The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00073
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00078

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text




E '


T UAT I ON


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF


.~7 : 5'


TlI
S.


-F OS-58




k.DOM ES1
-BASI!
PounDs


I:Ii~j~-jc
i;;;r



I

ts
i;' :Fnj~
;" ''
ii:i


I


C DI SAPPEA RANC E OF PR IM ARY .FATSI~PI
BY G ROU PS. U NITE D STATE S. 1 91 2. 1914. AN D


BILLIONS I
ii 12




10



8





"'6


ii
iiil


1912 1915 1918 1921 1924 1927. 19
DATA FOIR 194~1 AE PAIRTLY ESIra



DOMESTIC DlS.APPEARANCE OF PRIMARY FATS
visi~;1 :iMAB::~~l,8r LLY ESTIlMATED AT 11- BILLIONi POuLDS.
,4:r'99tht~. ~P;kidNacE was 9.7 BILL1on PouIos lu. 1940.


130 '1933~ 1936 1939 1942
ATED
NEG 19761 HUIEAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONtOMIC5

AND OILS FOR 1941 IS PRO-
THE PREVIOus RECORD DIS-
(FOR DATA SEE TABLE 2.)




dECEMBER 1941 2


Table 1,- Price per pound of specified fatal, ones, anrd glycerts,
November 1939 anrd 1940, September-NTovember 1941
Item : Now, 19 1
: 1939: 1940:Sent : Oct : Nrov.
"Cents Cents Cents Cents Cggtg
Butter, 92-score, Chicago ,,.,,,,,,,....,,,,.,,,.,,: 29,5 324 3, 35.2 35,8
Butter, 92-score, New York ,,,,,,....o...,,.,,,..,: 30.1 33.1 36.9 35.6 3,
01eomargarine, dom, veg,, Chicago .....,.........,: 15.0 14.5 15 17.3 1.
Compounds (animal and veg, cooking fats), Chicago 9.5 8.2 15.9 16,1 158
Lard, prime steam, tierces, Chicago ..........,...0 6.1 4,7 10..7 9,8 9 iC
Lard, refined, cartons, Chicago ,,,..,....,,.....,: 7,2 6,4 12,4 12,0 11~,g
01eo oil, extra, tierces, Chicapo .......,..,,....: 8,5 7.0 10511.5 13.4
01eostearine, bbl., N. Y. ,,,,,,,,,,......,....o.,: 7,9 6,2 9.8102 1
Tallow, edible, Chicago ........,..,,,,,,....,....,: 5.9 4.8 g.0 9.2 8 p
Corn eil, crude, tanke, fo,o.b mills .............: 5.8 5.3 12,4 12,2 11 ;2
Corn ail, refined, bbl., N. Y ,...,........,,..,,.: 8,6 7,8 15615.4 15 8.
Cottnnseed oil, crude, tanks, f,aoJ. S.E. mills ..: 5.6 4,6 12,2 12,2 -11 5
Cottonseed oil, p~s~y,, tank cars, N, Y. .........: 6. 5 .713.6 12,9 ;ig,#
Peamut oil, crude, tanks, f~o,b, mills .,........: 6. 7 .812.71.1 1
Peanut oil, dom, refined, bbl., N, Y, e........,,: 10.6 7.5 15.8 15.9 15i
Soybean oil, crude, tank cars, midwestern mill ..0 4, 8 4.3 10.5 10.4
Soybean oil, dom., crude, drums, N. Y. ...........: 6;,6 5.9 12.1 12,o
Soybean oil, refined, drums, N. Y, n........,,,,. 8,0' 7,3 1213,2 13441~


Babassu oil, tanks, f~ce,b, mills, Pacific Coast ..3
Coconut oil, crude, tanks, f,o~b, Pacific Coast 1/:
Coconut oil, edible, drums, N. Y. ................s
Olive oil, edible, drums, NJ, Y. ,,....o........,,:
Olive oil, inedible, drums, N. Y. ....,,....,,,,.,:
01ive-oil foots, prime, drums, N. Y. ..........,,:
Palm oil, Higer, crude, drums, N, Y. If .,,...,,,,:
Pal~m oil, Sumatra, tanks, N, Y, 1/ ..,,,..,,.,,,.ss
Rape sil, refined, denatured, drums, N. Y. ,......:
Rape oil, blown, drums, N. Y n...............,,.:
Teaseed ail, crude, .drums, NJ, Y, ..o,............:
Tallow, inedible, Chicago ,,,.,,,,,.......-.......,,:
Grease, A white, Chicago ,,....,,n.....,,........;:
Manh~aden oil, crude, tanks, f,o~b, Baltimore ,...,:
Sardine oil, crude, tanks, Pacific Coast .,,,,,..,:
Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, drums, N, Y. :
Linseed ail, raw, tank cars, Minneapolis .....,.:
Linseed oil, raw, drums, carlots, N. Y. ..,......,.:
Perilla oil, drurs, N, Y. ........,..............:
Oiticica oil, drums, N. Y. .......,,,.............:
Tung eil, drums, N. Y. ...,.......................,:


9.5

13.1
71,7
52.3
17.0
11,2
10.7
15.6
17.5
26,2

8.5
8.6
7.8
8.0
11.0
10.3

22.6
22.2
35.5


9.5
9.6
13.8
72,}
54.4
17,2

10.8
15.4
17.4
28,0

g,6
8.1
8.2
11.1
10,0
10,9
22,8
22,2
36,0


6.5
9.3

15.3
9,3
8,0

13.5
17,2

5.5

4.5
4,2
9.5
9,4


20,6
26,2


5.5
7.5
41.3
29.9
10,3
6.6
5.0

17.5
16,9
4.3

3.8
5.1
9.5
7.7
8.7
18,0
19,0
26.9


inster oil, No, 5 bbl., Nc Y. ,..........~.,....: 11.1 9,8 11.8 ~1
Castor ail, dehydrated, drums, carlets, N, Y. ....: 15.6 13116.5 ~1
god-liver oil, med, U.S.P. bb1,,N.Y,(dol.dbr bbl.): 39,8 72.5 87.5 8
Crrd oil, Newferundland, drums, N. Y. e.......,....: 9.6 8.0 10. 5 1
41;_oc,_r~ing soon).ye, 80) nCrCent basis, ta~nks. N. Y. : 7.8 1, 68
Gor:.oled froml Gil, Paint and Drccg reporter, Tlhe National .Prcrvisioner, a
of th2e Agricultuzal Marketing Servico and Bureau ef Labor Statistics. i
-ctude excise taxes and duties where applicable.
`Three-cent processing tax added to price as originally quoted,
Less than earlrrte,


.2,2
6,9


9~~pc








9,4
1 82



a ,4
87.5
11,5
9... 1 ,4 .
10,2
22,8ote










T HE FAT 5 AND 0 I LS S IT UATf~I 0


Summnear

Domestic disappearances, or consumption, of primary fats and oils for

1941 is provisionally estimated at 11 billion pounds compared with 9.7 bil-

lion pounds in 1940. Supplies of fats and oils from domestic production,

stocks, and probable imports will be sufficient to maintain domestic con-

sumption and exports in 1942 at the 1941 level, even if imports of oilseeds

and oils from the Pacific area are completely cut off. Under such circum-

stances, however, stocks would be reduced considerably during 1942. And

the substitution of domestic or Latin American fats and oils for such items

as coconut, palm, and tung oils might be required for some uses.

Imports of oilseeds and oils were about 10 percent smaller from

January through June this year than last. But in the third quarter, as a

result of an improved shipping situation in August and September, imports

showed a gain of 39 percent over the third-quarter imports a year earlier.

Approximately 20 percent of our toa~ll requirements for fats in recent months

has been met by imports, more than half of which have originated in the

Pacific area.

Prices of fats and oils were steady to lower in November, but they

advanced fairly sharply early in December following the outbreak of war

with Japan. On December 13, ceilings were established for wholesale prices

of all fats and oils, except butter, at the level of prices prevailing on

November 26.


- 3-


FOS-58


-- December 15, 1941





-4 -


DECEEBER 1941


REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

BACKGROUdt,- WPith l~arge world supplies available, prices of
fats and oils were at a low level in 1939. Prices advanced
in the fall of that year, but declined in the spring of 1940O.
Reduced shipping space and increasedi shipping costs early in
1941 restricted the volume of imporic of oilseeds and oils
and had thie effect of driving; a wepdgs'e betwe prices in the
United States and in surp~lus-producing areas. This influence,
together with marked innroivement in domestic demand and sub-
stential GovernmI~ent purchases of lard, resulted in sharp ad-
vances in domestic prices of fats and oils during the first
half of libl1. Prices leveled off in July and August, ad-
vanced in September, but declined in October.

Prices Steady to Lowe in Novem'ber, Advance
in Earlp DeceFmoer

Reflecting continued uncertainty concerning possible price-control
legislation and improvement in the ocean shipping situation in recent
months, pazrticularly with respect to imports, prices of fats and oils were.
steady to lower in November. Some strength in prices was evident in late
November and early December. During the second week of December, following
the outbreaks of war with Japan prices advanced fairly sharply. On
December 13: however, ceilings were established for wholesale prices of all
fate and oils, except butter, at the November 26 level.

The index number of prices of fats and oils for NTovember, at 93
percent of the 1924~-29 average, wAas unchanged from-a month earlier, but
was 25 points (37 percent) higher than a year earlier.

Prices of oilseeds showed mixed trends in November. Castor-bean
prices were up materially from a month earlier, and prices of peanuts and
soybeans also were higher. Prices of cottonseed, flaxseed, and copra, how-
ever, were somewhat lower in November than in October, although continuing
well above the levels of a year ago.

Temporary Price Ceilings Established

Ceiling prices over all fats and oils, except butter, were imposed
December 13 by the Office of Price Administration (Price Schedule No. 53).
The schedule forbids the sale, whether "spot" or rtfuturer(, of raw, crude,
or refined fats and oils, including lard and cottonseed oil, at prices
above those prevailing on November 26. The ceiling applies to sales at
all stages of distribution, excepting'retail. Processed or finished fate
and oils products, such as shortening and salad oil, are not covered by
the schedule. Also excluded are "essential oils", mineral oils, and
chemical oils.

Referring to the exclusion of finished products, the schedule states
that should unwarranted price rises occur in these appropriate action"
will be taken by the Office of Price Administration.





E08-58


- 5-


On November 26 the closing price of the December futuren for cotton-
seed oil oni the New York Produce Exchange aas 12.50 cents a pound, while the
December lard. nguuaren in Chicago closed at 9.77 cents a eound. Comparable
prices at.the close December 12 were 13.65 cents a pound for cottonseed oil
and 10.57 cents a pound for lara.

The present temporary schedule is designed to meet an emergency con-
dition, it was announced. Upon completion of studies now under way, it is
planned to develop and issue a revised schedule of a more permanent nature.

Contracts made to and including the close of business December 12
may be carried out at the contract prices, even though such prices may be
higher than the established maximu~ms. However, the details of any such
contract must be reported to the Office of Price Administration within 10
days after delivery of the product is made or received.

