The Fats and oils situation

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Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00073
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00073

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Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text













I,' _i___
I' : :


DEITORY I T, UAT I 0 N

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL E ,I M IQS .;
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE '

5 ',, / DECEMBER 1945


FATS AND OILS: WHOLESALE PRICES AT LEADING
MARKETS. UNITED STATES. 1922-45
INDEX NUMBERS (1935-39=100)
PERCENT" I I I


194 PAMULZ rVrIMAT
RED 40g57 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC6


U. .DEWIARTMUENT OF AflICULTURE


Ceilings prevented any substantial increase after 1941 in the general level of
prices for fats and oils. With world supplies of fats and oils to continue short in
19N6, prices of most fats and oils in the United States will remain at ceiling levels.
If ceilings are lifted in 1946, prices will advance.


THE


I;FOs 16!

.!-;


I
*







DECUMB 1948


Table l.-baoltale prie per peas of fat. oIll. a lt gweni at spe d f tmakat, aal lanr mber at prices of th
ml o*ls, kwberl 1913 an 19t. I ptmber lorveber 194


ItesI I I I
i2oI09
__I- -


ttatr. 92-oear. bleacoa ........................................
Battr, 9?-aeore. Iw Tas ......................................
fOleoargari, J. wag., ~h ........o........................1
sing containig ma1 .*t. -pa u tnd arteo, Chicago .......I
ar, l Chae ................................................. ..
Iart prim etam tlrene Chlag .............................I
lard, reflud, 1-poamd eartoe. Chiea ..........................I
01e oll. etr, tires. Chiaeo .................................
e1stearl s. bbl. I.T. .........................................
llow, sdible Chicage .........................................

Bon oil, e l, tak, f.e.b. aill ..............................I
Can all, edible. retunable d 1.C.1., I. T. ................I
Cotteaisse aol, erda, teak f..b. .3. S. l ..................I
Cattonseed oil., p..y. teak ear, T. .. ....... .......... .
Peant all, enrd, tueak, f..b. omll ...... ...................I
Peannt ll. reflia. edible (white), drum. I. I. ..............I
Baybea oil. endrA. tak marm, midwoter Mill ..................I
Sarba oil, edible, drum, 1.e.., I. .........................
.naflor ail, @mi-refl ed, teak cars, f.o.b. N. T. .............
Blbass oil, tank I. .........................................
Cocnat all, Kmlla, crden o..f. Pacifl Coast ..............
Cooeaut all, C end, b .......................
Olve oil, Celiforla. edible, drm. I. ......................
01llv-ll fote, ipored dream. ealote, Iw Tatk ..............I
Pkla oil. Caoge, crd. blk, I. T. ...........................
Nape oil, refined, deatured., bulk, Iw Orleu ..................
kllow, Nl. &. Iedble, Chicag ..................................
*reas. A White, Chicao .......................................
M ehadm oil. endt, tait, f.o.b. Witlcr ......................I
ardime oil, ar~e, takes, Pacifi Coast ........................I
Whale oil, refined, bleached witer, drum, I. T. ................
CottlnIod oil feoot. ro, (50% t.F.A.) delivered, hit .........

Lased oil ra, r ank oars, innapolls .......................I
Lnsed oil. ra, returnable drue, onrloet, ................
Oltieesa oil, d rm, f.o.b. I. T. .................................
TnS.oll retuable iArm earlots, 1. .......................I

Caster oil, No. 3, bbl., N. ....................................
Cater oil, No. 1, teak, I. ...................................
Caster oall deohyrate. tanks. T. .............................I
Code-lir oal, med. O.B.P., bbl., I. T ..........................
Cod oil, Nwfamadln d, drum, T. ..............................

Olyerln. a plre basis 80%. teakL I. .......................


11.e
k2.3
19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
13.0
10.5
9.9
12.8
16.2
12.1
14.0
13.0
i6.3
11.1

1U.3

11.0
11.1
62.7

/11.5

8.A
8.8
8.9
B.9
12.3
3.6


26.2
39.0

13.8
13.0
17.7
36.5
12.0

1/11.5


41.,5
12.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
13.0
10.5
9.9
12.1
16.5
12.1
lb.3
13.0
16.5
11.1
1I.
1o3


I

4h.2

12.1
13.8
15.6
13.0
10.5
9.9
12.1
16.6
12.1
l,.3
13.0
16.5
11.1
15.


Lau
41.5
42.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
'13.
ig.6
13.0
10.5
9.9
12.1
16.6
12.81
A-.3
* 13.0
16.5
11J

.3


46.5

19.0
b.I
17.0
12.1
13.8
19.6
13.0
10.5
9.9
12.8
16.6
12.8
1i.3
13,0
16.5
11.8
1s.


11.1 11.1
11.0 11.0
11.1 11.8
60.7 60.7

U.b 11.1
11.6 11.6

8.4 81.
8.8 8.8
8.9 8.9
8.9 8.9

I: 13:1
12.3 t4.3
15.1 15.1
24.8 34.5
39.0 39.0
13.8 13.1
13.0 13.0
17.8 17.8
33.2 35.1
11.5 11.7

11.3 11.5


IDm lMUM (1921-29 a 100)
Hight demstle fate ad oll (1910-11 = 100) .......... ........ J 1
Elght doteste rate uad etl ...................................... 101

All ate and oil (27 tims) .................................... 108

Lnin tati .................................................... 96
rae sa am l ............................................... 132
Vegetable oil, dxtle ....................................... 132
vegetable ell, forei4 ........................................ 156
Buter ......................................................... 93
matter, seas aly adjue ...................................... 86
Lar ......................................................... 105
Other fed fat ............................................... I 139
l flod fa ............................................... 103
Slp ftat ........................................................1 120
Dryig e l ............... .................................... a 119
ieUoolleaee oil .m....................................... 117
All Ltadstrial fate d oils ................................... 132


141 142 142 117
101 101 101 10
10o 108 108 11

96 96 96 105
130 131 132 132
134 13 134 13
156 156 156 156

93 93 93 105
06 92 90 97
105 10 10 105
a1 141 1ki 11
103 3 103 111n
120 120 120 120
1it 11k 18 IU
115 115 116 l6
131 131 131 131


Prien replied ifr Oil. Ptalt uad Drug prr Ho iatlel Proielner, he Jemael oft Cmume Em Ilakf), al
reports of Prodsetim .at lauketitag lAdtintrattlm uad oa Liab r Btatitelsn. icrose taI am ties lob l ed
abere nplleable. lae absm of easir Iyear begimit 1910 ar givr in Tcnio ll Nallttla h. 737 (1910) a
the hrts d Oa l Cilltttim begiataL g aeoser 1 90.

/ three-e-t preces s tam addsd to pries as arglamly qluted.
SC..f. Ne Test.
Srsns or teak@.


