The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00073
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00085

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text




































NET EXPORTS






e-!









IF PENT .. 5HE
AND PAL HTTE

PEANU CLV ENL PL N L
TOA, I IL ADOi 1 KRES TE
elates as a ag nTem : a.4Pesarw n.rt

Mar~ ~ IEIPOf EKOT PFAME.CPR N 00U t.U'ySB.CS1RBA
i erak asawa xcd varter o ee. K srn ies
WA aadts rardseaw re ne arcw AN ors Pa awao t
SL ~ ~ 'W NYO AliR Idli hH 577 1UlIa FaiiuTUA colgc


L 494Whi"~~5ai :449th~
I xanuay ad









FR~IEti NEST AID IARTH AFRICA AS
A:: 1 SOURCE OF FATS1 AND DILS


;NC E~ST AND NORTH AFRliCA: NETTitADE
IN 'ATS AN D DiLS. AVERAGE 1934-36


r
: 'I
i~*
'


I i


I


.i"F1
il:l
.I. hllI:
" ;li"l


" b


tabitshalet of trade with Frenh IYeat and (Isrth Africa girobabliy'vl~t
):l1i Op punds annully to the strpply of ftat eand oils a~vailablir
its .lin IsS4**jig elltatAricallTi~gnit eaPprtblaeI .halac 'bf li|
il$B ia~~rEiik silli;fit Aiiil `in terms of ofsif, i:'t~fft paiptsr, p~l~iji. hati~left,
Win F~pqip Y-po t Reins.~lll Fr81enh :Iroth Afl~rica had a net ileport.
E liififjj:,)~iint S iidhil pite ubsabntliatl irportsr of elive oil.





f












Table 1.- Wholesale pries per pou or fati,
numlapr of prNIse 1owser 0 als
PRICII
Item a


guster, 92-ecore, C ico~ ...........................,,,,,o.,o__g
Blate yri M 92aere Mmr Tork .................................,, ,
Oleom~agerbl, dea. was. Chimag ...........***************...... *
Iuad, loose, Chicago ................*********************......:
or~d, prim steam, t~ieros, Chicago ...........*********--..***.....
Ivad, refined, carbtone, Chicago ........********............: ....,.,
dmeo ail, extra, tiroea~, Chicago ......-********..................s
01enatearine, bbl.s NJI. ........................------.......,....:
Tallow, edible, Chcago ....................,,........,,.,.,n.,,,


InDE Nv~UBRS (1924-29 100)
Fight comestic fats and oiled (I910-14 160) ......................: dd 119 14 10913
aBigh Gomestic fate and oila ......................................r 62 St. 101. 106 10?1

All fats and ails (27 itoma) ......................................: 68 93 107 111 11
Ganu ed gb argn :
nr rata ...................................~............ 66 82 99 104 10fs
Marine anim1l oils .......................................... 86 118 127 127 12
Vegetable oils, domestic ........................................g 59 111 126 126 128
Vegetable oils, foreign ......................................... 91 16 145 145 145
Grous by use:
Butter .................................................. 74 81 98 104 104
Butter, seasonally adJusted .....................................: 68 75 97 101 96
lard ................................................... 36 75 98 103 105
Other food fate ............................................. 65 130 132 133 134
All food fata ............................................. 67 89 104 109 110
Soap fata .........................................*...... 62 117 119 119 319
Drying oils ............................................... 88 107 134 134 132
IMacellneous oils .............................................. 84 105 117 117 17
All Industrial rate and oils ..................................I 73 112 125 125 2
PRic'e campled from 01, Paint and DrUg~ Reporter, the national Plmirisior, the Journal of Coungss (rbu Iagi), ad
reports of the Agricultural Markting Adminitrakton and Bureau of Labor Statistice. Prices quoted inalide singbg
taxes and duties where applicable.~ Inda matters for earlier pears bgiming 1910 are giwen in Tenhnical %Olbl].e
No. 737 (19110) and tsheat~a and 011e Situatian beginning December 19r0.

M Thr~ee-nt processing tax added to pries as originally qluoted. 2} Tentre, N.T. I/ Quohd in drill.


phedr 0stche a 1AMM4m
Cas Cose Ama
43.9 46.5 44,
19.0 19.0 1.
17.0 17.0 17.0
11.9 12.5 12.8
12.9 13.5 13,8
165 15.9 15.6

10.5 30.5 30).5



15.5 15.$ 5.
12812.8 12.8
13.6 13.7 14.0
13.0 13.0 13.0
17.0 17.0 17.0
11.7 11.8 11.8
13.0 13.0 13.0
14.2 14.2 1.


11.0 11.0 11.0
11.4 11.6 ,14
9 12.8 Z 12.0 / 1.8
56.7 58.4 5g.4
51.7 50.D 51..2
19.0 19.0 19.0
12.1 12.1 12.1
16.0 16.0 16.0
18.2 18.2 28.2
J EA.3 14.3 1A.)
30.0 29.8 290

-. 8. ...
8.8 8.8 8.8
8.9 B.9 8.9 .C
111 1.1 11.1

12.2 12.4 12.1
13.5 13.5 13.9
24.5 21,.5 2.
25.0 25.0 25.0
39.0 39.0 39.0

13.8 13.8 134
L].0 13.0 13.0
18.6 L.6 16
36.4 36.4 36;A
12.0 12.0 12.0


9
,.8
11.6
11.6
10.3
g.9

11,g
15.0
11.4
12.6
11.9
15.8
9.8
11.8
13.0

9.6
9.8
S10.6

72.3
54r.4
17.2
12.0
14.8
17.2

28.0

d8.
8.6
7,7
7,9
11.1


1.
7.8
4.6


7.5
6.3
5.9
7.3


5.5
J 5.9

41.3
29.9
10.3
6.6
13.6
17.5

16.9

4.3
4.3
j.8
5.1
9.5


7.0
6.2
4,g


Corn oil, crude, t~aka, f.O~b. mill ......................o.,o,,g I
Corn oil, refined, bbl., N.Y. ***************----**................s
Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, t.o.b. S. S. Inles ..................s
Cot~tanaed o11, p.a.y., tak cuar, NJr. ............**..............s
Peanut oil, crude, tMansc, t.a.b. mill ..............*.*............s
Peanat, oil, dom., refined, bbt., HI.T. ....................,.........s
Soybean oil, crude, Snk cara, mideestern mille ...................:
Saybeen oil, dam., crude, druis, N.y. ....*.....................,,: ~
Soybean oil, refined, dnrum, N.Y. .................................:

