~tn 3 China
has been e-cluded from the totals. In the case of ?fanutZ, r _rcanin~uts,
it has been necessary to combine expert statitistie for com~e ce~_I:r7Fti with
production statistics for others, with the? ;-ea.lt tha-t tl, estima~te-~ total
world production figures for peanuts a-9 urdic.er~r.tate-.ien:t s. Le3r'i' e cuch
deficiencies, th~e world totals as estimated by thle Eurcou ,:roblabJ~l ;jrroide
a fairly reliable nearare of th~e year-to-yeafr ch-cnges- that ;: ..e taken place,
as well as of the longer-tine trends in production.

Production of c~ottonsee scybean~s, cand pean~uts
increased sharp 7 after- 19

Since 1922, a sharp increas~ae has taken pnlzce in world prooluctionr of
the principal oilseeds yieldine edible oils, i.e., cottonscel, so;beans,
and peanuts. World pr~oduLction~ of cottonseed (c:Celuding Chlina-)inrse
from about 8 million short tons in 1922 to a record high production of more
than 16 million tons in 1937. In bot.h C1937 and 193r7 however, such pr3--
auction totaled somewhast less than 13 million tons.

The record large production of cottonseed in the Uhitae.l' State-s in,
1937 was mainlyr responsible for the sharup rise in the world total in that
year. However, most of the upwrard trend in world production of cotto~nseed
since 1922 has occurred in couxntries other thaLn the Unitai. St::toor, notatty
in the Soviet Union anld Brazil~, and in several of the n~inor?-pre-luci cou~n-
tries;, including Argentina, P~r~lu, Turkey, Iranl, Chosen, I!nd certa3inL African
t erri t nr ies. A slight urpward trend in production also has takercn pl-ce in
India and Egyplt and in Chlinz.

Aside from the large production in China, Mianchuria has long occupied
what might be called a dominant position in thep world production of sayboans.~s
Practically all of the Chinese production is consmedd in Chiina, ;he;reas
Manchurir.has had largee quantities of soyboons avaic.labl f'or export. Pro-
duction of soybeanls in Mainchulria has fluctutatd nioly in re;cenlt yers.r= Be-
ginning in 1934 a2 vegy sha,-p in~crea.se in so;-beanu production too~k place in the
United States, with the result tha-t thes Uniited Staters is now the third larFgest
soybean prodLucing nation. Relativelyl little chan~e has, tzken place in soybeatn
production in Chosen- since 190g. production in Jnpanu, onr thle other hzrnd, has
tended to decline since 1921. A fairly Eteadyi upward trend is observabjle in
production in the N~etherlands Inllies since 1316, the first year for whiich
data are available for thatt country.

SnybeanI cultivationio in the Dzrnubian? Easin is a r-l :ti-.l_ now? Ceterl-
prise. In 1334, according to nfficial reportss onl.; 2r6,000i bu;;;ls of soy"-
beans were p~roduced in Rbumaniz. But by 1939 production in tha~t country nrd
increased to 2.572,000C bush-els. Production in Bu1_~lgria icre:;~~.sod from- ;i,0100
bushels in 1958 to EL27,0007 bushals in 1939~, and in Tyeacl-.via production in1-
creased from 27,000O to 213,000I bushlels duringr this per~iod. Total p~romotiono
in these countries is still small, honever, compared with the production of
about 149 million bushels in Marnchuria and u7 million curhlls in thle Unrited
States in 1939.






FOS-35


- lo -


Peanut production more than doubled from 1909 to 1922, an~d again
from 1922 to 1939. Most of the increase in the world production of peanuts
(excluding China) has taken place in India, although nearly all peanu~t-
producin2 countries have sh~own some increase in production during the past
30 years.

Nearly half of world flaxrseed surENZ ELcducrd in Ar entina

During the past 1FJ years nearly on~e-ha~lf of th~e tota.l :orld supply
of flax~seed ha1~s b~een produced in Argentina. Production of 10.;:seed in that
country amounted to less tho~n 30 million bushels in 1909, but totaled nearly
90 million bushels in 1931. Since 1931, production in Argentina h-s f-lllen
off to some e::tenrt, and in 19:39 a year of un'SUTllY poor y'ieldP, totaled
only about 50 million. bus;,els. Other countries in which flc::seed production
now is larger than in 1909 :tnd 1910 include the Uhion of Soviet Socialist
Republics anda Ur~ugu. Production in India nlso is l-Lrger, but by only a
small amount.

