The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00070
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00070

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Fats and oils outlook & situation

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D S I T.u AT ION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS'. /
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

NOVEMBER 1945


EXPORTS OF LARD FROM THE UNITED STATES, 1910-45


POUNDS
, MILLIONSI


800



600



400



200



0
800



600



400



200



0


1945 PARTLY FORECAST


U. N OEPATMEINT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG 45034 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


Exports of lard in 1945 (including Army procurement for European relief) probably
will total 600 to 650 million pounds, compared with 886 million pounds in .1944 and 736
million pounds in 1943. In the next year or two, exports of lard probably will be
smaller than in the war years, but materially larger than in the years front 1935 to 1940.
In that period, drought curtailed production, and war in Europe restricted markets.
Chief non-European outlets for lard are Cuba and Mexico.


THE


POS 104


1945


.r







NOVF:iiajE 1945


Table 1.- T.holaesle prise per pound of fate, oils, and glyoeria at specified markets, and index
numbers of prices of ftot and oll,. October 1943 and 1944, August-October 1946

PRICES
S October 1 105
Se1948 i 1944- Augus a reptoer. etober
I Emast Cents en.s- Ctues 1emss

Butter. 92-score, Chicago ......................................... 41.8 41.5 41.6 41.6 41.
Butter. 92-score, Nq 'York ....................................... 42.5 42.2 42.2 42.2 48.2
Oleomargarine, dam. reg., Chicago ................................1 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.0
Shortening containAig animal fat. 1-pound cartons Chicago .......1 17.0 17.0 17.0 17.0 17.0
Lard, loose, Chicago .............................................. 12.8 12. 12.9 12.8 13.6
Lard, prime steam, tieresa, Chicago ..............................a 13.6 13.6 13.6 13.8 13.8
Lard. refined, 1-pound oartons, Chiago ..........................a 15.6 16.8 16.6 16.6 16.0
01eo oil, extra. tierces, Chicgo ................................. 13.0 11.0 13.0 11.0 13.0
Oleastearine, bbl., S. T. ...... ................................a 10.6 10.6 10.5 10.8 1C.6
Tslloa, cole. Chicago .......................................... 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9

Corn oil. crune, tanks. f.o.b. mills ............................. 12.8 12.8 12.e 12.8 12.5
Corn oil, edible, returnable drum. l.c.1., N. Y. ................ 16.2 16.6 16.6 16.6 16.6
Cottonseed oil, rude, tanks. f.o.b. S.S. mill .................. 1 12.8 12.0 12.8 12.8 12.8
Cottonseed oil. p.s.y., tank oars, N. Y. ......................... 14.0 14.33 4.3 14.3 14.3
Peanut oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ...........................a 13.0 13.0 13.0 13.0 13.0
Peanut oil, refined, edible (white). drums, N. Y. ................ 16.3 16. 6.6 16. 16.6 16.
Soybean oil, rude. tank oars. midweatern mills ..................a 11.8 11.8 11.8 11.8 11.9
Soybean oil, edible. drum., l.o.l., I. ......................... 16.0 15.2 1. 15.4 1.4
Sunflocer oil, semi-refined, tank oara, f.o.b. N. .............. 14.3 14. 4.3 14.3 14.3

Babassu oil, tank, N. Y. ........................................ --- 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1
Coconut oil, kn la, crude. c.i.f. Psoitfl Coast .............. 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.0
Coconut oil, Ceylon. crude. bulk, N. Y ....................... 11.5 11.8 11.8 11.8 11.8
Olive oil, California. edible. drums, ...................... 2.7 60.7 60.7 60.7 60.7
Palm oil, Congo, crude, bulk. N. Y / ........................... 11.4 11.4 11.4 11.4 11.4
Rape oil. refined, denatured, bulk, New Orleans .................. 2/11.6 11.6 11.6 11.6 11.6

Tallow, No. 1. inedible. Chicago .................................I 8.4 8.4 6.4 8.4 8.4
Crease, A White, Chlceio ......................................... 8.8 8.8 8.8 0.B 8.8
Menhaden oil, crude, tanks. f.o.b. Baltimore .....................s 8.9 8.7 8.9 8.9 8.9
Sardine oil, crude, tanks. Pacific Coeat ......................... 8.9 8.6 8.9 6.9 8.9
Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, druma, S. I. ................ 12.3 12.3 12.3 12.5 12.3
Cottonseed oil foots, raw. (50% T.F.A.) delivered, B st .......... 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.6

Linseed oil. raw. tank oars, Minneapolis ......................... 14.5 14.3 14.3 14.3 14.3
Linseed oil, raw, returnable drume, carlots, 1. Y. ............... 16.3 15.1 15.1 16.1 16.1
Oltelea oil, drums, f.o.b. N. Y. ................................ 26.2 20.3 24.8 24.6 24.8
Tung oil, returnable drums, oarlots. N. Y ....................... 39.0 39.0 39.0 39.0 39.0

