The Fats and oils situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00069
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00069

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text









S FT' AT ION


UNITED

SOS 107


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMI'CS
STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

MAICH AF
i i


USE OF FATS AND OILS IN OLEOMARGARINE. 1922-45
POUNDS
MILLIONSS,


'RIL 1946


SOrBaAN OIL LESS rTAN 800 POUNDS


U. C.DIPmTMINT or AmIIOCUTUE


EE.9 43344 SUNIEA OP aOh'CULTUIAL ECONOMICs


Cottonseed and soybean oils were the principal fats used in oleomargarine in 1945,
a. another recent years. The limited supplies of coconut, babassu, and palm-kernel oils
: frvai lable since early 1942 have been reserved for use in non-food products. In recent
:':',: .-years margarine has contained very little oil or fat of foreign origin.
S Use of fats and oils in margarine probably will decline in 1946, reflecting reduced
production for export and smaller quotas of fats for civilian margarine in the first half
;.i: of 21946 than a year earlier.


r.hT











1
I: .r k


1.. ,.


N...
:; ;K. *' : :'
.: :


..... ..
. *:
.;:: If


* 'I




4; *;


MABRC-APRIL 1940 2 -

Table 1 .- Wholesale price pe. pound of fate, oils, and glycerin at specified markets, mad index
numbers of ?riose of fat# and oils, January, February, and December 1945
January and February 1946


PRICES
Item


Butter, 92-acore, Chicago .........................................
Butter. 92-score, New York .................................... ..
Oleomargarine, dam. veg., Chicago .................................
Shortening containing animal fat, 1-pound cartons, Chicago ........
Lard, loose, Chicago .............................................. I
Lard. prime steam, tierces, Chicago ..............................
Lard, refined, 1-pound cartons, Chicago ...........................
Oleo oil, extra, tierces, Chicago ................................s
Oleostearine, kbl., N. Y. ...........................................
Tallow, edible, Chicago ...........................................

Corn oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ...............................
Corn oil, edible, returnable drums, 1.o.., N. Y. .................
Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. S.B. mills ...................
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., tank cars, N. Y. ..........................
Peanut oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ............................
peanut oil, refined, edible (white). drums, N. Y. .................
Soybean oil, crude, tank oars, midwestern mille ...................
Soybean oil, edible drums, 1.c.1., N. Y. ..........................
Sunflower oil, semi-refined, tank cars, f.o.b. N. Y. ...............

Babassu oil, tanks. N. Y. .........................................
Coconut oil, Manila, crude, o.i.f. Pacific Coast 1 ...............s
Coconut oil, Ceylon, crude, bulk, N. Y. I/ .......................
Olive oil, California, edible, drums, N. Y. .......................
Olive-oil foots, imported, drums, carlots, New York ...............
Palm oil, Congo, crude, bulk, N. Y. 1/ ............................
Rapeseed oil, refined, denatured, buTk, fNew Orleans ...............

Tallow, No. 1, inedible. Chicago ..................................
Grease. A White, Chicago ...........................................
Menhaden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore ......................
Sardine oil, crude, tanks, Pacific Coast ..........................
Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, drums, N. Y. .................
Cottonseed oil foots, raw, (50% T.F.A.) delivered, East ...........

Linseed oil, raw, tank cars, Minneapolis ..........................
Linseed oil, raw, returnable drums, oarlota, N. Y. ................
Oitlcica oil, drums, f.o.b. N. Y. .................................
Tung oil, returnable drums, carlots, N. Y. ........................

Castor oil, No. 3, bbl., N. Y. ....................................
Castor oil, No. 1, tanks, V. Y. ...................................
Castor oil, dehydrated, tanks, N. Y. ..............................:
Cod-liver oil, men. 0.S.P., bbl.. N. Y. ...........................
Cod oil, Newfounalana, drums, N. Y. ...............................

Glycerin, Soaplye, basis 80BO, tanks, N. Y. ........................


INDEX NUMBERS (1935-39 2 100)


Eight domestic fate and oils (1910-14 = 100) ......................
Eight domestic fate and oila ................ (.72*) ...............

All fats and oils (27 items) ............... (.73*) ...............a
Grouped by origins
Animal fats .............................. (.69 ) ...............
Marine animal oils ....................... (.77) ................
Vegetable aoils, domestic ................. (.84) ...............
Vegetable oils, foreign .................. (.88*) ...............
Grouped by use
Butter ................................... (.67* ...............:
Butter, seasonally adjusted .............. (.67 ...............
Lard ..................................... .78* ) ...............
Other food fats ....................... (.84 ...............
All food fats .......................... .71 ...............
Soap fats ............................... .80* .............a
Drying oils ............................. .8 ................
Miscellaneous oils ....................... .71') ...............
All industrial fate and oils ............ (.82E) ...............


I


--


142 142
140 140

148 148

139 139
170 170
160 160
177 177

139 139
137 134
135 135
168 168
145 145
150 150
175 175
154 154
160 160


1 1ae4


I


I


Prices compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, The National Provisioner, The Journal of Comeroe (Now York), and
reports of Production and Marketing Administration and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Exaise taxes and duties included
where applicable. Index numbers of earlier years beginning 1910 are given in Teohnical Bulletin No. 737 (1940) and
The Pats and Oils Situation beginning December 1940.
/ Three-oent processing tax added to price as originally quoted. 2/ oNw York. / Revised. "'altiply by this factor
to convert current index number (1935-39 = 100) to old basis (1924-z9 : 100).


---- ----


January
Cents

41.5
42.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
13.0
10.5
9.9

12.8
16.5
12.8
14.3
13.0
16.5
11.8
15.2
14.3

11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7

11.4
11.6

8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
12.3
3.6

14.3
15.1
20.4
39.0

13.8
13.0
17.7
30.6
11.5

10.0


I N4b
i February
Cents

41.5
42.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
13.0
10.5
9.9

12.8
16.6
12.8
14.3
13.0
16.5
11.8
16.5
14.3

11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7

11.4
11.6

8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
12.3
3.6

14.5
15.1
21.9
59.0

15.8
13.0
17.8
50.6
11.5

10.0


pecember
Cents

46.5
47.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
15.8
15.6
13.0
10.5
9.9

12.8
16.6
12.8
14.3
13.0
16.5
11.8
16.4
14.3

11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7
18.0
11.4
11.6

8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
12.5
3.6

14.3
15.1
3/24.4
39.0

13.8
13.0
/17.5
35.2
11.9

11.5


January
Cents

48.5
47.2
19.0
17.0
12.8


13.0
15.6
18.0
10.5
9.9

12.8
16.6
12.8
14.3
13.0
16.5
11.8
18.4
14.3

11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7
18.0
11.4
2/13.0

8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
12.3
5.6

14.3
15.1
24.4
39.0

13.8
15.6
13.0
17.6
35.2
11.9

11.5


a FeDruary
Cents

46.5
47.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
18.0
10.6
9.9

12.8
16.6
12.8
14.3
13.0
16.5
11.8
15.4
14.5

11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7
18.0
11.4
2/3.0

6.4
6.8
8,9
8.9
12.5
3.6

14.5
15.1
24.7
89.0

14.0
13.3
18.0
35.2
11.9

11.5





i PS-107


r


w


-3 -
--------.._*>>_---------------------------------------
THE FATS AND 0ILS S SITUATION


Approved by Outlook and Situation Board, March 22, 1946

: Contents .
Pago :
C


s Summary ....................... 3 :
: .Outlook ....................... 6 :
: Government Actions ............ 12 s
: Recent Developments ........... 14 :
: Margarine, 1945 and 1946 ...... 15 :


SUMIUARY

The prospective soybean acreage to be grown along forc.ll purposes this

year on the basis of farmers' plans on March 1 is 11.8 million acres, 12

.percent loss than in 1945. Flaxsood acreage planted this season may total

3.5 million acres, 14 percent less than a year earlier. The acreage of.

. peanuts to be grown alone for all purposes may be about 3.8 million acres,

down 5 percent from last year. No information on cotton acreage will be

available until July. Farmers' decisions to reduce soybean, flaxsood, and

peanut acreages this year apparently are based mainly on moderately higher

prices reqcived for competing crops --corn, vzhoat, and cotton -- this season

than last. Prices for oilcrops are little changed from those of a year ago.

Support prices for 1946-crop soybeans will be the same as those in effect in

the current season, and nearly the some for peanuts, Direct payments will

be made to growers oh sales of .1946-crop flaxsood, with the payments roprc-

sonting the difference botimon the support price of $3.60 per bushol,

Minnoapolis basis, and the market price under ceilings. For 1945-crop flax-

soo, growers received returns on the basis of a market price of $3.10 per

bushol, Minnoepolis, plus an acreage payment equivalent on the average, to over

60 cents per bushel on flaoisod sold.




i.ARCH-APRIL 1946 4.-

A larger soybean acreage may be planted this year than indicated on

the basis of the Mirrch 1 reports, because of th'o" icroaso- .in .th national

soybean goal from 9.6 million to 10.7 million acres to be harvcstod for

beans, announced in lato February, and bocauso the 1946 base support price

of $2.04 per bushel, oqual to the 1945 support, was announced only a few

days before farmers reported their prospective .plantings .March 1

plans are subject to changodcponding in part on weather conditions during

the planting season.

Prospects for hog slaughter and for lard and grease production in 1946-47

are fully as significant, ir. the outlook for production of fats and oils next

season, as prospects for oilseeds. Farmers' reports last December pointed to

a 4-percent increase in the number o sows to farrow this spring compared with

last. This indication is borro out in part by a 4-porcont increase in the

number of sors and gilts 6 mor ths old and over on f.frms January 1, 1946 compand

with a year earlier ..nd b:y cortinu-ation of the hog-corn price ratio through this

winter at a level moderately above the lo.g-time aLvoragc. An increase in the

pig crop this spring conp.rcd with last will provide more hogs for slaughter

in the fall and wirntor of 1946-47 than in the past fall and vwintor.

World supplies of fats a-.;:d oils will remain short of demand this year

and probably next. All recent, reports indicate that rocorory of exports from

the Far East :r.d production of anir.-.l fats in Europe -rill be gradual. Pro-

liminary indications are that Antarctic wihalo-oil production in the current

season is less than ono-thirrl of prowar. The srmno difficulties oncountor'od

in the Philippines in arranging shipping, providing .trade goods, and roorgadizirg

trade are being not in other parts of Asia freed from Japanese control. In

Europe, toh grain crisis will prveont any increase in animal-fat output this

year. Fat production in Europe 'in the 1945-46 crop year is estimated to be





i* .ft-1.07- 5-

T".
Smatorially bolow the prewar level.. On the basis of the oxporionce following

World War I, it will be at least 5 years before European output of animal

,fats will approach the prewar level. Export supplies of fats and oils in

1946 from world surplus-producing areas (North America excluded) arc tentatively

estimated at about 5.5 billion pounds, over 1 billion pounds more than in

1945 but 4 billion pounds less than prewar.

A moderate increase in civilian supplies of butter in the United States

is likely this spring and summer as a result of the seasonal increase in

butter production. Hovrvor-, unless butter is stored in sizable quantities

during the flush-production season, supplies are likely to become extremely

short again next fall and winter. For 1946 as a wvholo, civilian supplies

of all food fats per person -- butter, margarine, lard, other shortening

and edible oils -- may be close to the ,2 pounds consumed last year, with no

significant increase in any of the major items. At this lerel, supplies per

person will be 6 pounds bolovthe 1935-39 average and at least 8 pounds below

demand at present prices.

Little improvement in supplies of oils and fats for industrial (non-food)

use is in prospect before the lr.tter half of the year. Stocks of inedible

fats are unusually small. The strinroncry in linseed oil supplies was intensi-

fied in January and February by a slow movomont of flnxsood to terminal

markets, despite the oxistrnce of substantial supplies that apparently a.rc

still in country positions. Imports of flaxsood, though expected to incrc.so

this year, wore small in January and February. Negotiations for shipment

of now-crop Uruguayan and Argentine flaxsood wore still under vay in early

March. Exports of copra from the Philippines from September 1945 through






I,'ARCH-,PRIL 1946 6..-

February 1946 tot:.lod approximately 28,000 long tons; most of this quantity

was shipped in January r.nd February and will roach the United States this

spring. An increasing rate of imports of copra is likely during the remainder

of the year, but under the proposed Combined Food Board allocations imports

of other industrial fats such Ls palm oil and tallow may be loss in 1946 than

in 1945.

Output of margarine in 1945 totaled 613 million pounds, 25 million

pounds more than :a yer r earlier .nd only 1 million pounds less than in 1943,

the peak year to date. Production for Government agencies (largely for lond-

lease) r.nd for commercial exports was.somewhat reduced from the 1944 level.

But production for civilians, a+ 5241 million pounds, was 26 million pounds

larger than .: year earlier and was the ln.rgk-st on record. Cottonseed and

soybean oils co:nstitulted 92 percent of the total of all fats and oils used

in Margarine in 1945, compared --nth 80 p.ercort in 194-1. Somewhat moro

cottonsood oil ti.Lan so;.boer.n oil .ras used in both years. Production of

margarine nay decline in 19416 in viow of the prospective reduction in exports,

-.nd the -ov;or quotas of oils and fats for use in civilian nargarino in the

first half compared with the first half of 1945.

OUTLOOK

'TsCKGROUlJD. Fats and oils woro in f-irly l-rgo supply in the
spring c.nd summer of 1944, chiefly as a result of record pro-
duction of la.rd and groaso in the first half of that year. Pricos
of lard, grease, and some gr-.dos of fish oil were slightly blow
ceilings for part of the yo:.r. In early 19415, hoeover, supplies
of fats and oils ag-in bccamO short (table 10). Lard output
in 1945 v.s about 30 percent smr.llor tl nn in 1944. Production
of butter, groeso, a.nd linseed oil also declined. Domestic
-.nd export dcmand for fats and oils remained strong.




708-107 7 -.

Altor tho end of hostilities in August 1945, civilian
supplies woro icroasod nodoratoly.by reductions in the rato of
military procuronont and by'rolodso to civilians of some military
stocks of fats, notably butter. However, the gap between supplies
of fats ard oils and.donand at coiling prices remained wide. A
renowod doclino in butter production bog-n last fall, following
ronoval of"rostrietions on production or sales of fluid milk, cream-
and 'ico croan.' "Inventorios" of oils and fats are unusually small.
Prices o0 all fats nnd oils aro currently at'ceilings.

Reductions in Soybean laxseed, and
.Poanut'Acreages Likely This Year

A reduction this year in planted acreages of soybeans, flaxseed,
and peanuts is indicated by farmers' plPns reported about March 1. The
indicated acreage of soybeans to be grown Plone for all purposes is
11,840,000 acres, 12.percent less than last ye.r. A few days before March 1,
the goal for soybeans to be hPrvested as beans was increased from 9,590,000
acres to 10,700,000 acres, only slightly less than the 10,873,000 rcres
harvested for beans in 1945. The announcement that 1946 support prices for
soybeans would be as high as in 1945 was not m.de until late February.
Farmers' plans on March 1 probably did not fully reflect changes that will
be made on the basis of these announcements. The prospective acreage to be
planted to flaxseed this year is 3,497,000 acres, 14 percent less than l-st
year and 19 percent below the goal of 4,300,000 acres. However, a larger
percentage of the total national acreage of flaxseed probably will be in
the higher-yielding Stptes this year than last. The prospective acreage
of peanuts to be grown alone for all'purposes this year is 3,759,000 acres,
5 percent less than last yerr but 16 percent above the goal of 3,25C,000
acres grown alone for all purposes, No official report of cotton acreage
will be available until July. The 1946 cotton goal is 20,200,000 rare in
cultivation July 1, 11 percent more than last year.

Prices of Competing Crops Advrnce in
Relation to Prices of Oilcrops

The prospective reductions in pcreeges of soybeans, flaxseEd, and
peanuts arc mainly a result of price changes in these and competing crops.
Prices this winter for oil, crops hrve been about the smee as a ye"r ago.
3ut prices of corn, whept, and cotton have advanced 5 to 15 percent from
last season. The desire of farmers to return to rotations with more land
in pasture and soil-building crops probably is rlso a factor.in.the re-
duction in oil crop acreages, p-rticularly of soybh.ns.

Prices to f-rmers for soybeans produced in.19J6 will be supported
at the same levelss a yepr earlier -- $2.04 per bush.1l for No. 1 or No. 2
green or yellow beans, 14 percent moisture, delivered et country shipping
points. In mid- Flbrua.ry, 1946, the average price t'o' farmers for soybeans,
at $2.11 pur. bus'.l w:s about the same ns a ye;r earlier. But the average
price of corn, et, $1.11 per bushel, was up 5 percent. Price ceilings
for corn wore raised 3 cents per bushel in early March. Corn prices
this spring probably will be 5 to 10 percent higher, in relation to soybean
prices, then a year ago.





MARCH-APRIL 19946


Returns for 1946-crop flaxseed will be supported on the basis of
$3.60 per bushel, Minneapolis basis. This is comp-rT.ble wtth an average
price of $3.10 per bushel nt Minneapolis for the 1945 crop plus special
payments to farmrrs of $5 per acre of flaxseed pl-nted, equivalent on a
n-tiandl basis to rbout 54 cents per bushel of.flaxceei produced ahd over
90 cents per bushel. an flaxseed sold. The r-ter.ge price received b? farmers
frwhe-tinnid-ihbiary at $1.55 per bushel, was 5 percent higher than a year
earlier.

Peanut prices to farmers on February 15 averaged about 4 percent
higher than lest year. Prices received by farmers for cotton, at 23.01
carts per pound, were 15 percent higher thr.n L. year earlier. Farmers'
pln-rs probably also have been affected to some extent by the support price
announced for peanuts in 1946-47. Prices for peanuts grown in 1946 are
to be supported at an average equal to 90 percent of the parity price on
July 15. Ninety percent of the parity price for peanuts on February 15
this year wrs 7.69 cents per pound, 6 porcEnt below the support price
for the 1945-46 season.

World Export Supplies of Fats and Oils
Still SubstantiPlly Pelow Prewar

Recant estirmtes of probable net exports of frts Pnd oils in 19h6
from world surplus-producing rrens (INcrth America excluded) total 5.6
billion pounds, 1.3 billion pounds more thp.n in 1945 bit 4.0 billion pounds
less th-n prewr. The largest increases over 1915 -re anticipated in
Argentine flaxseed, Philippine copra, Ar.t.rotic whale oil, and West African
pcanuts. Exports of peanuts and peanut oil from India are expected to be
mrterially smaller this year then rlst. Only sm.ll quantities of palm oil
or copra are likely this year from the lIetherlands East Indies or MEleya,
two of -the leading suppliers in prewar ye.'rs. There is little evidence
th-t :y soybeans will be forthcoming from M-nchurir this ya-r.

T-ble 2.- Net exports of f-ts and oils includingg butter), and oilseeds
in terms of oil, from major surplus-producing areas,
prewar, 1945, -nd 1946

: Averr ge, : Estim ted, : Forecost,
S: 1_ l -3S : 1945_ : 46
:Billionr pounds Billion pounds Billion pounds

Asia .................: 4.0 .7 1.1
Africa .................: 2.1 1.7 1.9
South Americ. .........: 1.6 1.2 1.6
Antrrcticp..............: 1.0 / .3
Australir. and eIT Zeala3d .6 *5 .5
Other Oceanip .........: .2 .2 _
Tot-. ................ 9 4 5.6

1934-38, based mainly on Intern-tion-'l Yearbook of Agriculture. 1945 and
1946, estimates of Combined Food 3Bord.
I/ Less than 50 million pounds.


- 8 -





7OS- 107


-9-


European Production of Fats and Oils
Substantially f elyFrewar

Quantitative &atinrtes of fts produced for food from domestic
sources in 1.5 European countries in the 1945-46 season, totnrling 3.g
billion pounds, indicate a reduction of 34 percent from a prewar level
of 5.4 billion poun.d. I/ These estimates do not include the Baltic
countries, Poland, Germany, Hungary, Rumania, or Bulgnria. However, fat
production has been seriously reduced in those countries also. No estimate
of inedible fat production is available. However, with meat output
estimated to be down 32 percent from prewar, production of inedible animal
fats probably has been reduced at least that much. About two-thirds of the
fa.t produced in Europe normally is from livestock consisting mostly of
butter, lard, fat outs of pork, and inedible beef and hog fats. Recovery
of livestock production in Europe will not be rapid .while grain supplies
are short. Even if grain supplies were increased, the rebuilding of herds
and flocks could not be accomplished rapidly. -European fat production is
likely to continue small in 1946-47, end to lesser extent for some years
thereafter.

U. S. Civilian Food Fat Supplies in 1946
About Same As Year Earlier; Some
Increase From this Winter Likely

Present prospects indic-te that supplies of food fats for civilians
in 1946 may be about the srma, per person, r.- the 42 pounds consumed in
1945. The seasonal incre-se in butter production beginrin.n in Mrrch
probab-ly will result in an incre-se in civilian supplies by !etf spring
which will.extend into summer. Lrst yo-r thc seasonal increase in output
was tPken up largely by milit-ry procurement, estimated -t 270 million
pounds. This year military takings may be only about one-qurrter rs L1rpre
as in 1945. Butter production in 1946 as a whole probably will be smaller
than the 1945 total of 1,685 million pounds, which in turn wrs 2.4 percent
below the 1937-41 average. With consumer demand for fluid milk and crena
and ice cream unusually strong, utilization of milk in these products is
at a new high.

Creamery butter production in Jenupry, Pt 69 million pounds, was
30 percent smaller than a year e-rlier and wa.s 44 percent below the 1937-41
average for JPnu-ry. From this low level of output, the usual seasonal
percentage increase to the June peak would not bring the supply of butter
into balance with demand at ceiling prices. With prices remainining at
ceilings during the flush production scpson, commercial stocks probably
will not increase materially. In the Pbsence of price inducement to store
butter when production is high, supplies of butter probably will be short
again next fall and winter.

Y/ U. S. Dept. of Agr., Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations, World
Food Situ;tion, 1946. Washington, D. C., February 1946.





MARCH-APRIL 1946


Lr-rd output currently is 1 r'er than a yer-.r ago,. nd:prOduactti is
expected to continue above a ye-r earlier through the spring and summer.
The 1945 fall pig crop, from which the bulk of the hog slaughter will
come from l-te April through September, was 12 percent larger than the
fall pig crop of 1944. The prospective increase in lard production this
ye-r ov7r Dast, however, is more thn offset by a reduction in stocks on
Jnnurry 1, 1946 com.anrod with a ye-r earli r.

The weekly quantity of federally-inspected l-rd to be set aside for
Government procurement (for milit-ry use and export) was raised on
Febru-ry 10 from 3.5 to 5 pounds per 100 pounds live weight of hogs
slaughtered. At the sEne time, the number of Stat,:s exempted from the
requirement was reduced from 29 to 11, fll of these States being in the
Southeast where 1-rd production nornFlly is small. The. set-aside re-
gu.lations were extended on March 10 to Fpproximn'ely 100 slaughtering
pl,-nts that are not under Federal inspection but pare certi-fied by the
Dep-rtment of Agriculture as qualified to ship livestock products in
intcrstrte commerce. About 40 percent of th, l-rd and rendered pork fat
produced under Feder-l! ins-.ection is now required to be set aside for
Government purchase, cnorMp-red 'eith 20 to 25 p'rcer.t before the change, and
about 40 percent l-t spring. Military procurcnent is substantially
smaller thnn a year ago, rrn lr rr.er proporti-nn of the L-rd set aside
will ob purchased for export th.r-n vrs the c.se last yerr.

Production of a dible vegetable oils from domestic oilseeds in
the 12 months beginning October 1945 m'oy be .bout 300 million pounds
less th-n r ye-r e-rlier, reflecting the sh rp reduction in the 1945
cottonseed crup. ProTdction -,f cottonseed oil in October 1945-September
19L6 prob-bly '-ill b.I clcse to 1 billion pounds comp-red with 1.3 billion
pounds a yc"r errl'er. Output of soybean oil, on the other hand, may be
somewhat roger r thnrL in th: 1944-45 season, when 1,343 million pounds were
produced. The 1945 crop of soybeans wns estiT' ted to be about 1 million
bushels lrreer thrn ,- 'yer e-rlier, :'nd experts of soybeans from the 1945
crop -.re not expected to be ruch .rer 1 million bushels compared with
5 million buiiFhcls sh ,ped in 1944-45. With comnerci-.l supplies of corn
tighter this scns-n th -. l-st, output of corn oil probably will decline
fairly shr-rply fr.m the 195-1-45 level of 217 milli-,n pounds. Production of
pernut oil is not likely to be much different from the.'89 million pounds
produced from 'he l'-14 crop. Demnnd for shelled peanuts end peanut butter
renrins exceptin?'n-ly strong this season.

The effect of the reducti-,n in output of edible vegetable oils on
total civilian supplies this season is npproxinm-ely offset "y increased
stocks of such oils cor.pred 'ith p -yemr ago, and. by'smaller exports and
nilit-ry requirements for edible veget-tle oil products th.n lrst season."
F-ctor,,; rnd wv'rehouse stocks of the four edible veFetable oils on October
1, 1945 tot.-red 552 million pounds, an increase of 46 million pounds over
a ;,'e.r e-rlier. Exports of ui rr-rine in the current crop yq.r are reduced
and .nre being takcn lrgpely, from Government st.ecks "-nhnd at the beginning
of the soson.


- 10 -





Yo08107


Supplies of Soap Fats Improving

Stocks of inedibi'tallow and grepses, efter reaching an unusually
low level last fall, have been increasing recently. Total factory and
warehouse stocks reported on October 1 last year were only 165 million
pounds, the lowest in many years; by Janutry 31, 1946 these stocks had
increased to 222 million pounds. Total use of tallow and grease was re-
l1tively small in October-December 1945.

Peginning in Februarythis year, production of grease apparently rose
above the level of a year earlier and probably will remain L-rger through
the spring and sumner. Federally-i.spected hog slaughter recently hlFs
been running above that of a yerr ago.

Table 3.- Inedible tallow and greases; Appr.rent production, factory
consumption, rnd factory -nd warehouse stocks, by quarters,.
1943-45, .nd Jenuary 1916

Apprront : Factory : Stocks, end of
Period ; production : consumption period

S: : : i
: il. lb. Mil. 1b. Mil. lb.


Januv.ry-M-rch ...: 403
April-June....... : 385
July-Soptenber...: 419
October-December.: -442
Y wrr......... 1,650
*1944 : 5
TJanur ry-M rch....: 553
April-June.......: 50s
July-September...: 439
October-Decenber.: 443
Year........: 1,943
1945 :
Jrnur'ry-Morch....: 44
April-J-ine ....... h15
July-September...: 404
October-Decenber.: 438
Year........: 751
1946 1
J."nu ry............ .164


472 236
443 191
4o6 209
438 220
1,759 220
42 300
465 355
481 318
___94___ 2O
1,923 270


519
503
419
o00
1.840

142


249
181
165
200
200

222


Factory consumption and stocks, from reports of the Bureau of the Census.
Apparent production, computed from frctory consumption, stocks, imports,
and exports. Totals computed from unrounded nurdbers.


S11 -






MARCH-APRIL 19U6


- 12 -


Shipments of copra from the Philippine IslanTd"arte increasing. In
February, 12,000 long tons were shipped, compared with 8,000 long tons in
January and approximately 8,000 long tonsin the latter part of 19 5. bhip-
ments in prospect from the Philippines to the United S:tates in March-June
total 50,000 tons. Of total export supplies in the Philippines this year
about two-thirds are destined for the United States, one-third to other coun-
tries. There have been no shipments of coconut oil or copra from Ceylon to
the United States for several months, and no further shipments from tht source
are scheduled this year. Shipments of copra to the United States frm the
South Seas also are being terminated; the last loading occurred in March.
Freight takes 30 to 60 days to reach the United States from the Philippines.
Total imnorts of copra into the U. S. from all sources in January amounted to
10,202 long tons.

Linseed Oil in Short Su-oly This Winter,
Improvement Likely y Summer

Supplies of linseed oil for 1?h6 as a whole are likely to'be sub-
stent.ally larger than in 1945, as a result of the 59-prrcent increase
in domestic production of flaxseed last year and the prospect of another
large crop this year. But current supplies of linsepd oil are small.
Factory and warehouse stocks of flaxseed and linseed oil on FeBruary 1, 1946
totaled 255 mnilli'n pounds, in terms of oil, cormpred with 344 million
ounmds a year earlier. movementt of domestic flaxseed to terminal markets
has been slow this winter, despite sub-tantial stocks still in country positions
Linseed oil supplies prob rbly will increase materially. r.fter these stocks
move to market. Imports of flaxsded recently have been small. Negotiations
for shipments of substantial quantities of new-crop Argentine and Uruguayan
flaxseed to the United Statrs were still in progress in e.irly March.
GOVE.MIKT ACTIONS
Proarmu for 1936 ~7axceed Price Surort

The difference between the su?-ort and ceiling richess of the flaxseed
crop harvested in lq46 will be naid to .-ro.rers thro-.i.h the Field Service Branch
of the Production and Marketing Administration on srles receipts or other
acceptable evidence, the Daportment of Agriculture ranouncfd March.22.

Flaxseed of the 1 45 crop is not eligible for such payments. The
support -rice announced by the Government on ITovamber 3, for the 1*'6 crop
is $3.60 a bushel, Minneapolis b'sis, fnr 1.o. 1 flaxseed. The present ceiling
price at Kinreapolis is $3.10.

Complete details for making payments through the Field Service Branch,
fbrmerly the Agricultural Adjustment Agency, will be announced before harvest
tine.

Emergency Quotas for Shortening
-nd Edible Oils Discontinued

It was announced February 28 that the emergency incrensein basic quotas
of 4 percent allowed since September o1a5 for the manufacture of civilian
shortening and edille oils would be discontinued Airil 1. This leaves in
effect the basic quotas of S8 percent df average use in q140 and 1941. No change
from the first quarter was made in quntas for civilian margarine, which remain
at 95 percent of use in 1944.







FOS-107 13 -

Lard Set-Aside Increase .

The quantity of lard required to be reserved weekly by federally-
inspected packers, for purchase by Government agencies, was increased
February 10 from percentt to 5 percent of the live weight of hogs
slaughtered. At the same time,. the number of States exempted from this
requirement was reduced from 29 to 11. The States- still exempt are
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Lousiana, 1iissssippi, North Carolinn,-
South Carolihe, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The new reouirem:a-nts
were issued in Amendment 26 to WFO 75.3.

On March 10 these set-aside regulations were extended to cover non-
inspeted. plants certified under provisions of the Patman Amendment as up.lified
to ship'neat products in interstate commerce. There are about 10"ocertified?
plants compared with approximately 0oo under Federal inspection.

Subsidy Rpfund Reauired on Exports
of Soybean Oil

Beginning February 15, payments to Commodity Credit Corporation
on exports of soybean oil are renuired, at the rate of 3.75 cents per
pound on crude oil and 4.o0 cents -er -pound on refined.. Details were
announced in Current ExYort Bulletin To. 313, issued by the Department of
Commerce February 15. The payments are to reimburse CCC for the subsidy
of approximately 30 to 35 cents per bushel of soybeans crushed.

Soybean Oil to Be Exchanged
for Olive Oil

Arrangements for selling 3,0CC metrictons (approximately 6.6 million
pounds) of United States soybean oil:and-buying an eulal quantity of
olive oil from Greece were announced February 11. So far, eyport licenses
have been granted only for 500 tons.- Similar arrangements with Lebanon and
Syria, involving 400 tons of soybean ni.l,.reenetly were: completed. Even
with the subsidy refund payment required-on exports of soybonn oil, soybean
oil fon export is much less expensive than olive nil. The ceiling price
for imported. olive nil in drums a New York is approximately 70 cents =r
pound. The exroPrtprice of refined snylean oil, druns, Hew York including
the special payment to CCC, is about 19 cents per pound.

Linseed Oil Inventories Restrieted

Amendment 3 to WFO 12N4, effective February 26, prohibits the pur-
chase of linseed oil by users in an:.- quantity which, together with inven-
tories on hand, would be larger than a h months' supply at the current rate
of use. Amendment 2, effective from Seotembpr 1945 to Februnry.19h6,
permitted purchases that would result in an inventory equii'vlent to no
more than 12 months' supply. With the lq5-46 flaxseed crushing season
about two-thirds over by late February, long-term contracts are no longer
needed for.normal m.-rketing by crushers. The four-month inventory limitation
will help.to.distribute the available supply more evenly.






MARCH-APRIL 1946 -1 -

Ceilinc Prices for Castor Oil Increased; -- -
Ceilings Established for Chstor Peans

Anendmeht' 56 .to tPR 53,' bffect'bi"e ebruiaiy' IS, increased ceiling
prices for castor'oil. The new "beilinW for No. 1 castor oil. (tank cars
New York) is 14.30 cents per pound, 25 'cents higher than tefn s. .,The
new maximum price fnr No.- 3 castor oil is 1i.0O cent pr:r pound, also up
1.25 cents. -An increase of 1.50 cents per pounl,, to 19.35' cents, was
-made in the -ceiling for dehydrated eastr' nl1. These increaibes were
nllowrd because of a rise in the price of rastor beans ih Brazil, the
chief source of sup-ly. Until enrly lqf4, .prices of Brqzilian caster
be-ns were stabilized by agreement with the 3razilian.Gov',rnment at $75.00
per long ton, f.n.b. Brazilian port, ecuivn'lent at that time to $102SA
c.i.f. 'Tew York. Brazilian ex-ort rides varied from a low of $58..00 .
per lohg ton ih -Iovember 1944 to a high of l102.00 in January and early
February 1046.

Amendment 56 estnblishea a ceiling rice of $113 per long ton,
c.i.f. first port of arrivr.!, for castor beons imported into the United
States .- Ca-iling prices c.i.f, first' oPrt of arrival also were established
for castor nil,- at 11.15 cents -er pound for No. 1 oil and. 10.5 cents
per pound for 1,. 3 ril. There ceilin.xs are exclusive of the import
duty of 3 cents per pnund.

Use of Fats and Oils in S.-nthetic
Detergents Restricted

Synthetic deterg-nts are now to be considered .s soao for the pur-"
pose of determining manuf.-.dtureris quot-s of f-ts and oils. Thic rquire-
ment was established ty Anndment 9 "'tn WFO -2-b, Effective March-11. Under
present quota percent.ag.ls, a manufacturer's total c''_'trrlJ use of fats and
oils in synthetic detergents and 'soup for sale to civilihts in bars or in
palcKg-os of less. than 25 pounds is re'stri-6ted to 78 pnrc::nt of .ave-rae use
in thec e pr-odurts in corrien-nding quarters of l1-4O nd 1?41.' :The quoth
percentage is S4 for soap or synthetic deterrents sold in bulk packrLres..

Amendment 9 also permits rosin to be used as arn "extpnder"n for soap.
An ear-lier iaendment hnd ri-nuired the -nhydtous fa.t content of packaged soaps
to be reduced by the use of lsuitAble nk-line comriands. R)sin may now be
substituted for these materials. Use of rosin in civili-n soap was-seyerely.
limited b;,, Civilian Production Andinistrtion Order M-3S7 from Febru.ry'2S,"l?0
to FcbruPar,- 6, 1946 whon r strictions wcre removed.

Rf3CENT DEVELOPiiTNTS
USDA Purchases of Fata. and
Oils Inrcise

Purchases of f..ts and. ils by the'U. S. D-oartment of Agriculture
increased in January and Fetruary. The total for Februnary was 51 million
pounds (including soybenns and soap in terns of oil), corm-ored with 4h
million mpunds in January and 38 million pounds in December 1945. Lard
was the principal item purcha-ed.





-i 15 -

Table:4.- Contracts for purchase. of fats, oils, soap, 1.nd purchnscs
Sof soybeans, by Vho Department of Agricuilturc, 3941-46
of, b .-
S...19
Item : 1941 : 1942 : 1943 '1944 145 Jn. : Feb.
: : :,,.11 lb. il lb. Mil.b. Mil.b. lilI.T'il.lb Hil. b.

tbr .. ....... 3....4: .2/ 4 120- 106 J 3 / 4 -
td.and rendored pork fat : Z26 65.4 882 809 226 40 45
nir aniiiats "and oils / : 2 3b0 61 2 --
inseed oil ..............: -- 70 391 198 1 -
eans (oil equivalent) 5: 4 4 9 ?2 0 /
cybear oil ...............: --- 17 22. 100 7 2 3
her Vegetable oils ......: --- 82 49 15 31 2
or'tening ..'.............: -- 46 62 8 18 -- --
wrgarine (ftb.content) / : 1 77 72 59 59 -- --
ap(fat intent) 6 ......: --- 16 23 13 50 3
Total, f't oquivaTcnt ....; 33 1,30 1,6 91 1,3 1 66 "-5

S:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
S, b' bu. hu. t.u. bu. bu bu.

o beans 1/ .............: '45O 400 982 206 4, 96 8 2

eliminary.
'Less than'500,000 pounds.
ThInudes cstimatcd butter content of Ar.y tprcad.
Includes fish and fish-liver oils.
Oil equivalent cstiim.toed --t 9 pF-ndr p,'r bushel.
/'Fat content estimated -it 80 perctr:t- for. n:.rrrinc; 55 percent f.r sor.p.
Excluding soybcrns resold fcr crushing.

TRL.IDS I! OLL0'AL...,IE, 194-5 qndl 10-16

production of Margarine Large in 1945;
Record Civilian Use

S 'Output of margarine in 1945 tot+lcr. 613 million pounds actuall weight),
4 percent moro than .a year ouriic.r -nd ~.!'.ost as much :!s in 1943, the peak yci.r
to date (table 6). Civilian usc of n .rrg;,-rin 19'5, -it 524 million pounds,
was the largest on record, and was cquival,:.t to 4.0 pounds per person (-.ctutl
iweght) cbniparud with 3.9 pounds in 1944 And r n vvirae of 2.9 po'.nds in 1935-39.
[Civilian. supplies of otr-cr food fats and oils werc reduced about 3.0 pounds per
:person in 1945, with half the reduction occurring in tuttc.r. "ith cons'mr. r incomes
continuing at a high level, consumption of nar;-rini,- by civilians ir. 1945 'ppaprently
Iwould'have boon still grcatcr if-ranufaeture of civilian vr.rg-r'int hid not brccn
limited by. qutas- on use of fats..rnd oils. M-inrgarine mtnuf-cturucs fully utilized
their quota.s in 1945 for the first time. since quota restrictions wore cdt-.blished
in late 1.942.





!LARCH-APRIL 1946 16 -

Table 5.- MWrgPrine (nctual weight): Permitted production for
civilians and civilian consumption, compared with
civilian consumption of butter, 1943-46
.. .".. .. .i
: Margniine
Year: Maximun production for : ivilin :Civilian consumptioa
Civilians allowed by :of butter
*: os -rox"nte)J_1 consumption

Tota Per tal .Per Total : Per
S ___ : person person : :/ person.
Mil. lb. Lb. Mil. Lb. Lb. Mil. lb. Lb,


1943 590 4.5 502 3.9 1,515 11.7
1 : 569 4.4 49s 3.9 11547 12.0
1945 : 515 4.o 524 4.o 1,362 10.5
1946 : 4471 4/3.4

L/ Estirmated by applying qu-rttrly quota percr:nt~cges'to tax-paid withdraw-
als of rmrgprine in the base period.' Does not tllwb for unused quotas
carried over from fourth ou.crter of preceding ye.r, or for special adjust-
pents in quotas allowed under p-ragr'ph (m), '%FO 42. From January 1943 to
March 1945 the base was the average of corresponding qu-rtere in 1940 and
1941; the quot percentage wrs 180 in Jrn.-June 1943 and 167 in July 1913-
MXr. 1945. Since M.rch 1945, the base has been thhc cbrr'spohding quarter
of 19441 the quota percentree w.s 110 in Apr.-J-une 1945 and has been 95
since then. Each manufacturer's quoota of oils -nd frts for "civilian mprgar-
ine is determined by applying- the ouot. percen't:.re to his use of oils and
f-ts for civilian mxrg rine in the b se period.
2/ From table 6
J Computed from data on production, imports, exports, stocks, and military
procurement.
4/ Quot. percentrTe for first 6 months applied to entire year.

Exports and Militrry Procurement of
Mcrgarine Lirge in 1'45

Exports of mrgrrine in 1945, et 76 million pounds, were slightly
smaller than r. year er rli-r but fr above the pr' war level of less than 2
million pounds. Most of the 1945 exports were mr.de under lend-lease, with
arrangements for shipments to the British, rned forces stationed outside
the United Kingdon continuing to the end of the ,yer. The principal other
exports of marrnrine in 1945 were 7 million pounds to the Soviet Union
under lend-lease in the first half of the yenr and 2 million pounds to
Fr"nce in Deccnber.

Reflecting the scarcity of butter and reouirenents for feeding
prisoners of wvr, net procurement of mrrg-rine by the armed forces in
1945 rose to 14 million pounds, more than in any earlier ye-r. The
American Red Cross procured 4 million pounds of nprgarine in 1945 compared
with 13 million pounds in 1944. This margarine was used in food parcels
for Americans held .s prisoners of wr.


L'





Feo-ot 17 -

Use of Colored Margarine Increasing

Use of colored margarine by civilians increased to about 20 million
pounds in 1945, compared with 16 million pounds a year Earlier and P. prewr
Average of less than 1 million pounds (Table 7). Sales of colored marg-rine
Send to increase when butter is scarce or is high priced in relation to r-r-
garine. In the-first 10 months of 1945 retail butter prices in leading cities
averaged 50 cents per pound, 26 cents above uncolored margarine; following the
increase in ceilings on November 1, butter prices rose to an average of r5
1-ents per pound,21 cents over the average for'uncolored margarine. The
'41fference between prices of butter and colored margarine would be approz-
imately 10 cents less than these differentials, or about 21 cents per
pound at present prices. A Federal excise tax of 10 cents per pound is
levied on colored margarfne withdrawn for consumption compared with only
1/4 cent per pound on the uncolored product. The prewar differential between
butter and colored margarine was about 10 cents per pound. Though use of
colored margarine has increased rapidly since 1941, it still amounted in
1945 to only 4 percent of total civilian use of margarine.

Cottonseed and Soybean Oils the Leadihg Oils
in margarine Manufacture

Cottonseed and soybean oils accounted for 92 percent of the total
quantity of fats and oils used in nmrgPrine in 1045 Itable E). The u-e
of cottonseed oil in margarine increased moderately in 1945 to 254 million
pounds, 51 percent of all oils and fats used i margarine. Use of soybean
oil declined slightly to 207 million pounds, 41 percent of all fats used.
Production of both cottonseed oil and soybean oil increased materially in
1945. The relative quantities of edible oils used. in margarine were de-
termined largely by allocations of edible oils to manufacturers under War
Food Order 29.

Except for 6,000 pounds of sunflower oil, foreign oils were not used
in margarine in 1945. Use of the -rincipal lauric acid oils (coconut,
babassu, and palm kernel) in edible products has been prohibited since
mid-1942. Aside from cottonseed and soybean oils, the fats used in
, margarine in 1945 consisted mostly of peanut oil, oleo oil, corn oil, and
Neutral lard. Use of leading oils and fats in 1944 and 19)5 was as follows,
in terms of percentages of total use of all fats:

1944 1q45

Cottonseed oil ........ 45 51
Soybean oil ........... 44 41
Peanut nil ............ 3 2
Oleo oil ............. 2 2
Corn oil ............. 2 2
Neutral lard .......... 2 1
All other ............. 2 1


Total ......... 100


100





-' "1 6
Some Reducticns Since 19Z8 in State
6Margar!ne Ta'xes ani Fen

on.J~rnuary 1, 19-'S excise taxes on the ost:e Of mar:.arine '.-ere levied
by 20 States tablee 9). Theuo t:.xe. vrri---. i'ion -f 3+ it. fron 5 o4 15 rents
per pound. Seven States taxed .alec 1' m.rar.arSir c r*ardr'lsS of th~ materials
used in r:unuf.cture. .T'.'clve States taxed ,'J .: oi r rc-irz.re cor,+a.ri:jl- fcr-
eigzf oil or 1its. T1-o States tqAxee s:'Llc_ of mrrC.-wtrine not *ont,'ir ing a
specified minumumi perccntu,-c of animal fijts. In thr.cd Stites, ccl arel nr r-
g.rine ::.s 4:ixu' st ihig',cr rast thin v.ncclorcl, jri in 27 SF'tes, the isle
of colored .rgp-iin-. *.s prcFhitited.

License. fa30 tno -,Ianfsrture oreT sell :-.r.ir: "*:.rc rectvired by 16
States "t. tht tb-crn&i :. of 134i. f.nn:al.r.;te 1' or r*'- nufctur.rs v.iriedd fro;.-
one dollar tr 1,000 '.oil'rs; for ::..flssujsr., fror:- :' cort.- 'o 3,000 dollars;
for rct'-Filt.rs, fr.'m. /O i,;:s t-.o 400 ric-ilars.

Fder-.l turXF3 ch dom.es' ol-. ':;r ar:'..., -r.r,-!,n"e.1 since l 19 are Es
follows: Y.xciro +t .x on ol:rrmr.--1)c with;r.:.,n fc-"consu''-t'ion in the United
States and tcrritorics., p;r.'n :.- ;::; .-'.:f-cti -- -- 10 c'!.ts per pnund on
yellov -.nd 0.25 cLri.t ::.-z- Fr.. c: r.d; ::';.. -. : ... .'P. itp .,- l t-lx --
,..0: n: ,' :'..- .:r%-, I.; c cot th-t if
mnar.uf'cturE.r's, .',f600; v:.h1.. i .i .-,, ..O: a.... :c- .l.;., ;Q ; trccrt th-tt if
only uneolored ric'-nr:- .ri c '. '... -' .' p "200 d rf toilers
$6. I-.r.rt d oIl -'? r .: 'in: i.- -''r t t.- -, i -. +;' c+ l- r-- nts c'r pound
and sEtarni t x or f 11 c rt- Fp:r r'.' ''." ,' "

Sin c J-.nir.ry 1, 197.-, S ... .+- : ;' t x. :n ..T' I irjc v. bacn r T--
riiov d in. A 'ab-. ebr -' k'., '.w .. < -', r I *h':t--:n. Th. trnsks taK,
levi ,rw3 o' .r r-.ri r : r *' r,,.. .. 3 "- [: re. :t nf .'ir -] 'ts or eon-
tainix- ir.portcd oils or fcts, o'r .' ] .:-c u r-::r $ 'ut ;: ::. by:, the Statc
SuFrcmc Court in '-,y; 194 In t c. -, .t+-..t n, t, 1 tx. v -(. tor.it':.t,-d by
legislative ::'-ction. Sir.c..: the b. r .i n. n`' 19.1.9, St't.: liccnsc lc.s I.;-re in-
crtssl. in Tt:"''n.s b:t .:ci r,? c or .i-.- :" ir- r. liforni-: north
Carolin"r, ind 0;':1 -.-o '.

Production':.a nd Consuniptorn o' -. r," -
Likely ToF Pc a .3-d i. 1'r 4

Production o. mar -rin ''111 sm!l.-l ir !i;4b '*han last y.r Ex-
ports; vhich vwmc re rinl: fi'cr t!i.. .i+ish+ .r a force's -in 194.,, ','re cxpctcd
to be sh'irpiy ri..i. E 'i. yt :r. r. ..- ric ivij inn 'is. in 1J45 also r.,y YL
dirminished :.o :er atly 1- a rczult of 1 .'cr .r'ri.ui'-ret'r rs' quo ns of oils and
fits in the. first cu'.rt March 1946 .ro b'tr.'-d o:i 95 r.rc,.tt o!' first-ri **r r 1iAC4 u- ;L, ccmpzrcd vith
civili-an uroductirinc i:: J Ti'nry-!.irch list yi .r t' th.( r t'. oi' T'.5 pFrctnt of
1944. Quotas for. thi F c" .1 q1: rt, r v .r:c rLOtr.!tly rnc;nc'-. d "'. th-h. 96 per-
crnet r-ut.t. L t y.- .r s-cond qu..rtir qun-t-'. .'r 11i') p. r(rent. T. July-Duc-
emntir 1945, quntis :*..re -'.. lh-. 07--p rc-r.t I vcyl.

Dcurnd V'cr narg:r.-.inc ,+ pr( ,. t -ii si wLt-il n' *;xc'rc ef supplies.
Supplies of r r i'-. i i r' t .l1 -~cr .e N.v. b-L. sca-rc. ir. r.' -)t n.rL s of +h.
country. Prices of -.r rint pr-*l'.by '..ill r'. :ir. .t cc l : lv- Is throu h-
out 1946.
rf? T.tc marP'r.r,.. t '3 .r. li..ns fecs or. Jt'.try 1 1539 w'crc .rhow i
Ttbl 1, p..gc 6, Of S.t c :'' :'..r.-11 .-i :1 :rn *;L i.cision Dcsi ns I-cl-.+ing to
Oleomargaranc, r ."im. ogrnph~ l i-.ubli--.ti-.n of .,. Dpt. of A"r. ,Bur,.
Agr. Economics, -hihgton, D.C.,JaJir'ury 1V'9.


- 1: -


MARC'!-APEIfr 1946






W.15oy


table 6. Olotsrgarlter Produation as reported by the Department of Agriculture and
S the Bureau ot IZte9rl jave., nds. sa doneti diuappearance, 1909-4 .

P #eUI en as r reported by sDomestio disappearanoe
.i I SPl ijjo I "ge Bureau :of Internal :Revenue a
Tear uupmbl' ? a Pr
ad 8 ut Total 'Uncolorud 'l orlored Tonl a Total oapita
d a Toa a p a it
Sl I I I
A 1795012 lop Ljoa 1b. .ooo 1,000 b. 1.000 lb.'l700 Ib. i. lb.. 1b.


lo30


1918

181
1816
;17
lolll
Zily
-. lolg
.150

1981
1986

4153
1984


llll
INI
L592
116
1989



1Ul
1881
10888

134
198 1

1911
1911
1840
1941
1841

134 5


I

I
1
a


31,604 866,688
89,251 366,140
148,699 e33,119
195,187 17,119-
101,291 110,876
75,610 109,186
861779 181,798
100,876 187,00
118.705 117,906
111,149 117,445
188,688 118,979
196,18 111,681
881,688 180,68
318,T79 05,171
188,081 6. .878
166,645 41,071
188,711 461,30
810,160 54,640
880,700 .47,177
841,889 481609
0560481 41,068


173,1Il 41,585
111,468 81,715
868,888 86,411
586,40 881,733
589, 17 44,881
180,0001 1,78


.--






390,701
554,391
871,518
567,486
211,867
1685,078
2881,678
328,776
3880,611

172,6062
1073984
542,250
811 ,758
alleges
137,716
341,351
168,900
578,577
890,886
381,8500
180,018
8501880
180,671

415,377
610,181
881,766
681,83
I ,Y
"I --l






854,391
871I,1 U


109,879
141,231
b9,398
156,875
145,096
135,185
134,277
179,989
279,789
544,047
349,610
355,266
207,169
178,345
217,389
220,067
221,786
289,004
262,412
300,661
158,861
511,219
224,332
199,811
848,874

878,791
3909*88

383,702
199,418
8X7,018
362,813
861,286
497,601
400,617
814 10


6,082
6,168 .
5,661
6,349
6,950
5,981
7.692 :
7,574 .
7,455
6,560
19,1886
14,226
7.913':-
6,409 :
10,191.
11,762
12,167
15,476
15,087"
18,981:
17.887
18,441
6,596
5,411


3,640.
3,660.
1,7090
1,588
1.445
8.451
4,774
64,488
116,648
107,568
I8,U88S


115,961
147,418
105,059
142,224
-152,048
141,166
14.1.969
187.663
267,245
350,607
368,799
369,484
215,082
184,752
227,560
231,829
233,951
242,660
277,498
516,662
356,248
325,660
229,927
203,232
246,472
864,406
881,681


586,863
500,866
830,402
867,587
428,749
614,144
881,184
618.279


113
144
102
: .139
150
139
139
18.
284
347
354
364

184.
282
230
282
240
276.
314
353
323
229
200
.2842

a78
397
385
501

858


8'
V824


1.2
1.6
1,1
1.5
1.5
1.4
1.4
1.8
2.7
3.3
3.4
3.4
2.0
1.7
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.3
2.6
2.9
2.6
1.8
le
1.6
1.9
2.1
8.0
3.0
3.1
2.9
2.8
2.4
1/2.7


Nj9
o9


SOpaled as followsI
oduetion -
iU I. DBpartar t of Agrieulture, lbrsartne Prodution. Bureau of Znternal Revenue,
Taual reports of the OUmlIILaser and lateral Ramwvn Bullette.
Produietio reports 4h the Bureau of internal Revnue ore required by law and are son-
dered to be mere serurte than reports to UISA, whlh are voluntary the letter
are ueful blearle they are breake dow into speoia elarssiftiatlon.
Dil0appwearaei ta-pad lwith Lam for use in the ited Ib*te and territorie, plus
sumfree withdrawals for use Ln OQvernment Ilsttutioan, Bureau of Internal Revenue.
Bega iag 1981, shipments bo terrltorite (Bureau of the Oenlu) deduoted.

jV Otll4 disppearameo. eTotl disappearaaeo, Laeludia military, ws as follows. in millions
of poundes 1941 and 1968, I8 (i.7 lb. per sapitas) 1843, 504 (8.7 lb. per oepita)l 1 64,
500 (I.6 1, per capita)) ad 106t, |68 (5.B lb. per espits).
8 Prelirmiary


* 19 -


Ji-





ML.H--APRIL 1946


". 1Y.
". ;,,?m.,ii'i


- 20 -


Table 7.-Oleomnrgarine: Producti6n and withdrawale, 1940-145


Item : 1940 : 1941 192 : 193 :1944 j/ : 1945'


Production:
Cdlored
Uncolored
Total

Withdrawals:
Tax-paid for consump-
tion in the United
States and terrz-


1.oo00 lb. 1,000 1 1,o000 lb. 1.000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,00oz


2,451 4,774 64,4sg 116,543 107.5689 8,85 :
:3l9 2 l,813 361,262 47,61l g. 61
:20,~O2 367,2587 1749 614,144 13$
6 'I


*
*
:
* !


tories--
Colored
Uncolored
Total
Tax-free for
ernment-
Colored
Uncolored
Total
Tax-free for
Colored
Uncolored
Total


All withdrawals--
Colored
Uncolored
Total


340 582
:317.396 362.b54
:317,73b 363,236
U. S.Gov-:- --

897 2,098

: 897 2,106
exort --
: 1,174 2,037

: 1.174 2,.3


.977 5,119 16,012 20,296
362,7 0 494,886 79, 953_ 52O_ 0 i
363,707 50,00o 95,964 523.37


60,o41l 10,278 90,80o4 656 6,
___ 161 37 7.6
-60o,148 11l0,439 90,41 74,389 :,
----
3,276 572 1,243 11,964
10 ___ 1 4 .o8
3,286 572 1.355 16, 72


: 2,411 4,716 64,393 115,968 1os,o58 98,186
:311 6 362664 32.747 4 5,04- 480 .102 515. 3__
:319,807 367.380 427,140 611,015 5s.1l 61 64-,91


-- --
Comniled from annual reports of the Commissioner of Internal Reevenue,an3 Revet"p
Bulletin,
Totals computed from unrounded numbers.
I/ Preliminary.






Table 8.-1Oeonargarine: Materials used in manufacture, 1938-45
Item 1938 1939 : 194 i 1941 1942 19o3 19U4 1945
: 1,000 1,000 1,GO0 11000 1,000 1,003 1,000 1,000
1* n1. VtV 11U h h_


:!> .Lme IL' J.L'.

oil ...........: 13,411 11,866 14,332
ja9tearine ......: 3,282 3,067 3,386
IE, neutral ..*...: 1,464 1,355 5,100
stock ........: 1,532 1,,42 1,260
ter ............ ..
ber animal fats 1/: -- 69 88
otalanimal ... .: 19,68q 7, 17 99 24.,
lottonseed oil ....:l12,g58 98,656 115,94G
Eybean oil .......: 39,885 70,822 87,103
eanut oil ........: 3,593 2,445 1,730
lrn oil ..........: 566 489 421
ijnseed oil .......: -- -- --
thber vegetable.
nils 2/ .........: 27 12 11
Tota, domestic :
vegetable ......:186,929 172,424 205,211
biconut oil .......: 89,520 38,519 21,780
V bassu oil .......: 11,5'+7 13,942 6,150
aim-kernel oil ...: 4,746 473
aiJm oil ..........: --- 1 1h


18,415
3,058
81300
1,919


17,236
3,1448
10,69U
2,819


22,495
2,919
8,133
3,940


11,938
3,079
9,630
2,092


--- ~3 --- ---
13___ 201 512 220 24
31,823 37,6l1 34,709 26.59 18,465
149,930 1(6,44 252,109 215,008 253,997
75,634 133,346 198,020 211,105 206,642
2,210 920 4,564 12,295 10,215
6n7 1,690 5,828 11,480 9,174
.4,280 413 ---

12 259 281 1,231 138


228,413 02,659 465,082
29786 3,491 -
946 332
957
4,991 1,375


easae oil ........: -- --- -..
flowerr oil .....: -- -- --- --- 782
ibr ../ ..........: ___6 -9 --- O14 3h ---
.otal, foreign :
vegetable ...... :105,582 52,935 27,0931 36,784 6,Ol4 ---
Total fats and :
oils ..........:312,50 2h2,758 257,311 297,020 316,36k_ 499,791
Gk .............: 73,169 58,-55 6o,961 67,323 74,875 104,39
t ..... .........: 16,916 12,889 12,727 12,628 13,931 19,732
rivative of
:.glycerin ........: 1,059 749 823 841 823 1,o05
within ..........: 92 80 93 261 278 503
ostearine ......: --- --- 76 165 187 403
da (benzate of) : 149 122 122 161 215 368
vitamin concentrated: 17 14 13 45 88 121
lor .............: 2 1 2 2 42 83
tearine .........: -- -- -- -- -- --
scellaneous .....: --- --- __ i23 13
Tntal,other


251 532 480,166


1 6


__1 6

478,492 498,637
101,642 105,002
19,201 19,098

922 1,o64
556 662
44c 478
376 398
109 120
69 96
93 115
17_ 19


materials ......: 91,4014 72,510 7,825 81,431 90,462 126,671 123,425 127,052
Total, all
materials *....:4 0 ,904 315,268 332,136_378,451 _436,26 626 462 601,917 625,689_
Umpiled from Internal Revenue records and Internal Revenue Bulletin.
Z Includes beef fat, oleostenrine oil, tallow and lard flakes.
f Includes cottonseed stearine, soybean stenrine, vegetable stearine, cottonseed
Lakes, soya flakes, and snya stearine flakes.
i includes palm flakes, oalm stearine, and rice oil.


rri rv ~r ~YI









Table 9.- OleoamrZrine: State tacxe and license fees i effeoot'o Janumary 1960


Exoise tax, per pound, on- I Use tax. per
I pound, an ole
I a Oleo- sOlecmr- mrgarine pur.
i a mr- igarine sobased ouitaid
'Colorres *- ga rineIt ol-itha 8oe by-.
State lm ooloreds con- stainingsI
Sar- oleo-staininglminninums
garne ar- asforeip perment- Con- a Othej
a 1garine i mate- :age of I umr a user
a I rials :animL :
a c a 1/ afate 2/' I
e Cents cents centa Cente Cents Cenc


S Li~onse fee, anul rate payable by-
'-I

'- Hotel' mr



SI I I utti
a a a athe la
I ao l I I *I* I ol
Dollars Dllre Dollare Dollars Dollare. Dol Dalla
r~olr Doler ar s ..nueutK w


Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Iowa
Kansas
Louisiana
Maine
Massachusetts
Minnesota
Mississippi
Montana
Nebraska
North Carolina
North Dakota
PennsylvaniAL
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Veraont
Whshington
Wisconsin
Wyoming


... ... ... ... ... ...- -- ---
S100 50 -- 2
2105 25
100 50 6 3 5


200 50 -- -



--- .. --- --- 0.50 0.50 --
----- --- --- 200 50 -- --


--- --- --- --- --- -- --- --


(P)

(P)


10
(P)


(P)
(P)

(P)



(P)
(P)


10

10
(P)
(P)
(P)
(P)


/10 0 ---


10- 6
10 ---


--- 100

10
--- 1,000

10 --
500




15 1,000


6100
1,000
25
75
5
500


FN


1
6/10
400
1

2.
100


9;0


--.
--

--
--
--
...
--


75 5 -- --

.5 /.5 -- --
2 a -- ""


-5
25
. --


-- ....

--- 1--.
-a-


Compiled from synopsis of State laws prepared by the National Association of Margarine Manufacturers.
/ Tax applies to oleoeargarine not nade front oils and fats (speoiticany named by the statute) that.are largely
derived from domastio materials.
The minimum Is 66 percent in Minnesota and 21 percent n Wyoming.- "
() Sale of colored oleomargarine prohibited. Sale of colored oleomarGarine is also prohibited in Dellare,
Illinoi, Maryland, Michigan. New Hampahire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio., and Oregon.
3/Required for each place of business; payable annually except in Montana, where one-fourth of the danul rate is *
due each quarter.
SPublic eating places.
Oleomrgarine oontaining soybean oil is also subject to the tax. .. "
/Wholesalers and retailers' license fees are due only if oleoamrarine nade from foreign materials .i sold ..
/Hotels only.
/ Applicant for license must first file a bond for not les than $600.
Retailers pay a license fee graduated from $2 to 3100 an the baels of volum of sales. -The fee probably averages
beeen 0.2 and 0.3 cents per pound of oleomargarine sld.
1 Including confectioneries.
n/ cluding both oonsumars and other users. .


I~

-I-














11
- -- ::i













--a
-.-- !

1 ."

-- E..


di-


b-,














*iir Acee stidn materials
S. --**** i. 6r L7 ..6 1g 47 1.37C
Poa........... ua.~' 4 g- 341 329 .315
~ II (notuni' 'ieih t : 2.211 71) 01T18 T.*.- 6'og
f5' T. .at:. Ca '
c2ted .........;...: 1.224 ,1.724 .2.0 0 2.367 1 311
r ...... ..... ..: -0 .745 .977 .8 .
g:- Tat 1.-,,. ; e... j.64F--gh r13.1 21fl 2 .0IT-
aaa.r, eleostearlne, oleo :
o oil .............. .213 .277 .259' .198 .202 .;
t11.o ard greases. ,..... .. 1167 .742 .650 1.943 1.751 1.
al~ oils... .............: .2-3 .158 .175 .214 .10 )
...................- .... .155 .248 .237 .211 ..205
o .ll.......:........... 1.-472 1.386 1.313 1.132 4.273 "
......................... ..087 -077 .153 2/.10s ?2.095 ) 3.1
t.l.. ...................: .419 762 1.234 1.246 1.38 .
..s................: -277 .639 .-715 .729 .454 )
...... .............. ..: .021 .035 ,40 .034 .b46 )
from domestic materials.,: 8.230 .9S3 uC;.s' 10.745 9.46 30o-


,ii
*ltr


anuarjy'1, (crude bpesis) v 2.2
o :il 'and fact ory- action:
itpo~mte t rials .-.._ 2.0
6@~y.. -..................................
=..;


0.1
2.3. 2.0 2.2 2.2 1.

1.0 .9 1.0 ..
13 19- =70 _12. 6_ 3


fteiports. and' 4hirpments
StribOiLe /....... .. .9 1.6 1.6 1.1
icetsib -31 rude..basis) : 2.3 2.0 2.2 2..2 1,7
ife?9ppePaaec : 9.7 10. 100 .10o 9_.-8:
r pzroiotrement, excl.relief: --- 5 .9 1.1 .1.2
ted dfivilian disappearance :_ _9. 9.8 9 -.1 _.1 8.6
S, oirds Pounds PonLnde Pounds Pounds
aidisa ipearane, per ceapit':
....................: 9 48 46 45 42
o.2 26 24 25 24
V a +7 .. ,,74....... 74 70 70 6

tI erd of the Bureau -of the census, Fish and Wildlife Service, as
iFnt r :ic zLture. Totals computed from unrounded numbers.
ti 'offiiail estimate to be. mad in late April.
on nii sd I e:.q:.iv a Slent of .iported Argentine peanuts.
i.n. e 1S edit -!rvent .of net iaports of flaxseed.
Slit .shrt fe g and a .p in terms of fat. content. .Exports include
h I|j&''4a. eoap in tea.'Z f .fat content, procurement by the Ara,
e "3ttn i 1a, 1by e Ameri can- Red *Cross. Exports 14 no4i.t
laib iot ,t13* pf lrtod. *

..i .. .... j


i;t. .


:1.


: "ii

..:..
-r~l
*rt:
:Q::.
.. i















































raM: nm t oI l ..............................................
e P At oil ............................................
Perill ol .all............................................
. aipe oil ...............................................
Soybean n oil ............................................
Soybeln oil ............................................
sunflower oil .........................................
Teaseed oil .........................................
Tung all .................................................
SVgetable tallow ........................................
Other Vegetsblo oils and fat '..........................:
Veetahble oils, shipments to U.S. territories ...........
Total, vegetable ..........; ..........................
Total, primary fate .................................


16.1
28.9
13.3
9.9
7.0
.8
10.0
100.4
2.7


r --r
1,165.2


ri.0


21.0
1.9
.1
84.9

; .


-r.


.3
.3
---

1.3


432.0-
154.4--
rM6-


2.4
-:-^

10.6


07 ...

1S.E r" .

B, _*_
TSOF.b"T"


0 Oil-bearing material (in term or oil)


SBbaasu kernela (63 percent) .............................:
': Ceator beana (45 pereat) ................................:
oI;; Cpr (63 percent) .......................................
i Cottonseed (15.5 percerit) .........:......................
; Fl xeel (A4 percent) ...................................
m. iruuru kernels (36 porceot)s/ ..........................
:. lm-nut kernels (45 percent) ............................
Pe: a ute, shelled (39 percent ............................
S Perill soeed (37 percent) .................................
Bg. me need (47 percent) .................................
: yb l ans (15 percent) ....................................
Tuols kernels (43 .eroamt) ...............................


48.9
96.0
355.9

351.7
I.'
14.9

.5
4.8

2.4


.4
150.2
'119.5


. .6
16.7
S.4

3.7

,9


46.3
13T.0O
149.1


.4
37.3
19.8

.5

* 6.9.