Babassu oil, tlanks, Z.o.b. mille, Pacific Coast ...................
CoDEDuU 011, Llinfla, crude. Sana, S.o.b. Pacific Coat. Y ........:
Coconut oil, abnila, rude, bulk, c.idl. NJ.T ..................:
Caoont oil, Masnita, refined, edible, tank care, T.o.b. N.T. y ...:
Olive oil, edible, drum, N.Y. ....................................1
Olive oil., Inedible, dums, N.Yl. ..................................:
OLive-ol foota, prian, drume N.Y. ...............................:
Palm oil, Higer, crude, druin, N1.T. i/ ............................s
Rsap oil, refined, denartured, druas, NJ.I .........................I
Rape oil, blamr, damus, N.Y. ......................................:
Sunflowe oil, taNk cars, f.o.b. N.T. .............................:
Teaseed oil, cunde, drums, N.Y. ...................................:

Tallow. No. 1, Inedible, Chicago ..................................:
Grease, A Whie, Chicago .........................................:
Manhraden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Haltismor ......................:
Sardine all, crude, tlanka, Pacific Coast ..........................:
Whale oil, nrefned, blaeahed winter, dawma. NJ.I ..................:

Linesed all, raw, tank cara, Minneapolia ..........................s
Linaeed oil, raw, drum, carlota, N.Y. ............................s
Perilla oil, crude, dums, N.Y. ...................................:
Diticina oil, drums, N.Tl. .........................................:
Tung oil, dume, N.Y. ...........................................:

Castor oil, No. 3, bbl., I1J. .....................................:
Castor oil, No. 1, tank, M1.T. ....................................:
Castor oil, dehydrated, druma, carlobe, NJY. ......................:
Cod-liver oil, mad. U.S.P. bbl., NJI. .............................:
Cod all, Newfoundland, drume, NJ.I ................................:


ii








983 PATS8 AND OILS SITT.TATIONl


-r Summary

Productionh of fats and oile from donestic materials in the 1942 crop year

'es estimated at 11.7 billion pounds compared with 9.6 billion pounds a year

earlier. Goale for 1943 call for increased acr~eages of flaxseed and peanuts,

and a soybean acreage only slightly less than the record acreagee in 1942. The

Dj~i~ ton goal' has been reduced, however, to permit greater utilization of

:4 ho~Pur~ces for more essential crops such as peanuts and feed grains. Wlith

normal yields, production of vegetable oils from domestic materials may total

4.3 billion pounds in the 1943 crop year compared with 4.2 billion pounds in

the current yesr. Weoathzr was unusually favorable in 1942. The upward trend

in lard, tallow, and grease production is expected to continue in 194j, but

this may be partly offset by reduced butter production.

Supplies of fats and oils for 1943, including production, imports, and

stocks on hand Janluery 1, probably will total about 14.5 billion pounds.

Military and export requirements for 1943 are estimated at 2.6 billion pounds,

and civilian use under the manufacturers' limitation order is estimated at

9.2 billion pounds. This will leave only- 2.7 billion pounds for stocks at the

close of 1943 compared with a goal established by the Foods Requirements

Committee totaling 3*.5 billion pounds, including contingency reserves. To

meet this objective, direct consumer rationing of food fats and oils probably

would be necessary, for without such action further reductions in allocations

of food fatal to manufacturers are not considered feasible. The quantity of

fa~te that consumers wPould take p.t ceiling pri-ces is estimated to be

. tea@$2eabl retr thn the quantity avatial under the pre~set limitation _

MA;34er, with due consideration to the supply of butter and lard available for

enivilian nreeb The manufacture of butter and lard is not restricted.






DECEMBER 1942


-4 -


Prices of nebst food rnd sorp fats and oils wefe at ceiling levels in

November and esrly December. Flaxseed and linseed oil prices declined in

November, reflecting some slackening in demand for paint oils xnd the

existence of large supplies of flaxseed. The an:nouncenent on Novrember 30 of an

increase in the support price for flax~seed of the 1943 crop brought a sharp

recovery in flasseed prices, however. Prices of oilceals rose materially in

the first half of Novem~ber. The advance in cottonseed, pe.=nut, and soybean

-;eal prices was halted as a result of price orders issued by Commodity Credit

Corporation end the Office of Price Adiniristration. Linseed neal :prices, not

covered by ceilings, have continued to advance.


--Decemnber 15. 1942

REVT~EIE OF RECEiJT DEVELOP!.IE~iENS

PACIIG"OUNTT.- With thle entrance of the United Ststes into
th z*7-r in~ Tecember 1?I1 and the: sulbsequenft loss of mnost
of ouir inprt~~s from thet For East, our f?.ts situation was
trnfo~e: rmon fconnarative abundane to one of
scarcit;-. Fear-tit elso rePs experienced by other United
i'abions, rii theJ United Strtes undertoox to supply large
anol-r.tities oJIf to endi oils unler lend-lease. In addition,
civrilian requircronto rwere counting under the stinulus of
tha r-r cff'ort 311 iin ncms.Dezti" rvrodulction of
fats and oils nwas icrrcaSsed Dbout r0 perc-nt in 1342, partly
in response to the exp~ension progrnn of the Depertment of
Agriculture. The WJir Production Boa~rd in September issued
a general order Uiniting man~ufacturers' use of fats iand oils
to co~nserve supplies and build up ,7 reserve for future
contingencies. Price control over fats and oils 7AS
ir.;tituted in December 1911i. Ceiling prices were revised upward
on sever3l occasions during 1942. Prices of practically all
fets and oils, xcep~-t linseed oil, pro now covered by
specific ceiling orders.

Little Che~nee In Prices In Novenber

Hiighe.cr avErage prices in November for lard and cottonseed oil, as a
result of advanes during October, brought a rise of 1 point ir. the index
nur.1bor of nholesale pri~cs of 27 leading fnts and oils. The index in Noavemnber,
at 112 percent of the 1924-29 average, was 19 points (20 percent) higher than
a year onrlier. Pries of nost fats and oils, including lard and cottonseed
oil, were at or near ceiling levels throughout Novedber. Prices of linseed






FOS-70


-5


oil and flaxsee~d declined du~rin-g: November, however, apparently reflecting the
existence of large supplies of flarseedl available and some slcckening in the
demand for paint oils. khe announcementst on Novem'ber j0 of a higher support
Price for 1943-crop flazaeod resulted in a sharp recovery in flaxseed prices
knd halted the decline in linseed oil prices.

Prices of oilmeals advancced materially in early Novenber, continuing a
rise that bogan in October. With1 the exception of peatnut neal, 011neals by
Novsember 10 hadl reached approximately the price levels of last March. Price
orders issued by CoD:.andity Credit Corporation and the Office of Price
Aduinistra~tie halted the rise in prices, of cottonseed, peanult, and soybeenl
meals. Linseed meal prices, wh2ich a-e not subject to ceilings, have continued
to advance.