Any contracts made after December 12 in compliance with the temporary
ceiling may be carried out at the contract prices, even if maximum prices
set in a revised schedule should be below the temporary ceiling.

Consumption of Fats a~t ligh Level
in Third gaarter

The apDparent domestic disappearance, or consumption, of primary fats
and oils (excluding farm-roduced butter and lard) totaled about 2,487 mil-
lion pounds in the third quarter of 1941, 16 percent more than the 2,148,
million pounds consumed; in the third quarter of 1940. Although- the largest
consumption for the period on record, the gain over a year earlier was not
so great in the third quarter as in the first half of 1941, when an 18-
percent increase was recorded.-

For the first 9 months of 1941, total domestic disappearance (ex-
cluding farm butter and lard) amounted to about 7,529 million pounds, 1,121
million pounds (17 percent) in excess of disappearance in the corresponding
period of 1940. (Table j). An unprecedented demand for fats resulted from
marked advances in industrial and buildings~ activities, and in consumer in-
comes. A strong storage demand for finished articles containing fats
apparently also was a factor in bringing about increased disappearance of
primary fats, although inventory figures for goods in the hands of dis-
tributors and consumers are lacking.

All groups of fats and oils shared in the increase in consumption
(disappearance) in t~he first 9 months this year compared with last, Among
the food fats, the greatest gain occurred in cottonseed oil, consumption of
which was up 250 million pounds (25 percent) from that of a year earlier.
Consumption of peanut oil, soybean oil, lard, and edible beef fats also
abowed substantial gains. Minor decreases occurred in the consumption of
butter and corn oil, while the consumption of olive oil, reflecting re-
bueed imports, was 50 percent under that of a year earlier.

Among the fats and oils used-primarily for soap, a gain of J28 mil-
lion pounds (37 percent) occurred in the utilization of inedible tallow and





DECEMBER 1941


- 6 -


greases, and the consumption of "ooth coconut oil and palm oil was more than
90 million pounds greater than that in the first 9 months of 1940. These
increases were partly offset by reduced use of marine animLal ils, inedible
olive oil, babassu oil, and pallm-kernel oil.

Striking gains occurred also in the dryring-oils field, with disap-
pearance of linseed oil up 166 million pounds (JS percent) and disappearance
of castor oil up 4P million pounds (18 percent). Dehydrated castor oil is
being increasingly used as a substitute for tung oil. Consumption of
oiticica oil, aZlthough relatively small, was more than double that of a
year earlier. Despite sharply reduced imports, tung-oil consumption was
maintained at about the same level as in the first g months of 1940; but
consumption of perilla oil was reduced.

Imports Show MatSrial Gain in August and September

Imports of fats, oils, and oilseeds in terms of oil, which in the
first half of 1961 ran 103 percent under those of a year earlier, were 39
percent greater in the third quarter this year than last. All of the in-
crease in the third quarter occurred in Alugst and September; imports in
July were 11 percent below those of July 1340. For the 2 months August
and Septem~ber, imports were more than 70 percent larger than a year earlier.

For the-first 9 months of 1941, total imports amounted to 1,34C
million pounds compared with 1,294 million pounds in the corresponding period
of 19_40. (Ta'Ble 4,).. This was a gain of nearly 4 percent. Most items
shared in the increase.' The principal items to show reductions from a year
earlier were tung oil, aorn 65 million pounds; olive oil, down 58 million
pounds; and whale oil, down 20 million pounds.

Exports also were materially larger in the first 9 rmnths this year
than last, chiefly as a result of increased shipments of lard to the United
Kingdom under lend-lease. Total exports, including reexports of items im-
ported free of duty and import tax amountedd to 409 million pounds in the
first 9 months th~is year compared with 312 million pounds in the corres~pond-
ing period of 1940.

Production Increased, Stocks Reduced
in First 9 Haonths

As indicated in the November issue of The Fats and Oils Situation,
factory production of fats and oils was substantially larger in the first
9 months this year than last. But because of the increases in domestic
disappearance and exports, stocks were reduced. On September 30 this year
*factory and warehouse stocks of primary fats and oils amounted to about
1,980 million pounds, approximately 229 million pounds less than a year
earlier.

Data on production, trade, stocks, and disappearance of fats and
oils for the first 9 months of 1939, f940,.and 1941 are given in tables 3-5
of this report. Similar data for the first 6 months of the year were given
in the August and September issues of The Fats and Oils. Situation.







70S58


- 7-


OUTLXOOK

Supplies Sufficient to Meet Requirements in 1942-

Present indications point to a further gain over a year earlier in
consumption of primary fats and oils in the fourth quarter of 1941. But
the increase in this period may not be so great as in the first three
quarters of the year. Consumption was comparatively large in the fourth
quarter of 1940. Dealer buying, moreover, apparently slackened off in
October and November, mainly as a result of price uncertainties and a
more favorable import situation than prevailed earlier in the year. If
a 5 to 10 percent increase in disappearance of primary fats and oils is
allowed for the fourth quarter this year compared with last, total dis-
appearance, including farm-produced butter and lard, would be about 11
billion pounds in 1941 compared with approximately 9.7 billion pounds in
1940.

Supplies of fats and oils from domestic production, stocks, and
probable imports will be sufficient to maintain consumption and exports in
1942 at the 1941 level, even if imports of oilseeds and oils from the Pacific
are completely cut off. Under such circumstances, however, stocks of primary
fats and oils would be reduced considerably during 1942. And the substitur-
tion of domestic or Latin American fats and oils for such items as coconut,
palm, and tung oils might be required for some uses.