In the United States and Cranada, flaxvseed production was relatively
large in 1912, but decreased in subcequent years. In Can~ad, production in
1939 totaled only about 2 million 'tuchels. In the Uhrited Stat~es, a major
penlk in prolduction wa~s reached inl 1924. But from 1924 to 1936, the general
trend of production wd~s downnard. A sharp increase in flnacsed production
took pl7.ce in the Unlited States in 1939, when over 20 million btushels, the
largest crop since 1930, were produced.

World production of frl-a::seed excludingf: China) shored no pronounced
trend after 1922, but fluctuated within a raniGe of 125 to 165 million
bushels nninunlly. Priorr to 1923, \7orld production exceeded 125 million
bushels in only 2 years of record, 1912 and 1913, hen production in
Argentina, the Dhited States, India, ?nd. Canasda al v1 ere relatively large
for that period. Ex-cept for those 2 yours, world production from 13013 to
1922 ranged within the limits of 68 to 113 million bushels aznnually.

Estimattes of production of pcrilla seed,? which yields c ~lr;ing oil
somewhat, like linseed oil, a~re nvilable- for L.Imchur~i7.for thle past 7 years
and for C~hosen for fhe plast 12 yeaLrs. Production in other countries is
negligibtle, except in Japanu '-:here it is estimanted tha~t -bout 600,L000 pounds
are produced annua1lly.r Ten to 12 million pon~rds of perill:: seed are ProC-
Auce~d annelly in Chosen, lund 100 to 400 million p~oundis in M-Lnchuria. The
total production in 1938 amunt~ed to about 266 million pounds compared wJith
a world product ion of flax~seo~d in that yrear (e::cluding China) of appTroxi-
mately 1,'j68 million pounds. The largest production of porilla seed in rer-
cent years occurred in 1935, when about 410 million po~unds we-re produced.





















































Continued -


-11 -


Production in specified countries, and estimated


Table j.- Cottonseed:


worldl total excluding China, 1909- 9 1/


Yea~





1909

1911
1912
1913
1916
19315
1916
1917
1918
~1419
1920
.1921
1922
1923
1924
j1925
1926
~1927

1929
t1930
j1931
19j2
~1933
~1934
'1935
1936
1937
1938
1939


: Estimated:
r:world total,:
:excl. China *
:1,000
:short
:tons


United *
States *
1,000
short
tons

4,44,2

6,970
E6,087
6,286
7,155

5,Tl5

5.341


3,528
4,3ji
4,5c3

7,150



6,5 C
6,1 1




4,729
"1,511

5,1310
5,239


India : U.C.S.R.: China : Bralzil: Egypt


shojrt
tons

4s5
73f
719
726

611
4s5
517
6841
494
571
618
446
688
669


h18
e17
a6LL
8 7
6 2


761

915
1,047
754


short
tons

2,227
1,812

2, 62
2,361
2.8L27
1.742



2,702
1,678
2,(\0







2,779 2

2,700
2,e60

2,0Cu
2,783


*
1,2..Lr 1,000


short
tons

281
j21
421
469
759
867


)2
45


31



482
597




rr57

i. i


short
tons








p51
1,165
1,400
1,602


1,291

1,11 r
1,171 '





1,368


1,2~4
1,6~33


shocrt
tons

155



225
222
162
161
194
220
241
262


2TT
264



246
289
l 5





1,r45


8,617
10,0i25
9,878
10,415
11,477

s,798
8,754
s,412


6,695

g,490
10,76'-
12,298
12,455

11,558
11,595
11,202
12,1?78
l10,263
11313 3
11,60s

16,647
12,5S!0
12.750


:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
g/:
2/:






FOS-35


S12 -


Table 3.- Cottonseed: Production in specified countries, rnd estimated world
total excluding China, 19079-j9 1/ Continued


:Argen-: *
Year Perzl :!efx
: tina, : :