Castor oil, No. 3, bbl.. M. Y. ................................... 13.8 13.8 13.6 13.8 13.8
Castor oil, No. 1, tanks, U. Y. .................................. 13.0 13.0 13.0 13.0 13.0
Castor oil, dehydrated, tanks, N. Y. ............................. 17.7 17.7 17.9 7I.8 17.8
Cod-liver oil. med. U.S.P.. bbl., H. Y. .......................... 38.5 30.6.2 33.2 35.4
Cod oil. Newfoundland, drum, N. Y. .............................. 12.0 11.6 11.5 11.5 11.7

Glycerin. Soaplye. basls 80%. tanks, N. i. ....................... /11.5 10.0 11.1 11.3 11.6

INDBX NUMBER (1924-29 S 100)

Eight domestic fats and oils (1910-14 = 100) ..................... 142 2 1 142 142 142
Eight domestic fats and olls ...................................... 101 101 101 101 101

All fats and oils (27 items) ..................................... 100 108 108 108 108
Grouped b origins
Animal ats ..................................................... 96 96 96 96
Marine animal oils ............................................. 132 130 131 131 132
Vegetable oils, domestic ........................................ 132 134 134 134 134
Vegetable ols. foreiCn ........................................ 157 186 165 166 166
.rouped b usel
Butter ......................................................... 9 93 93 93
Butter, seasonally adjusted ....................................i 90 90 96 92 90
Lard ........................................................... 105 105 105 105 10
Other food fata ................................................ 139 141 141 141 141
All food fats ................................................ 103 103 103 103 103
Soap fats ...................................................... 120 120 120 120 120
Drying oils .................................................... 150 149 149 148 148
Miscellaneous oils ............................................. 117 116 115 115 116
All industrial fats and oils ................................. 132 1S1 131 131 131
1
Prices compiled from Oil, Paint ana Drug Reporter. The National Provisioner. The Journal of Comnereo (New York), and
reports or Production and arketing Administration and Bureau of labor Statistics. Excise taxes and duties included
%here applicaola. Index number of earlier years beginning 1910 are gilvn in Technical 3uJlstln Nu. 717 (1S40) and
The Fats and Oils Situation beginning Deoember 1940.
1/ Three-cent processin; tax added to price as originally quoted. / C.t.f. New York. 3/ Druns or tanks.


- 2 -


















.:.: s ... .. .. L .. ..

Sl!::. iea of food fate for civilian consumption in the United Stetes

m: i may average 4,to 45 pounds per capital, compared with 41 to 42
fn: nA5 a5,''m average of 9s pounds in 1936-39, and a potential demand

at the 1945 level of prices of at least 50 pounds per capital. At present

t Iiihs, a:te most pronounced shortage in food fat supplies in 1946 will be

ai. -btter. Most of the increase in supplies in 1946 will be due to a rise

.' output' iof lard, but a. moderate expansion in butter production and declines

it its" if 'butter, margarine, and vegetabld oils also are likely.

"' W tdd etion of edible vegetable oils from domestic oilseeds in 1946

sP: iajL e slightly less than in .1945. Cottonseed oil production will be

A MuA l.ly sm:il in the first half of 1946, because of the small 1945 crop

of oottonseed. But in the second half of 1946 output of cottonseed oil

'Wobe'ly-winl be materially larger than a year earlier, as an increase in
Co jtdth acrepge in ldVf seems likely. Output of soybean oil in 1946 may be

J:igt iy less then in 1945. Some increase in peanut oil production is

; d.




NOVEMBER-1945 4- ; 4

Soap f.ts probably will b'.in somewhat larger supply in 1946 than in

1945, as a result of moderate.increpues in grease production and in imports

of copra. A larger supply of drying oils also will be available, reflecting

the increase in the domestic crop of flaxseed in 1945, Fnd a probable increase

in imports of Argentine flaxaead and resumption of imports of Chinese tung

oil in 1946. national income,. thoughh less than in 1945,: will be unusually

high next year. Consumer demand for fat-and-oil products will be strong.

In addition, there, will -be a .strong demand.for rebuilding inventories of

industrial fats end oils. Stocks of inedible tallow, grease, fish oils., linseed-

oil, and tung oil are now Pt exceptionally low levels, in relation to probable

use..

Returns to flaxseed producers for the 1946 crop will be supported.at

an average of S3.60- per bushel, Minneapolis basis, according to recent *

announcement.- This would be equivalent to an average of about S3.40 per bushel,

farm bp.sis. .Monthly aPverage .prices to fPrmers for.the 1945 crop, from July

through O.ctober,- were S2.89 per bushel. In addition, flpxseed farmers were

eligible this year for special payments of $5.00 per planted acr.ae-- equivalent

t.o 58 cents per bushel on the basis of the nat-ionel average yield per planted

acre.