Import Situation Uncertain

The outbreaks of war in the Pacific introduces new uncertainties con-
cerning imports. In 1940-41 approximately 1.6 billion pounds of fats and
oils (including oil contained in oilseeds) were imported; more than half of
these imports originated in the Pacific area. Principal items imported from
this area were coconut oil and copra, mostly from the Philippines, and palm
oil, from the Netherlands East Indies and M4alaya. Imports of tung oil and
perilla oil also originate in the Pacific. Supplies of perilla seed and
oil are controlled by Japan; tung oil is a Chinese product. Alternative
sources of supply for coconut oil and copra are the Netherlands East Indies,
various islands in the South Pacific, and East Africa. Palm oil in the
past has been obtained in considerable quantity from West Africa.

Substitutes for coconut oil are available in the form of babassu and
other palm-kernel oils contained in the nuts of different varieties of palm
trees found in great profusion in tropical Latin America. Conditions as b
transport, labor, and equipment are such, however, as to preclude any rapid
expansion in exports of palm-nut kernels from Latin America to the United
States. Fairly large quantities of palm kernels are available in West
Africa. Brazilian oiticica oil and dehydrated castor oil (derived largely
from Brazilian castor beans) already are being used to supplement supplies
of tung oil and perilla oil in the United States.





DECEMBER 1941


- 8


Ta2ble 2,- Domestic disappearance of primary fats and oils, crude basis,
by groups, United States, 1912-41


: i-liscoucncocus .
* industrial
Total
* anid medicinal
:rc-ts ar..1 oils 4/:
. ,000 lb. 1,000 lb,


fats .
*


ap rig
ts ,o~ils
.1
-


So;
i


Year ,



1912 :


-


3,994,413


1,C30 1F_

525,686


6


laggg Ib

503,34


5,o89.4c58

5,834,128

6,142,661
6~,088,309
6,388,280
6,181,


7,266,482

'7,s76.:~~30
8,101,477
8,282,496
8,469,70lc
8,723.177
8,3itC,701
8. 33!,621
8,001,346
8,172,628
P,6~14,128

9,o93,718s
9,247,452
9,o'6, 46
9,6"16,392
9~,76.588

6,408,315
7, 529,088


1914 ,


: 4,646,980

: .4,739,850

: 74,66

: 4.7,29 7c '_;

: 4, }9,216

: 5,150.553
: 5,42r3,576
: 5,575,a67
: 5,617 050

:57219652
: 5,715,r95
: 5,698,939
: 5,66~3b779
: 5,679,550
: 5,92c;,oos
: 5,542,517
: 5,793,260
: 6,oho,ook
: 6;149,151
: 6,354,064
: 6,536,635

: 4,052,232
: 4,476,735


66,013

68,164

73.547
77,70s
78,415
64,435
68,623
63,180
83,545
loo,926
105,258
113,112
123,937
137,222
144,723
158,711
135,700
1311,5&7
102,703

142,.911
244 357
276.503
179,579
128.745
175,857
169,910


5-79.,134 539, 850


1916
1917
1918
13:19
1920
1921 .
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
19ko
Jan.-Sept, ff
19ko
1941 6f


685,462
880,796
1,145,228
528,310
9/53,712

1,267,42
1,466,798
1,411,908
1,520,559
1,5a7,806
1,682,672
1,821,410
1,931,206
1,882,395
1,921,767
1,7s9,246
1,847,his
1,985,4c3
2.212,514
-2, 34, 795
2,246,018
2,171,633
2,379,112
.2,337,277

1,719,087
2,191,701


583,so2
513,170
412,377
513,855
559,422
S559.150
709, 971
7~6p,632
785,020
el&s,87
813,867
845,542
882,860
903,610
.. 652, 711
582,328
.'. 445, 618
510,642
556,766
662,363
719,160
781,851
.627,017
737,959
692,7566


115,693
158,257


521.303
692,415


Complu'd- from data on production, trade, and stocks,
If I .* e~ss butter, le~rd, dleo oil, oleastearine, tallow, edible, corn oil,
nott.?n ad- oil, olive oil, edible, peanut oil, sesame oil, soybean oil, and
tesse Ur rIl1
2/ In::1uce~s inedible tallow and g~reasles, exicluding wool grease, fish oil,
wha'.e cl.! seal oil, baboascu oil, coconut oil, me.l-;:-mu-kernel oil, olive-oil
foots, 3llve nil, inedible, "palm-kernel oil, palm oil, and tucum-kernel oil,
In3'li.' esL l~OceFd il, C11iticica oil, p~tilla oil, and tlung oil,
SIr.ke no*sfo i, wiool grease, f~ish-liver oil, cashew shell nil,
Eacto.- oil, houpsFeed oil, Japan waxf, kapok oil, mustard oil, rape oil,
supfloweer oil, and vegetable tallow,
J Shipments of butter and lard to United States territories not used in
D-omp~uting dome stic disappearance, Does not include disappearance of fam-
Drodiuced butter and lard,
~jPrliminary,































































Continued -


51.8 27.4 19.6
147.6 135.9 122.7


ks.4 49.5 4.
1.4 ?.0 2.0
54.0 62.0 110.6
150.6~ 447.7 54o.
1?4.7 132.0 128.1
1,055.0 g92.1122.
2.41.6 2.4
426.9 438.0 604.5
2.3 1.8 1.1
16.2 12.7 29.7
55.0 '46.9 18.8
4.9 4.7 2.1
20.8 15-0 112
9.8 8.5 4.1
232.3 1i6.5 227.2
'06.9 4. 121.5
33.5 17.8 5.5
6.1 11.0 7.-
6.1 4.2 4.6
328.7 35n.2 425-8
.26/ 6/
4.3 5 .4 -.8
3.07 2.2 5.7
82.2 52.9 52*8
2.3 .5 1.8
3,053-7 2,8263.4 3,590.6


PDS-58


S9 -


Table j.- Production and disappearance of specified fats and oils,
crude basis, Un~ited States, January-September, 1939-41

: factory :Apparent domestic
Item : product 3n 1/ : dicappear-:ance j
y) :1340 : 94 f:199 : 1SK0 : 19~12
:Mil. lb. Mil. 13. Mil., lb. Mil. lb. Mil. 1%, Mil. lb.