- 2 -









THE FATS AND O.I.L S SITUATION



: .1
: Contents
: Page
:Summar ......................... 3
:Recent Developments ................ 5
:Government Actions ................. 7
:Effects of Size of Family Income on
Consumption of Fats and Oils ..... 8
:ndex to Special-Articles .......... 19


SULMARY

Factory and warehouse stocks of fats and oils on Octobpr 1, the usual

seasonal low point, totaled approximately 1,660 million pounds, the smallest

since 1936, and about 670 million pounds less than in 1944. Fats and oils

will continue in tight supply throughout 1946. Domestic production and con-

sumption of fats may be moderately larger th-n in 1945--exoorts smaller. Strong

dema-nds to increase domestic consumption over current subnormal levels and to

rebuild inventories will be important price supporting factors.

Tentative acreage goals recently announced for 1946 oilseed crops suggest

an increase of 9 percent over 1Q45 in cotton acreage, a slight increase in flaxe

seed acreage, a 10-percent decrease in acreage of soybeans for beans, and a 23-

percent decrease in peanut acreage picked and threshed. The tentative goals,

subject to revision in State meetings, are as follows: Cotton in cultivation

the first of July, 20 million acres: flaxseed planted, 4.2 million acres; soy-

beans harvested for beans, 9.5 million acres; peanuts picked and threshed, 2.5

million acres. An average return to producers of $3.60 per bushel, Minneapolis

basis; has been guaranteed for flaxseed produced in 1946. This is equivalent to






*::E .








DEC.MBZR 1945 4--

approximately $3.10 per bushel, farm basis, pnd is nearly the same as returns

to farmers in 1945 if the $5.01-per-acre payments are inc-luded.on a per-bushel

basis. Support prices for 1946 oilseed crops other than flaxseed have not yet

been announced. ...........

Prices of fats, oils, and oil meals were maintained att-eiling levels

in November and early Decembpr. Market reports indicate thatu.uppliers of

oil meal and of most fats and oils were not able to accept all orders. Whole-

sale butter prices advanced the full 5 cents permitted by new ceilings effective

November 1. Soybean )rices rose in No'vember despite the seasonal peak in market-

ings. Midmonth prices to farmers for soybeans averaged $2.09 per bushel, close

to the ceiling of $?.10, compared '.ith a price of $2.06 a month earlier and

$2.0 in November 19h4. Demand for -eanut '-roducts is exceptionally strong,

and -rices to growers for farmers' stock peanuts advanced to an average of

S.3 cents per pound in mid-Novemt'r, 0.2 cent higher than a month earlier and

a ye-r earlier.

A sample survey of consuiner food purchasess indicates that with increase.

ing family incomes, home consumption of butter, mayonnaise, and salad dressing

increases, but-that household consum-:tion of lard and other shortening, and mar-

garine, tends to decline. The indirect use of fats and oils by urban households

incre-ses with family income, largely through increased consumption of commercial

bakery products n.nd other prepared foods. The baking industry is a large user

of fats and oils.


-- December 13, 1945







... .;* .. .. ., ..* -. ...C T ..Cfi & T '
-.n
..i .. .7 4.d.. 9 -
cr~g: G. a i c e ge st'ei'" .': ," "~'-.'
!r:t. &tt e reags e golse fr r-oalsePeds tobe pirodubed in 1946 were recom-n
1:4ilde by th'e Tetry of Agrigultire of December 1. These recommendations
': ill be cbniderPed ftiin rg'December at State meetings between representatives of
the United States Department of Agriculture, State agricultural colleges, and
other State agricultural organizations, including farm groups. Final goals wil
:be annBt nchced. about ithe first of' the year. .
: ,. ,' : '. .. .. -.. .
S. '. &6'-oalsi 'sigtke a'moderate increase' it otton'acreage, pot much. ch-ang
afitlaxbeed!actreage a -10"percent decline in. acreage of soybeans for.beans, .an
; '& 3-epbAtc6nt decresee'.in peanut acreage picked And threshed., The rpcormended
cotton acreage is 20 million acres in cultivation 6n.July 1, compared with
S18.4 million acres in 1945. Planted acreage of flaxseed would be 4.2 million
acres, compared with 4.15 million acres in- 1945-- T-he -suggested -goat-fo wr wy-
beans harvested for beans is 9.5 million acres, compared with nearly 10.6
mlliaon:acres in 1945." The goal for peanuts is'3.25 million acres grownralone
for all"puifpoes, with 2. million acres to be picked and threshed, compared
with 4.0 million acres of peanuts -rown alone and 3.2 .million acres picked' nd
threshed in 1945.

It was recently announced that average returns to farbmers for flaxseed
produced in 1946 would be supported at S3.60 per bushel, Minneapolis basis.
This is equivalent to an average- return of about 53.40. per bushel, farm ba-sis,
and is nearly equal to returns farmers received fron the 1945 crop, when in
addition to the ceiling price of S3.10 per'bushel, Minneapolis, flaxseed grower
were eligible..for Governeent payment of 35.00 per planted acre equivalent to
5..cens per'bushel on the basis of the national'average yield.
Soybean Stocks Belatively Low on October 1;
S 1945-46 Supply Reduced

'Irith a record rate of crushing and relatively large exports in 1944-45,
soylbeen stocks were 6.5 million bushels lower on "Octoberl, 1945 than the 1,..3
million on October 1, 1944 (table 6). Crushings 'i -1944-4..5 'ere 15..3 million
bushels, compared with 142 million a year earlier. Exports of soybeans in 19411
45, at 5 million bushels, were 4 million bushels larger than a year earlier,
Sand the largest since- 1939-40. .

Soybean production in 1945 is indicated at 190.6 million bushels (on the
asis, of November 1 conditions). The total supply of soybeans for 1945-46 is
about 198 million bushels, compared with 207 million bushels last scrson.
W ith the supply reduced, total crushings and experts in 1945-46 may be less thar
in 19.44-45..

..... "







It
.,





Inventories of Fate and Oils at a Low Level .. ,*

Factory and warehouse stocks of fats and oils on September 30 this year
totaled approximately 1,660 million poundss (partly estimated). This was
about 670 million pounds smaller than the unusually large total of. y ep.
earlier, and was the smallest since September 30, 1936. Stocks of inedlitE
tallow, greases, drying oils other than linseed oil, and commercial stocks of
lard continue to be especially low in relation to prewar. Inventories of domestic*
edible vaget-ble oils are at about the 1937-41 average f6M September 301
(Table 9 .)

Demand for oils and fats for rebuilding stocks will be an imporxat
factor in the fats and oils situation in coming months. This demand is partly
restrained.at present by ihventory limitation orders on inedible talltw.greases,
and linseed oil and by Government control of the distribution of aInrie-acid
ails, palm oil; and edible vegetable oils, as well as by the general lbaitation
on the use of fats in manufacture.

USDA Purchase of Fats and Oils Increasing

U. S. Department of Agriculture purchases of fats and oils (including
margarine, soap, and soybeans in terms of fat) increased from the September
low of 7 million pounds to 12 million pounds in October and 30 milliontpounds
in November. The principal gain was in lard.