27.1
--- I
0 "'. 'ji9
::


0.9 :i

-flu


Sotal, oil-bearinC materiall .......................,.... 85.3 .1b.E- 468.1' .5
.-- -5 ". "

uMnufrctured produota (rat ocntaet)
SMgarine / ............................................. 1.9 -- --
Shortanin, ............................................... 1.1 ..... "6.tt "
ap ................................................ ...... .
Total, anu actured products ..........................1 6.1 .4 1. .. I. .
S*g rand total


I All Itnem .......................................... 2... ,016.7 965.5 901.7 .. 806.3 1

Cpllad from Monthly uimary of Ponip COa nroe of the United Setaea. records a the BUl u of Aia dOali
the U. S. Dpartmoh of Agroiulture. Totils oaputed from unroualed nuaxers.
The follouiag iS.tp are not Ianluted above Prounrment by the Amy Ia 1 for urpea roaf. s
lard sad 10 mllimo pounds let oanta~l ar amps in 1945, 68 allsin pounds of lard, I llioa M t popndle .
I milLIon pound fat obateat-of soapi Preouruaqt of argrl me, habortaelrg. ad maap by the Amriuas Ml
fat sc tet, 21 m1lllon pound 1in'4 and 11 mlllio pounds in 1965.
.i i Ztal-tude Uhimat tO 2. torsLtrles of butter, ard, and. ,annufatur l pRrodqutirr ditsiog
S. 1, olive-.aol foots, and ooprej uM reeporta in 1944 nd 1945 or certain quantitia of ih l
, il reported in port fr onaaptin. fpmeut Lanluae elein prog-M Ct I M 1F ,i 0A '
S udr atual Wight af bubtr oil nad spred, (Ar-). hsm w sart rtitd i
.000 ponds. 6 ot reported separately., j 187-41. 'pr.ta t. rti .a
t"v* .o l.^ s.


u, ..


P


'











and January 1945 and 1946; and factory and warehouse took
on specified dates, 1944-46


Produ tion


Items grouped by
major use


SJanuary-
IsDecober
s 1944
I


sJanuary- !
3 DeoomberI
a 1946 aI
I I


January
1945
I


Ja4
19.


l Million Million Millii Mi
I pounds pounds pounds p
I


jwod fats and oila
Butter 27 ... ...............
104 mUan rendered pork fat / .
ur d ,sa rendered pork fat 3/
:Oled oil, edible animal stear-
Anda,.and edible tallo ......
Total edible animal rate ..
Corn oil ..............
:: ottosee oil / .............
Olive oil, edible ............
K;:: Peanut oil / .................
:*": ":eeam oil ....................
.L ti: o-Soybeen oil 4/ ................
total edibTe vegetable oil .

' fat and oil.
: -llo. inedible ...............
S..e ;rnis., excluding wool grease .
L Palm oil 4/ .................
" Fiah oil ......................
Ibrine mammal oil .............
O :live oil, inedible and foot .
Total slow-lathering oils ...
abRmasu oil 4/.............
'.Uoanut oil .............
SPalm-ernel 1o 4/ ...........
Total laurio-awid oils ......
YingE: oil.
Cagsti r olb dehydrated / .....
Linseed oil ...................
itbiiooa oil ..................
"' erilla oil ..................
Tn oil .....................
S Total drying oils ...........

Other industrial
ia'-foot oil ...............
Wool grease .........,......
Cod oil and fish-liver oil ...
F e:aodr oil., o. 1 and No. 3 /
iapeaeed oil.................
Other vegetable oils ..........
"Total .......................


Grad Total .................


S1,488.6
* 2,366.9
l


1,370.2 99.0
1,510.9. 158,1


Stocks rudee basin)
I : 1 I I
nuar :December I January N november' Dcembr January
46 :"l. 1944 '31. 1945 '80, 1945 .sl, 1945 s1, 1946

llion Miioion million lion million Million
undse EomdB' pounds pounds pound pounds.


69.0 60.8 38.9 108.5 53.1 32.1
152.7 377.9 306.7 0.1 91.5 108.6
*^fi


S 195.3 .200.7 16.4 9.1 9.6 12.0 7.6 8.9 7.9
S4,050.8 2,881.9 273.5 230.9 448.3 357.6 186.2 153.5 143.6
S 210.7 204.7 22.1 12.8 17.9 19.9 15.9 16.9 18.4
1,132.5 1,273.3 178.7 143.3 44045. 495.4 438.0 500.7 553.0
S 5.7 4.4 1.9 .9 1,2 2.0 1.1 1.1 1.2
111.4 115.1 12.2 13.7 57.5- 36.7 39.6 40.5 41.1
S-- --- 2.4 2.g 1.1 .8 .9
s 1,2b5.9 1,388.5 '111.1 143.4 123.3 129.1 195.0 209.6 281.9
S.2706.1 2.985.7 325.9 314.1 622.8 685.3 690.7* 768.6 8385.5


989.8 948.9 83.4 88.4 150.4. 150.7 123.3 132.2 144.7
640.6 512.9 49.0 46.4 119.5 107.7 61.3 68.0 76.9
5 --- --- ---9.3' 69.1 44.6 86.1 31.2
206.2 174.0 6.7 4.2 165.8 153.5 99.3 86.6 66.5
S .3 --- -- --- 45.7 43.9 20.8 19.8 18.9
5s/ 5 5/ --- 2.6 2.5 1.2 1.0 .8
1.836.9 1,635.8 139.1 159.0 543.3 517.4 550.5 543.7 : 39.0
Y b1 2.2 2.7 10.9 12.4 12.0
127.7 6/19.3 1.7 1.4 101.2 105.0 136 127.3 122.3
/ 45.1 5/ --- 13.6 7/12.4 7/28.6 7 28.0 7/20.4
S 127.7 194.4 18.7 11.4 117.0 120.1 170.8 167.7 154.7

s 86.0 51.5 6.7 3.3 11.2 10.5 7.2 8.0 8.8
s 956.6 526.0 43.5 56.0 265.9 252.4 171.9 180.1 173.7
5/ --- --- 6.8 6.7 10.9 9.0 7.6
I --- --- --- --- .2 .2 .1 .1 .1
* 2.6 6.7 1.0.Q 1.1 20.2 20.8 6.5 6.5 6.7
s 1,025.1 586.2 51.0 60.4 302.3 290.6 196.6 203.7 196.4


S 2.4 2.6 48 .1 2.5. 2.5 1.7 1:4 1.3
s 17.0 17.56 1. 1.7 3.7 3.5 4.1 4.4 4.5
s 7.5 6.0 .6 .5 16.8 17.0 12.1 11.7 10.6
s 79.8 92.0 .4.7 8.9 29.0' .19.1 .10.0 11.2 14.2
S --- --- -- -- 18.1 15.8 17.9 16.9 14.1
8 54.3 66.6 4.9 4.7 51.8 46.3 31.5 31.7 20.0
; 140.9 184.7 11.8 15.9 121.9 104,2 7%.3 77.3 64.7


I 9,887.6


8,468.6


819.9'


771.7 2,155.6 2,076.0.


i!





. :


1,676.9 1,714.4 1,723.9


:"pjtled fromareports of the Bureau of the Census, except as noted.
positions. Totals computed from unrounded numbers.


Data include stooke held by Government in reported


Preliminary.
* Creamery butter production and oold-storage stooke, U. S Department of Agriculture.
federally inspected production, UIDA.
Btdoks, rude oil plus refined oil converted to crude basis by dividing by the following factors Babassu, corn. catton-
osed, palm, and pala-kernl oils, 0.93; oooonut, peanut and soybean oils, 0.94.
Included In "other vegetable oils".
Incomplete partly included in "other vegetable oils".
Crude Only.
O'.nverted to rude basis by dividing by 0.88.
ty Siatbed quantity used'in manufacture of dehydrated asstor oil excluded from production.




S: i" UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
l l 1llllllllllllllllll1111111111llllllllllllll 111
3 1262 08905 1980
CH-AP.IL 1946 26 -

table ij.-Price received by farmers and prices at terminal markets
for specified oil-bearing materials and oilmeals, Januar "ri
February, and December 1945,. January and February 1946."

Oilseeds


:_ 1945


S 1946


Castor beans, Brazilian.....
f.o.b. Brazilian ports.....
Cottonseed, United States...
average....................
Flaxseed, ITo. 1, Minneapolis
Flaxseed, United States.....
average....................
Peanuts, Y.o. 1 shelled,.....
Spanish, Southeastern......
shipping points............
Peanuts, United States......
average....................
Soybeans, No. 2 yellow,.....
Chicago....................
Soybeans, United States.....
average....................



Copra meal, Los Angeles.JL..
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent.
protein, Memphis...........
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent.
protein, Chicago...........
Linseed meal, 32 percent....
protein, Minneapolis.......
Linseed meal, 34 percent....
protein, New York...........
Peanut meal, 45 percent.....
protein, f.o.b. South-.....
eastern mills..............
Soybean meal, 41 percent....
protein, Chicago...........


Jan.
: Janl Febl. Dec. Jan
DoUlars DolarsPg S fo ollaras Dip'l
-- I/ '


Long ton :73.75 76.25

SShort ton :52.80 52.70
:Bushel 3.12 3.11

Bushel 2.91 2.91


: 100 pounds 114.25 14.25

:100 pounds 3.14 g.14

: Bushel 2.19 2.21

3 Bushel 2.06 2.10


Short ton :50.00 50.00

:48.50 4S.50

54.45 54.45

45.50 45.50

": .00 .l/49.oo


53.00 53.00
S :52.00 52.00


91.75 101.oo 1-.00

51.40 50.90 50.30
3.10 3.10 3.10

2.89 2.89 2.89


14.25 14.25 14.25 "

8.32 8.37 8.43

2.18 ---- --

2.09 2.09 2.11
Oilseed Meals 2/

49.50 49.50 49.50

48.75 48.75 48.75

54.75 54.75 54.75

45.50 45.50 45.50

49.00 49.00 49.00. i


53.25

52.00


53.25 53.25

52.00 52-00


Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, .aily Market Record (Minneapolisa'-
Chicago Journal of Commerce, reports of the Bureau of Agricultural Economical,.
and records of Production and Marketing Administration.
C C. 1.f.- first port of arrival, U. S. ii
/Bagged, carlots.
I3Original r-uotation adjusted to bagged-carlots basis.


MAL(


Item


: Unit