1.45.21,51.11,401.4 1 381.4 1 369.3


Butter ................: 1,428.0
Lard, including render-:
ed pork fat .........: 976.3
Neat's-foot nil .......: 3.7
0100 hil ..............: 553
01eo stock } .........: 24
01enstearine ..........: 27.9
Tazllow, edible ........: 69.7
Tallow, inedible, and:
greases kj .........,: 810.8
Wool grease ...........: 5.0


1,009.4
2.0



68.6


1,184.7
7.1
65.6
1.7
323.1
66.2


731.4

53.6

30.5
71.6

780.7
6.8


970'.2
2.7
532.2

---


1,212.3



24.7
58;.6


1,025.3 1131
6.4 10.0


887.8 1,216.3
12.5


Fish-liver oil ........: 1.5
Fish oil ..............: 113.7
Marine mammcal oil .....: 26.4
Total, anizal--*** :ji520).8
Babassu oil ...........: 531
Cashew shell oil ,,....: --
caster oil ............: 51.6
coconut ail ...........:' 203-8
Corn oil ..............: 107.9
Cnttonseed oil ........r 808.0
Japan wanX (tatllow) ....: --
Linseed oil ...........: 398.4
Murmunru-kernel oil j.: 2.3
Oiticica oil ..........: --
Olive oil, edible .....: 6.4
Olive oil, inedible ...: 6}
Olive-oil foots .......: --
Palm-kernel oil 1/ .....: 2.9
Palm oil ..............: --
Peanut oil ............: 66.5
Perilla oil Il ........: 2.4
~Ra~pe oil ..............: --
sesome oil Lj .........: 2.9
Soybean oil ...........: 301.3
Sunflower ail .........: --
Teaseed oil .........o.: --
Tueum-kernel oil jj ...I j.0
Tung oil ..............: 3 .0
Vegetable tallow .,....,r --
Untal, vegetable ....: 201.5
Total, all fa~ts and
oils ..............: 5.534.3


1.2 1.3
68.8 10).6
19.9 .)
j,9=7.0 4,182.9 _
417-1 35.1

72'.9 105-8
259.? 2377
119 .7 1c7.1
671.3 850.5

414.1 516.3
1.8 1.1

1.2 8.2


9.7 6.0

26.5 116.2


5-8, 3.1
377.2 409.0


2.2 5.7
.7 &/ 5.0

2,009.5 2,56c6.8 g


5,936.5 6,689.6 6,444.3 6,4os.3 7, 529 -1






DECEMBER 1941


- 10 -


Taible j.- Production and disappearance of specified fats and oils,
crude basis, United States, Janua~Lry-SetrSeptmbr,1939-41 Chri~td.

Compied as follo-rs:
Production, Burea.u of the Consus, except bufttr, Agricultural~ Miarketing
Service, und tung oil, ]BulrF-u of Forej:n and Domestic Commerce':
apparent disappearance computed from da-ta on production, trade, anda
stocks.
Totals computed from unrounded num~bers.

IfExcludes f--rr butter rand lord produced on farms and in small rendering
plants.
2/Preliminary,
Exports.
Production is corrputed from reported factory consumption, stocks, and
foreign trade: factory consumption is used to represent total domestic
disappearance..
3/ Oil eauivalent of imported raw n,-terica.
b/ Less thann 50,000 pounds.
1/ Production, oil equivalent of imported raw natorial.
8;/ Estimzte.





: ~Imports
1939 1940 1941 1/


II__


- 11 -


Table 4.- Imports and exports of fats, oils, and oil-bearing materials,
United States, January-September 1939-4~1


: Exports
193B 1940 :1941 1


Item


:Mil lb.Mil.lb. Il b. Mil. lb. Nil. lb. Mil. lb.
Laimal fath and oils -:
Butter ...................: .8 .9 1.7 1.5 2.,1 2.1
Greases 2/ .................. 2.4 4.4 3.1
Lar d .. .T..............,.: 3/ 3/ --- 213.6 168 .6 251 .4
Neatsfoot oil ..............: -- -- --- .4 .4 .3
01eo oil ...................: --- --- --- 4.1 1.2 .5
01eo stock .................. -' -- 2.4 .9 1.7
01eostearine ...............: 3/ -- .3 3/ .1 .3
Tallow, edible .............: --'2.3 .2 .1 .1
Tallow, inedible ...........: .9 4/' .9 4/ 16.2 1.0 1.6 1.7
WIool, grease ...............: 2 .8 2 .4 .8------