Table 2.-Purchases of fats and oils, and soybeans by the UI. S.
Department of Agriculture, 1941-45


Item .: 1941 '1942 :1943 1944 : :
: : : : 8ep': Oct. "Nov.. ;.Jan-
_: __: I/ : l/ l Nov.
:Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mt.
:Ib. lb. Ib. Ib. Ib. Ib. lb ti b.o


Butter ........................: 2 34 120 106
Lard.and rendered pork fat ...: 326 654 582 gO9
Other animal fats and oils 3/ : 2 30 61 2
Linseed oil .................: -- 70 .391 198
Soybeans (oil equivalent) 4/ .: 4 4 9 2
Soybean oil ..................: --- 17 22 100
Other vegetable oils .........: --- 82 49 15
Shortening ................... --- 46 62 8
Margarine (fat content) 5/ ...: 1 77 72 59
Soap (fat content) 5/ ........ --- 16 23 13
Total, fat equivaleht ......:333 1,030 .691 1 312


.-- --- 32
5 10 ?4 191

-- -- -.-- 1
- 2 4 40
2 7
--- --- --- 31
--- --- --- 11
2 --- 62
--- -- 12
7 12 30 425


:1,000
: bu.
Soybeans ..................... :450


1,000
bu.
4n-o


1,000'1,000
bu. bu.
983 o06


1,000
,u.


1,000
bu.
175


1,o00 1,000
bd. bu.
475 4'79r


1 Preliminary.
2/ Less than 500,000 pounds.
3/ Includes fish-liver and fish oils,
Oil equivalent estimated at 9 pounds per bushel.
5/ Fat content estimated at 80 -ercent for margarine: 55 percent for soap.







OS-105 7 -

Fats and.Oils Price n Up;
Soybean *;2r ices Advance
The index number of wholesale prices of 27 major fats and oils rose
Sin November to 114 percent of the 1924-29 average, compared with 108 percent
a month earlier aid a year earlier. The rise reflected an increase in
butter prices in November under new ceilings effective Noverber.l.

Prices of soybeans advanced in November despite seasonally heavy
marketing. The average price received by farmers in mid-November was $2.09
per bushel, compared with $2.06 in mid-October, and $2.05 in mid-November 1944.
For No. 2 green and yellow soybeans, 14 percent moisture, sold by growers,
the support price is $2.04 per bushel and the ceiling price is 12.10 per bushel.

GOVERNMENT ACTIONS

Rationing of Food Fats and Oils Ended

Rationing of food fats and oils, as well as meats and canned fish, was
terminated November 24. With supplies of meat in Decenber and the first
quarter of 1946 expected to be about sufficient to meet demand at ceiling
prices, meat rationing was considered no longer necessary. Fats and oils,
particularly butter, ill continue in short supply for some time.

Set-aside orders and other measures to meet military requirements and to
fulfill commitments on fats and oils to be shipped abroad are being continued.
Also, limitations on use of fats in the manufacture of arg?-rine, shortening,
and edible oils continue in force.

Restrictions Placed on Packaging of Lard
and Edible Fat-and-Oil Products

Amendment 21 to '^FO 42, effective January 1, 19h6, prohibits manufacturers
of margarine, shortening, or edible oils from packaging the product in any
size container not used in 1944, and requires the same volume, or more, to b-
packaged in each size of container each quarter as in the corresoondi ng quarter
of 1944. Tank cars are to be counted as containers. Similar provisions are
to apply to lard and rendered pork fat, except that the base year will be
1945 instead of 1944. Products sold to agencies exempt from quota restrictions
under 'AFO 42 will also be exempt from these packaging restrictions. The purpose
of this order is to prevent undue diversion of food fats to large commercial
users, following the removal of rationing restrictions.

Ship-Suopliers Added to List of )uota-Exemot
Agencies for Soap and Edible Fat-and-Oil
Products

Amendment 8 to War Food Order 42-b, effective December 1, added shin
suppliers approved by War Shippinp Administration to the list of agencies to





DECE3E2I 1945 8 -

which soap manufacturers .ay sell soap without charging the fat equivalent
against quotas on total fats used for soap. A similar quota exemption for shipil
suooliers was added to 'VFO 42 (which limits use of fats and oils in edible
products) by Amend.ent 22, effective December 1. These exiembtionb foi' ship
suppliers had been provided until December 1 by 'VFO 74, which was t-ehninated
on that date.

Certain Oils and Oilseeds Removed
From -Import Control

Amendment 6 to WFO 63, effective November 15, removed restrictions of
-the order on private importation of sesame seed and oil, rapeseed oil,
neat's-foot oil, and animal oils known as neat's-foot stock.

Inventory and Use Restrictions on 1944-Crop
Soybeans Terminated

Limitations on inventories and use of soybeans produced in 1944 was
terminated November 30 by revocation of War Food Order 110.

EFFECTS OF SIZ OF FAMILY I'TCOE OF" COrNSTJUTIO! OF FOOD FATS

An indication of the effects of size of family income on food-fat con-
-sunption in private homes is given by the results of a study published in 1944
on family incomes and food consumotion.V/ The study is based on food and
income estimates obtained from 2,700 households in the spring of 1942. This
sample was designed primarily to provide information on groups of foods and
certain key items, and probably as too small to obtain stable results for
the less frequently used foods. The data presented below for butter and lard
exhibit a consistent. attern of consumration and expenditures in relation to
size of family income. But the data for margarine, shortening, and cooking and
salad oils show fluctuation anoarently due to the smallness of the sample.

1. Effects on Kind of Fat Consumed

On the bnsis of the sample indications obtained, consumption of butter
increases consistently from each family-income grouo to the next higher (table 4
Consumption per person per week in the lowest urban-income group studied --
households with total incomes from 0 to 499 dollars annually -- was 0.23
pounds per person per week. In the highest urban-income group households
with total incomes from 5,OOC to 9,999 dollars annually the weekly rate
was 0.44. pounds per person. MarFarine consumption per person was largest in
the $500-999 income class, and was markedly higher in the income groups under
$1,500 than in the groups above that level. On the basis of the sample, total
consumption of butter nid margarine per person tends to increase with family
income, both in actual ousntity and .s a percentpe of total consumption of all
food fats, although thj proportion of margarine consumed diminishes rapidly in
incmTe groups above the $1,500 level (at 1942 prices).


1/ Family Food Consumotion in the United States, TU. S. Department of Agriculture
Miscellaneous Publication No. 550, Washington, 1944.







FOS-105 9 -

Total household consumption.of lard and shortening per capital, on the
basis of the sample data, decreases with increasing family income, both in
actual quantity an~ in relation to total consumption of all food fats (tables 4
and 5). Part of this pay be explained by increased consumption of prepared
foods containing cooking fats. Lard consumption per person appears to decrease
as urban family-lnagmq increases (negative income elasticity).. Consumption
of shortening per capital, on the other hand, was reported to be decidedly less
Sin income groups below $1,000 than in those over $1,000.

Household consumption of salad and cooking oils apparently is small in
the lowest urban income groups, but reaches a peak in the $2,000 to $2.99 group
Consumption appears to decline with increasing family income above that level.
The households from which data were obtained apparently included a group that
used olive oil extensively. This would account for the high average price paid
for salad and cooking oils by the families with incomes from $1,500 to $2,999
annually (third section of table 4).

Mayonnaise and other salad dressings evidently are consumed in the home
in increasing quantities with increasing family incomes.

2. Effects on Total Consumption of Fat

Direct consumption of fats and oils in urban households fbr. families
sagmpled.increased markedly with increases in family income up to 1,500 dollars
annually, but no trend was apoarent'in home consumption per person with
increases above the 1,500 dollar level. Total consumption 6f food fats in
households with annual income of 0-499 dollars was 0.71 pounds per person
per week (including margarine,.mayonnaise3 and salad dressing in terms of
estimated fat content). In the 500-999 dollar group, consumption per person
rose to.0.76 pound, and in the 1,000-1,499 dollar group, to -
0.82 pound per capital. In the-groups above this level, consumption per-
person.varied between 0.89 pound per capital (in the 1;500-1,999 dollar group)
and 0.80 pound per capital (in the 2,500-2,1999 group).

Effects of variation in *income per capita on fat. consumption per capital
are not fully revealed by the study. Although the higher family income groups
have higher average incomes per. person i6 .the family, classi:ti.cations on the
basis of total family income do not coincide with those based.on per-capita
income, For 'example, a family of two with an income of 6,000 dollars (3,000






DECE2MER 1945


- 10 -


dollars per capital) would be placed by the study in the same group as a family;
.of six with an income of 6,000 dollars (1,000 dollars oer capital It is
possible that a classification of families on the basis of'income per capital
would show different results. Other factors to be considered-are consumption
of food fats by the food-orocessing industry, including bakeries, and con-
sumption in restaurants and hotels.

Urban' families in the higher income groups get more fat through con-
sumption of commercial bakery goods than do those in lower groups. The
following table shows indicated consumption per person of bakery products
in urban households ir. one week of the spring of 1942, by family-income
groups. A rough calculation of the fat used in producing these quantities is
also shown:

"Table 3.- Per-capita consumption of commercial bakery products in
urban households, one week in the spring of 1942, with
estimated fat equivalent, by family-income group


:Bread : Crackers, cake, and :All commer-
Family income: .. other oroduct-s -- :eial bakery
(annual : Visible : : Visible : products,
basis) Quantity : fat : Quantity : fat :visible fat
: : equivalent: :equivalent :equivalent _
Dollars Pounds -Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds

0- 499 1.42 .03 .29 .02 .05
500- 999 : 1.59 .03 .43 .03 .06
1,000-1,499 : 1.52 .03 .49 .03 .06
1,500-1,999 -: 1.69 .03 .67. .06 ..09
2,000-2,499 : 1.77. .04 .71 .05 .09
2,500-2,999 : 1.68 ,03 .72 .06 .09
3,000-4,999 1.85 .04 .74 .06 .10
5,000-9,999 : 1.75 .04 .70 .05 .08
Average, all
Groups ....: 1.71 .03 .64 .05 .08

Based on table 27, Family Food Consumotion in the United States. Fat
equivalent estimated as follows: Bread, 2 percent; crackers, 8 percent;
cake, 15 percent; other products, 2 percent.
I/ Computed from unrounded numbers.





11 -

ae 4.-Fnts and oils consumed in urban households, 1 week in the spring'of 1942:
l. e consumption nd .expenditure per:person, Pnd P ppp.rent ..verage price paid,
by family income groups

.. F.mi'jy incomzn annialf rnte-- _:Average,
tifOem 500 1,0 $1o 5500: $2,o0O:$2,500I3,C000: 500: n11
to. to : to : to .: to : to :*--to : to :income
__" __ : 'g ; :s$99":$3-9$q?1,99:$"99"99:,99g :$93,.39rgr ,S
l- :' Pounds Pounss Poundh Poukds pounds Pounds rounds Pounds Pounds
_____ __ Cnnsumttion
tts ............ 23 25 .29 .37 37- 39. Th3 .h .37
Mgrine I.
tual vight .... .0 ..10 10 .0k .05 .04 .03 *1 .06
t, content 1/ ... .08 .10 .08 .03 .0O .03 .02 .01 .O
t..............: .31 .27 .?0 .18 .12 .11 .10 U.11 .15
Prtening ........: .06 .07 .13 .11 .11 .11 .13 .10' .11
Making, salad oil: .01 .02 .06 .13 .10 .n .09 .08 .08
r6nnaise and .
ilad dressing:
t.al weight .... .03 .08 .10 .11 ..1 .11 .12 '.15 .11
t content 2/ ...: .02 .05 .06 .07.__ .0s .0 .0 .10- .08
1, i items:
tual weight ..'.: .74 .81 .88 .94 .87 .84 .90 ".9 .88
Cpt content, :
cept of butter .71 .76 .82 .84 _.? .S, .8 ...84 .83


: E___x enaitur- __
: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


Cents


Cebt's' Cents


ter ;...........: 9.6 10.2 12.2 15.7 15.4 16.7 1r.3 18.8 15.T
marine .........: 2.3 C.4 2.0 1.n 1.2 0.9 0.6 0:2 1.0
S............: 5.6 4.5 3.4 3.3 ?.2 1.8 1.7 1.7 2.6
tending ........ 1.1 1.2 3.0 ?.0 .5 2.7 2.5 29 '2.2
ing;salad oils : .-- 4 1.4 6.7 4.6 3.3 .3 2.4 3.2
tanailse nnd
4ad dreeting ...: 1.1 2.0 ?.4 2.7 2.8 2.7__ 2.8 2.6
a, 6 items .... :T9. 20.8 24.4 31.3__28. 28.2 292 29.2__" .2
: App.arent aver.geo rice oaid ner pound 3/'
er .........: 41 4o 71 h' 4" 43 4 4 43 4?
marine .........: 24 21 21 27 '5 23 -- -- 21
..............: 18 17 17 19 18" 16 17 16 17
Opening ........: --- 19 4 18 2? 20 28 21
king, salad oils: -- -- 22 50 47 4L 35 31 38
nnaise and
Lad dressing ...: -- 5 24 '3 24 23 21 23
rage, 6 items .:: P7 26 8 33 3 t --32 33 31-

Mated from data in t-tlles 27 and L'0, Family Food Consum-,tion in the United States
a Department of Agriculture miscellaneous Publication No. %50, Wpshington, D.C.,
., In this study, 21 meals epten at home w'-re counted. Ps 1 person.
11 percent of actual weight. 21/ iMayonnaise, 71 percentt of actual weight; salad
sing, 40 percent of actual weight. 3/ Calculated by dividing expenditure.
consumption.


L.
::"i .,






DECENMZR 1945


.1


- 12 -


Table 5.- Specified fats and oils as-a percentage of all fats and oils: Conaauptton
and expenditures by urban households, 1 week in the spring of 1942, by family
income groups
Srg .. .....--- -----. .....
: : h Family. income (anp. 1 rat-e- :Average
:i t : oo 3 TT,ooo 5 1,5o50:$2,00: :$2,50P :$3,000 :55,000 :all i-.
m : to : to to to t to to. o t : to : to :come
___ ___ *$499 $999 :$9,99 !groupL
:Percent.Percent Percent Percent PercentPercent Percent Percent:Percent
u: Consumption-Percentafe of total fats : '
3utter........: 32 33 3 '- 2 S 531 52. W 4
Margarine /..-: 11 13 10 .3 5 2 : 5
Lard..........: 44 35 24 20 15 14 12. 13.. : il
Shorten-ing... .: 9 9 16 12 13 14 15... .2 : 13


Cookingisalad :
oils .......: 1
Mayonnaise and:
salad-dros-C4
ing /..... :

Total 2/... 100


Butters........
Margarine.....: 12
Lard...........: 28
Shortening....: 6
Cooking salad I


3


.7 15 .12


10 11


7_ 8 10 .10 O


100 100 100 100 100 100

Expenditures-Percentage of total fats
." 9 50 .50 o "5 .59 -6
12 8 3 4 3 2
21 14 11 8 '- 6 .6
6 12 6 10 9


oils.......: --- .. 2 6
Mayonnaise and:
salad dressing: 6 10Q 10


21 16


12 11


.9 10 10 -9


Tptal........ 10 .- 100 100 100 .100
Based on table E.


,100 1Q ..


10 : 10
:.

,12 : 10

100.- : 100

: : 5
S 58
1: 4
6: 9
10 : S

18 : 12

1 : r
* 100 : 100


1 Fat content.
2 Fat content, except of butter.


.






-Table 6ba Soybeans: Suply and. disposition,
: .* .
... .... .~~. .. osition-ir
.: : '" '*"Stocks' ; i '
A Oct. 1 Shipl :Esti-
(r..-t.% -,.... ... :a *. ,ments Crush- mated : :Resi-
Sl. ,..ortsto U.S. ings fortuse for Seed ua
tt.ion :co00 p-:are-. : supp Iy; terri- oil and :full-fat : 3
Stion to.ries meal :flour T .
S..e i ron :house

.. .. b '. b.l -. ti. 'hu.. .. 'bu. bu. bu1i
?rLl.. ,,n.. ,." .......--- ... -


2 ., 15 i N.
;33 ,59.-. 'N.A
1934 : 23,157 5 N.A.
i'935 480.1 -4 N.A-.
1936 1 33,721' -17 N.A-.
1957 *S' 146,i64 '* -3 N.A.
94S8 1..E ,9o6 *3 .A
199 : 90141 -*2 N.At.
1940 77468 -1 N.A:
'1941 :105,587 -/ .A:
194t2 :187,15 5 6.0
S3 119S3.t125'.. ..25, 5
1945'4 192,863. 4.3
1945@ 190,646 7.8:


00
43
06
14


. 17, 305 '"2''r6" '.
-.i15 17 2'.C" '.4.
13'.515 -- -- '"A.,"
23,162: 19 I.A.
4g8,90 5 3,49'0' .A. '
33;738 1 Y 10o
46;167 1.368' 24"
61,909: 4 ,401' 23
.90; 143:" 10,o949'
77;469: 237" 47
105;587 "469 "20
193,155" '904. 1-
205;668- 934 26
207,173" 5;057 33


4,725.
3 WO7
3, 370
.3,154
9,105
25,181
20,618
30,31b
44,64g
56,684'
64,056
7%,131
133; 454
142,3o06
152,773


N.A. 6,250
N.A. 5,940
N.A. 9,310
N.A. 11,250
N.A. 10,770
N.A. 11,200
N.A. 12,880
N.A. 16,386
100 17,730
100oo 17,090
500 21,072
1,9i 0 21,958
S,6oo o 20,179
9006/19.570


filed rom repos the U. S. Department of culture and reau of the
filed from reports of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Bpregu of the


STear beginni J-ly .
1931~4o', ca'lbflated 6n basis of 1.5 Iushels per acre grown alone for
Ln following year; 1941-44, estimated by Crop Reporting Boardi
SIncludes use for feed, direct huren consumption.,- and loss.
JanuarylJune 1937 only.
SLess than- 500 bushels.
Pr lima.ary, ....
t" ''. "9 ""


all purposes


br.A.
N. Ar
X.A,

N.A.
I.A-
N.A,
. Av
N. A,
N.A~
N.A,
22,38
26,31
21,0?t








Table 7,-.Supply. and disposition of fats and oils, average 1937-41, annual 194-45


S-Item 9er7 : 1942 :. 19 3 : 19 4 19
: I ...
-, -Br'a'n -g5i 7i^" c

Production from domestic mntetials : :
.Butter: Greamery .............. 1.780 7. 1.674 1.487
Farm ....................... .431_._.366 .3' *2t.
*Total ...... .....2. 2.211 .130 2.01 1 1.
Lard and rendered pork fat:
S. Inspected .................. 1.224 1.724 .,.2.080 2367, .
Other............... ..... ....4 97 .g:.
otal ..... ......... 1.964.2.4c69 3.056 3.25: H 2O
Edible tallow --oleostearine, oleo
-stock, .and oleo oil .............. .213 .277 .259 .19. .220
Corn oil ...,... .................... .155 .248 ... 237 .211 : .22,P
-ottonseed oil-.....................: 1.472 1.386 ...1.313 1.132. 1.240
Peanut oil .e........................:. .087 .077 ... .153 2/ .10S: 2g .10p
Soybeanoil .......................: .419 .762 .1.234 1.246, 1.330
Inedible tallow and greases .........: 1.167 1.742 ...1.650 1.943. :1.750
Marine animal oils .................: .243 .158 ... .175 .215, : .210
Linseed oil J ................. ....: .277.. .699 .715. *729. : .450
0ther ............................... .021 03 4 7 .040
STotal, from domestic materials ....:, 8.230 9* 98 ,10, 10. 9.6
9.963 .1094


Stocks, January 1 (crude basis) ....... 2.2
Imports of oil and factory production :
of oil from imported materials / ...: 2.0
Total supply ...................... _12.4

Exports, reexports and shipments
to U. S. territories / ............. .4
Stocks, December 31 (crude basis) : 2.3
Domestic disappearance 9-.
Military procurement, excl. relief
Estimated civilian disappearance :1.7
:Pound
Civilian disappearance, per capital:
Food........................: 49
Nonfood ...................: 25
Total ..................: 74


2.3


2.0


2..2


2.2


1.0 1.0 .8
13.3 13.89 14. 0 "12.


.9 1.6
2.0 '2.2
10.3 10.0
.5 .9
.8Is Pouns
Is Pournds Pounds


48
26
74


46
24
7e


1.6 1.1
2.2 1.7
10.2 _.6
1.1 1.1 ",
9.1 8. __i
Pounds Pounds

45 42
25 ____ 23_
70 65 .


Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census, Fish and Wildlife Service,and
U. S. Department of Agriculture. Totals computed from unrounded numbers.
Partly forecast.
Totel production minus oil equivalent of imported Argentine peanuts.
Total production minus oil equivalent of net imports of flaxseed.
Imports include shortening and soap in terms of fat content. Exports include
margarine, shortening, ahd soap in terms of fat content, procurement by the Army
for European relief and procurement by the American Red Cross. Exports do not
include oil equivalent of oilseeds exported.