Subsidies to butter manufacturers were withdrawn on October 31. -This

wrs.accompanied by an increase of 5 cents, per pound, effective November .,

in wholesale price ceilings on butter, except butter in storage on which the

subsidy had eprcP y toen paid. Butter prices aPdvanced in November, reflecting

the new ceilings. This rpas the first considerable increase since 1942 in the

price of any leading fat or oil. Prices of other fats end oils remain pt

ceilings.


-- November 15, 1945








.. Lard Product ioni ome setic *Consumptin"' -
to acrsg4in..

S? .. tei o of lard and -rndered- pork fat:-ip 1946..i.s tentatively fore-
ll ato '.4'b.'llion pctds, 306..i;lioB pounds more than estimated output
in 1949 but 800 million pounds less than the record production of 3.2 billion
1lll pounds in 1944. Hogs from the 1945 spring pig crop are being marketed later
and at heQaver weights than usual.' This may result in a .grger hog slaughter
S in the first 4 months 6f 1946 tNiW a year earlier. The yi.el.d -of -lard per hog
slaughtered also is likely to belaagethanTn early 1945, when export require-
-ments for fat pork cuts were unusually heavy. In May-September 1946, hog
slaughter will be larger than- year earlier, reflecting an increase in the
number of days farrowed in the '1945 fall season. Lard output in October -
December ndxt year.-.may bea.at. least-as large as in.'the corresponding months
o fR 19.45. 3-og 'sla&ghter..in. the .-.st 3 months of 1916 will be chiefly from the
1946 spring pig crop. A spring pig crot goal bf 52 million head, the same
: as the number seyead..i.n th.e...ss .-ng seF.on.of. 19w5, recently was announced by
ite- Department of Agriculture.

L.rd expor.ts. in .1 6 pr.obpbly will be smaller than the total of 600
to %5i m'llcii p&outrds in 1945, but will be iP.terially larger than in the
ageis, just beforaEthe war. From 1935 to 1940, lard exports from the United
S Stlates were severely curtailed, as a result of droughts rnd by war in Europe.
Annual average exports in 1935'40 were '172 million pounds, 'compared ,ith
.561 millionn pounds in 1930-34. In 1946, with world supplies of fats and oils
:m fll short, .there will be a strong European demand for United States lard.

S:': Sinc. World 'far I., the principal markets for United States lard have
b. e "e 'the United Kingdom, Germany, other Western European countries, and Latin
C -m i -mmiia For many years prior to 1934, a year of severe drought- followed by
reduced lard output, the United Kingdom toqk a relatively stable qu.ntitty
of.United States lard, with shipments averaging 262 million pounds'-annually-i
in 1930-34. In 1942-44, exports of lard to'the United Kingdom-'?eragbd--
461 million pounds annually, bit this quantity probably ..will be substantially
reduced in the next few years. Continental Europe,,chiefly Germany, was the
largest impo-rte'r of United States lard in the early and middle 1920's, but
in 1930-34 'f.pz4dortsdeclined to pn average of only 182 million pounds. In
1946,"the countries of western Europe will tpke at least as much as inl945 -
150 .t' 200 million pounds. Exports to Latin American countries in 1942-44
'averaged 99 million pounds annually, compared with 110 million pounds in
930-314. This market probably will continue to take about 100 million pounds
a year. Around 35 million pounds of lard are shipped annually to the territorial
possessions of the United States.

SA large quantity of lard was shipped under lend-lease to the Soviet
SJnion during the war, with a peak of 294 million pounds .in 1944. But it does
n ot seem probable-that the Soviet Union will be a major market for United
'l StatPs 'lard after immediate relief needs are met.







S, Table 2.- Lard;., Exports to specified countries, and shipments to
United States territories, '1930-34 and' 1942-45

Destination : Averaget 1942 1943 : 1944 : January-
S___ :'i1 -34 : August 1945
: Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil. lb.

Exports: .
United Kingdom ...: 261,5 485.1 504.4 393.9 146.0
Germany ..........: 112.1 -- --
Continental Europe;..
excluding Germany:
and the SoviettUnon: 69.6 .5 .8 10.1 135.1 1
Soviet 'Union .....: ./ 88.2- 155.5 293.9 105.2
Other countries .. : 117.9 77.8 75.6 160.9 57.6
Total .........: 561.1 651,6 736.4 858.8 4A3.9 2-
Shipments to U.S.
territor.ies.......: 23.0 32. 38.9 35.6 21.2
Total exports and
shipments .......: 594.1 684.4 775.3 894.4 465.1

Compiled from official records of the Bureau of the Census, except that
shipments to territories include quantities shipped under special programs
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, reported by USDA. Totals computed from
unrounded numbers. I Less than 50,000 pounds.
Assuming exports of 500 to 600 million pounds of lard in 1946 and use
of 55 million pounds in margarine and shortening (the average of recent years),
the balance available for total civilian and military use as lard would be
1,800 to 1,850 million pounds. This would be about 13 pounds per capital, com-
pared with an estimated domestic consumption of 11.7 pounds per capital in 1945,
and a long-time average (except the drought Deriod) of 13 to 14 pounds percapita
Slight Decrease Likely in Production
of Edible Vegetable Oils in 1 46
Total production of edible vegetable oils-from domestic oilseedst n
1946 may be slightly less than in 195. Output of cottonseed oil in the
first half of 1946 will be materially smaller than a year earlier, as a
result of the reduced 1945 crop of cottonseed. However, if cotton acreage
were increased in 1946 to a level mear that in the years just before th'e
war, cottonseed oil production in the Latter half of 1946 would be sub-
stantially larger than the unusually low outout in the corresponding period
of 1945. The total for the year may be slightly smaller than the total in 1945.

Production of soybean oil in 1946 may be slightly smaller than in 1945.
With a slight reduction indicated in the 1945 croo of soybeans and with a
strong export demand for soybeans, crushings in Janunry-Sentember 1946 are
likely to be a little smaller than a year earlier. Also, a reduction in
soybean acreage is probably in 1946 as a result of shifts to hay and pasture.
This would mean a slightly smaller soybean-oil output in October-December 1946
than in October-December 195. Crushings of peanuts and production of peanut
oil in 1946 probably will be somewhat greater than a year earlier, as a result
of an increase in the 1945 crop of peanuts and a reduction in military require-
ments for shelled peanut products.








p Moderely it 19_4

Butter production is expected to be slightly larger in 1946 6han
I 1 .te 1,720 million pounds estimated for 1945, with the increase coming in the
Il:DPesOn of flush production and later. Production is likely to remain below the
i vel of a year earlier during the first 3 months of .194,6, unless butter prices
t4; i e above present .levels. Exports of butter in .l0c including shipments to
iWited States territories are expected to return to the prewar level of about
10 million pounds. In 145, .rour.d 30 million pounds of butter have been
. exported, with approximately 25 million pounds (including butter oil and Cartea
t..ii~read) going under lend-lease to the Russian Army. Domestic supplies of butter
i* 1.i946 may be moderately larger than in 1945. Also, reduced military pro-
ia.'i' ent will add to civilian supplies per capital. Military takings of butter
It .diafrifg the war were more than twice as large, on a per capital basis, as civiliar
i' applies. The civilian supply per capital in 1946 will still be materially less
than prewar.

S...iilian fpply of Food Fats to Increase in
.46 But Likely to Remain Short of Demand

.. ...Present prepects for 1946 indicate a civilian supply of .44 to 45'
i pa;:: da.of food fats and oils per capital including butter in terms of actual
weight. This is comparable with an estimate of 41 to 42 pounds per capital
in 1945 and a 1935-39 average of 48 pounds per capital. With national income
expected to be at a high level in 1946, consumer demand for food fats and oils
probably will be strong enough-.to support a consumption of at least 50 pounds
per capita, with prices at present levels. This demand will keep prices of
food fats and oils at ceiling levels in 1946. If ceilings are raised or
removed,, prices of food fats will advance. With a continu-tion of prresent
.r:ices,. the gap between demand and supply probably will be narrower after mid-
.: 946-than in the first part of the year, principally because of increased
.otput of cottonseed oil and butter in relation to corresponding months of 1945.

S* .S Fat Situation To Improve in 1046

... ,Supplies of soap fats probably will increase in 1946. With hog
4 al gterq expected to be larger than in 1946, output of grease is likely to
increase moderately. Also, fairly substantial imports df Philippine copra
.are expected :in 1946. However, imports of coconut oil and copra from Ceylon
and the Soptt Sea islands,.which approached 200 million.pounds annually (in
ar,..:erms.of o.l' in 1944 add-1945, will be severely curtailed in 1946. Total
Sip.orts of coconut oil and copra (in t-rms of oil) probably will be less th.n
-halfas large as the 1937-41 average of 700 million pounds.

Military procurement of soap fpts will be substantially reduced in 1946.
-For 1945 as a whole, military takings of soa-p will total around 300 million
p. pounds in terms. bf fat preliminaryy) out of a total soap production for all
purposes of about 2,100 million pounds, in-terms of fat content.

Demand for soap fats will be strengthened during 1946 by the need to
Rebuild inventories of inedible tallow, grease, and fish oils. These inven-
Stories are now materially below normal.





'* :.I "; 1 .: :4 -"..
Increase in Spplies of Drying Oils i 1946 7" ." "
Dependent on Imports

,~~.Supplies of linseed oil continue short of demand at ceil ng prices,
despite peak--season crushing of the relatively large 1945 domestic..crop of
Sf-laxseed. Many Eastern seaboard mills, which depend largely on Argentine
flaxseed,- were closed from midsummer until recently. However, recent receipt
at these mills of some domestic and Argentine flaxseed have permitted re-
sumptiont of- cursing on a limited scale. .

Relief of the tightness in linseed-oil supplies will depend on arrival
of Argentine flaxs.ed in .volume. The 1945-46 Argentine crop, to be harvested
beginning in December., is expected to be smaller than average but' ubstantifl
larger than the 1944-45 crop. However, European demand for Argentine fl.xseed
is strong. United States supplies of drying oils in 1946 will.be increased
by resumption of imports of tung oil from China.

Reduction in military requirements for drying-oil products has already
permitted a substantial increase in use of such oils in civilian products
from the unusually low level of mid-1945.

Stocks of drying oils on September 1 were at an exceptionally low leave
Demand for oil to rebuild inventories will be an important part .of the total
demand for drying, oils in 1946.

Returns per Bushel for 1q46 Flaxseed
To Be Supported Pt $3.-
Minneapolis Basis

It WFS announced on Novr-ber 8 that returns to growers forE flaxseed
harvested in 1946 will be supported, by acreage payments or otherwise,' at
an average level equivalent to $3.60 per bushel, Minneapolis basis. This
would mean a national season average return to farmers in 1946-47 of about
$3.40 per bushel (farm brsis), compared with an Everage. pice-of $2.89 per
bushel in July-October 1945, plus a payment of $5.00 per plafttd acre,
equivalent to 58 cnnts per bushel on the basis of the national average yield
of 8.6 bushels per planted acre in 1945. Farmers who pplnted flaxsed. in 194!
up to their fprm acreage goals were eligible f.or the paymaht of $5..00pper acr,

Planted acreage.of flaxseed in the United States for harvest in 1945
wd 4.1 million acres compared .rith: 3.1 million acres a year earlier. Prices
to farmers wrrc approximately thr- spme for both crops, but in 1945 the ad-
ditional payment of S5;00 per acre was offered. With a high average return pi
bushel guaranteed for the 1946 crop, planted Pcrepge is likely to be main-
tained at a high level next season-

A strong demand for linseed oil is anticipated in 1946-47, on the
basis of-a high rpte of industripl..production and a.return of building
activity to P relatively high level.


NOVEMBER 1945"


- a -












ei-s,' and- -no.d -tt4,br inx -Tet 'Ok-lahoma Vaidd -Xikan$as in
orred-aced. the Iate cotton 6-rop and paused some damaggetob peanut s
oup ad t~hseag, 13ut, not yet- tbreshed. On hebisof
ionw, iwcso tose this year would ba 3'.8,0
thd 19P460 vekheten Ie s i lit a~nd. seea. The
'Wig) 4& E qi00 fi5: t& 94 'atpt of p:e anut r
@d now al, 2,:174 million ppounds, compared, with b2, 260
indidd on Oct6 er' or qn wi ro f 1 1 m 011i


,'Hvvd.g of soybea&_s Iac began, in Olcttoer, revealed le 'as" wel-
pb4S and smaller bVeans than had"'been expected.' As- a result, thie..
itak *or the 1i4 soy hn-crop-ki'-1191 aflo uhl,6
jbealssti ndicerted a 0t alead2 lin uhl
hitr1944 op

-O~ltees:. Yield pe ac ad productin 1943-45:


Ind' : Indt-1
Vni't 1943 : 1944 :cai ed Viit .1943: i944,:,. a.ted
1945. : :1945

1.. 18. 19.4 19.0::Mil. pu. 19 1 1929.9 190.6

8.2 5. .:;" :51-9 g 35 6

Se ed Lb 427 .4g2 4 20 :fl'00otous: 4AV 4,901 _3.EE
if 8 60 61q2 .:i.1.215 2,111 2,174

peracr hrvetedfo bens;flxsed,-orplmted aare; cotton*.
er acre in cuiltivation Juily I-, peau tsjpei acre',pitkea and: thres~he& q



IPreliminary estimates Aindiate. that, _*rli peanut )#oductiori in 1945,
I? abo i0.11 on, pounds, 0.4 'billion pounds more~than n 1944 and
liqn pounds more, that in 1953.A la~rge- part of the increase oder
4 n eqg: 4 te l1ead~ing, au-pouigf~to of Yren'ch-West Arica,"
^ .7mpikj'6q ppojuds' Is' ia(dicated,, 270 million pounds more than,
Refetta y'6,7-iz ear ier
herddchedUniteid-~ae cro -e ilon' pounds isaboult -60
St tO rounds 2,rg174h inn19ii.































Argent.ina....... ..- .. ........... 75 : : 4
Sst-imated total ..:..........: 257 54 .
i Oceania (including Australia) '
Estimated to'dl ........'...... 13 18 ":

Est impt ed totd: total'.......: 18,573- .19,'693: 2Q

Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations (Foreign Crps aznd.-MeTkliA
October 22, 1945). :!
I/ Revised. 2 Free..China only. 3/. Unofficial estimate'. Produ:e
available; exports are shown.
World Flaxseed Outpit Up in '194
World flaxseed production in 1945 (including Southern' H
partly harvested in 1946) may total about 150 millionbuehel:,
latest indications:. This is 26 million bushelsb mbr. than last yea
million bushels more thah the 1935-39 average.. TheUniead Ptatee sc
year is estimated.at 35.6 million bushels, 12.1 millpn" bushels mo g
last yeer... No official estimate of the Argentine.'c0op., to be haavT.
beginning.,i December, has yet been made. Abou 4 .6 million acres'j:j`
planted.ths year, 2 percent less than in 1944t Bt unusually farmsv
weather since planting time is expected to refalt in a i*bstantial
output this year than in 1944-45, when yieldswere severely re*aduil
drought. Output of fleaseed.in India in 1945'ie placqd.at 15;6 jit
bushels, compared with 15.2 million bushels last'.year... .
'iT
.u r... :... I :s..
-'A


014 ... t%
: ~. '..
... **; ,.*. ..* :^;A;,'aa


I







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'A' 24 m,4
m10-
4.1



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41



,E~M ACTI
f rSoea4il:
7L
ii oe---2 alth







Rgltion29 The'new cip "t y
butter,, dell ered-at Ghicago, '46.oents qa
retaia, br-f permit incre'_ qfgig & td 4_
Aptow d(anbsai -b g The, new i:t,%Ii 9 i
6ttcti e (mber-1 ftor edit tor'. q which t0
pa~id'Pie subject A.t th 1AMl na-s.,* a p
t o the Trdgy ,de average, tetail'g~p t' nl
rodent.. months. prott om was "90 r

ft oM e ,IV reqA 0 1A. iie'iseorit- tt gt 3,yigha1
approxiatb ,ely ihe levels proyailin&g in, 44.9 Fu\es
in Jue 1.3 as Parto the pTrog 'mto' hold the, cast' of Wn
P 6anuat BriM tr'lbl Ended-.
r ide .nk

Oub`sidy paymentOF- by' Commodity. Gr hi Corpotatlon to,
factur ers were.:ended. atbe T1 Thes e pm 8,sca.e: %lit
of, 5.pacnts' p er'--pound( from X ioembdl o6uut0l
rateof .0 epts per pbund~fro epmbe 1. .1459 'io Ir
ments had Ve'en'--.ade ol q t.utppce nfti~
(2 pouids or, 1"s, .S **
Xanuf actur ersp c~elling -Lrices for pea4ngt bte pcei
tainers were: raised 4, cents, Ter. pound onl 1pyembbr 1 by hAtnB p
RMR43.TMF, aion was taken tn.a-cwnsia e, lxareeres, f4
of the subsioy. Under,-regulations governing whpj.es.Al mirtf
ceilings retail -orices of peanilt butter: Wayadvaniqe 04pproATMMOA
Round where' the 4-cent increa-se in -orocessors" ceiling: isfu~ll:-,FeT
The average reta il price of -peanut butter in recent- m?-nt.hs-i 1. e
of the United States 'was 23.6 cents per pound.

Shortening Subsid42 To Re.Terminated

It wAs announced tn November that, shortening subsidi14'WO4
on or before December 331, 1945. Under the present. *rogram, -,in-'
a-Dcember 1411, shortening manuf tct urers -a re el11igibe f oi s
Commodity Credit Corporation on shortening sold- to whole salesr, re 1
cons-umers and sold -intdrum, -or 'tierces. Tthe ate.0 o,:.PaYMent-iz .0.2
pound on the yk-getable.oil content -of, bydrog~enateda ahrein
pound on th ~v-geta.ble-oil content 'of 6tandar& shorteInVn.

47peciflc ykaxfmams. EstF.blished for
Oliveq Oi IT06a

Amendment 51 to Maximuz Price Regulation 53*, effeotitve c~tob~
established s-pecif ic maximum prices for olive oil Rfodt,0 s? fVsullg
at 17 cents per pound. This 'maximum applies to do res t ibc Oil At
foo.b. seller's plant, aid to imported oil in tank..-crs, f 0.b e
An additional cent 1per p'ound may be charged-flor. ail sld in. diltzs,
"i foots" in an inedible oil. extracted froia o1treaplressCk e
of solvents, and. is used ma inly in soap manuf aptur GO
... ...,






ii6
m4
t f ttl11v v1lt o g
to Fb`Od8|
75-
IIm
5* cn f t tlOtlt
; _o a t ,... ............ ........
/ert` i~oro-s~
a m l Vp
Im44"
4I, 4 ,a
| A b etq1I v d gr 6
& !`ah g e
t ,p t t 6 r e
#0 O i
Ili Ig h fr 6tne-nndm TdgOdojs ''








e 6. app lt* $ 6yltlon ou'ut6


-tem.