Cod and cod-liver oils ....'.i 52.9 13.7 5/ 14.2-- -- -
Fish oils ..................: .6 .36.0 1.4 3.9 1.2
Marine mammal oil ..........: 19.6' 22.2 1.9 --- ---l 3.__ _
Total, animal .........: 77.6 '40.4 43.5 227.2 183.2 262 .5
Vegetable oiled -
Babassu O22[ ................: .6 6 -- -
Cashew shell oil ...........: 1.4' 3.0 2.0 -----
Castor oil .......;..........: j[/ 3/ .5 .7 1.0 .8
Coconut oil 6/ .******......: 257.6 257.9 298.5 8.5 29.7 46.7
Coconut oil '/ ............*. -- --- 3.4 8.5 3.0
Corn oil ...................: 13.0 .4 1.4 .1 .2 .2
Cottonseed oil ji ..........: 30.8. 10.1 4.4 5.2 12.7 12.3
Japan wax (tallow) ...*.***.: 2.4 1.6 2.4-- -- --
Linseed oil ..........****.*: 3/ 3/ .1 .7 3.4 4.5
Oiticica oil ...............: 16.2 127 29.7-- ----
Olive oil, edible ..........: 48.8 44.2 8.,4-- -- --
Olive oil foots ............: 24.1 21.5 4.0-- -- -
Olive oil, inedible ........: 5.4 4.9 .7 --- --
Palm-k~ernel oil ...*******..: 2.2-- ---- -- -
Palm oil ............*......: 214.8 182.4 222.9 2/6.2 7/ 17.9 7/ 26.4
Peanut oil ...........*.....: 3.2 2.8 2.3 3 2.8 6 .6
Perilla oil .............. 37.6 8.6 5.0-- ----
Ra~pe oil .........****....: 5.3 9.1 12.4-- -- -
Sesame oil ................ 3.5 3/ .1---- -
Soybean oil ................: 1 2.8 .8 5.9 11.9 10.4
Sunflower oil ..........**..: .2 /3 -
Teaseed oil ...,.............: 4.6 3.4 .8-- -- -
Tung oil ...................: 56.3 90.9 25.9 7/ 4.7 7/3.4 '/ 25
Vegetable tallow~ .,....****: '2.3 .3 1.8-- -- -
Total, vegetable ......: 732.5 659 .0 62~4.0--- -- 35.4~ 91.6 113.5-~
Total, all fats:
and oils ............: 810.0 6599.3 667.5 262.5 274.8 376.0


Continued -








3ECEMVBER 1941


- 12 -


Table 4.- Im.ports a~nd e::ports of fats, oils, and oil-bearing materials,
United States, Jan~uary-September 1939:-41 Con~tinued

: Imports : Exports
1939 1940 191L 19 190 911
law materials :Ml b i.l.Ml b 1.l.$1 b 5.$
toil equivalent) -:
Babassu nuts and kernels:
(63 percent ..............: 55.8 45.3 35.5 --- --
Castor beans (45 percent) ...: 47.6 73.4 130.2 -- --. -
Copra (63 percent) ..........: 173.1 280 .5 274.4 'y? 3.7 15.7 'yl 321.2
Flaxseed (34 percent-) .......: 263.7 176.3 216.5 -
V'~urumuru kernels (45 percent): 2.3 1.8 1.1 -- -- .-
Palm nuts and kernels:
(45 percent) .........*****: 2.9 9.7 6.0 -- -- -
Perilla seed (37 percent ) ..: 2 .4 5 -
Sesame seed (47 percent) ....: 2.9 5.8 3.1 ---- -
Soybeans (15 percent) .......: --- --- --- 16.9 21.2 14
Tueum kernels (45S percent) ..: 3.0 2.2 5.7- -
Total, rawJ materials .....: 553,7 595.1- 672.3 20 .6 37.0 32.6~-
G~rand total ..............: 1,363.7 1,294 ,4 1, 339 .8 283.1318406
law materials-
Babassu nets and kernels ....: 088.5 71.9 56.4 -- -- -
Castor beans ................: 105.7 163.2 289.4 -- -- -
Copra .......................: 274. 7 445.3 435.5 9 5.9 7/ 25.0 97 49.5
Flaxseed (mil. bu.) .........: 13.8 9.3 11.4 -- -- --
Hempseed 8/ .................: 1.0 .8 .9 --- --
Murumuru kernels ............: 5.1 4 .0 2-.4 --- --
Palm niuts and kernels .......: 6.4 21.7 13.3--
Perilla seed ................: 6.5 3/ -- -- -- -
Rapeseed 8/ .......,..........: 5.7 3.9 3.2 -- -- --
Sesame seed .................: 6.3 12.3 6.5 --- --
Soybeans ...................,: -- 112.4 141.6 94
Tuocum kernels ...............: 6.9 4.9 12.7 -- --

=ompiled from Iklothlyr Sumrmary of Foreign Commerce of the United States. Totals
computed fro~m unrounded numbers.
1 F-eliminary.
SIncludes "other animal greases and fats, inedible," grease stearin, and "other
animal oils, inedi~ble."
/Less than 50,00I0 lb.
/Includes 95,000 lb. of "oils, fats, and greases, n.e~s." in 1940; 17,000 lb.
in 1941.
5/Includes 91,000 lb. of "fish-liver oil, n~e.s."
6/Crude plus refined converted to crude basis, dividing by 0.94 in the case of
coconu-t oil, and 0.93 in the case of cottonpeed oil.
Reexports. Palm oil includes palm-kernel oil.
Believed not crushed.








Table 5.- Stocks of specified fats and crude oils, U~nited States,
bcy qulartersF, SeptembeFr 30, 196-September j0, 1941

S1955: 94 1


Item
,Sept. 30


SDec. 31 Mar. 31 ,
Mil.10. 1lil~b.


June j0 ,Sept. 30
Mil.1b. il.1b.