- 14 -


DECEMBER 194 5









Tabl' .- qicirti'ad exports oa fLt, oils oil-bearing mtarials, and ftt-ind-oil products,
January-Septkmber, atrage 1957-41, 1914 and 1945 .1


Primary fts
I Imports for aom


-- It


I
I,


unsptin


average a 194 19465 Average
1957-41 a s 2/ 1937-41
l. lb. M lb. Iil, lb. Ml. lb.


aiport. I1
S19 1
nt r4 A


1' ,.fats .
. t: a~"~ r ...................................... ......
028rd "-. ..... .. ... ..J... ...................
SOleo aol ...............................................
S Uearla Uleail edible ..............................:
SOlo stoak .................... ................
allow. edible .........................................
T1lloa. Inedible ......................................
Br sel ...............................................
Wool rease ............................................
l* ent's-foot ail ......................................
total, aniol ..................................... i
S ............... ....................
SPih o- 1 .l............................................
SbriMe s sl o.... ..................................
11 otl, arisL. ls......................................
Total, mario ........................................
Veeta le f ats
.Babsla oil ...........................................................
Chash nut Ishll liquid (oil) ..........................
SCtor oil ............................................
Cooaut ole ............................................
C-"4Ma ol-", .........................................

Japan a. (tallow) .....................................
Linoea oil ......................................... I
ltlioa o1 ............................. ...........
Oli e oil, ibl. ....................................
SOllve-oil "ftot .......................................
lie oil, nedle ........ ...........................
I ola-krnaL oil ..........l.... ......................
Palm il ......................................... ...
Peanut oil ................. ............................
Prills oil 4............................................
.Bapa oil ........................................
me. oil S.........................................
Soybean oil .......................................
Safliaer oil ......................................
STeased oil ........................ ................
Tug oil ................................................
Togrtable tallos ...........t.........................
Other vegetable oil and fats ..........................
'--Veogtablo oils, *himaent@ o'U. I. territories .........
S otal, vegetable ....................................
Total. primary frts ................................


3.0 I. .4 6.8 68.3 / 30.1
S.2 194.0 07. 499.6
2.8 2,4 .2
.5 --- .2 Y. -- /
-7- -- -- 1.8 2
2.6 20.6 1.7 .2 1.2
4.6 45.8 31.6 I:1 17.6 t.9
S4/ 3.1 2.2 4.T
2.2 -- ---
.-- ..... 6 .5 .1 .1
-Z., 8".E SE 210.5 799.4 540.3

35.2 16.9 17.4 1.3 3.2
1.7 9.4 10.3 2.1 7.6 11.T
22.2 *1.5... .1.6. 4/ 2. 13.s
89.1 .7 29.. 7.1 114 28.3

.3 .9 2.7 -
1.8 "4.2 .2 -
.3 1 .. 1.1 .7. .. 1.7 1.0
366.1 46.8 55.4 25.0 4.9 .1
*11.7 .* 4/ .2 .2
63.1 4.I .0 7.6 4.6 7.6
2 .1 -. ...- ---
.1 83.9 48.6 2.0 270.0 6.8
12.8 .6.2 17.3 -- -
'59.6 8.7 -- .1 .1
-- -- .6 .1
3.9 .1 .1 -- 4/
26.8 -, -- -** -- --
222.7 50.0 8.5 1 5.8 14.8
23.8 "'/ -- 1.9 ". .2 .1
I22.0 -.-.. -- -- --
1.0 13.0 I7.7 -- .. .6
B.6 .9
6.8 .1 -- 7.5 44.5 32.1
.1 9.0* 66.2 _/ 19.0
8.6 U:- .--... ---
82.1 1.8 .2 3.9 .T 1.6
2.5 :4/.. .2 .-. --.
.T.0 1.2 8.6 12.0 2.4
-6-- -- 6/ 6.4 6.3 6.7
826.2 26. 2 88.8 4 74.2 351.86 11.
s62.1 552.5 361.? 256.e 1.162.6 S0.8


011-bearing materials


Bsbasu kernels (63 percent) .............................
*Cantor beans (46 peroant) ................................
Copra (83 peront) ......................................
Cottonseed (16.5 percent) ................................
Flazseed (34 percent) ....................................
aruaurn kernels (6 peront) ........................
*Palnnut kernel (46 peroet) ................
Peanuts, shelled (39 peront) ............................
PerllU seed (57 percent) ................................
Seasme seed (47 percent) .................................
Soybean (15 proent) .....................................
Suoum kernela o43 perunt) ..............................
Total. oil-bearing aterials .......................... i


38.3
.66.5
244.6

260.1
.8
13.2

.5
3.7

2.1
6X8.T ~


4.8
n8.8


3,6 .4
.1

36.4..
*- .



14.6 ~


54.2
109.6 .
125.8



57.3
19.6

.1

6. -
ibE.3


-- o
19.6



--



8.1
2 .-7
27.7


--


.6
.3





--4.5
--.-


-

1.0
-
--



* .45.8
-6-.-


Inufaotured products


marine / ..............................................
Short ing ... ........................................... ;I
Sop ......... ..............l........................... l I


S1.5
,1.0
..- 2.1


t--
* 3/


.6


1.1 46.4 62.0
5.7 13.4 17.0'
6/25.1 23.2 45.7


Total. oufaotured products ........................... 4,6 .3 .6 .6 .- 8. 114.6


All t +s .....................................;....... .... 1i668s T. 4. .59.4 3 4.3 1..6.' .' 81.6
g *........... ....... .. ......... ...


Ccqilldd from Monthly Sumary ro rei Cmorm of the e ite StatMe, roserde of th Sbr.eu oftJhe Ce nul, un fi ports of
ths 0. S. Doartmait of Agrculture. Totals mputed from uarounad numbers.
i. following l.i tenm r not Itnluded aboron froureaomt by thu Army la 1946 for Europe relief, 656 mlliof pounds of
lard and 6 million pounds rat content of oap. Procuremnt of argarine, ihartniag, and saop by the Amrlian Red Cros.,
in term of tat patent, 16 mllim pouads la 1914 and 11 million pounds in 1946.
-Intesk hipmmtahl to u;.'. Serritorie. at Outter. lar, and mo ufiatured produotms reeapqrts of oooonut palm, and taoo
". oi olive-oll root., and ooplta aid rnetprtp la 1914 and'1946. of certain quantlies of whale oil asd antflmwer oll
r- E red in t'iort.a 4r, aoaumutia. abipate ineliude peoial,progrta of UEDA Jn 1944 and 1946. 2/ Prliinpry..
.Ieluoes mstel night of buotr oil am.. spread (Ay). Theme ern nbt reported separately prior to 195. / l i th
00poNlnis. /fot reported u parate'ly. g/li eu-t ftlhsb of aub average. I/ 1937-41, 3 percent. /:qportL d
uargu l oe. largely to Puerto saoo end th Viiln Zslandu.


-- --


- -


-


ir




DECEMBER 1945


Table 9.-Fats and oils: Total factory production, January-September 1944 and 1945,
and factory and warehouse stocks at end of month, September 1944, and Auvust
.nd September 1945
Items rrouied by : Production : Stocks (crde basisT
uajor use :Jan.-Sept.:Jan.-Sept:SeTt. 30 :Aug. 31 :Sept. 30
____ _____ ____ r 19t4 :4 1 14 1945 L 12.5.
: il. lb. il. lb. Milb. T il. lb. Mil. lb.
Fond fats and oils
Butter 1/ .................... 1,214.1 1,145.1 140.3 206.5 189.9
Lard and rendered pork fat 2I .: 1,921.9 929.9 513.7 93.2 76.9
Qleo oil, edible anim-.l stear- :
ine,ar.d edille tallow ........: 154.1 153 17.7 15.6 16.2
Total edible animal fats ....: 3-290.1 2-234.3 6. ___315 283.0
Corn oil 3/ ...................: 153.5 159.8 20.3 16.5 16.5
Cottonseed oil 3/ .............: 618.3 783.2 242.3 22S.8 273.6
Olive oil, edible .............: 5.5 4.3 2.1 1.8 1.3
Peanut oil 3/ .................: ?2.4 .2.5 40.5 54.8 N.A.
Sesame oil ...................: 4/ / 3.1 1.6 1.2
Soybean oil 3/ ...............: '599_.7 1,557.0 203.4 222.4 216.0
Total edible vegetable oils ..: 1,.19.4 2,092.1 511.7 585.9
Soap fats and oils
Tallow, inedible ..............: 751.9 693.6 161.4 102.0 97.8
C-rease, excluding wool grease .: 497.5 35.- 156.3 75.0 67.4
Palm oil 3/ ..................: --- --- 56.5 6S.0 N.A.
Fish oil ..................... : 111.7 105.7 129.0 78.0 93.2
Marine m=nmal oil .............: .3 -- 50.2 23.3 23.4
Olive oil, inedible and foots : 4/ _/ 3.2 1.6 1.4
Tot-l slow-lpthrrin. oils ....: 1,3bl. 1,1 5..1 556.6 3 9
Bbr.ssu oil 3/ ................: h _/ 5.4 13.0 7.7
Coconut oil 3/ ................: 95 125.6 105.9 137.4 140.6
Palm-kernel oil 3/ ............ : 4 4/ 6.7 _6 29.2 6/ 32.1
Total Iauric-acid oils .......: 4__ 125.6 11S.0 179.6 180.
Drying oils
Cnstor oils, deh;,dr-ted 7/ ....: 62.7 43.7 11.2 9.4 N.A.
Linseed oil ...................: 774.3 333.9 310.6 151.0 168.7
Oiticica oil ..................: 4/ 4/ 4. 9.0 9.7
Perilla oil ................... --- --- .3 .1'. .1
Tung oil ............. ........: 4/ / 23.6 11.9 9.5
Total drying oils ........... _6175 37.6 181.4 __
Other industrial
'eq-t's-foot oil ............... : l. 1.9 2.6 2.1 2.1
Wool grease .................. : 12.6 13.3 3.7 3.4 3.7
Cod oil ond fish-liver oils ...: 7.6 4.7 17.4 13.8 12.2
C-stor oil, No. 1 and lo. 3 8/ : 5.1 74.0 39.5 13.5 N.A.
Rppe oil ......................: -- -- 13.6 2'.2 20.8
Other vei:et-ble oils .......... : 26.0 93.4 3.7 47.0 N.A.
Tot-1 ........................: 106.1 137.3 120.5 101.0
C-rand total ............ 7 50.0 6,232.0 2,334.0 1,711.19/1 660.0
Compiled from reports of the Burenu of the Census, except as noted. Data include
stocks held b, Government in re-orted positions Tot-ls computed from unrounded
nunbc rs.
1/ Creamery butter production and cnld-store-i stocks, U. S. Dep-rtmentofgrdulture
2/ Federally inspected aroductinh, USD3.. 3/Stocks, crude oil plus refined oil con-
verted to crude basis by dividing by the following factors:Babassu, corn, cottonseed,
pilm, and plan-'ernel oils, 0.)3; coconut, neanut rnd soybean oils, 0.94. 4/ Includ-
ed in other vegetalle oils.5/ lot reported. 6/ Crude only. 7/ Converted to crude
b-.sis by dividing by '.co. g/ Estimated ouantity used in .anuftcture of dehydrated
castor oil excluded from production. 9/ Includes estimates for items not reported.


- 16 -





: .

Table 10.- rid4 received by farmers and ricecs at terminal
markets for specified oil-bepring ma.tprials and oilmeals
.Noember 1943 and q194, Septenm er-November 1945

seeds

'3 November 1945
Item : Unit I
.": '.;: 1 1.93 4 Sept. : Oct. :-.Nov-
Sb- :Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars

Csftr beans, Brazilian,
f.o'.b. Brazilian )orts ....... long ton 75.00 59.75 82.50 54.50 86.50
Cottonseed, United States
average ......................: Short ton : 5.50 53.40 51.h4 51.00 51.30
.3aiBee&d. No. 1, Minneppolis : Bushel : 3.0 3.11 3.10 3.10 3.10
,Playseeed, United Statfs
. average ..................: Bushel .: 2.S4 2.90 2.89 2.89 2.89
eaits, .no. 1 shelled, .
Banish, Southeastern -
shipping points .............. ''100.pounds '4.12 1-.25 14.25 14.25 14.25
Peanuts, United States
average ......................: 100 pounds: 7.12. .08 8.29 S.06 8.30
Spybeans, No. 2 yellow, :
Chicago- ..................... Bushel -- 2.17 2.11 2.18
Soybeans, United States :
.average .........................: Bushel. : '1.80 2.05 2.07 2.06 2-.09

SOilseed Reals I/


-*op-ra meat, Los. Aneles .......:
Cottonseed meal, 4il percent"...t
protein, Memphis" ............:
Cpttonseed meal, hl percent
- protein, Chicago .............:
linseed meal,. 32 percent
,;;otein, M.4inner.polis ........!
Linseed meal, 34 percent .......
-protein, iew Yor k...........:.
Peanut meal, 45 A tcent
.protein, '.f.o.b. South-
.6astern mills ...................
Soybean meal, 41 percent
protein, Chicago .............:


Short
nI-








ff


ton : 51.50. 50.00

" 48.501 48.50

" % 5 '.5. 54.45

" 45.50: 45.50

"I :2/49.00. 2//49.00


" 53.00. 53.00


S2/9.50


2/49.502- 49.50


48.75 48.75 s8.75

54.75 54.75 5-.75

45.50 45.50 45.50

49.00 49.00 49.00


1/53.25


" : 5190 52.00 52.00


1/53.25 53.25

52.00 52.00


Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, Daily Market Record (Minneapolis),
Chicago Journal of Commerce, reports if the Bureau pf Agricultural Economics.
and records of Production and Marketing Administration.
1/ Bagged, carlbtsg
2/ Original quotation adjusted to b.gged-carlots b.sis.
'/ Revised.





Table 11.- Olsomargiarine: Produ tion, withdrpwals for consumption, and
export, and materials used in manufacture, United States,
January September 1943 45, September 1943 45

Item : Jaur-SeptemrSeptember
:___ __0 l. i14 lb. 1 5 Ib. 190 4 1 7 lLb. i0 10 i,
:1000 lIb. 1000 lb. loro Ilb. 100 Ilb. 1000 lb. 1000 b,


reductionn:
Colored
Unco lored
Total 2/
i-.thdrawals:
Tax-paid for consumption i1
Sthe United States end
territories
Tpx-free "for U.S. Governmel
Tax-free for export
Total
materials s used:
Dleo oil
Oleostearine
Lard, neutral
Oleo stock
Tallow
STotal, animal
Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Peanut oil
Corr. oil
Pinseed oil
Cottonseed stearine
Cottonseed flakes
Soybern stearine
$oya stearine flakes
Soa'f lakes
Totel, domestic vegetable

;unflo-er oil
Total, foreign vegetable
Totsl fats and oils
d;ilk
*plt
lerivpti-,e of plycerin
'ecithin
or.ostearine
;oda (benzoate of)
vitaminn concentrate
:olor
,stearine
miscellaneouss
Total, other materials
Total, all materials


: 100,285 98,656 s4,732
:353.352 4.6 38s.359
:.5645 3 ..- 23,306 473,089

n- :

: 353,2S5 333,231 392,819
nt : 97,252 88,045 68,455
_: 517 7 s 12,637
:451,05U 422j77 473.T 11

:13,650 9,9,o 7.512
S 2,679 2,19 1,626
:3/ 7,975 /7.7,70 5,008
: 2,418 1,873 1,223.
: 411 128 15.
: 27 13 21 790 115, 84.
,19 1 45226 203, 8,23
: 155,310 157,175 151,643
: 3,422 5,930 6,129
: 3,ogs 663 7,071
: 3,53 413
45 6 -
21 -- 57
: 10 14 20
S 32. 1,038 --
: 4 123 51
e :34202 322 598 36E,79,

-: --- __1 __
S --- 1 6
: 6q 157 344,399 5g4..4
: 7772 .72,563 81~19
14,569 14,027 146750
75: 653 .794
: 355 370 498
: 25 314 387
: 267 274 399
: 87 80 92
S 59 6r 8s
S --- 66 s3
: 15 10 16
: 919 7_ ,417 9877
: 62,;594 2~SIT -82, 621


4,098 2,262
46.516 48.821
.50,614 %093


1, 867
~31 ;


46,669 48.7T3 34,556
4.357 838 ,8958
46 6 177
51r072 ?r 9 .2 44I


. 1.331 734 594"
S 35 229 20C
962 729 279
253 43 174
1 34 2
__2925 1, .35
23,S52 19,5962 17,80
12,631 16,884 16,o0
629 1,855 765
285 1,265 584
638 -- -'-
63 -
6

3 ---

*5 .- ---



40974 438 3 425
S8,768 8, 48 7543
1;662 1,616 1,414
87 87 80.
S46 47 46
.* 37 41 37
28 .31 30
10 9 8
3 1 -8
10 S 8
2
10, 64i 2. 793. 45,0
51,617 52.159 45.600


compiled from internal Revenue records -nd Internal Revenue Bulletin.
i/ Preliminary. 2/ Total of unrounded numbers, 3/ Includes 32,000 pounds of lard
stearine. V/ Includes 92,000 pounds of lard flakes.


II




.






lTHE FATS A jU.L"N J dUI.LS SITUATION
THE FATS A$1m OILS SITUATION
1Q Q_4


Subject and Issue

Africa, French 'est and North :
Det, 31942

Argentine trade agreement --
Naov. 1941 -
:1
Coconut oil and copra -- Sept. 1939,:
Jan. 1945 :
Comparable prices ~- Feb. 1942 1

Cottonseed and cottonseed oil -
Aug. 1939, Sept. 1940, Sept. 1941 :

Disappearance, total apparent -
.domestic, Feb. 1940,Feb. 1941, :
Apr. 1942, Apr. 1943
:1
Drying oils -- May 1940, May 1941,
May1942, May 143, May 1944,
May 1945
Export outlook Dec. 1944
Family income, size of, effects on
consumption -- Dec. 1945
Flaxseed -- Sept. 1940, Aug. 1941 :
Foreign Trade Statistics Mar.1945:
June 1945.
Glycerin -- Feb. 1944, Dec. 1944
Greases, inedible -- Aug. 1940,
Sept. 1943 :
Italy July 1943, Aug. 1943 :
Lard -- Sept. 1943 -
lard and shortening July 1940,
July 1941, July 1942, June 1943,
July 1944, July 1945. :
Margarine Mar. 1940, Mar. 1941,
Feb. 1942, Feb. 1943, Mar. 1944; :
Mar. 1945 "
Marine animal oils -- Dec. 1940 :

Oil yield per acre, by States -
Mar. 1943, June 1943 :

Oil yield per unit of oil bearing :
materials June 1944


Olive oil -- Nov. 1942


Subject and Issue


Outlook -- Nbo. 1939, Dec. 1939, Apr.
1940, June 1940, May 1941, Oct. 1941,
Jan. 1942, Ott. 194; May 1943,
Sept. 1943, Oct. 1944, Oct. 1945

Peanuts and peanut oil Feb. 1942,
, Aug. l9424--Ag..:1943, .Sept. 1944
Philippine Islands -- Jan. 1945
Postwar prospects -' Sept. 1944, Oct.
1944, 3ec. 1944

Prices -- Aug. 1939, June 1940, Jan. 1941
Jan. 1942, Jan. 1943, Jan. 1944,
Jan. 1945

Processing capacity -- Aug. 1943, Aug.1944

Production -- Feb. 1940, Feb. 1941

Soap fats, rosin, and glycerin -- Aug.194C
June 1941, June 1942,'July 1943,
June 1944, June 1945


Southeast Europe -- December 1943


Soybeans -- Feb. 1942, Sept. 1942.
Aug. 1944
Statistical summary, 1912-39 -- Oct.1940
Subsidies -- Nov. 1943
Tallow, edible -- Oct. 1943
Tallow, inedible Aug. 1940, Oct. 1943

Utilization by classes of products -
Apr. 1939, Apr. 1940, Apr. 1941,
:Apt. 1942, Apr. 1943, Apr. 1944,
Apr. 1945
War, effect on outlook -- Dec. 1939,
June 1940, May 1941, Jan. 1942

Western Hemisphere Sept. 1940

World production Jan. 1940


:World situation May 1943, Oct. 1945




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3i 1r I08Ill57lll
3 1262 08905 2277


DEcCMBR 1945


S 20 -


BAE "SITUATIONT" REPORTS


* ty


-The Cotton Situation (Monthly) .

The Dairy Sitdation. (Mothlyt)
* ,
The Demand and Price Situation (Month) '

S he FPar Ihdome Situation monthlyy)

-The Fats and Oil* Sit.uation (Monthly),

The Feed Situation --. (Monthly)

The.Fruit'Situation : (Quarterly)

The Livestock and 'Wool Sittatio : (Monthly)
H t
The Marketing and Transpqotation Situation (Monthly)
,.-
The National Food Situatied (Monthly)

The 'Poultry and..Egg SituatiVn (Mont-hly)

The Tobacco Situation quarterly )

The Vegetable Situation (Quarterly), :

The Wheat Situation- (Bi-monthly eaett
monthly o9 .July
and Adiast)

The World Sugar-Situation (Annually),

The above reports arm available free--upon request.

Address requests to: .
*
Bureau of Arieulttural Econaelics'
U; S. Department of Agriculture
Wvshington 25, D. C. -

S. ... *. .

.. !. ,.


,. .1 *.


':'.

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' f
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* '~.