Moal quotlations, bagged, per ton, on De~cedber 8 ,cnd highest March 1942
qdtaion ae sfolos Cottonseed neal, 41 rercent protein, Menphis,
$35.75 and $37.50; peronut meal. ;15 p-rcont protein, Southeastern rcills, $38.00)
and $45.75; linseed neal, 36; percent protein, Minneap~ois, CLL3.oo andl $82.50.
Soybean n~real is not quo+.tjd currently, but the neixima price forr bl-per~cnt meal
at Chicaho is sround $81-0.00, compared with the high-est Irarch quotation of
$46.20.

Restrictions Placed Or Prices sad
Vovement Cf Cilu~ea

E~ffectivre NTov-anb.r 11, nexirunl pric s to "Do charged for oilmeal by nills
under cottonseed, pea-nut, or soyb5er.n procesor contrescts for the Cotton States
were established by Comilodity-C'redi't Corporation at $2.00 per ton over the
minimum trade price specified inl these contracts for Februairy 1943. The
maxtdici prices thus established, f~o.b. mill, bulke delivery:, are $~35.00 per ton
for 45-47 percent peanut ileal and for 41 percent tcott~onseed meal. and $3j.00 to
$34.50 per ton for old-process saybea~r. meal, depo.-.di-g on location.

Distr-ibutors' narfgins nore Uinited by the Office of Price ALd;inistration,
effective Nove..iber 12, to a nriaxious of 50 cents per ton for jobbers, $2~ per ton
for wvholesalers, and $3 per ton for ret~r.ilers. Dealers performing nore than
one function mayr takea the appropriate nacrgin for each function they perform
An additional regulation, effective NJover.ber j0, limits processors' extra
charge for less-than-carload lot seles to $1 per ton wrhen the sale is to a
distributor and to $3 per ton when the sale is to e.consum~er or feeder. It was
expected that these regulations would reduce the cost of cottonseed, peanut,
and so3tbem eals purchased for foedlin,- by Ej to th per ton.

S~hipnlent of soybean nre.?. in~to specified Northeastern, and Southern areas
ePas prohibited by Commolity Credit Corporatial Oilseed Orders 4 and 5,effective
December 8. The purpose of these orders is to conserve supplies of protein
feeds in the Midwest and Pacific IUorthwest, and to minimize crosshauling.
Connodity Crodit Cornoration is arrang.ing for the shipment of large quantities
of so beans from the Corn Bolt for crushing wherever processing capacity is
available in Eastern, Southern, and Pacific Const mills that normally crush
'tlaxseed, .cottonsesed, or copra.







DECEMBER 1942


-6 -


Other Recent Price Orlers

Under Anend:~.lents 17 andl 18 to the fats and oils price schedule,
effective No~ve:.2ber 19, sales of refined soybean, peanut, or cottonseed oil for
nrned.ible uses may be made at a level 1/2 cent per pound. Pbove the maximum
prices set forth- in Anonds~ti.ents 7 and 8. Unlike sillors of those oils for
edible use, selleTS f0T nOnf~ood urposes eare not entitl00 to buy the crude
oils fr~o Commolrdityr Credit "Jorpor3.tion nt 1/2 cent per pound under ceiling
prices for cruio. Hence th~e ner action by the Off ice of price A;1rlinistration
equalizes refinin,- nsE~cine as between oil goinZ into food uses and that going
intoi nonfood uses. Ind~ustried uses nermally account for a smell pa~rt of the
Ototal disaPPearJnCe of these oils. In 1961 only 22 percent of the soybean oil,
7 percent of the poenut oil, an~d 5 percent of t'r.e cottonseed oil reps used for
purposes other then food~.

Amendment 62 to SuppFlemen~tary Reg-ulation 14 of the-G~eneral M~aximun price
Rog~ul-~tion,, offectiv-e Bovem~ber 23, prov-ides a 2-czrnt per pound margin for
indepe-ndent collcctorsr of greasc th~t; is ealvag5Ed in households. In some
localitirs, renderers do not collect directly from butchers, but rely on
irndepenhan~t collectors. Maximum prices for houshol-cld-salvaged grease are as
follows: Housewi~fe to butcher, 4 cents per pounld; butchzer to renderer or
independent collector, 5 cents per pound; collector to renderer, 7 cents per
pound.e

Effective Date of Limitation ordrer
Advanced to Cat.:'- r 1

The general limitation order for fats and oils, General preference
Order M-71, was rcissurd in amended form on Novrrmber 24. The order now
specifies the last CquaIrter of 1982 a~s the~ first; Tjriod for which quotas must
be observed, instead of the; last 4 months of 19-E specified in thy original
order. Thlis modification is IEaigned to give relief to manufacturers who had
made large sales in Sep~tber jorfcore th~e q~uotas were announced and who conse-
quently were unable to do their p~roprtortoats ha~re of business in the remain-
ing 3 months of the original q~uota period.

The limitation on th~e manufacture of otherr edible finished products"
,1Ka officially interpre~ted on No~vem'ter 18 as not applyiing to products in which.
fats and oils are nrot the~ largest single ingredients by weight. Shortening,
mayonnaise, and salad dressing, however, are subject to the order, regardless
of their composition.

Butter Stocks Frozen

Conservation Order %--267, issued November 20, required about half of
theF bu~ttcr in cold-storage warehousess in 35 cities, or roughly 40 percent
of total ccld-sto~rage stocks, to be set aside for the requirements of
Go~vFrnmEnt; agencies. Until Mlarch 6, butter set aside in accordance with this
order may' not be dclivpred without specific p~ermissiorn of the Director-
Gerr.ral for Industry Operations, except for military or la~nd-lcase purpofises
or to a Go-vernment agency. The border was acc~ignrd to create a readily
available supply to meet reqp~iroments for such purposes in the immediate
future.






708-70


-7 -


Producers of cream were prohibited by Conservation Order M ~259,effective
November 25, from delivering cream containing more than 19 percent butterfat
except to other producers. Exceptions were made for small-volume deliveries
by farmers and for deliveries in States having high minimum standards for
cream, Although this order will result chiefly in increasing supplies of
milk for fluid consumption, it will tend tr encourage butter production, More
direct aid to butter ;production may result from Conservation Order M-2711,
,restricting commercial production of ice cream in December and January to
60 percent of October output, Since ice cream production declines seasonally
from Datober to December, the restriction is actually in the neighborhood of
20 percent. It is estimated that the butterfat saved in December by the order
will be eq~uivalent to about 70 million pounds of milk or ).j million pounds of
butter.

General Import~s Orde~r Amended

General Imports Order M-6) was reissued in emended form on November 20.
As before, commodities named in the order may not be imported into the Ulnited
States without written authorization from the War Production Board, except by
aulthorised agencies of the Federal Government. The commodities are grouped
into three lists. List III includes commodities that are not needed so
urgently in the war effort as those on the other two lists. Items on list I
are distinguished from those on list II by stricter control over their
movement and utilization after importation. The revised listing of fats and
oils is as follows:

Lists II and III Castor beans; cod oil; cottonseed oil; flaxseed; linseed
oil: murumuru oil; neatsfoot oil and stock; oleo oil; peanut oil; rubber seed
and oil; sunflower oil; edible and inedible tallow, including oleo stock; b~ucua
oil; wool grease; babassu nuts, kernels, and oil; cashew nut shell oil; castor
oil; coconut oil; cohune nuts, kernels and oil; copra; edible corn oil;
oiticica oil; ouricury nuts, kernels and oil; palm kernels and palm-kernel oil;
palm oil; rapeseed oil; sperm oil; and tung oil. List III: Butter; hempseed
and oil; hydrogenated or hardened fpts and oils; Enurumuru nuts and kernels;
oleostearine; rapeseed; sesame seed and oil; sunflower seed; tucum nuts and
kernels; and vegetable oil soapstock and other foots. List III also includes
fatty acids, and oilmeal except from coconuts or copra, soybeans, or flaxseed.

Glyearin Recovery Order Issued

Domestic production of glycerin may be increased 6 million to 7 million
pounds per year under Conservation Order Md-19), effective December 1, which
sets up certain standards of production efficiency in glycerin recovery for
the soap, fats splitting, and glycerin refining industries. The new standards
are more severe than those in effect on coconut oil and palm oil under Generail
Preference Orders M~-59 and MI-60.

Production o~f Fats and Oils Seasonally T-igher_ in
October; October 31 S~tocys_ Slightl~y_ Higher

Factory production of fats and oils totaled 81i8 million pounds in
October, an increase of 87 million pounds over September. Reflecting seasonally
heavier marketing of cottonseed, the opening of the new zrep year for soybeanes







DEC3EMBER 1942 8- '.

and increased crushings of flarxseed, total production of vegetable oils was
100 million pounds larger than a month earlier. Production of animal fats
and oils declined about 14 million pounds, largely because of a decline in
creamery butter output.

Factory and warehouse stoc:s of fats and oils increased about 14 million
pounds during October to 1,836 million pounds (crude basis) at the end of the
month. The largest increases wer-e )12 million pounds in cottonseed oil and
30 million pounds in linseod oil, while decreases of 37 million pounds and 25
million pounds occurred in stocksa of butter and inedible tallow, respectively.
StocL-s n,-rmlly would have increased more than they did during October as a
result of thle seasonal increase in production. Consumption of fats and oils
was uniusually lar-ge in october this ;year, however.

A)1 .Purchases of Ilhortening Increased

T;;e Agricultu-al blarketing: Aiministration purchased about 19 million
pounds of sh~ortening= other then l,-rdl in Nove-ber, cornnared with a total of
about 9 milli-in pncids in the first 10? months of 19 2. ~Furchar,. s of lard,
howYever at spproxrimately.) i; 7illion. rolnds, wesre rather small in relation to
those in ot"cr me~.the- thlis yue'.r. Total purchases of fets and oils in November
amo~unted to Fbout FrJ nililin prounds, compared with by million pounds in October
anrd a monthly ove~r: S of 80 million round in the first 10 months of 1942.
With neasr-rro;rd o~r resort~ nauber~js of hogs now' beiine nav~cr? Ptel Goernment
purchRr~ss of lard probabl;, cill incrca~se substant~iall3- in Docomb~er and following~
months.



Production of F~eb Frmn 1412 C-one
Fl?.ced Bt I ..i Bi~llion Fountl~-

Frod.lction of hisf and3 oils from7 donPestic naterials in t~he 1942 crop
year is now estinrated at 11.7 billion p~ou.nds, -npred~r~ -ith 4.6 billion pounds
in 96142.Aproximately,, 7.: billion pounds of the 1942 crop-year total will
be ani;al fats and oils (IncludlinC narir.e), an~d 1;,2 billion Irounds will be
vegetab-le oils. Th~e fourt 11jorT vPstable oils enosps -- cottons:.ed, flezseedl,
peanuts, :nid soyboans -- are C:.4 oted to yCielld about !.9 'tilli7.n pounds of
cruds3 oil, essumi: e tha.t 1-.i to 105 :-.illion bsshels of Psaybcans can be crushed
in the current, marketing yea~;r. Details for ;.lcjor ite;.ns pre shown in table 6.

Production Gosls for 1a27kT Anou-~nc

Agrin:1turall production! goals for 194 t-annunced I~over-ber 30, call for
further inc~zasers ne:-:t ;';ar in hMg and daily nroau.7ti:-n, in livestock slaughter,
and in fls.i,-2d an pean.t acronge. The8 noyboan~ :5ol for 194)j is 1.5 million
acres larger than for 1',.2, but is slighrtlly under the c~-regag indicated for
harvesct this eer. The cotton sereage~ Ireal has been rreduced to perr.1it greater
utilization of land3 and labor in the South for more essecntial crops, such as
p-:anuts and livestocki feed crops.






FOS-70


- 9-


Table 2.- Oil crops: Production goals for 1943, with
comparative data

Acreage
Aveag :1942 : 14
Commodiy : : Indicated :94
Commdi1 9g7-4 1 Goal goal
. :(preliminary):
:1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres


Cotton, planted ............
Plaxseed, planted ..........
Peanuts, picked and threshed
Soybeans harvested for beans






Cottonseed, 1,000 tons .....
Plaxseed, 1,000 bushels ....
Peanuts, million pounds ....
Soybeans, 1,000 bushels ....


:26.359 2 ,ooo 24,005 22,500
:2,j09 .,500 4,675 5,000
:1,818 5,ooo 4.173 5.500
:4, 141 9, 000 10,867 10,500
: Production
: vrg 92: 1941 goal
:1937-41 :indicated : Seed : Crude oil
: :(preliming)~ If equivalent 2/
: Million
a pounds
:5.876 5.764 4,972 1,245
:191553 42,682 36.250 630
:1,T92 2,811 3,712 685
: 76,672 209,953 189,000 1,440


____


.1/ Alcreage gobal multiplied by assumed Normal"al yields of 442 pounds of copud cttonr-
seed and 7.25 bushels of flax~seed per F1lated acre; 675 pounds of peanuts and
18 bushels of soybeans per harvested acre.
2/ Oil equivalent of seed available for crushing after deducting other uses.

With nnormaln yields per acre, the output of oil from the 1943 projected
acreage for the four principal oil crops would total about 4 billion pounds,
only slightly more than the estimated output for 1942-43. Growing conditions
were unusually favorable in 1942, and yields generally were about average.
This situation may be repeated in 1943, but the chance is equally great that
growing conditions will be below average next year.

To implement the 1943 production program, support prices were announced
for flaxcseed, soybeans, and peanuts for oil, as well as for hogs and certain
other farm products. Prices for the 1943 crop of flaxesed will be supported
at not less than $2.70 per bushel, basis No. 1 flaxseed at Minneapolis. This
is equivalent to a United StPates average farm price of about $2.55 per bushel,
compared with an estimated average farm price for the current season of about
$2.25*

Parm prices for 1943 crop soybeans will be supported at $1.60 to $1*75
per bushel, depending on oil content, for yellow or green beans of high oil-
yielding varieties. If the quality of soybeans produced is equal to that in
1942, the average farm price for all soybeans in 1943-44 should be slightly
higher than the estimated price of $1*58 per bushel for 1942-crop beans.

A single price program has been recommended by the Department of
Agriculture for all peanuts, whether for edible use or for oil. This program
would assure growers an average return of 80 to 85 percent of the parity_price.







DECENDER 1942


- 10) -


On the basis of the November parity price of $148.80 per ton, this would mean
an average price of about $125.00 per ton in the old producing areas in the
East and a comparable price in other areas. Such a program would require new
legislation. If a single price program or its equivalent is not possible,
price-sup ocrt programs for peanuts for nuts and peanuts for oil, similar to the
programs nowr in effect, will be continued in 1943. Prices of peanuts for oil
in 1942-4j are being supported at ran avera60 level of $30.003 per ton, while
prices of peanuts for nuts are supported at an avor~age level of about $131.00
per ton.

Outpylt of Fetrs in Celendr Year 196J to
il2tal AboIut thle SeelT as rin 19 2-43Z

Increased output .7f lord, tallow, greases, and pe-nut oil in the
calender yearT 1916), compared with the crop year 19421-4), probably will be aboul
offset by reducticns in output of butter, COtton980d 011, nd& linseed Bil,
assuming that 1943 production goals are reached anid that weather is about
normal next ycar. Total productions from domestic materials for the calendar
;;ear therefore may be tentiative~ly placed at 11.7 billion pounds, the same as
for the crop y:ear. This would compa-re with a production of about 10.1 billion
pounds for tae calendar yecar 1342.

Hog and cattle slaughter is expected to be considerably larger in 1943
than in 191:2. hence the upward trend in production of lard, tallow, and
greases is likely to continue. Lard production may total 3 billion.pounds in
194), comared wrs.:ith about 2.9 billion pounds in the 1942- ) marketing year
(Octoaber- Ep~tember). Lard production would be greater if the cut-out in
packring plants were increased. The yield of lard rer hog in recent months has
run under that of a Zye-r earlier, despite an increase in the avreragle liv~e
weight of hogs slaugh~tere-. Ine lower yield per hog is largely a result of thr
relationshipe existing between prices of lard and pork cuts and of the short-
age of meas~. Much of the excess fat now sold on meats is wasted.

Butter production may be reduced in 1943, unless consumption of fluid
milk and cream can~ be held to 1982 levels. The total of milkr produced in
1943 will be short of requirementst eve~n if the 122-billion pound milk produe-
tion goal is reached. Eement restrictions on whipping cream and ice cream
will tdae care of only about one-fourth of the milk shortage.

Requiremnents for Fats Olutrun Supp'slie-s

Despite the remarkable increase in production of fats and o-ils already
achieved, requlireiments in. the folrthcoming year are likelyr to exceed supplies.
This is due onl-y in part to the loss of imports from the ~Fr Easf, Of more
importance is the growing volume of lend-lease exports, the large military
requ~irements, and a amounting civilian demand as a result of rising income
and increased hours of labor.

The ;upply of fats a~nd oils for 1943 is tentatively estimated as
follows: Production from domestic saterials, 11.7 billion pounds; impIorts,
including oil in seed, 0.8 billion pounds; factory and warehouse stocks,
January 1, 2 billion pounds; total, 14.5 billion pounds. Probable disposition
is about as follows: Military use, lend-lease exports, commercial exports,






EL s-f


- 11-


and shipments to United. States territories, 2.6 billion pounds; civilian
nonfood use under general limitation order, 3.2 billion pounds; civilian food
use under general limitation order, together with available butter and lard,
6 billion pounds; factory working stocks, and of year, 2 billion pounds;
Go~0verlnment contingency reserve, end of year, 0.7 billion pounds; total, 14*5
billion pounds. In addition, 18 to 20 million bushels of soybeans in excess
of crushing needs, equivalent to 150 to 200 zillion pounds of oil, may be held
.as a reserve for foreign or domestic contingency needs.

Actually, requirements for fats will be greater than use in 1943, arimr
ticularly the requirements for civilians and for the Governm~ent contingency
reserve. The objective for this reserve was originally placed by the Foods
-Requirements Copmittee at 1.~5 billion pounds to be accumulated by Decenter j1,
1943. To achieve this goal it probably would be necessary to institute direct
-consumer rationing of food fats and oils at a level below that considered
feasible under the present manufacturers' limitation order.

For food fats and oils, the situation with regard to available supplies
under existing orders and probable demand at ceiling prices is indicated in
table 3. Without direct consumer ratLioning there would be about 48 pounds of
food fats and oils per capital availstle for civilian consumption in 1943,
including indirect consumrption of fats in such manufactured products as bread,
cake, confectionery, salad dressings, canned soups, etc. Consumption averaged
49 pounds per capital in t~he period. 1935-39 and 51 pounds per capital in 19)80-42.
Hence consumption in 1943 would not be greatly below th~e average for recent
years. However, it is estimated on the basis of past "alatinships between
consumption, price, industrial wrorke~rs' income, and prices of computing
products, that consumers would take about 57 pounds Te: capita in 1943 at
present ceiling prices if such1 a cruantity were avcilable. This estimate, of
course, is.subject to a considerable degree of error, since it; was necessary
in making it to extrapolate beyond the range of previous consumption and
income data.

Table 3.- Per capital disaIppearanrce of food fats by civilians and civilian
food industries, average 1935-jg and 1940-42, estimated 1943

::: 19'r3
Ave r. e.
Item : Average : 10-2:Probab-,le Estimated
: 1935-39 : / I : em:.ca at : vai lable
:: :ceili! rices:
: .Pournds Pounds P0aIs -Pounds
Butter and margarine:
(actual weight) .........: 19.7 19.1 2o*5 17-5

Lard and other shortening .: 22.9 23.9 26.2 23.0

Other food products 2/
(fat content) ...........: 6.3 7.9 10.4 7.7

Total ......,.........,: 48*9 50-9 57.1 148.2

IfJ Preliminary.
2/ Includes satlad and cooking oils, mayonnaise, sa-lad dressings, confectionery,
bakery products, canned and packaged foods.







D1ECEMEF3R 1942


-. 12 -


FENCE WEST AND NORTHI A~IRIG AS A SOURGCE
OF FATS AND OILS

Pre-war trade statistics for Fresnch West Africa rand French North
africa indicate that these two regions, considcord together, have a net export
capacity of roughly half a billion pounsdc, of fats, oils, and oil-bcaring
materials in terms 7f oil. ota eC.~xports rof these itemaJ averagd 690 million
p:unds, annually In 1934-38. wl..:le total imports avcrafged 155 million pounds,
leaving a net export balance cf about 535 million pounds. Yeast Africa had a
net export balance ef about 565 million pounds, but North Africa, with its
sizable urban population, had a not import balance of about j0 million pounds.

French Yejt *ifTrica, is a leading source of the peanut entering inter-
national tradea, steading secC-:d only to India. Together with reslativ ~ly small
but increasingr quantities of peanut oil, peanuts accounted f;F 70 percent
of Wes~t Africa's total exports of fatal, oils, and c.ilyee~d.s in 1934-38.
Substantial quantities of palm kerre:."c palm oil, and shea kern:els and shea
butter were also exported, aad -ona".le- qantities of cjpra, cottonseed,
castor ~beans, and sesame seed. (5.:o table 4.)

OliVE Oil 15 the only fat or oil exported in large quantities from
French Norta Africa. Some flaxaced is exported, especially from French
Morocco, and there nree also small exports of carutor berms, cottonseed,
mustard seed, and apricot seed, as we~ll as of certain fahc -ils and animal
fats. PEanut oil is by far the largest item among the improrted fats and
oils, but sub;stan~tial quantities of soybean cil, butter, anrd linseed "oil
were also imported in 104'-38. (See table 5.)

Total consumption nf fats and eils in French iicrth africa appears to
have been well over 200 million pounds in 19!4-38, with net imports furnish-
ing about 30 million pounds of this total. 170 accurate estimate of consump
tion can be mande, however, a; production figurres are l:-c:-ingP for many items.

The net. trade position of French West Africa anda North Africa in 1934-3
doeE no~t necessarily indicate the cituation as it exists todr-y. Changrzes in
foreign trade relations resulting from the war may havt; caused production
to declir. !:ver the long run, h;-wover, the figures given; in this report
sh.7uld pl.\vide a fairly reliable guide to the status of Vest Africa and
North Africa with respect tor. fat.e andr oils sup~pl~ies.




708-70 -- 13 -

Table 4.- French West Africa 1/: Estim_7ted production and net trade in
fats, oils, and oil-bearing materials, average 1934-38

: :tio Net exports (-) or net
: :_ in orts (+c) in terms of oil
:Oils and o il-:: : To or from
Item To or from
: bearing a oa Fae rench
I':materials in: : / a rthArc
:terms of oil~: : 3
:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:pounds pound s po rds pounds

ieanuts, unshelled (30 percent) : 4f 520,000 -285, 005 -276: 766 -66
anuts, shelled (40 percent) ..: N.A. -102. 502 96,655 11
anut oil .....................: N.A. 5,198 +_- ,og -6,162
Total, peanut and peanut oil: NA. r-392, 705. -:73 ,0}jb -,

amkernels ( 5 percent) ......: 143,000 94,026 4L,502 5
amoil ....................... 80,000 49,652 36,830 16

eakernels (46 pecet 6f ... 7, 200 -7,144 1,49 5 -
eabutter 6/ .. ...............: N.A. 10,720 -8,805 ---
Total, she1a kernels & butter : N.i.. 17,P864 10,300 --

opra (6) percent) .............: 1/ 5.3co 5,286 4 ,389--

Stonseed (15 percent) .......?: 8/ 3,600 ,0 26 -
Stonseed oil .................: R.X. + -
Total, cottonseed and:
cottonseed oil .............: N Ar. 1,602 26 ---

ator beans (42 percent) ,......: 7/ 1,0 ,l ,090--
ator oil ......................: Nu. A. + 96 + 3 -
Total, castor beans and oil .: Te ,13 -1,8 -

same seed ....................: 4,320 641 301 2/
seed oil ....................: .. 2 5 97 -
ther oils and fets ............: 7/ 4OO N.A. N.. 61
her seeds ....................: N.Ap. NJ.A. N..
Grand total ......,...........: PZ/g-The1L -562,7I4 vs9 -71263
Total oils ..................: S9/ 80,COD- 65,2-22 kg~ 132 -7,189
Total oil-bearing materials .: ff 684,72 -L;SS,49~2 -425,237 -80

piled from off icial sources and Internat ional Yearbookrs of Agr iculItural Statistics
the international Institute of Agriculture, except as otherwise indicated.
Including Togoland, French mandate.
Imports from French West Africa and Togoland (French mandate) as shown unofficial
ech trade statistics, except that figures for shea kernels aLnd butter are exports
aFrance as shown in the official statistics for French West Africa and French
gland.
Imports from French West Africa as shown in official trade statistics for
th Africa.
Average of crop years 193}-34 to 1937-38. Harvest of peanuts begin in October.
Less than 500 pounds.
.Average 1934-37*
Based on exports; undoubtedly too small.
Based on exports of cotton.
Total of items shown.































1



7/+1 ,029;1


crUCEMBER 1942 c- 14 -

Table 5.- French North Afcrica: Estima~ted production, dlisappearance, and
not trade in fats, oils, and oil-bearing materials, r
averager 1934-}$f

lept exports (-) or
: : Apparent : net ima~c rts (+)
Item :Production: domestic : : T r a or fro
: dis- :Total from French
:appaearance: :rnc : L'est
:Africa
: 0 15. ly 0 b. 1 00 o. 1 l3 b. 1A l0 b


Ve retable oils and oil-'oearing:
materials (In terms ofr orrni :
oil):
Olive oil ..................: 1/164,230
Peanut, al~shelled (30 pet.): --
Pe~anuts, shellej. (40 pet.) .: --
Peenut oil ................: --
Totel, peanuts and:
peanut oil ,.........: ---
S3aybEen oil ......,.........: ---
Flaseed 3) nt.) ........,: 58
Linseed oil ................: U--
Total, flarseel an~d
lins; eed oil ...~......: 5, 277
Coconut oil ......,.....,....: --

All1 other v.tegeabCle oils ...: --
Anisal ani fisr fal-s and oils::
Batter ,...............,.....: d.' 2?
Talowl ,.,...................: --
Othesr animal. fats and oils .: 8/ 101
Fiah Gils ....,............: gl :'.1
Sod oil .....,...........,...t~~ --
Margarine andl vsge~table fat- : --
lrjand tc tr .........,,:10' /1 71,'Ls19L lj


L1,520: 2/-1?2,71ko ;!-53.801 20
87 + 5,726 i 17 ;4 + 66
1,21s + 116 + 397 + 11
87,1 40 + 87.li!0 r71,616 +6 ]2~


12,193 12,199 + 176 -
163 5, 70e .. 5,115 Z/
_7,S 5+?'i ,5


7,632

'. 212



1,575

2,391
ly
2Cl,19)


1,7155

2 66



1, ?5

57 1~
2_-0


1,082
1,578
16)
6.597


I+

I +

2/+
+


Cit
6/-
1/+


L 5,18&4 + 18~
+ 1,30r9 ---




+ 5,564s +7+,4 1


Vege~tablt'-e oils, :includ- :
i ne maazn ........ /6,6 12 17,L -j S : PC +5,67 3 *7,1
AnJimal anl fish fats
andJ oils ........1/ E}1(1._2 + 1 627L- + 7,029 + 17
All faV :: ols.... :101 U 10/Jl 137, 7b0 2 ~1+ +42,7O2 *7 If9
To'al, oil-tearing
moite,-ialf ..............:10fl 6, }}_10-' L172,52 + ~ 552-3. + $t
Pro actir:~ c nli frade conc.i3ed froi:. official sou-ces, and In~t rnsional Yearbooks of
Acricultural Stat~iztics of the Internationd Insctitute of A ricultlr~e. Domestic
disa3le-urane co:nnatedi from dats on orocu-cion r::i tr3Le.
If Crom ylears 1933-3$t to 193'7-_73. Cro;1 yeair bean~s in 11ovrmber. 2/ Includes oliv(1
oil foots.j eota 0 ons hi 3ata fnr "un~isi includes calm-kernel oil.
/ In-cludes estimated of 69~,000 po~unds of cottornsaee, based on trroiniction of cotton
as estimated b; Office of Foreign Agrirultural Relationls, rem-ainder based on expot
anrd is p~robablyr too small. ii Includes cottonseedl, he~oseed, c-esame seed, muzstard~~
seed, copra, castsor beans, apricot seed, and other seeds not spe7cified. Jfl Includp
palm oil, ?al:1-kcernel oil, castor oil, cottonseed oil, seeame oil, rapeseed oil,
sur~flcwer oil, corn oil, and other oils not s~Pcified. Sf Based on exports; proba~i
too small. ig/ Includes lard, wool grease, lanolin, and other ainial fats and oils
not specified. 101 Total of items as shown.




- 15 -


Table 6.- Factory production of fats and oils, October 1940 and 1941,
Alugust-October 1942, and indicated crop-year production
for specified items, 1940-42

~Mongaprduct io
Item : Oct. : 1942
: 1940 : 1941 ~: Au : Sout. : Oct.
:Mil lb.Mil. lb. Mil. lb.Ml.b ill.
fats and oils:
seybutter .......r........... : 130.8 1'33.5 169.6 1. 126. 3
Intp~Ected lard and rendered pork :
fe~ ................... .........: 114. 8 127. 5 106.7 118.2 120.0
9-reases excluding wool grease ....: NJ.A. 1N.A. 40.1 40.5 43.7
15eatsaoot oil ....................: "r .5 ,}
igleo oil .........................: n 10.1 8.0 8.4
Stearine, animal, edible ..........: n n 5.2 3.9 4.5
Wallow, edible. ...................r a 10.8 10. 1.j
allow, inedible .................: "r 7s.4 80.9 80.7
ol grease ......................; 1.3 1.6 1.
sh-liver oil ...............r....: .5 265 .6
sh oil ...........r.: ""27.1 267 20.j3
arine mammal oil ................: n
.Total, animal.......... .....: n 4507.3 431.0- 117.4
tabl oils, crude basis:
stor oil ............. a 10.6 7.0 6.7
conut oil r.....................: n n aI 9.1
.rn oil .........................: 21. 2.6 21.5
ttonseed oil ...................: 22!.5 209.0 2(j.2 161.7 232.9
Anseed oil ......................: Ui. A. IUA. 76.3 72.0 84. 8
lifive oil, edible ...............: ---- --
beanut oil .......................: 179 13.3 5.6 1.8 8.2
ticy~bean oil ................... .-..: L.A. .A. 57.4 55.4 64. 5
tiung oil .........................: -
tfhat vegetable oils .............: "9. 11.2 2.6
8e Total, vegetable ............: 202.0 _329.7 430. L
Grand total ...............:___ ___ 6 3.~3 760. 7 8Ic7.7.

: Indicated crop-year production
: Ypa 94-1 1414 94-)2
beginning 54-: : *914 i ~~
: : Mil. lb. Mi.lb il. lb.

fats and oils::
matter, including farm ...........: July 2,280 2,180 2,150
ar nd rendered pork fat, total : Oct. : 2,275 2,4so 2,900
Indbe tallow and greases, total: Oct. : 1,492 1,732 1,950

Sonoil *............. Oct. : 13:5 242 250
.toneed oil ...................: Aug. : 1,425 1,250 1,445
aeed oil I/ ..................,: Ju.ly :70 7 988 g10
fve oil ........................: Oct. :11 811
eaut oil .......................: Oct. : 174 76 300
yban oil ......................: Oct. : 5614 707 1,44o
all .........................: Dec. :5 3 8
11ed from reports of the Bureaul of thne Census and the Department of Agriculture.
hly reports do not show total productioT. of butter, lard, inedibletallow, mdgreases.
Included with "other vegets~ble-oils." 2} Based on rmost recent isndications: subject
a~Bag.e.J{ Incl6&e4 productiion-from import~ed flaxseed,







nLUCceKKE 1942 16 -

Table 7.- Factory and warehouse stocks of specified fats and oils, orade
basis, October 31, 1940-42, August 31 and September 30, 1942

Oct. 31, Oct. 31,--
Item 1940 1941 Au.1' et 0 c.3

: Million Million Million Hillion Million
: pounds poun ds poundsa pounds pounds

Animal fats and oils:
Butter .................. ..: 106 187 152 124 87
Lard and rendered pork fat .: 223 177 85 62 56
Greases, excludin,- wool:
grease : .A. N.A. 103 99 91'
Neatsfoot oil ..............: a n 3;
01eo oil .... .... .... ...: a n5 4
Stearine, animal, edible ...: a n 2
TaJllow, edible .............: n n 13 11 13
Tallow, inedible ...........: Fl 258 237 212
W~ool grease ................: 5 5 5
Cod and codi-liver oil ......: 13 11 12
Other fish-liver oil .......: 2 2
Fish oil ...................: 118 12411
Marine mammal eil ...... n n 45 40 62
Total, animal .........: a n 805 724 682
V~egetable oils, crude basis 1/:
Babassu oil ................: N.A. U.A. 13 12 12
Castor oil .................: 37 30 24
Coconut oil ................: "I 1-j6 130 134
Corn oil ...................: n nt WI 42 3
Cottonseed oil .............: 531 360 276 304 346
Linseed oil ................: U.A. .A. 230 243 *27)
Otticica oil ...............: 9 9 8
Olive oil, edible ..........: a nr 7 7
Olive oil, inedible and s
foots .....................: 12 12 11
Palm-kernel oil ............: 1 2 2 2/ 1
Palm oil ...................: n a 98 95 90
Peanut oil .................: n 24 16 1
Perilla oil ................: n n 8
Rape oil ...................: nn1 81
Sesame oil .........
Soybean oil ................: 111110
Tung oil ...................: a n } 32 3
Other vegetable oils .......: a 33Ti1
Total, vegetable ......: 1,116 1,0811
Gran~d total .........: 1.921 1.822 1.83
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census, ecept butter- and lard,
Agricultural iarKetin; Administration. Totals computed from unrounded numbers.
L/ crude plus refined converted to crude basis by dividing by the following factor
3abassu, corn, cottonseed, palm-lcernel and palm oils 0.93: coconut, peanut, and
soybean oils, 0.94.
2/ Refined onlyr. Data for crude not available.
lJj Less than 500,000 pounds.

















































Compiled from records of the Agricultural Marketing Administration.
If Bagged, carlots.


.. 17


Table 8-- Prices if specified oil-bearing materials,
November 1940 and 1941, Septemnbe~r-November~ 1942

: : Nov. : 19 2
Item : Unit : 1940 : 1941 Sept. Oct. : Nov.

9:- ::Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollare_ Doll r


C'astor beans, Brazilian,::
ji':f~o.b. Brasilians ports ........:Long ton :1/51.oo 1/so.12. 75.oo
'Obstonseed, United States farm::
price ..........................:Sh~ort ton: 23.12 45.28 45.33
flaxseed, No. 1, Minneapolis .....: Bushel : 1.59 1.4 2.43
Flaxaced, United States farm price: .j9 1.60 2. 24
Peanate (for nuts and oil),
United States farm price .......:100 pounld: J.24 4.61 5.69
peanuts for oil, delivered::
Sdesignated agencies ............: *: --- g. 84 -
Soybeans, No. 2 Yjllow, Chicag~o ..: Bushel : .95 16 .1
Boybeans, United states farm price: n .84 1.4) 1.57


75.co 75.0i.


46.466
2.46
2.25


45.01
2.L'
2.2c


5.77 5J.9


4,04
---


4.0~
---~


Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug R~eporter, Dal rd ultn(hcg), Ghicago
?iournal of Commerce, Daily Market Record (Minneapolis), and reports of the Bureau of
~-Agricultural Economics.
If C. and f., New York.

Table 9.- Price per ton of specified oilseed meals,
November 1940 and 1941, September-NJovember 1942

: Nv. 1942
Item 1/ : 1940' 1941 i Sept;. Oct. Nov.
:Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollers


Copra meal, Los Angeles ....................: 21.55
Cottonseeed meat, 41 percent protein, Memphis: 29.30
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent protein, Chicago: 35.60
Linseed meal, 34 percent protein,:
Minneapolis ..............................: 28.25
Linseed meal, 'j2 percent protein, Newr York .: 27.50
Peanut anal. 45 percent protein,:
t~o~b., Southeastern mills ..............: 24.94
Sorbeen mreal, 41 percent protein, Chicago ..: 30.50


36.45
36~.75
42.60


52.40
35.60
41.35


52.90
36.25
41.30

36.45
3375


52.88
38.60
45.40

39.75
3~375


35.90 36.00
31.25 35.20


36.97
39.10


36.94
43.50


3775 39.12
42.70 46. 60




IIECEMBER 1942


- 18 -r


Table 10.- 01eomargarine: Production,: withdrawals for consumption,
and materials used in manufacture, United States,
October 1940 and 1941, August-October 1942

: Oct. :1932 if
Item
: 1980 01 : Aur:. :St. Oct.
:1,000 15. 3,000 15. 1,000 10. 1,U)3 lb. 1,000 lb.
Production:
colored ,................... ....:, 217 206 15.360 9, 260 12, 492
UJncolopre:d_ .... ................: 2 949 J1,Sg) 2313 3,34 ]791
icotal 2/ ................,....: 30, 160 76,060. 32 ba} 59,-65 r+b, 2a3


Tax-vaid withdreraals for Unjted
s~t,-,te consumpFtion 3/ ...........: i


29, 500 .


.33. 932


Materials used:
01eo Oil .......................: 15199 1,766 1,639
b1eostearine ..,.................: 30{1 278 78
Lard,aoutral ..................: 1127 6d2 358
01eo stock ,..............-..,....: 107 ..159 266
Butter .................. ....,...: --- .--- 3
Tallow ......i...........,.......: --- --- 13
Mojnocjteerinle ..........,...... ...: 20 15
01eoste~arine oil ...,........... --. -- -
Tot allanmal .................: 2, 060 ,9 259

Cottonseed oil e....,...........: 11,82,7 13,T05 21,312
Soybean oil ,,..................: '8,61j4 .h997,:-(
Pearnut oil .,.............. .....: 185 235 j!
Con i .... .........: 19 El25
Cottoneseed steerine~ i,..........: 1 --- 25
SSoybean abearina ......,...t.....:
Total, R.omestic vegetable~ ...= 20,~T- 13,722 T 28,7- ~T:


2,217? 2, 3j9
215 342
735 911
335 41hy

2L 14
10 15

),936 4,068

13,487 15,612
10,496 17,689
75 37
1!1 153
62 57


Coconut oil ....................: 1,464 4,680 ---
Babassu oil ...,.......... ......,: .18. .275 -
Palm oil ..,..I..................:. -- 1,'125-----
Palm flake4~s .~.............1.....: --- 16 ---
Palm-ker.-.l oil ......... --1 -
Sunflower oil ... ....~........: ------- 41
Total: fo~reign veg-etable ....: 1.b261) --- --4
TPotal, fats andl oils ........: 24,fg 27.7 1,8 1,9 5.

Milk ...;....r.......i........... 5, 545 6,oh19 6,629 7, 1L3 8,012
Salt ..........o.........,.....:L 1,130 1,155 1.225 1,274 1,4s9
"'Derivatived of g~lyzeri=-;.1.......: 70 70 69 71 77
Leeithin .....1....,.............: 10 ;1 21 24 29
Soza (benzoate of) ,............ 11 14 2j 23 25
Vitamoin concentrate ..,.........: 1 7 9 S &
Miscellaneous .........,....,....: --- 2 9 5 12
Tetal, other materials ......: b. 7b'7 7, 31Y 7,j85 Y,55 9,6
Total, all materials ........ 31 .125 !5,o 7 39.328 40.46 4730

Compiled from fatzernal3 .=.evenue records and Internal Revenue Eulletin.
Preliminary.
Total of unroundied nubes.
Z Excludes withdrawn fre e of tax for use in Federal institutions, and withdrawn
for orport. --


24.3?/9 29.537 35,4o3
























































































I







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