Animal fats and oils -:
Butter .........................:
Greases, excluding wool grease .:
Lard, including rendered pork
fat ................ ..........:
Neatsfoot oil ..................:
01eo oil .......................:
01eostearine ............. ......:
Tallow, edible .................:
Tallow, inedib1e .......:
Wool greese ....................:

Cod and cod-liverr oil ..........:
Fish oil .......................:
Marine mammal oil ..............:
Total, animPl .............'..:
Vegetable oils, crulde basis 2/ -
Batassu oil .......... ..........:
Castor oil .....................:
Coconut oil ....................:
Corn oil .......................:
Cottonseed oil .................:
Linseed oil ....................:
Olive oil, edible ..............:
Olive oil foots ................:
Olive oil, inedible ............:
Palm-kernel oil ................:
Palm oil .......................:
Peanu.t oil .....................:
Perilla oil ....................:
Rape oil .......................:
Sesame oil .....................:
Soybean oil ....................:
1-uing oil .......................:


Ic1.c
12;.4

2s4.1
1.5
5.3
L.7
C6.8
JOJ.5
tj.9


120.2
109.5

1,9.5


5.5

6.49 ~


203.0
97-9

218.0
2.;j
5.0
4.7
0.0
271.2
5.1


123.1
115.5

235.7
1.5
3-5
2.5
5.9
313.9
5.7


a.0
12j.)

j18.7
1.5
5.0
5J.7
6.1
2p1.9
7.1


14.4 9.7
70.2 118.23
39.0 r4.7
057.0 976.5


21.1
96.7
57.0




224.3
22.9
45 3-7
115.1
9.4
21.0

i.4
161.4

5.9
4.6
1.8
89,4
66.7


15.5
132.5
7).2
931,2


12.9

LS5.4
9=5.4 1,


7.8 2.6 6.4 2.6
20.0 8. 15.4 15.8
258.0 226.5 102.6 20i.4
21.2 226 25.5 4l.3
671.5 710.4 449.9 271.8
150.8 192.4 150.9 11.
10.0 15;.4 7.5 7.8
21.6 7. 14.8 14.4
2.6 2.1 1.51.
2.6 .7 5.9 4.5
155.7 1L9.5 118.8 125.0
4j.6 7).] 57.2 3).9
T;o 6.4 8.9 6.5
6.5 5.9 8.1 11.b
1.9 .3 .7 .4
94.6 90.1 74.1 68.1
57.1 43.2 37h 32.7
1,536.6 1,546.7 1,179.8 1,00!.?
2,52;.7 2,512.1 2,236.9 1,979.S


Total, vegetable ............: 1,221.7
Total, animal and vegetable : 2,208.6


Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census except for butter and lard which
are from cold storage reports, AgricurlturPl Harkr~etine Se~rvice.
IfPreliminary.
SCrude clus refined converted to crude basis. Refined oils have been converted
;II crude basis by dividing by the following factors: Babassu oil, corn oil,
cottonseed oil, palm-kernel oil, and. palm oil, j.9)j; coconut oil, peanut oil, and
saybem.~ oil, 0.94.


1_1 11


f







DECEMBER 1941 c- 14 -

Table 6.- Wlholesale prices of f-'s End ot~s: Index numbers,
ilovember 1939 and le ., September-November 19 1
(1924-29q 100)




Eight domestic fats and oils 1/ .....,: 88 88 124 .14 119
Eight domestic fats and oils .........: 62 62 88 84

All fats and oils (27 items) .........: a7 68 96 93 95
Grouped Ab ori in::
Animal fats ............: 64 66 Sk 81 5
Marine animal oils .......... By 6 117 120 1-18
Vegeta le oils, domestic ...........: 67 59 122 116 111
Yegetable oils, foreign ............: 92 91 142 1We 1 3
Groulred 5: u'se:
E?-ter .. .. .. .. .. .: 67 74 83 so 81
BL: er, ajusted 2/ ................: 621 68 52 77 75
Lee .. .. .. ... 46 36 82 75 75
Fcjx fat;, other ..........: 69 65 135 133 130
SoaL. fa~tS ............: 72 62 116 118 117
Drying oils ............: 95 8s 16 11 0
Mirc-llaneous oils .................: 95 sk lo3 105 105

If "10-14 = 100.
2}Adjusted for typical seasonal variation.

Table 7.- Prices of specified oil-be :ing materials, November 1939 and
1s40, Septerrber-HTovember 1941


~Item Unit Lr: 13 1910 : Se~t. Oct.- Nov.
: : Dollars Do a .asIollars ole
Castor beans, Plexilian, ::
ship't., 2. & f., New York :Long ton : -- 51.oo 6Y.oo 75.90 so.12.
Copra, bags, f~o.b,
Pacific Coast .............' 100 lb. : 2,11 1.111 4.06 4.15 4.02
Cottojnseed, U.S. farm price :Short ton: 23.75 23.12 49.g3 50.89 45-28

ML n.I;.als ............ Bu. : 1,84 1.59 1.99 1.a7 1.84
Flaxwi ed, J S. farm price ..: :16 1.39 1.85 lab4 1.60
Pehnut~s, a Telled,::
R~urnnrs IHo. 1, S.E. mills .: 100 lb. : 5.25 4.88 7.oo 7.15 7.so
Peanuts, U.S. farm price ...: :. 3.9 3,24 4,49 C,41 4. 61
Soybeans, No. 2 Yellow, ::
ChicAgoi .................: Bu. : 9.8 .95 1.8) 1.5 1,60
Soy~bans, U.S. farm price ..: :.82 .84 1.61 1,42 1.4j

Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, Daily Trade Bulletin (Chicago), Daily
Market Record (Minneaporlis), and reports of the Ag~ricultural Marketing Service.