ardad readeted. -ft, Idt--.
.Inspected z.........t12 8
Other .. .: [
To tal ...-...---------.
Editle. tallow,% oleasteatinezol0o
41 stock-, "d 2ot0e i '......-, .13 .
oorn ai /. .. 6 4. .. *155 2
Cotthdeed-oil~~ '........... 48 14-396- 131
SP it. n il 097.. .. 2 .. 1 2 .k 52
Inedible tallow and greases ....:116 1742' 1.
Khrine animal oils .............. '23 158, .
inseed oil Sj .*********** *-1 9
ADther ............ .. .. .021 .
Total, from domesti-c mat erial~s ...8


rsof oil &a&d factoy rocion
bfOi~l fr-om import2LLmatLbrlale ..-S2 1_4
'Total supply ...........12.8

Eport, an,,Shwmeiata
To 04 roore ....... ..9 1_6 .1
12851Dec chd'-asi-s) :2. 2O.2,
Domest ic s":ra J(.0 l
Milit~aby prcrmetexc"l. rel ief -. 1
Esti1maEted civ-ilian. disappearance -9. .
: Ponds pounds
Civilian disappearance, per capit a' 7 70

'Tompiled from reports of the Bureau of the Genous,: Fish andf Vildliff Se
9.Si Department of. Agriculture. Totals compouted fom mArounded numbers
IVPartly f forecast.
Total production minus oil equivaleritr imported Argehttibas ads
Total production minus oil equivalent of Aet imports of f laxseed,
Imports iholude shortening and soap in t erms of fat conteatL. 4XPOr
margarine, shortening, and, soap in terms of fat. content. -procuxement









IT x
MUM __



1944
lb- X0. W k" J611F, LW,. Nil. lb. Mil.-
4

7 6".4 6.4

jl* 6 0i 2.3
.2

.......... ...... %8.& 17-
9 37.5 31.6 1.0
2.7 4.3,
.6
A
:7. 2, 'T; 04.0"

;qt; 27. 2 '*.6 3 .0,
13. c 2.1
...... 14 2 I.,fi .In 2.7 1,340
26.7 26.7 E.JL IlL 24.2,

............... .3
all, upz


............................. Ti4 .x .z
# ....... L ....... ......... 4- 7.4. 5 .0
.............................
.......... 6..4
.... .....

..I ...... AC3
3.3 1
7AL
'34iq S 9


_ef,
-7-
.......... ji's
oil .............. Pis


..............
fats, .- ...... 1:1 q/7.0. lo. 4'..
-IV 6
ij*ile. shipmentisto 134,Se 5.5 .9.0
............. 6217, titi 71U.49 Z 9
lrl-lry rats. .............. 5717.4 MS.
Oil-bearing. AmRt,6 tsmM of oU) F

..............
................ ......
75 4 Al4.0. j3i$
er an ....... IV
... .......... ... 5T. 2
Wridols CU ainout a3
(45 1r;ent) ....... 1 6.0 awi.3
r;"t) ................
I -
Aeot' (7 par"nt) .............. t rM

..........

... . ...
lwnuftced produdtc (;rmt ao4tent)

J, 1 ......... ...... k, 1. 4444

V, a 90 e7,
JZ
GrUnd, total

............. 1,20&44, 6 74 .'6 .6724

Ccimmrcs of the UnAted States', racwrda. of.. the BLr"u, of 't1wn qckLaus and mporUx
4tum"w;, TA numb6irs.
lt _JZJU 4if Abovol; rr'alcurement by the tkrzW ilm NA5 Vor R4r*pmm:.r*1i4f, 6.5 odlaiox poup4o_
o abop. F"our ipf margRri", shortening, mis* amp by Aluarl"a aoij C;roma,
a 194C, n 'JO "XA] lion pQLMd 6 In I M
orj,s of, blatt'"'. a" mwaufRQtw-edjproeu6t90 ?*s4drtw_:of cocanut* pa2ft, ftn# t
Ani$40w0oi*t0 J3 1044 and 1946 of ceptaij, quantities of whul* oil and sunflower ctl:
ox". lvda'apeolal -progriya. d WkA Jim IFU abd 1946. Pr6ljtdn&r3r.
VdAgtr4 of t'jutter oi I mad sprdp
Us (rvy). These waremat rl"Hm6rrted a r,
i"'e, twelkhm of clent. / -1, 1
193"1, 3b per























I'Tallow, inedible .............. 681.7 ,617.2 177.7 llX8 i)
Grease, excluding wool grease 455.0 349.7 163.7 75 N', ...
.iPal.m oil ./ ..............-- -- 54.1 71
Fish oil ...................: 75.7 66.1 109.1 60.~1
Marine mammal oil ............: .1 -- 51.7
Olive oil, inedible and foots' : 4 4/
Total slow-lathering oils .. 1.212.5 1.0 59.7
Babassu oil 3/ ................J lJ 5.7 i. n.
Coconut oil ./ ........... 8.9 -1 .3 103.5 124.4
Palm-kernel oil 0/ ...........:__ 4 5 iL
Total lauric-acid oils .....: 8.9' 114.3 109.2_
Drying : ". a
..Castor oil, dehydrated J .....I 55.6 *41.5 11.1 .4
L Linseed oil ................... : 704.6 281.2 23.0 15.:
Oiticica oil ............... 4/ 44 77
Perilla oil ............. -- .1 ,
Tung oil ......................: 41_ J 41 24
STotal drying oils .........: 760.2 322.7 363.6 .17
theirr industrial :...::"
ieat's-foot oil ..............: 1.5 1,6 '2.5 1U9
Wool grease ...................: 11.1 11.8 3.7 2.9 ::
Cod oil and fia-liver oils ... 6.5 '4.2 16.0 1.3 ... '
SCastor oil, No. 1 and No. 3 8/ : 51.5 65.6S 42.6 .11.9. -
R ape oil ..................... : -- -- 15.6 18.2
> Other vegetable oils ..........: 23.2 82.1J. .. 5.. ......r
Total ...................... : 93j. .165. 115.1 ..
Grand Total..... ......,...; 6.-8169 5.575a.7 2.58-.6
-Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census, except as noted, Data..
stockss held by Government in reported positions. Totals commuted from ua
numberse. 'i ';
j Creamery butter *nro'Luction, and cold-storage stocks, U.S, Department of'.t.
Federally inspedted production, USL&. / Stocks, crude oil plus ref 1in*
k"verted to crude basis by dividing by the following factors' Babasseu, aCIi
.seed, palm, and Dalm-kernel oils. 0.93; coconut, peanut and soyvea ::oite0,
/J Included ih other vegetable oils. N/ot rorted. 6/ .cru&e i .:: 4,i
:to crude basis by dividing by 0.88. 8 Estimated quantity Lsed n 6W
phydrated castor oil excluded from production,. ...*.;,i:
...a.. .. .. ,, :, ". it U :M:. :is e
..i :: '... ~ ~~~~~: .:.... .. ,,.. ..; ...; ,:...:., ..... ... ....,m ..:'.,.







Srane. y.-' -rrice receive oy xermers pna prices at terminaj
markets for specified oil-bearingmeterials and oilmeals
October 1943 Pnd 1944, August-October 1945

Oilseeds

.* October 1945
Item : Unit : : __
S____1943 194 : Aug. : .Sept.: Oct.
: : Dollars Dollars Dollars Do 1ra_: Dllars
r-beans, Brazilian,
.o.b. Brazilian ports .....: Long ton 75.00 61.00 82.50 s2.50 64.50
tonueed, United States
rage ....................: Short ton : 52.50 52.70 52.50 51 -40 51.00
eed, No. 1, Minneapolis .: Bushel : 2.99 3.10 3.10 3.10 310
eed, United States
roage ................;...: Bushel 2.79 2.90 2.89 2.89 289
umata, No. I shelled,
S.panish, Southeastern
Shipping points ............ 100 pounds: 14.00 14.25 14.25 314.25 14.25
nuts, United States
average ....................: 100 pounds: 7.05 7.71 8.19 8.29 8.06
Qbeans, No. 2 Yellow,
;ticago ....................: Bushel : 1.8 2. 2. 2.1 2.17 2.11
beans, United States
.e.rage ....................: Bushel : 1.80 2.04 2.12 2.07 2.06


era meal, Los Angeles ......:
ittonseed meal, 41 percent ..:
protein, Memphis ...........:
ittonseed meal, 41 percent
protein, Chicago ...........:
.seed meal, 32 percent
protein, Minneapolis .......
)seed meal, 34 percent
.protein, New York ..........:
pnut meal, 45 percent
protein, f.o.b. South-
epstern mills ..............
rfbean meal, 41 percent
protein, Chicago ...........


Short ton :




11 1 :


n I :
1) I:


Oilseed Meals 1/

51.50 49.so /50.0o 5. 950 41o 50

4s.50 4s.50 48.75 4kz75 4s75

54.45 54.45 54.75 54.75 +,75

45.50 45-50 4550 45.50 45.50


249.00 2/49.00


53.00 53.00


" : 51.90 52.00


49.00 49.00 49.00


53.00 53.00 .53.00

52.00 52.00 52.00


piled from Oil, PPint and Drug Reporter, Daily Merket Record (MinnepolZs),
Lcego Journal of Commerce, reports of the Bureru of Agriculturrl Economics,
I records of Production and Marketing Administration.
Bagged, carlots. A
original quotation adjusted to bagged-cprlots basis.





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I UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
S IIIIIIIIMIIlll3 HjI2IIIII
3 1262 08905 2129