:short short sh
:tons tons to

1009~ : 1 49
1910 : 1 36 1
1 11 : 1 9 1
1912 : 2 4
1 ,13 :1 45 1
1914 : 2 52
191 : 2 46
1916 : 2 46
1917 : 7 51
1918 : 8 i8 2'
1919 : 8 6 1
1920 : 15 72 1
1921 : 1 76
1922~ : 15 86
1523 : 33 115
1924 : 39 118 11
1'325 : 79 13;2
192 :33 96
1927 : 62 104
1928 : 71 90
1929 : 8S7 115
1930 : 82 104
1"331 : 93 100
19"2 : 8 101
1933 : 118 112
1934 : 181 142 ,1
1935 : 22o 161
1336: 855 156
1937 : 141 17
1938 2/ : 179 171
1939 -2/ :


:::: :Anglo-: el-
:*::Ug~anda :EESyp- : .a :Tangan- Ni-
ico, Tur gl, Iran Ch~osen -aa
:2 :tiar. :Coe : yika :geria
:::: :Sudal~n :
n**D ~liOr 1,0 ,0 ,0 ,0 17 100 1,000 1,C000
;rt short short abort short short short short short
ne tons tons tons tone. tons tons tons tons


1?
15
15
12
1:
13
17

2 I

s1

91


61 1


j7
1-i
11;
150


11
F9

r18
By i


11
25

86

12



'5
83 l
r9
17


11
10
13
17
19
19
22
22
31
35

54
r?
~2
62



6

76



31
1;
10?
I
I7


7
10:
7


11


11

11
14
11
51

7
!2


"5
1.27


127

117
116


1
17


59


e6 .
L1
51

71

17 ~
i152
130


Bureau of Agricult~ural Econcrrlrie-s. TI:.ta b:: count~ri.s carrile~d from official sources
aind the International Institrutl. of r.gricultu~re, or deri:i d f~rnm ofiicial cotton
production estimates.
If Data are not availa~ble~ for crta1tin countries inr yea-rrs fnr **hiich flan~k spaces are
show:n,.
2/ Preliminary.
fl Exscorts of ginned cotton, in terms of cotton~seed.



















































Conitinued -


Un cited :
States :









1,000 ~
bushels







2?9L7



9,398
13,471
16,7?33

13,14?
23,055


L5,272
62,729
"37,&09


: :N:etherlands
Chosen : Japa~n : India
: : 2/


: Estimated : ::
Year :world total: China : Ea-
:excl. China::cuia


5


FOS-35


- 13 -


Table 4.- Soybeans:
world tot


Production in specified countries, and~ estimated
lal excluding China, 1909i-39 1/


:1,000 1,000
:bushels bushels


1,000 1,000 1,000
bu shels bu shels 'oushels


1,000
bush~els


1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1.931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939


17, 1:55

17,505

1L,1S7
17,',370
19,048
17,774




17,1086
1L,359

20,211
120,199





15,467


11,4~35


1,7,017
11,2i8



19,038
20,4627
231,075
15,550
22,710
22,179
21,404


23,609




22,989
21.,15 5
22,578
23,324


17,937
20,205
18,3?33


2,603
2,609
2, c23
2,533
3,740J
3,6-.-7



L,0383
3,t08
3,961J
4,303
3,917
$.,6t,92
',722
5,C71
6l,669~
6,445s


2/ 9,873


163,000
169,000 3
155,000
179,000
156t, 000
21?,000
227,O000
228,000
250,000
258,000
217,000
-230,000
186c,l-000
231,000
226,000
255,000 O
27;8,000
285,000


l113,L69
119,853
112,055
126,092
107,740


163,319 5


178,372
196,949
1902,57


2107,038
2L0,6 5
267:175
207,400
SIC:L,413
21r,192
251,362



















































Bureau of nag-licaltor-1 Economlcs.. Data by countrica compljiea~ frou. Of-
ficial --ouirces and~ theF Internati7nal Institute cf Agricllt~ure.

1/~ Data are not available for certatni countries in y~ear~s for whJ~ich
ank spaces are shown
N native crops only.
Includes Pclandl, CzehO:chlvakiiaJ and~ what was for~merl:. Austria.
E Preliminary:
Repo~rteyfrLd as prod:uction~ minus seed. for plant~ing.


FO~-35


-14 -


Table L4.- Soyrbeans: I'roduction in s,ecified.
world, total exclud~.in; China, 19093--39


countries, and! estimated
1/ Continued


:: :Other
: Bl- ugo- :Europe
I ,7a-la I slavia: */

bu3belis bu.st ~ls bushels


Year :Ka-: Taiwran:
tung .
: 1,000 1,000
:blush-els bushels


U.S.S.R.: RumarNia


1.,0iC O
br~shels


1, 000
~u s: els


19103

1913 1

1915
1910
1917
1C918
1919
1492

1. 922
1423

19125

19~27
1928


1933
1937


1936
1''37
~1938
1939


719r
53e
519
400L"
566i
276r


230

220
220
227
197
176
175
180 7
173
171

152

15?


716



735
735
735
735
??5
;:1
016


2,6
1,17';
?,,000



2,50s


2,5EL

2,572


77

il?
24 r
827


27

22
54
1?0
213












: Estimated : British: : : .e :: *
Year to ec.IaChina Seea tte i i lands Japan Ar na
: China :burma : : 2 India .
: il. lb i.l.Ml1b l-.b 1.1.Ml1.Ml1b i.b i.b


I_


__


15 -

Table 5.- Peanuts: Production in specified co~untries, and estimated
world total excluding China, 1I909-39 2.


.1909 :
S1910 :
S1911 :
S1912 :
S1913 :
1914 :
13915 :
S1916 *
S1917 :
S1918 :
S1919 :

1920 :
1921 :
1922 :
'1923 :
1924 :
1925 :
S1926 :
1927 :
1928 :
1929 :

1930 :
1931 :
1932 :
1933 :
1934 :
1935 :
1936 :
1 3 1937 :

1939 /:


2,722
2,835
3,206
3,466
3,741
4,207
4,408 :
^1,878
5,157
4,219
4,394

5,011
5,235
5,552
5,202
7,040
7,795
8,0~77
9,635
11,055
10,234

10,932
9,162
11,601
12,637
9,475
10,583
12,252
141,183
12,750


1,029
1,12?
1,957

1,877
2,121
2,370
2,r,79
2,365
1,402
1,841 ;

2,289
2,148
2,769
2,428
5,826
5,978
4t,072
5,430
6,223
,E,2r1

t5,196
5,080
6,71
7,r;59
4,220
5,058
6,402
8,200
7,206


3775
3575
514
514
514
514
419
507
573
651
717


3


65
5?
30
169
169
1J2

153
171
80 j
77
26,
427
420
3)5
346 ;
4!95

492
537
6J2
6?7
923
618
732
1,n95
605


85

70
Pl
93


9C0
1~00
122

112
131
114
171
164
178
193
218
230
262

258
287

806
327
326


25
32
32
34
62
,23
40j
54
65
98
132

125
91
89
82
105
151
129
14;3
105
145


129
17i3
229
205
250
1,59
153


452
510
510
410

620
607
576
4_73
488
448
475
498
,538
217

548
460
534
507

415
52,5
570
6235


83E



5j23

712
722


844
898

697


820
1,010
1,1i7
1,253
1,224
1,506
1,180O


631
765
730
791
960
981
1,00C
1,030
1,080
1,090

1,192
4?1
1,0837
1,257
1,046
1,257
1,332
1,257
1,411


6,571
5,850
4,957
5,801
6,i63


Bureau of Agricultural Econromics, Data byi co~untries ecmyiledl from official sour"ces
and the Internatiornal Inctitute of A,-riculture. Data for several minor-producing
countries, for which production in 1E87 totaled appFroximattel 1,250,C00,000 pounds,
not shown.

/ Data are not available for certain countries in years for whlich blank spaces are
shown. 2/Picked and threshe-d. 3/ Exports o~nly. 4'/ 'Including Chosen, Kwantung, and
Taiwran, 5/ Preliminary~.


908-35





















































Continued-


1,0~00
buchel s

12,068
17,272
23,012
2 ,956
21,8i4
15 ,o0c
14,200

li,920
1~7,760
21,ke1


21,160
17,080 0

15,ase




16,6400
171500
1.9,030
17,Ec?


1,0i00
bu~shels

28,212
23,4j4
22.536
44 ,486


35,238



49,390


47,577


75,113
co1,783
82,b72

50 ,004
78.342
62 06 7
S2 59 5
r97-'
59,445
76 ,200
60 6i4
~55509
49,2~10


- 16 -


Fos-35


Table 6.- 71axseed: Production in specified countries, and estimated
wrorldi total ex:cluding China, 1309-39 1/


:Est imat ed: :
: world ::
Year : total :Ar'gentina:


:
:
U.S.S.R:
:
:


India 2/: Uhrited
: States


Cana~da :Ur~ugua


excluding :
: Ch-ina :

: bushels


1, 000c 1, 000 1,000
bu shel s bu shel s bushels


: :


1,000
biushels

1.6,724
13,938
16,167
17,726
19,769





9~,L04
G,752
11.083 ~
13,379
1 ,747
21,259
19,684
119,64
23,690
26,060 1
28,242
33.L217
31,595
r9,307
27 ,019
29,133
29,526


1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1323
1926
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1~933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
14939


92,00 CI
ar 104,00
156,0 oo
123,00 r~

96,000 u

72,00 Cl
sh, noo


76 ,01:0



153,o 111-1

160,700


140,oCo

13"1,1000
140(,00 CL


128,00 CI
138,000


19,511
11,3g4
18.537
28,139
15,199

11,270
11,829

12,779

10?,900

10,520
16,563
31,221'


25,174
19,11i
15,926
21,673
11.755
11.511


14,520
5,2'73
i,089
a.15:
20.~330


4,245
10,075
26,130
171539
7,175
6,114
5,260
51935
6;,055
5,473
7,998
4,112
5,008
7,160
9,695
6,237
5.995
4,885
3,614
2,060 7
4.399
2,465
2,719
632
910
1,6r7
1.795
775
1,389
2,149


660
&79
1,302
963!
g88
391
122
333
498
932
966
519
719
1,178
1,542
2,030
1.970
1.954
2,030
3,216
5,056
i; 841
1,475
2,s76
3,402
3,007
3,011
3.728
4,425
5,157














































Continued-


.Poland
: 1,000
:bu.

: 1,808
: 1.559
: 1,704
: 1,658
: 1,785





: 1,1
: 2,2
: 556 0
: 6347
: 856 0
: 1,816
: 2,129
: 1,872

: 2,250
: 2,472
: 2,790
:2,9413
:2,335


Flaxseed: Production irr specified countries, and estimated world
total excluding China, 1909-39 If -Continued

:: :: Germany : Czecho-:
,Lith~uniaLatvia ,6etonia~incl. AlustriEdalovakia:Rumania: Hungary


Ye~ar



1909
1910
1911
1912
191)
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922

1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932

1934
1935
1936
1937
1938 .
1939 a


708s-35


- 17 -


Table 6.-


1,000
bu.


1,000
bu.


952
1,102
1,00s
1,019




252
417
625
56)
647

1,099
971
411
904
7~3
'99
352
4355
597
811
725
880
803
9\9


1,000
bu.


1,000
bu.


1,000
bu.


1,r000
bu.


1,000
bu.


1,130
1,215
911
1,139
1,171




827
1,011
909
1,108
1,056
1,3}2
1,571
1,574
1,405
1,0?0
1,718
1,532
1,oo3
626
8)23
1,014
1,487
1,444
1,401
1,161
1,239


494
37)
4j3
439
437
365
260
232
201
198
222
313
300
312
j62

331
351
323
308
169
100
95
105
163
225
288
356


711
647
008

619
243
432
462
376
361
226
287
311

428

475
365
229
420

253
154
244
290
369
4140
396
350


191
37
560
718
529
15k



196
183
119
194
251
223
331
246
242
241
278
39)
523
374
420
365
450
534
288
217


205
185
189
220
274
219
145
160
224
225

69
73


56
33
34
54
99
341
310
95
202
251
210
240
1T6
276
246


169
307
676
1,300
1,663
968







FOS-35


-18 -


Table 6.- Flaxrseed: Production in snacified countries, and estimated world
total e-cluding China, 1909-19 1/ Continued

Year : France : icelaium~ : Prethlerlands : Ital.y : Morocco : Turkey : Janan : China


:1001,000 1,000 ~
:ba. bu. bu.


1,00 1iC 00C 1,0007 1,000
bu. bu. bu. bu.


1,000
bu.






















2,106


2,4oo
3,2oo
2,200


416
: 96
:576

:161
:131
: Its




268
r17
531

S502

: 1,078
:749

S183
:42'i
F 855


1;11
1912




91917

1915
1920

1424
1925

19127
1928

1931

1933 3



1?37
193fi 3/
19439


21)

563
416
32E
212
286
367
316
176
267
61

242
251
336

205
;1o1
353
358
138
52


273
428
491
6i9


281
274
341
Lgy

321
362
32'
43'

413
402
6.2

459


31E

126
s7


150
Pol 1
263


515
518





475
s62

356
413


492
431
492
613
417

239


773
5-39
634


128
564
610


258



27~6

'448

:369
125

326
2 3
2rS 1


4s}
271
284
213
271
2~6
77
93
121
119
123
87
147
181
147
151


112
416
143

272

240
3 9
338


Bureau~ of agricultural Econom~ics. Data by countries comriled f'rom official sources
~ad the International Institute of Agericulture adjustedl wPhe-e necessary to show
product ion within national boundaries nrev'ailing in Alugust 17.Data for several
rtinor-producinrg countries, for which production totcaled3 about )i00,0~00 bushels in
1938, not shown.
If D~ata are not available for certain countries in yenrs for which btlank: spaces are
show~n.
Prl/ arRenorted p~roductionn lclus Indian official estimates for unranorted tracts.






FOS-35 19 -

Table 7.- Perilla seed: Production In M~anchuria and Chosen, 1928-39

Year : ot al : Man churia :Cho sen
: 1,00 l. 1900 b. ,000 lb1.
1928 : 1 2,1139
1929 :1/ 1=,501
1930 : / 12,2.56
1931 : 1 11.,768
1932 : 1/ 12,251
1933 : 122,527 110,230 12,297
1934 : 1963135,259 11,204
1935 : 409,541 399,033 10,503
1 936 : 333,6e 9 323,139 10, 550
1937 : 275,632 264,552 11,080
1938 :265,989 255,73: 10,255
1939 : 2/10,3 /
Bureau o~f Agicultural Econ~orrics. Comp~iled frc.c: officially sources. in ad-
dition to the above, prjductinn in Japan is r~eprted to toltal about
lc00,000 pounds annually~. Production in other countries is neglgbe
1. Not available.2/Pliia.

Table 8.- 01ieomargarine: Prcdu~ction ani: Imateri-.ls, use~d In :.manufacture,
United States, Nocvemb:ter 1937 and" 1938, Sept em~ber-bjove: ber, 19319

Itnm : Idovelber- : 1937 l,
am : 193 : 938 : Spt.: O'ct. : Nov.
:1,1000_1b. 1,000 -- lb,uu 1,00 1,000 15. 1,000 lb.

01eo oil : 650 940 e6262 7L5
Oleo stearine : 304 26~2 329 236 228
Lard neutral : 16 112 115 88 120
01eo stock: 59195 18
Total anim~al 1.,175 1, 42)__ _1~ 71 1,1 1l8
Cottonseed oil :20,339 10,807 9,076 51689 9,701
Soyrbean oil :2,186 4,3!!3 ?,371 5,982 8,074
Peanut oil :240 2!.'6 253 19 201
Corn oil :109 11L 35 22 3lc
Cottonseed stearine: --- --- 10 --- 1
Soybean stearine: -- -
Total domestic vegetable : 22,7 15j7 1078 .1,9 1,1
Coconut oil : 5,611 7,023~ 3,1~13 2,167 2,151,
Babassu oil :50?1 04,3 1Jl,40 988 1,057
Pala;-kernel oil :-31;3 18 --- --- ---
Total foreign veget able : ?j,495 4t ,522 3,155 31211
Total fats and oils 30, 54 2L,5r0A 22,60 19,06 22, 400
Mill : 7037 ,3 ,9 ,3 ;3
Salt and other mi-cellaneous: i,8E i1,366 1,2P1 1,116 1,301
Production of 01eo!.argarine i ?,489 30i, 21 22,105 2,.,7845 2', 886
Computed from Bureau o'f T`Itnt t Revenue records and Internal :.eveniue Bulletin.
1/ Preliminary,










194.41935 1936 1937 13813


Item


Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, The National Provisio~ner, and report of
the Agricultural Marketinsg Service and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Averages are for
months reported.
Includes excise tax of 3 cents beginning May 10, 1934.
Includes excise tax of 4.5 cents beginning August 21, 1936.
Includes excise tax of 3 cents, Maoy 10, 1934 August 20, 1936,
~IIncludes excise tax of j cents beginning July 1, 1939.


Fos-35


:Cents Ents Cmte Cemrts


0mre~mia O

27.1 25.lC
155 14-7
8.0 6.4
9.2 7.5
10.2 9.3


Butter, 92-score, Chicago ..........................:24.8
01somargarine, dem. veg., Chicago .................. -
Lard, prime steam, Chicago .........................: 7.7
Lard, refined, Chicago .............................: 8.8
Compounds, (Alnimal and veg. cooking fats), Chicago .: 8.6


28.8

13.8
15.1
13.1

9.6
12.1
9.2
10.4
12.2

9.6
13.3
8.1
10.6


7.4
10.0
23.1
7.5
7.7
6.3
16.5
9.2

6.2
6.8
4.0


8.6


9.4
8.2
16.3
17.0


32.0
15.1
11.3
12.2


8.9
12.0
8.6
9.8
10.4
9.0
8.8
12.5
7.5
9.8


8.0
10.4
24.1
8.1
7.8
9.9
15.4
10.6

Z.8
6.3
4.3
4.5
7.8
8.7

9.5
9.8
10.4
12.6


33.2
15.6
11.3
12.7
12.4

s.4
11.5
8.0
9.2
12.4
9.7
8.6
12.1
8.1



9.0
11.5

9.o

16.8
11.9
10.8

7.5
8.o
5.2

10.3
11.1

10.3
10.8

12.9
157


Corn ail, crude, tanks, f.o~b. mills ...............:
Corn oil, refined, bbls., N. Y. ....................:
Cnttonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o~b. S.E. mills ....:
Cottonseed oil, p~s.y., N. Y. ......................:
1Olo oil, extra, Chicagn ............... ............:
01eostearine, bbls., HJ. Y. ............
Peanut oil, crude, tanks, f~o.b. mills .............:
Peanut oil, dom. refined, bbls., IT. Y. .............:
Soybean oil, crude, tank cars, midwestern mills ....:
Soybean oil, refined, N. Y. ........................:


5-9
8.0
5.6
6.5
'7.6
6.9
6.0

8.2


7.1
9-8
6.7
7.9

7.2
6.9
.10.2
5.6
8.4

6.4
6.1
8.4
26.0


15.5
10.4
7.8

5.0
5*3
4.4
4.7
9.1
8.0

8.7

14.9
11.1
13.5


5-9

5.6


6.8
5.9
q.4

7.6


I


6~.3

16.0
97.
60.5

516.

4.7
10.5
5-1
8.2

45.0
10.0


Babassu oil, N. Y. .................... ............: --
Coconut ail, crude, tanks, f.o~b. Pacific Coast if .: 4.6
Coconut oil, edible, N3. Y., 1/ ......... ............: 6.8
OJlive oil, edible, bbls., N. Y'. *..........23.1
Palm-kernel oil, denatured, busa., ;:. Y'. 1/ .......: 5.4
Palm oil, crude, casks, NI. Y. 1/ ..................: 5.4
Raipe oil, refined, bble., N. Y.- 2/ ................: 5.4
Somame oil, refined, drums, :J. Y.- r ..............:11.8
Teaseed oil, crude, N. Y. ..........................: --


Tallow, inedible, Chicagn ..........................:
P-". 13 A white, Chicagon ...........................:
MY ;n nil, crude, tanks, f~j.b. Baltimore .......:
3r ..> Oi'l, crude, tanks, Pacific Coast ...........:
;'.0 cil, refined, bleached winter, bbls., N. Y. 4/:
01~.. -sil foo~ts, prime, drums, iJ. Y. ...............:

LI-' at il, raw, tank carlots, Mlinneapolis ........:
L" *.4. oil, raw, carlots, bble., N. Y'. ......
Pe;:i La il, drums, N. Y. 2/ ......................:
Oitcica oil, N. Y. .......,.................... ....:
Tung oil, drums, N. Y. .............................:


4.0
2.6
2.7

7.1

?.0
3.4
9.0
-- g


.


Castor oil, NJo.3, bbls., IH. Y. .....................: g.5
Cod oil, Newfoundland, bbls., U. Y. ................: 5.5


9.2 9.3
6.0 5.3


9.8 10.2 10.2
4.; 5.6 6.9


UNIVERSITODF FLORIDA "
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I I 111 ''I~
20 3 1262 08905 1519
.Table 9.- Price per pound of specified fats and oils, anua avrgs
1934-39