__ _~ __


Item 1/


Item


I


Compiled as follows:
Production of creamery butter and peanut oil, and cold-storage holdings of
butter, lard and rendered pork fat, Agricultural Marketing Service.
Production under Federal inspection of lard and rendered porkc fat, Burea~u of
Animal Industry.
Factory production and stocks of cottonseed oil, and stocks of peanut oil,
Bureau of the Census.
If Pre lminry.fine RoPevied. Included with lard prior to November 1940.
5/ Cudeplusrefnedconvrte tocrude basis by dividing by the following
factors: 04ttonseed oil, 0.9); peanut oil, 0.94.


FO>S-58


-15 -


Table b** Price per ton of specified oilseed meals, November 1939
and 1940, September-November 19811


: Nov, :
:1_539 : 1940 : Sept. :
:Dollrar Dollars Dollars


1941
Oct;- NoJV.
Dollars Dol1lars


Copra meal, Los A~ngleles .........:
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent:
protein, Memphis ..............:
Cottondeed meal, 41 percent:
protein, Chicago ..............:
Linseed meal, 37 percent :
protein, M~inneapoelis ..........:
Linseed meal, j4 percent:
protein. New York .............s
Peanut meal, 45 percent:
protein, f.o.b. southeastern:
mills..........................:
Soybean meal, 41 percent:
protein, Chicago ..............:


21.55 39.60 38.55 36.45


29.10

25.25

31(.75

33.40

34.10


36.co 36.75

-41.45 42.60


2"9.30

35.60


3975

45.65


28.25 39.oo 37 50 35.90

27*0 ~33*20 31.25 31.25


34* 56 24.94


38.55 34.00 36.97

41.40 37.95 39.10


32.70 .


30.50


Comoiled from records of the Agricultural Markeating Service.
If Bagged, carlots, except peanut meal.

Table 3.- Production and~ stocks of butter, lard, rendered pork fat,
cottonseed oil, and peanut oil, October 1939 and
1940, August-October 1941


:
:
:


Oct. :
19~39 :1960 -: Jag. _
Mil. lb. Mi'l. 13. M~il. lb.


1941_
: Sept.


149.7

10.6
129.5
1.1

203.0
214.3

271.8
3J.9


: ct. If
Mil. lb.

136.4
114.1
1-5.3
208-5,





352.1


Production
Creamery butter .,......,........:
Lard, Federal inspection ........:
Rendered, pork fat 35/ .....,.......:
Cottonseed oil. crude ...........:
Peanut oil, crude .....;..........:
Stocks. end of month:
Butter .............,,I..........:
Lard .....................,......:
Rendered pork fat jf ,...........:
Cottonseed oil, crude basis 4/ ..:
Peanut oil, crude basis kl ......:


136.8 2/172.5
11h.8 87.0
--- 11.0
22).5 .8
17.9 1.9


123.2


221.9 .
2. 2 .

128.1 .
68.7

622.3


105.1
22).2

530.7


200.2
282.7
5.4
284.0


















Production:
Colored ......
Uncolored ..........

Total 2/.....
Materials used:
01eo o-il .. ..
O-leaseteariae .......
Lard neutral....
O190 stock ........-.
Monostearine....
01eostearine oil..
Total, animal..

Cottonseed oil...
Soybean oil ....
Peanut oil.....
Corn oil......


............: 152
............: 23,638

........... 23,789


215
29.945

30,160


252 257
211.551 32,868 33

24,80; J,2


620 1,159 1,241 175 1
236 k4 162 356
as 427 538 541s
-71: ---197* -- 17 -I:2210~
---20 10 19



1,01 :-.. 2,060 ....,0^3_,6

8,6P8 9 11,827 10,131 12,524 1
- ,1982 -' '8,664 4,002? '~5eF1 sky; r
.197 ...j 18 8 181
22 19 43 4
---1 --- ---


I ,890 20,696 14r.359 18.596 1pi

2,17 .1,464 2,421 3.574
948 138r --- 290
-- -- Sk 905 1


.............
............:
............:
............:
............:
............:
............:

............:
...-.........:
............:
............:


Cottonseed stearine ....,........:
Soybean stearine ...............:
Total, domestic vegetable ...

Coconut oil .......;............:
Babassu oil .....'........ .......:
Palm oil ......,..........,......:
Palm flakes ................:


Pal




Mil
sal
Der
Lec
Sod
Vlit
Mis


m-kernel oil ................: --- :..--285 499
Total, foreign vegetable ....: 3,15j ----1,602 3.553 5,268 6 r

Total fats and oils .........: 19,060 24.358 1.995q 26,q25 -E

k ................... ...'.....* .,538 5,545 4, 582 6,044
t ...........................: 1,oho 1,130 s50 1,133
ivative of glycerine ....:....: 58 70 53 .73
withinn ...................,...: 7 10 _15 17 ..
.a (benzoate of) ........:.....: 011 11 15-'.
;amin concentrate ........,....: 1 1 I- .r
cellaneous .................: --- --- --- 1
Total, other materials ..;;....: 51654 6,767 5.514 7.290- ~'Il
Total, all materials ........: 24,714 31,125 25.509 34,2 8 3


ZCompiled fikon InternaY Revenue records and- hiternral Revenlue Bulletin.
1/ Preliminary.
2}Total of unrounded numbers. .


-r;
;Ii4: :it
I~ : ~


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

DEC~XEME 194L 161111111 -111111111 I l IIR
3 1262 08905 1279

Table 10.- 01eomorgarine: Production and materials used in manufao ra5ni~
United States, October -1939.and 19 0, ~August-October 191 .

: Octoboer :_1611
tem 199 190 'Augpst 'ISeptember

:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 13. 1.: