The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00066
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00066

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Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text













FOS 10


it =. U.S. DEPOSITORY 'LA T I N

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

6 RJANUE r FEBRUARY 1946


WHOLESALE PRICES OF EIGHT DOMESTIC FATS
S.- AND OILS, UNITED STATES, 1910-45
INDEX NUMBERS (1935-39=100)
PERCENT I I E I I I


1910


1915 1920 1925 1930 1935 1940 1945


1950


:... U. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
;**r *


In response to strong inflationary forces,
rapid.1y during the latter part of World War I and
post-war year. This peak was more than twice the
folli~ed in 1920 and 1921.


NEG. 45738 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


prices
reached
1910-14


of fats and oils advanced
a peak in 1919, the first
average. A sharp decline


During World War II, price ceilings prevented any material rise in fats and oils
prices after 1941. The level of these prices is now about 40 percent above the-1935-39
average and approximately the same as in the mid-1920's. With world supplies short,
prices of most fats and oils will advance in 1946 if ceilings are lifted.


I...

: 2010





i"., 150
150

I~,


100


S., 50


J! ..
E'" :'*.' ""
,,, ", ,! ,




:*


JANUAET-FEyRUA 1946


- 2 -


Table 1.- Uholesale price per pound of fate, oils, and glycerin at peaofied markets, and inde
numbers of prices of fats and oils Leaember 1943 and 1944, Ootober-D eeab 1946


It ePRICBES
Item-I es m" e r I


n Cents

Butter, 92-sooar, Chioago ........................................ 41.5
Butter, 92-soore New York ....................................... 42.2
Oleaamrgartne, dom. v e., Chicago ............................... 19.0
Shortening containing animal fat, 1-pound cartons, Chicago ....... 17.0
Lard, loose, Chioago ... .......................................... 12.8
Lard, prime steam, tietces, Chioago .................................. 15.8
Lard, refined, 1-pound cartone, Chicago ........................... 15.6
Oleo oil. extra, tierose, Chitago ................................. 13.0
01 ostearine, bbl., Y ...................... .... ................ 10.5
Tallow, edible, Chicago .......................................... 9.9

Corn oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ............................. 12.8
Corn oil, edible, returnable drums, I.o.1., *. Y. ................r 16.2
Cottonseed oil, rude, tanks, f.o.b. S.E. mills .................. 12.8
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., tank cars, N. Y. .........................r 14.0
Peanut oil, rude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ...........................s 13.0
Peanut oil, refined, edible (white), drums, II. Y .................s 16.5
Soybean oil, crude, tank oars, midwestern mills .................. 11.8
Soybean oil, edlble, drums, l.c.l.. N. .. .......................a 16.0
Sunflower oil, semi-refined, tank oars, t.o.b..L. T. ............. 14.3

fB bassu oil, tanks, Y. ........................................ ---
Coconut oil, Manill, crude, c.i.f. Pacific Coast ~' .............. 11.0
Cooonut oil, oeylpn, crude, bulk, N. Y. / .......................: 11.8
Olive oil, Californis. edible, drums, N. Y. ......................s 62.7
Olive-oil loots, imported, drums, carlota, New York .............. --
Palm oil, Congo, crude, bulk, N. Y. 3/ ........................... 11.4
Rape oil, refined, denatured, bulk, lew Orleans ................... '411.5

Tallow, No. 1, inedible, Chicago ................................. 8.4
Grease, A White, Chicago ..... ...................................s 8.8
Moenhden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore .....................: 8.9
Sardine oil, crude, tanks. Pacific Coast .........................a 8.9
Whale oil. refined, bleached winter, drums, N. Y. ................. 12.3
Cottonseed oil foots, raw, (50% T.F.A.) delivered, East .......... 5.6

Linseed oil, raw, tank cars, Minneapolls ......................... --
Linseed oil, raw, returnable arums, oarlots, N. Y. ...............s 15.1
Oitiolca oil, drums, f.o.b. N. Y. ................................ --
Tuag oil, returnable drums, carlots, N. Y. .......................s 39.0

Castor oil, No. 3, bbl., N. Y. ........................... ..... 13.8
Cestor oil, No. 1, tanks, N. Y. ................................. 13.0
Castor oil, dehydrated, tanks, N. Y. ............................. 17.7
Cod-liver oil, med. U.S.P., bbl., N. Y. ........................... 86.6
Cod oil, Newfoundland, drums, N. Y. .............................. 12.0

Glycerin, Soaplye, basis 609, tanks, N. Y. ....................... 511.6

INDE NUMBBERS (193-9 = 100)


Eight domestic fats and oils (1910-14 = 100) .....................
Eight domestic rats and oils ................. (.72*) ............

All fats and oils (27 items) ................. (.73*) ............
Grouped ?Z origin s
Animal fats ................................ (.69*) ............
Marine animal oils ......................... (.77*) ............
Vegetable oill, domestic ................... (.84") ............
Vegetable oils, foreign .................. (.688) ............
Grouped b uses
Butter ..................................... (.6t) ............
Butter, seasonally adjusted ................ (.67T) ............
Lard ..................................... (.78*) ............
Other food fate ............................ (.84*) ............
All foo4 fats ........................... (.71*) ............
Soap fate .................................. (.*) .............
Drying oils ................................ (.85') ............
Maooellaneous oils ......................... (.71*) ............
11 industrial fats and oils ............. (.82*) ............


I


142 142 ~42 2/ 152


142 142
140 140

148 148

139 159
171 170
157 160
177 177

159 1S9
127 127
115 135
166 168
145 145
150 150
175 175
18 160
160 160


I


I


142 5e 162
140 y 150

148 156

159 162
171 171
160 160
177 177

139 157
134 145
155 155

1486 156
150 160
174 174
166 161
16o0 10


I
Prices ompiled from Oil. Paint and Drug Reporter, The National Provisioner. The Journal of Com roe (Ne Tork). ead
reports of Production and Marketing Administration and Bureau of Labor Statitics. BEise taces and duties included
hers applioable. Index numbers of earlier years beginning 1910 are give in Technical Bulletin No. 757 (1940) mad
The pats and Oils Situation beginning Deoaber 1940.
/ Prellminary. 2/ Revised. / Three-aent processing tax added to prise as originally quoted. / C.l.. mNe York.
Dr-u or tanks. *Multiply by this factor to convert current index number (195S-89 = 100) to ola basis (192449 IZ0).


IDeoaber I


r fr Ir7


----


Cents

41.5
42.2
19.0
17.0
12.9
15.8
16.6
13.0
10.5
9.9

12.8
16.5
12.8
14.3
13.0
16.5
11.8
15.2
14.3

11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7

11.4
11.6

8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
12.3
3.6

14.5
15.1
20.0
39.0

13.8
15.0
17.7
30.6
11.5

10.0


Catoner
Cents

41.5
42.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
15.0
15.6
13.0
10.6
9.9

12.8
16.6
12.8
14.3
13.0
16.5
11.8
15.4
14.3

11.1
11.0

60.7

11.4
11,6

8.4
8.8
6.9
8.9
12.3
3.6

14.3
18.1
24.8
39.0

13.8
15.0


11.7

11.5


asn

Cants

46.5
/47.2
19.0
17.0
12.8

15.6
13.0
10.6
9.9

12.8
16.6
12.8
14.
13.0
16.5
11.8
15.4
14.3

11.1
11.0
11.8
80.7
18.0
11.4
11.6

8.4
8.8
8.9
6.9
12.3
3.6

14.8
15.1
24.8
59.0

13.8
18.0
17.8
56.4
11.9

11.5


catm

46.e
47.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
11.0
1.6
16.6
2S.0
10.6
9.8

12.8
itd.s
12.8
14.3
11.0
16.5
11.8
15.4
14.8

11.1
11.0
11.6
60.7
18.0
11.4
11.6

B.4
8.8

8.9
12.3
8.6

14.8
15.1
24.8
39.0

15.8
18.0
17,8
38.2
11.9

11.5


---











,;,n;; -i, *. ",
l.. ::. h :::-r.. s 4A:' .V .S.. .. 1..f -I- ; S.2 T1 'Uxk.' I I "

.: :: .-''* *, -* '" .. .

O o .*.... -.. ... ".** *--..- **
:o... contents
,. --. .... ., ..,*. .- : '.', ,. *"
uiam"9. "9S9 gp 5 a3SI9 S* 3
: Outlook: ..,i. t. v !.. a,.. .rs- r ....--., *.. ...-"* 5 :
Government Actions ................ 10
,.'* Rec ^ ED 6LQpmeat ....** ..-j,- .,.". 13*"3
PA" idbs ot as'a and Oils, 1910-45 ..., 1


,R, .. -

I Total supplies. of. fats and oils available for domfticnuse (civilian

A: military) in 1946 probably will be.slightly larger than-tte 9.7 billion

io ids consumed in 1.95, but will .be less than -n:the -four preceding years.

Sv..aAilan supplies. of fats and oils in 1946 for-both food and non-food-purposes,

S.9 ...e about midway between the 65 pounds per capital consumed in 1945 and

the prevar average use of 74 pounds per capita.g. Reduction in 'military pro-

?pnment will more than offset the increase in civilian population. Military

P.oeurement per capital was at a higher rate than formal civilian use.

With a high level of national income and industrial activity, demand

for fats and oilsat present prices will exceed supply- in 1946U' -If price

c4aAings are raised or removed, prices of most fats and-oils will advance.

Butter supplies are especially short of demand this winter, with no

material improvement in prospect before midyear. Under present allocations,

the supply of margarine for civilians for the first quarter of 1946 is smaller

%'tifo.r the. fi~st quarter of last year. On the other hand; civilian supplies

o~f lard for the year as a.whole will be moderately larger than in 1945. Per

Otpita. supplies. of all food fats for civilians may be 3 to 5 percent larger in

f. .than the 42-pounds consumed in 1945.
cold use
"Hi i ""






JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1946 4

Supplies of soap fats ar drying oils for use in civilian manufacture

are slightly larger than a year ago, as a result of reductions in military pro-'

curement. Major improvement in supplies of soap fats is dependent on imports

of Philippine copra;--which have not yet begun in volume. Some pickup in

imports of copra is likely. i. Vbhe.s co9,9hS f. of.196, but supplies of coco-

nut oil will. not be abundLgt.before.194.9 Approximately.75 million pounds

of lauric-acid oils were released from Government stocks to soap makers in

January. Crushings of both domestic and imported flaxseed are likely to be

larger in 1946 than in 19qL, but current stocks of linseed oil are low' The

1945 Argentine crop of flaxseed, recently estimated at.kO million bushels, is

about 70 percent above the low 1944 crop but -bout. nne-third less than rear .

Imports of Argentine flaxseed, Philippine copra, and Chinese t'mng oil

this year are expected to-be larger-than in 1945. Small shipments of copra

from the Philippines and tung oil fro'-. China .have already arrived, and addi-

tional shipments are reported on the way. With some decline in experts of fats

in 1946, chiefly edible fats, the United States probably will return this year

to a net import basis in fats and oils. .

Production-of. fats and oils from domestic materials may be 300 to 600o

million pounds larger than last year -The extent of the increase will- depend

partly on the .outturn of the i946 cotton crop. Production of cottonseed oil

in the 1945-146 marketing year wi.ll be about one-fourth less than in the

preceding crop.year, with a low level of output in prospect through July.

Th prospective increase in total output, of fats, which will occur chiefly in

lard, linseed oil, greases, and possibly butter, is offset by a substantial

reduction in the stocks on hand at the beginning of 1946 compared with 1945.

Factory and warehouse stocks of fats an.d oils on November 1, 1945, the latest

reported, totaled only 1,645 million pounds, about 550 million pounds less

than a year earlier and about one-fourth below the prewar average..








Stripes. :of farmere' stock peanuts produced in.l46,.. it.was recently

Aredw, will be supported at an average of 90 percent of the parity price

I f:uly 15, 1946. At. th ild-December, 1944 level, 90 percent of parity

~ai. be 7.60 cents per peund (-152 per ton.), S percent less than the estimated

6 season average ce. eanut prices next season will be supported

tipough loans ahd purchases, with no-restrictidns on marketing. Unit returns

.,, flaxseed, as announced earlier, will be supported at the equivalent of

I 160 per bushel, Minneapolis basis. No support program for 1946-croapsoybeans

i y b.et been announced.

:- January 23, 1946.

OUTLOOK

, Btte:r Output the Lowest Since 1920;
"!des W.ould Increase in the
< s'4 ofTpe Ceilings

Production .of butter is now at a low ebb. Output of creamery butter
in December lq95, according to a preliminary estimate, was 25 percent less
than a year earlier and the smallest for December since 1920. HowPver, butter
production may rise above the 19L5 level during the second half. o.f q196. The
total quantity of milk available for use in butter production- in 1946. probably
will be moderately larger than in 19h5, even if the total output of milk decUims
somewhat.' Military and export demand for manufactured whole milk products will
be.s.hrply reduced in 1946. Production of butter in 19h6, assuming that butter
prices remain at .the present level, may be 50 million to 100 million pounds
more than in.1945' but about 400 million pounds less than the 1.937-41 average.
Supplies for civilians will still be considerably short of demand at present
prices. .

Retail prices of butter under ceilings now average about 55 cents per
pound, If ceilings were removed, butter prices probably would rise 15 to 20
cents per piund, .but prices probably would decline some from theh.igher level
by midsummer as production of butter increased'.

Lard Output to Increase in 19L6; Civilian
Supply Per Capita U Slightly

Tbtal lard production in 196-.is provisionally estimated at 2,450
million pounds, 350 million pounds more than in 19h5. This increase is
S'predicated on the prospect for, a moderate increase in hog slaughter in :1946
Sand-about normal yields of lard per hog. The yield of lard per hog was
exceptionally low in early 1945, when there were large exports.of fat cuts
of perk. Lard production in 1946 will still be substantially less than in
1943 and 1944, when more thani3 billion pounds were produced each year.





JAJBUARY-lBaUARY 1946 6 .: ?..

Factory and warehouse stock of lard on November 1, 1945, the latest
reported, totaled only 60 million pounds, 376 million pounds less that a year
earlier (tableO). With a strong foreign demand for lard, exports including
shipments to United States territories in 1946 may be about as large as in
1945, when nearly 600 million pounds were sent out.

The total supply of lard'fbr domestic use may be about the'same this"
year as last. However, use in manufactured products probably will be substal-
tially reduced, particularly in soap, and military purchases are down bsarply.
Civilian supplies per capital may be slightly larger than in 1945.

Civilain Supply of Edible Vegetable-Oil Products
About Same as in 19Q45

The total supply of corn, cottonseed, peanut, and soybean oils may
be nearly the same as in 1'45. Output of these oils may be reduced from 1945
levels as the exceptionally small 1945 crop of cottonseed will result in a
small production of cottonseed oil in the first half of 1946. However, factor;-
and warehouse stocks of th- edible oils apparently were larger at the beginning'
of 1946 than a year earlier. On November 1, stocks of such oil's totaled 582
million pounds, 83 million pounds more than a year earlier.

At existing quota levels for use of -fats an4d oils in civilian-margarine,:
shortening, and edible oils, the per-capita supply of shortening-and oili for
civilians in 1946 would be slightly larger than in 1945; but--the per-capita
supply of margarine would bc smaller, with the reduction occurring in the first
half of the year. The total for all three items would be nearly the same as
in 1945, on a per-capita basis.

Production and Imports of live Oil
To Continue Small in IloT-

Production of olives in California in 1945_L6, estimated at 31,000
tons, is 26 percent smaller than in 194-145 and 25 percent below'the average
of the 10 crop years 193h-43. This season, with demand strong and production
reduced, prices received by farmers for olives are at new high levels. The
season average price for olives to be canned ripe is estimated at $298 per ton,
compared with $221 per ton last season and a 1935-39 average of $88 per ion.
Olives for crushing are bringing an average of $200 per ton compared with
$185 last season and an average of $38 per ton in 1935-39.

Output of oil from crushings of domestic olives in 1945-46 will be
less than the 4.5 million pounds produced last season. Peak production of
oil from domestic olives was 10.9 million pounds in 1940-41.

Imports of edible olive oil in 1935-39 averaged 62 million.pounds-
annually. In 1944_45, about 9 million pounds were imported from Spain.
Negotiations now under way with Mediterranean countries may result in some
increase this season in'imports of edible olive oil, but the quantity imported
is likely to remain small compared with prewar. The olive crop in the'
Mediterranean area this season is considerably below average as a result of
drought in 1945.








a! .. lMfOrnia live's ': Edible olive oil
S*.. : United States
S': : :Price to growers,:
Crush- : er ton : :Price per
I. :"ings as : :Produc- : Imports:"pound;
ending .ro&ic-: Orish- :a per- Cr~shed :. : tion !imported
L. ober.. tik ings toentae: for :Canned : oil,
"-" "I of : oil : ripe : drums,
:produc- : :New York
__ tion _____ ___ _
0 ,.OC00 1,000 .. Million Million
ton tons Percent Dollars, Dollars pounds pounds Cents
brage
1935-39 31 13 42 38 Sg 4.0 61.5 26.6
1940 74 38 51 70 93 10.9 14.4 54.5
,56 27 4s 145 167 8.0 6.0 70.0
-- -59 33 56 120 125 9.9 5.6 66.2
.3 57' 20 35 181 17~ 6.1 .6 1/56.3
i 4 : 42 13 31 185 221 45 8.8 1/60.7
194 2/ : 31 200 298. 1/1/6o.7

Bi mleicial production of olives outside California is neglible. 'Production of
li'a es and price to growers, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Crushings of olives
:aai.-or.oduction of live oil, Bureau of the Census. There is no crushing of im-
ported. olives.
/ California oil, drums, New York. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Average, Oct.-Dec. 1945.

Major Improvement in Soap-Fat Sup-ly Awaits
.Imports of Philippine Copra

Supplies of soap fats from domestic production and stocks probably will
be somewhat smaller this year than last. With hog slaughter increased, grease
production will be moderately larger than in 1945, but probably not enough larger
to offset the reduction in January 1 stocks of tallowand greases, and in-stock
of lard held by soapmakers. In 1945, soapmakers used about 80 million'pounds
of lard carried over from the nrecedihg year. Practically none of this remains
for use in 1946, The purchase of lard for use in soap has been prohibited since
the fall of 1944. Factory 'and warehouse stocks of inedible tallow and greases
on November 1, 1945 totaled 172 million pounds, 123 million pounds less than a
year earlier, and also less than what is generally considered a minimum working
levdl. Inventory controls are in: effect. Stocks of lauri-cacid oils on November
1, at 186 million -oounds, were 78 million pounds larger than a.year earlier.
governmentt stocks oib January 1, 1946, totaled 105 million pounds: these stocks
.are being released to domestic users, *with allocations being made under WFO 43,
!c.l:iCtNfly on the basis of historical use. Approximately 75 million pounds of the
tutal has been allocated to soap makers. New- snup-lris will-cQtinue t beeallcated
4n.er WFO 43.
Some increase in. soao fat supplies for civilian use in 1946 will result
from drastic reductions in military procurement of soap, which in 1945 amounted
to an estimated equivalent of 300 million pounds of fat. Also,some reduction
from 1945 in use of soap for synthetic rubber manufacturing is probable this
year.




J.aNUARY-FEBRnUARY 1946


- 8 -


Major improvement in.soap fate will depend chief 'on arrival f s.ub-
stantial quantities of Philippine copra. Imports of coconut oil and copra
from Ceylon and the Sbuth Sea islands, which approached 200 million pounds
annuall.v i 1944 and 1945 (in terms of oil), will be severely curtailed,
S- .. Cora and coconut oil from these
sources will go mainly to prewar markets, the United Kingdom and continental
rope. Shipments of copra from the Phillipines in 1945 amounted to less
than.15 million pounds, oil equivalent. An increasing flow of copra from the
Philippines-is likely during 1946. However, total U.S. imports of coconut"
oil'and copra (in terms of oil) from all sources probably will te less.
than one-half as large in 19.6 as the 1937-h1 average of 700 million poun.s.


Increased Sunulies of Drying Oils in Prospect

The supply of crying oils probably will be- increased in
iq46, compared with .1945 l%.reelv Rs a result of a moderate increase in domestic
supplies of linseed oil and an increase in tune-oil im>orts.-.,


A substantial increase from 1945 in production of linseed oilfromdomestic
flaxseed is likely in 1946, but this increase is partly offset by a reduction
in stocks of linseed oil .t the beginning of 1946 compared with a year earlier.
Factory and warehouse stocks of linseed oil on November 1, 1945, at 168
million pounds, were 136 million pounds smaller than a yenr earlier. Crushings
of domestic flaxseed in July-December 1945 apparently totaled about 13 million
bushels, leaving roughly 20 million bushels from the 1945 crop to be crushed
in 1946. Crushings of domestic flaxseed from January through June 1945,.totaled
g.4 million bushels. Another lirge crop of flaxseed is in prospect for 1946,
and crushings.in the second half year should be at least as large as in the
second half of 1945. Production of linseed oil from domestic flaxseed in 1946
may total over 600 million pounds compared with 400 to 450 million pounds in.
1945.

The ec r.nc official esti.tite nf fl-rpccr' r r''ucti r. in A.r/:entine this
season is 39.5 million bushels, nearly 16 millionn bushels below the first
esti.iate although about. 9 million bushels nnre thpn production in 1944-45.
Imports of flaxseed and linseed oil into the United States from all sources,in
the first 11 months of 1945 were ecuivr.lent to 6.4 million bushels of flaxseed.

Small lots of Chinese tung oil reached the United States in January.1946, ,
and other small shipments are-on the way. Stocks...of tung.oil at Chinese ports .
are reported to be small. Storage and river-transportation facilities are
reported to have been partly destroyed by war. However, with tung oil prices
at a high level, trade in this commodity may be restored fairly rapidly, al-
though the prewar level will not be approached in 1946.

There are no available indications of the size of the Brazilian castor-
bean crop for 1946, but the erpcrt price of caster beans in Brazil in Septem-
ber and October, when plantings are made, averaged 25 percent higher in 1945
than a year earlier.


''


:TA






Seco__d Domestic Production of Tug iNt This Season-

Production of tung nuts in commercial States-in 1945-46 is estimated.
at 33,100 tons, 24 percent larger than in 1941-45 and the largest on record.
R#otM data on tung-tree i'nmbers are not available, but large numbers of
young trees are coming into bearing. The upward trend in production is
expected to continue'for several years, although output in some years may
'17e sharply curtailed by early spring freezes, which destroy the"blossoms.

3ut-ut of tung oil from nuts produced this season probably will total
10 to 11 million pounds. Between 8 and 9 million pounds of oil were produced
from the 1944.crop.

Commodity Credit Corporation this season has offered to purchase tung
oil at 30 cents per pdund, f.o.b. mill, from processors who paid S81 per ton
or higher to growers for tung nuts. Prices of tung -oi1 .and .tung nuts have
remained above these supports. The price of -tung -oil is .at the .ceiling -
39 cents per- pound, drums, carlots, 1ew York-- and prices for tung nuCt this
Season average $102 per ton, the same as last season. The scarcity of tung
oil supplies is reflected in the low factory and warehouse stocks. On Nov-
ember 1, 1945, stocks totaled less than 8 million pounds, 15 million pounds
smaller than those of. a year earlier and the least since 1921. According to
trade reports, mills have already contracted to sell most or all of their
1945-46 output at ceiling prices.

S Tun-oil and tung-nut prices have been at an exceptionally high level
since 1940. Imports of Chinese tung oil in 1946, if large enough, may tend
to depress these prices next season.

Table 3 .Production, imports, disappearance, and price of tung oil,
and production and average price to growers for
tung nuts, 1935-45

TuMg nuts 2 Tung oil
: Pro- : Season :: : Price per
Year : duction,: average Pro- : :Domestic : pound,
year :price per : auction :Imports : disap- : drums,
:beginning : ton to : ::pearance : carlots,
S : December : growers : :New York
1,000 1,000 1,000
Tons Dollars pounds pounds pounds Cents
Average
1935-39 : N.A. N.A. N.A. 123,190 118,113 16.7
1940 : 11,000 6o.oo 62 97,049 66,937 26.3
1941 : ,750 88.30 3,533 43,800 68,515 32.2
S192 : 16,350 91.80 e,290 8,269 10,637 39.6
1923 6,200 99.00 5,310 68 8,345 39.0
1944 :26,680 t10.o0 2,558 1,771 9,626 39.0
1945 :1/33,100 1/102.00 2/8,600 2/ 20,000 39.0

S'"omropiled from reports of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Bureau of
the Census; and the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter.
/ Preliminary.
Partly estimated.




JANUARY-rEBRUARY 1946 10 -

GOVERMMEIT ACTIONS

Final Acreage Goals Announced

Final acreage goals for 1946 crops were announced on January 16,
following State meetings for review of tentative goals suggested by he
Department of Agriculture last December. In the case of oilseeds, the
national totals of State acreages recommended by the State review committees
'were slightly larger than the national goals originally suggested. The
larger acreages were adopted as the final goals for soybeans, flaxseed, and
cotton. The national goal originally suggested for peanuts, however, has
been adopted as final. This goal is for peanuts for edible purposes only.
The suggested and the final goals are as follows (in thousand's of acres):
Suggested Final
Soybeans harvested for beans ........... 9,500 9,590
Flaxseed planted ..................... 4,200 4,318
.Cotton ................................. 20,000 20,200
Peanuts picked and threshed ..... ... 2,500 2,500

Price Support Program Announced for
1946-Crop Peanuts

The Department of Agriculture announced December 29 that prices of
farmers' stock peanuts produced in 1946 would be supported at a national
average equal to 90 percent of the parity price on July 15, 1946. On the
basis of the parity price on December 15, 1945, this support would be at 7.60
cents per pound ($152.00 per ton), 8 percent less than the estimated average
price of 8.27 cents per pound ($165.40 per ton) received byfarmers for
the 1945 crop. Detailed support prices by type and sound mature kernel
content will be announced after the July parity is determined.

Peanut prices "ill be supported next season through loans and purchases
Loans will be made to producers, and purchases will be made (through peanut
growers' cooperatives) only to maintain prices or to provide markets.
Acreage allotments and marketing quotas will not be applied to peanuts
produced in 1946.
Soybean Use and Inventories Limited
The use of i'hole or ground soybeans in the manufacture of feed or
fertilizer was prohibited by Amendment 4 to War Food Order 9, effective
January 16. This amendment also prohibits use of soy flour and similar
edible soybean products in livestock feeds.

Soybean processors and seed dealers are not to purchase.more 1945-crop
soybeans than are needed, together with inventories already on hand, to meet
requirements for the period ending October 10; 1946. Sales to Government
agencies may be included in calculating these requirements, Country shippers
may not purchase more soybeans than necessary, in addition to existing inven-
tories, to fulfill contracts with soybean processors, seed dealers, or
Commodity Credit Corporation, plus (1) 2,000 bushels or (2) the quantity of
1945-crop soybeans purchased in the preceding 30 days. Persons who are not
soybean processors, seed dealers, or country shippers may purchase soybeans
only if needed to fulfill contracts with processors, dealers, shippers, or
CCC, or if needed for planting or for sales for human consumption




-10
KoS-lo6


- 11 -


Shortening and Oil Quotas Continued at
October-December Level

Manufacturers' quotas of fats and oils for use in the manufacture
of shortening and cooking and salad oils were continued through March 1946
at the rate of 92 percent of average use in 1940 and 1941, This action
was taken in Amerdmeint 24 to War Food Order 42, effective January 1, which
extended for another 3 months the 4-percent emergency quotas granted for
October-December 1945. The basic quotas are at 88 percent.

Soybean-Oi. Ceilings Extended. to Dakotas;
Ceiling Prices for Rapeseed
Oil Increased

Specific ceiling prices for crude soybean..oil (tank cars, f.o.b.
mill) in South Dakota and North Dakota were established by Amendment 54 to
MPR 53, effective December.24, at 11.75 cents per pound, the same as in
adjoining States.

Maximum prices for rapeseed oil (denatured, bulk, c.i.f. New York,
Depific Coast ports, or Gulf ports) were increased on December 24, 1Q45 from
11.5 cents per pound to 13.0 cents per pound. This action was taken in
Amendment 54 to MPR 53, in order to bring domestic prices into line with the
price of 11.5 cents per pound, f.o.b. Argentina, established by agreement
between the United States and Argentina.

Approximately 90 percent of the rapeseed-oil used in this country
goes into the manufacture of lubricating oils, especially for marine engines.
Most of the rest is used in making art-gum erasers and rubber factice compounL
Denatured rapeseed oil used for lubricating oils or rubber factice is exempt
from the import duty and excise tax on rapeseed oil.

Use of'Soybean Oil in Synthetic
Resins Restricted

Amendment 9 to War Food Order29, effective January 1, 1946, limits
monthly use of soybean oil in the manufacture of synthetic resins to
one-sixth of the quantity used for that purpose in January-June 1945. Use
had formerly been limited indirectly by recently-revoked War Production Board
restrictions on production of synthetic resins.

As a result of the revocation of Office of Priae Administration
Rationing Order (No. 16) on fats and oils, War Food Order 42 was changed to
list certain exempt fat-and-oil products formerly designated by referring to
the rationing order, ihich named them. This action was taken in Amendment 23.
effective December 17.
Shortening Subsidy Terminated; Ceilings
on Sales to Governnent Reduced

Subsidy payments on bulk shortening for civilian use which had been in
effect since December 17, 1943 were terminated December 31, 1945. These pay-
ments, amounting to 0.4 cent per pound of vegetable oil contained in standard
shortening and to 0.2 cent per pound in hydrogenated shortening, had been
made to offset increased costs of packaging during the war. Scarcity of steel
drums forced manufacturers to use wooden tierces, which are more expensive
than otpnl






JANUARY-YBRUARY 1946


- 12 -


Price ceilings on manufacturers' civilian sales of bulk shortening
were not changed when the subsidy payments were ended. However, ceilings
on sales of bulk shortening to the armed forces or other Government agencies
were reduced December 31 to the same level as for civilian sales by Amendment
55 to Maximum Price-Regulation 53. These ceilings had been higher than
those for civilian sales by amounts equal to the subsidies on civilian
bulk shortening.

Lard Ceilings Not to Reflect Western
Freight Rate Reductions .

Amendment 52 to Maximum Price Regulation 53 provided that reduced
freight rates,effective November 10, 1945, on the westward movement of packbi
house products from the central zone were not to be used in calculating
ceiling prices for lard. Instead, lard ceilings will continue to be based
on the old freight rates. This action ias taken as part of a program to
avoid a reduction in ceiling prices of hogs in West Coast States.

With prices of'lard remaining at ceilings in the Pacific Coast States
and freight rates reduced, the net price to some packing houses east of the
Rock, Mountains was higher for lard shipped to the West Coast than for
lard destined elsewhere. To avoid undue diversion of lard to West
Coast States, shippers were prohibited from sending more lard to these
States in December 1945 or in January-March 19h6 than they had shipped a year
earlier. This action was taken in Amendment 53 to MPR 53, issued November 30,
1945.

'Change in Ceilings for Castor Oil
under Consideration

Beginning January 15, caster oil can be sqld at prices wrhicha ay be
adjusted after date of sale if price ceilings are changed. Requests for
changes are now under consideration. This action was taken in Order 32
under KPR 53. Price of castor beans, f.o.b. Brazilian ports, in early
January were over $100 per long ton compared with $86 a month earlier and
$70 a year earlier.

Correction

In the December 1945 Fats and Oils Situation it wee stated that
Amendment 6 to WFO 63 removed rapeseed oil from the import restrictions
of that order. The restrictions were terminated for rapeseed, but not
for rapeseed oil.







OS-lo106 -.13 -

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

USDA Purchases of Fats an. Oils in 1945
Smallest Since 1941

.\ Purchases of fats, oils, soap, and soybeans by the U. S. Department
Sof Agriculture in 1945, at 466 million pounds (preliminary) in terms of oil,
were 64 percent less than a year earlier and the smallest since 1941. The
shortage of fats and oils in this country and the end of lend-lease in
August were the principal reasons for the decline. Large Government stocks
o$..lard were drawn upon during 1945 to -meet export commitments; deliveries
o f Iats and. .oils to our Allies were substantially larger than purchases.
"'Lard-was the leading item purchased in 1945, as in earlier years.

.S-able 4.- Contiacts for purchase. of fats, oils, soap, and soybeans by the
.Department of Agriculture, 1941-45


Item :1941 1942 1943 31944 : Jan.-
S : : : Oct.: Nov. De.: Dec.

: Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil.
Slb. lb. lb. 1b. lb. lb. lb. lb.

.utter ...................... : 2 34 120 106 1/1 --- _/2 .34
Lard-and rendered pork fat ...: 326 654 sg2 809 10 24 36 226
Other animal fats and oils 4/.: 2 30 61 2. ----- --- 2/
Linseed oil ........ ....... -- 70 391 198 -- -- --- 1
SSoybeans(oil equivalent) 5/ ..: 4 4 9 2 2 4 -- 40
Soybean oil ...............: --- 17 22 100 --- 2 --- 7
Other vegetable.oils ......... --- 82 49 15 -- -- -- 31
SShortening .......-;............: --- 46 62 8 --- --- --- 18
Margarine (fat content) 6/....: 1 77 72 59 -- --- -- 59
Soap (fat ~oatint) 6/ .......: --- 16 23 13 --- 21 --- 50
Total, fat equivalent ....: 333 1,030 1,691 1,312 13 30 38 4g6

:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: bu.. bu. bu. bu. bu. bu. bu. bu.

Soybeans ....................: 450 400 983 206 175 475 --- 4,496

I/ Preliminary.
2 Less than 500,000 pounds.
3/ Estimated butter content of Army spread.
4/ Includes fish and fish-liver oils.
SOil equivalent estimated at 9 pounds per bushel.
P/ Fat content estimated at 80 percent for margarine: 55 percent for soap.




JANUARY-2tRmARY 196


1945 Cottonseed Crop Smallest Since 19 21: bean and
Peanut Production About Same As in 1944

Cottonseed production in the United States in 1945 was estimated in
the December Cotton Report at 3,703,000 topa,- 24*percent less than in 1944
and the smallest since 1921. Unusually _eavyur~ains" during the growing season
increased boll-weevil infestation and delayed maturity of the cotton bolls.
The yield of cottonseed per acre in cultivation July 1 was 408 pounds compared
with 482 pounds-in 1944 (the record) and an-average of 417 pounds -in 1939-43.
Cotton in cultivation on July 1, 1945 totaled 18.2 million acres,ll percent
less than a year earlier. .

The 1945.soyean crop was estimated.by the December Crop Report at
191.7 million'bushela, 1 percent more than the revised 194L estimate of 190.4
million bushels, .The acreage harvested for beans, 10.9 million, was 4 percent
larger than'in 1944 and was the largest on record. However, the national
average yield per acre harvested, at 17.6 bushels, was the lowest since 1940.
Yields below the 1934-43 average in Ill.inois and Ohio more than offset rel-
atively good yields in most other States.

A crop of 2080 million pounds of peanuts picked and threshed in 1945
was estimated by the December Crop Report. This output is 1 percent smaller
than in 1944 and also is slightly smaller than in any other war year. The
acreage picked and threshed in 1945, estimated at 3,183,000owas 1 percent
larger than a year earlier. But excessive rains in the Virginia-Carolina
area in midsuimer and 'again 'at harvest time resulted in unusually poor yields
per acre in that area. Despite higher yields in the Southeastern area than
in-1944, the national average for 114 5 was reduced to 653.pounds, 3 percent
less than a year earlier.

The December estimate of flaxseed production in 1945 was 36.7 million
bushels, 59 percent above the 1944 output. Planted acreage in 1945 was
4,066,000 (induding some acreage seeded in the fall of 1944 in the early-
producing States). This was 36 percent more than ih 1944. With favorable
growing condiiions,the average yield per acre planted was 9.0 bushels, 17
percent higher than a year earlier and the highest for an." year on record,
except 1940 and 1941.


- 14 -







Table'5- 5 Cottonseed, peanuts, soybean-s;, and. flaxseed: Acreage, yield
per acre, and -production, average 1937-41, annual-1943-45


S. :Average
-... Item .. ". t -. :un937-41r
. ~


1 '943 1944 :1945


age in cultivation, July
Aeteage harvested
Yield per acre planted.
f ui.oduc tion

eage growth alone for all
f purposes --..
1 Adreage picked and threshed
SYlield per acre picked and
' threshed
: Production

rage grown alone for all
:purposes
W.Atreage harvested for beans
mjeld per harvested acfe
i Production '
xseed
*Acreage planted
SAcreage harvested
,Yield per acre planted
.Production


1:.,000 padres
: II.
SPounds
::1,000 tons


:1 ,000
:


acres
"


:Pounds
: Mil. lb.


:1,000 acres
11 ft
:Bushels
: 1,000 bu.

:1,000 acres

Bushels
:1,000 bu.


i


piled from reports of the Crop7Reporting 5oard.
1/ Preliminary..

Soybean Production, Disposition
Estimates for 1944 Revised

The December 1945 Annual Summary of Crop Production estimated 1944
soybean production at 190.4 million bushels,2.5milon busaelsless than estitaE
i December 1944..This-e=vision reduces the estimated residual shown in table 6
of the December 1945..Fats and Oils Situation. This residual represents use
of soybeans for feed, direst human consumption, and loss. The preliminary
estimate for 1945 production is placed at 191.7 million bushels. Revised
figures are shown on the next page.


" :26,358.
:25,555
S 414
5,500


: 2,361
: 1,8.18

S 766
S1,392


S8,778
S4,121
S18.7
S76,253

S2,307
2,092
S 8.0
S19,576


21,942
21,652
S427
S4,688


5,094
3,595

S608
2, 185


14, 575
10,684
18.1
193,125

6,299
5,847
8.2
1,946


20;354
20,009
.'482
.,.902


3,999
3,150

670
2,111


13,428
10,415
18.3
190,406

3,000
2,750
7.7
23,135


18,157
17,688
408
3,703


3,958
3,183

653
2,080


13,412
10,873
17.6
191,722

4,066
3,914
9.0
36,688




JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1946


S. .Table 6.- Soybeans: Supply and disposition
1935-45

-... .sP_ .ply :" ---- Disposition -" '' "

Year In- :Total : :Ship-: :Esti- a
be sto-r k -:o' : ments Crmsh ated': r -
be- ports Crush-
gin- Produc- for Ot1,:Total Ex to :ings foruse Seed R
o .. .d Total Ex- :terrii angs f :
ning tion con- lud- supply. ports .ies 'oil and:.1-
Oictog. supply :ports mel 'f
Octo -. ump- mealn .
ber tion :farm : : : : : fat : :
ber: : :stocks: :flour :
1, 000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000.
buu. b. bu. bu. bu. bu. bu. bu. bu. b


48,901
3 3,721
46,164
S61,906
90,141
77,468
S105,587
187,155
193,125
:6/190,406
:7/191,722


4
17
3
3
2
1



4


N.A4.
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
N!.A.
N. A.
.6,000
12, 543
14,306
7,814


48,905
33,738
46,167
61,909
90,1543
77,469
105, 587
193,155
205,668
j/204, 716


3,490
19
1,368
4,401
10,949
237
469
904
934
.5,057


N.A.

24
23
30
47
20
13
26
33


25, 181
20,618
30,310
44,648
56,684
64,056
. 77,131
153,454
142,306
152,773


N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
'.A.
100
100
500
1,900
1,600
900


10,770 N.A.
11,.200. N.A.
12.880 N.A.
16,580 N.A.
17,730 N.A,.s,:
17,090 N.1 .
21,072 N.A.
21,958 22, 33
20,179 26,3117:
7/19, 570 .18, 569
A.I


Compiled from reports of the U. S. Departndnt of Agriculture and Bureau of the
Census.
1/ Year beginning July.
S1935-40, calculated on basis of 1.5 bushels per acre, using total solid equiva-
lent acreage in fc.llorin, year ; 1941-44, estimated by-Crop Reporting Board.
3/ Includes use for feed, direct human consumption, and loss. / January-June
1937 only. 5 Less than 500 bushels. Revised on basis of December 1945 crop
report. 7 Preliminary.

Household Fat Salvage Data Available
Through September 1945

The following table shows nont;ly household fat salvage collections
in 1942-44 and the first 9 months of 1945, based on reports to the War
Production Board and the Office of Prico Administration by renderors and
master collectors. Data for subsequent months are being submitted by
renderers in voluntary reports but arc not yet available.


1935
1936
1937
1938
1959
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945


- 16 -


T
" c. ~






Table 7.- Household fat salvage collections and apparent production
of dthile tallow and greases, 1942-45


ziroth
I.


'5.



tal for year


-- j- 4
S- oti ri---
Household t edible
fat : tallow and
: greases
S1000 lb. 1,000 lb._


I


-- -


*
,--


g/ 690,806


:._ _---

3,016

" 6 _.29
821
: 4,718



2 21,467-


household : :Total.in- :Household
:fat as.a :Household : edible :fat as a
:percentage: fat :tallow andtpercentage
: of tbtal : _gregaes _f totai
Pot. a 1.000 lb. 1,000 lb. Pot.


13,696
S 14,255
S16.063


15,037
14,844

12,525
12,763
S 11,057
36 36,4
11,607
10,505
S 10614
.L 2S..2


50,9. 3 9.L






-T ,82 77--


3.1 : 158,74892/1.943,06i


8.2


5 91360
: 6,972

.: 7, 6
7,3 7..
7.. 9 2'
: 8,647
I l3 .S5tu... -Y5.L5i4-
S 7,819

: 22", ,29
7.379
6,86o
S___9,l4o '
S3.379 4.69


9,4.058 9.3


.5.LO_


-52


14,583
j 14,061
S16,310
44lq94
:.1. 71
13,392
11,408

9,550
9,211
- .7z863


it.l for year :


90,079 3/1,649,688


eh-olf fat salvge collections: August 19-4-D-ecember 19--3, War Production Board,
Filed from reports from renderers; January 1944-September 1945, based on reports
office Of Price Administration by renderers and master collectors. Apparent pro-
iton of Inedible tallow and grease: Computed from factory consumption, imports,
iets-, and stocks (Bureau of the Census).
t. :st and September only. 2/ Total for 5 months, 3/ Computed from unrounded


A.,~i


i .-"


o tal





ow9

;al.
t.

Bota1


5.5


I,- ---


415, 1~JZI: 3.5


- ~i~c~E~.


75.3


---- ~--




uJTIlRYl _MHRUARX 1946 8 ,

PRICES OF FATS AND OILS, 19-0-45


Comprehensive annual data on retail and wholesale prices of fater-oil.
and oilseeds in-the United'States, 1910-45, are givqn in tables :to 12. This ,
group of tables :also shows index numbers of wholesale prices, and prices re-
ceived by farmers for oilseeds, 1910-.5,

Prices of fats and dils in the United. States-have fluctuated widely du.f
ing the 36-year period covered "(cover-page chart) Th'e indei number of 8
leading domestic fats and oils, during this period varied between a high in
1919 of 228 percent of the 1935-39 average, and a low of 58 percent in 1932. '0
Prices in 1910-15 averaged .98 percent of the 1935-39 average, then rose unde.
the influence of war 'to the. 1919 peak. With. bthe sharp decline in: the genqca4'
price level fot all-'comnodities in 1920 ehd 1921, fats-and-oils pric-s fell ..
in 1921 to 122 percent of the 1935-39 Pverqge, but recovered in 1923-29. to a
level about 40 percent over .orewar. :

Drought was the main: factor in the temporary rise -in fats-and-oils
prices in 1935-37. In the late 1930's and 19h0, gradually improving busines'1
conditions prevented a return to the low point reached in the depth of the d.
pression in 1932 and 1933, although world supplies of fats-were large at tha'
time,

Prices of fats.and oils rose rapidly in 1941 when reductions in world
ocean shipping threatened t6 curtail imports and when demand was rising rapilld
In September 1941, the indei number of S domestic fats and oils reached '.22
percent of the-19.35-39 average, the highest level since 1929. With the entrk'ry
of the United States into the war in December 1941, the upwaTd pressure on
fats-and-oils prices was greatly intensified. Price ceilings were instituted,,
however, and there was no significant rise in prices after'mid-1942. The
index number for December 1945 was 150 percent of the 1935-39 average, compare$
with 149 percent in December 1942- and 117 percent-in December 1941.

Prices of all major fats and oils, except oiticica oil, were at ceilinft
throughout 1945. The-index:number of wholesale prices of 8 major'domestic f4t
and oils in 194-5 averaged 142-percent of the 1935-39 average compared with o
percent a year earlier, -

The price ceiling foz butter was raised 5 cents per pound November 1,
1945, in connection with removal of the 5-cent-per-pound subsidy paid to butteL
manufacturers, This action restored butter prices to levels prevailing in May
1943, before ceilings were poweredd 5 cents per pound and subsidies initiated,.
Wholesale prices for 92-score butter at Chica.o in November and December 1945
averaged 46.5 cents per pound compared with 41.5 cents in October and 46.8 qen'
in May 1943.

Prices of most fats and oil's will remain at ceiling levels through 1946i
Demand is strong, domestic stocks are at a low Level, and world supplies of
fats and oils are still substantially smaller than prewar. If price ceiling-"
are raised or removed in 1946, prices of most fats and oils will advance,. .






Table .- Oilseeds: Season average price received by growers,
United States, 1909-45

:Cottonseediper ton, :Flaxseed : Olives :Peanuts per pound :Soybeans :Tung
year beginning July :per bu. a for :year beginning Sept.:per bu. : nute,
r :State averages :year :crushing:State averages :yr. begiipcr ton
weighted by :beginning:per ton :weighted by :ning Oct.:yr.beg-
:Production: Sales : July :yr. begimProduction: Sales :: ning
S::a : ning Nov: : : :Dec.
SDollars : Dollars :Dollars : Dollars: Cents : Cents dollarss :Dollrs

900 24.15 24.35 1.42 -- 4.07 4.09
10 : 25.99 26.11 2.27 -- 4.01 4.01 -
11 17.15 17iB 1.97 -- 4.23 4.21
12 : 18.33 18.36 1.29 -- 4.44 4.43 ---
13 21.90 21.96 1.23 --- 4.50 4.47 1.79 ---
14 : 15.46 15.51 1.31 -- 4.23 4.19 2.21 --
15 : 30.13 30.15 1.68 4.14 4.11 2.15
16 : 45.70 45.63 2.31 --- 4.84 4.84 2.19
17 : 64.30 64.28 3.11 -7.0.5 7.04 3.17 -
18 : 65.16 65,23 3.57 --- 6.51 6.52 9.19
19 : 65.59 65.79 4.41 0.00 9.30 9.35 3.53
20 : 25.65 25.65 2.33 36.00 4.75 4.69 2.67 -
21 : 29.07 29.14 1.66 35.00 3.84 3.82 2.16 -
22 : 30.33 30.42 2.08 38,00 5.74 5.36 2.01
23 : 41.21 41.23 2.12 34.00 6.45 6.45 2.28
24 : 33.25 33.25 2.16 33.00 5.78 5.78 2.46
25 ; 31.69 31.59 2.26 .3.00 4.27 4.25 2.34 -
26 : 22.08 22.04 2,.03' 35.00 5.04 5.01 2.01 ---
27 : 34.86 34.83 1.92 35.00 5.15 5.15 1.81 -
28 : 34.15 34.17 1.94 34.00 4.88 4.86 1.8 ---
29 : 30.93 30.92 2.61 36.00 3.73 3.69 1.68 8
30 2 22.07 22.04 1.61 32.00 3.51 1.46 1.37 -
31 8.98 8.97 1.17 20.00 1.62 1.59 .50
32 : 10.35 10.33 .88 20.00 1.55 1.50 .54
33 : 12.91 12.88 1.63 30.00 2.85 2.82 .94
34 : 33.03 33.00 1.70 38.00 ?.25 3.26 .99
35 : 30.54 30.54 1.42 31.00 3.14 3.12 .73 39.00
36 33.30 33.26 1.90 42.00 2.72 3.72 1.27 31.00
37 : 19.50 19.51 1.87 46.00 3.30 3.28 .85 35.00
38 : 21.79 21.79 1.59 29.00 3.27 3.26 .67 31.Q0
S39 : 21.14 21.17 1.46 42.00 3.40 8.39 .81 41.90
40 : 21.72 21.73 1.42 70.00 3.33 3.32 .90 60.00
41 : 47.65 47.65 1.79 145.00 4.66 1/ 4.66 1.55 88.30
42 45.60 45.61 2.36 120.00 6.05 Th 6.05 1.61 91.80
43 : 52.10 52.10 2.83 161.00 7.12 7.12 1.82 99.00
44 : 52.70 52.70 2.90 195.00 d.C3 8.04 2.05 102.00
45 51.80 2.89 200.00 8. 7 ____12 ..
United States averages for TflaxBcei, s77.yhin, sf. t-,ng nut7 were o.tained n y
fighting St.tte season average prices ty production. 1Oie prices art. fI7r Calif-
ia alone. There is no commercial production of olives in other States.
SPeanuts for oil, 3.92 cents pcr pound in 1941 and 4.1'; cents per pouni in 1942.
Preliminary.






JAnUAJRT-FEBRUAET lql6


- 20 -


Table 9 .- Oilslr esl iholieale price at specafled markets and price received by grower, annual avere, 1910-..5 i

I Cantor I I I Pemant. shaelld, I Peanute, I
I beans I ottoanseeI local shipping point., I farmerre
IBra:tlllaq Copra, price per abush1 I r ppou-nd / 1 tooLk, pe bu l
Calendar I f.o.b. 8 be, received *. I I I I *plbh type. I pric. I I
year Ilrasllian Pslf by o. 1 PrIc~a r ITIrgln Rumnne.ri 1 a receivdI NIo. 2 Price
I ports, I Ooast. gron. I41nna-lrc~lv*l typ., I type,1 auuth-I South-I by I yellow It eel i
I per longPer pound per i i6 onl T I No. 1 I go. llieeter dlwestrnT growerl,lChalo 1 bl
Stone ton groverl" I I State Btate ipar pounds grower
SDollare Cents ollarv Dollars Dollara Cets Cent Ceant Cen*.e cents Dollr.


I --- .---





S--- .9
I --- --

-- ./.
S--- 8.5




--- 5.0.
I --- 5.1.
4.4
f 8.7
I -- 8.5 .



S--- 5.1.




S-- 5.4
S--- 5.9




-- .6
S3.
--- 3.7
12.0


S--- ~-1.9

a-V53- 1.6
-. 66.05 3.5
i/ 75.00 -
1" 75.00
s.. 71.30 -
6_1 81.05 -


27.20
21.89
18.42
21.?3
20.11
24.77
40.30
58.69
65.78
65.07
46.99
22.19
314.56
433.3 '
38.24
34.63
25.56
27.89
36.78
34.0, -
25.57.
16.52
9.L4'
11.76
24.97
34. -jL
314-70
3'n.70
29.54
21.13
22.17
24,31
35.0 J
44.42
48.19
52.o0
52.22


2.36
2.38
1.89
1.36
1.54
1.:5
2.26
3al6
3.92
4.53
3.79
1.86
2.48
.2.74
2.49
2.74
2.346
2.22
2.28
2.79
2.39
1.49
1.19
1.58
1.91
1.77
1.96
2.12
1.91
1.814
1.79
1.87
2.47
3.04
3.08
3.11


P.08
2.15
1.69
1.17
1.33
1.60
2.01
2.84
3.59
4.06
3.50
1.50
2.08
2.36
2.18
2.44
2.07
1.96
1.96
2.46
2.12
1.23
.97
1.352
1.66.
1.52
1.71
1.90
1.71
1.60
1.60
1.66
2.27
2.81
2.87
1.90


-,--
.--
-a-.





5.6
6.4
9.7
9.9
9.2
8.5
8.0

7.9
5.8
6.2
2.9
4.0
5.9
1.1
6.1
7.1
5.8
5.9
5.6
7.1



14.6
4.6.


Li



9.b
S.6
7.2
7.6
C7.2
6.8
5.9
14,7
-4.9
2.3
3.6
S5.4
S7.5
5.1
* 5.8
. 5.0
5.1
5.0
6.4
11.5
13.9
14.0
14.0


7.1
1 .n
10.6
7.6
8.7
9.2
7.1
6.5
5.7
5.3
2.5
3.9
5.5
7.9
5.4
6.2
5.2
5.14

6.6
12.n
14.3
14.2
14.2


7.3
12.3
10.9
.6-
9.2
9.9
7.5
7.0
6.1
5.9
2.8
4.0
5.8
*0.14
5.6
6.6
5.6
5.7
5.7
6.9
12.1
14.5
14.5
14.5


4.9

4.9
4.5
7.7
4.5
4.5
6.5
S7.5
S7.7
9.0

3.8
6.7
6.1


5.6
5.3
7.7
3.7
3.3
1.7
2.1
3.2
3.
3.4 .
3.B
3.4
3.4


5.8
6.9
7.7
8.2


.92
1.00


.89
5/ .92
.95
1.39
5, 1.80
i/ 1.76
/ 1.94
5, 2.1u


-
-


2.05
2.16

2.71
3.43
3.23
3).30
2.17
2.01 "
2.13.
2.37
2.53
2.SS
1.97
1.K7
2.04
1.86
1.06
i.b6
148
-73
1.14
S.98
.97
1.26
.79
.77
.85
1.22
1.66.
1.70
1.93 :
S2.11


Compiled Irom U11,.Palit an Drug e porter. Dally Market Iecord (Uineaapolle), Chicago Journal of Comeree, sia re-
ports of the U. S. Department o Agrloulturr.
I/ Blmple average f monthly prices. j/ 0. & 1. New York before 1942. I/ October 1, 194 January 6, 1936, prices
include processing tax of 1.5 onate per pound. 'V_ 194 and 1945 average banqd on sale of lgss than 20 carload.
1/ Average for less than 12 months. / Preliminary.


-


-- -- ----- -- --







- 21 -


lO" 10.-,ate and olse, salad dreaing, and peanut butter: Retail price per pound, leading cities and all commun-
ities, United States, annual averages,
1913-45
: tter i Oleomargarine I lard, I Shortevning Cooking I Salad Peanut butter
ler A LeL" A1 : lea- Leading eitites : All :amn salad :dreeeingl : All
S IadiaclI ~Omm l M:cion-s Ing 'Carton. y/ Uther 2m o n-ioillead-:leading : neo
Sct i tie elt ties le tles I c ontaoinlerl- itee :ig eitiet cities I citie: cities
ntC et Cat. Cents .Cet en. Gents .ent Cents CGente Cents Cents

191 1 38.3 36.0 15.8 -
"192 2 ].2 -3 1
S 35. 33.4 18 ? -
19 39.4 37.0 17.5 -- .- -- -
19 17 54.7 B57 -2 27.6 -
i, 1 57. .2 -- 33.3 .. ..- --
S 919 6. 5 41.3 39.7. 36.3 32.4 -
2 1920 7. 65. 0 29.5 35.1 31.
1921 51.7 48.5 31 30.4 18.0 22.6 20.2 --
192 5 7.9 44.9 28.0 26.9 17.o 22.5 20.1 -
1929 3 55.8 52.0 28.1 28.2 17.5 22.3 203. -
19 '52.2 49.2 29.3 29 1.8 2.1 22.1 -
l 19~ :5.52 51.2 30.2 0 23.0 25.0 22.9 -
192 53.6 50.9 30.1 3o 21.7 22.9 -
1927 7: 53 532 2.3 28. 19. 6 --
g92 .9 53.7 27. 27. 18.3 -- 25.7 232 -- -- -- --
1929 55.5 52.1 27.0 27.1 18.1 24.1 1 --
1930 16.4 44.6 25.0 25.5 16. 23.5 21. -- -.
931 35.8 34 .2 19.9 20.0 13.1 22.3 20.: -- -- ---
1932 1 27.1 26. 15.4 15.5 8.7 19.2 17.6
S 193 27.5 26.4 13.2 13. .9 17.9 16.3 -- -- --
-193 31.5 30.1 13.5 13.6 11.7 18.5 17.o 3/16.9 3/15.4
1935 : 36.0 34.6 18.8 18. 19.5 16.6 22.0 20.6 2.5 1.4 19.5
1936 9.5 37.6 1s.5 1s.5 16i. 15.1 22.3 20.3 2. -- 19.1 17.
1937 :40.7 38.7 19.2 19.2 17.0 15.5 22.0 20.3 25. 19.5 17.7
1938 r 34.7 33.2 17.5 17.5 13.o 12s 20.2 18.4 24.7 i- i.6 16.9
S 1939 : 32.5 31.1 16.7 16.7 11.0 12.1 20.2 18.1 V24.2 18.0 16.
1940 36.0 34.4 15.9 15.9 9.4 11.8 19.0 17.2 20.7 17.9 16.3
1941 1 41.1 9.4 17.1 17.1 12.7 14.5 20.5 19.0 21.6 18.4 16.7
191 47.3 45.5 22.1 22.1 17.2 19.4 24.9 23.6 25.0 26.0 23.6
4 52.7 514 23 .6 23. 0 20.0 24.7 23.5 30.5 25.2 32.2 29.2
S50 .0 2.1 24.1 18-7 20.1 4.8 23.6 30.5 25.6 28.5 25.9
1915 5/ 50.7 24.1 18.8 20.0 24.6 30.4 24.9 28.5
Average retail prices in leading cites, from reports of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Average retail prices in
all eommnities, from U.S. Dept. of Agr. Misc. Pub. No. 576, Price Spreads between Farmers and Consumers for rood
Products. 1913-4I bhe averages for all communities are based on prices in leading cities and prices paid by farmers
(as reported to the Barea of Agricultural 3onomics), with adjustments for level indicated by consumer food pur-
abase studies. th method of estimating is explaihed on pages 26-28 of Misee. Pub. No. 576.
Largely standard shortening.
/ Chiefly hbdrogenated shortening.
Average for 11 month.
: Average for 8 months.
Preliminary.









JAUAT- lhminl 1946 22 -

Table 11.- Pats and oUil: IndE numberU of wholesale prices leading
markets, United Statee. 1910-45


S8 Domestic
:fsat and oil


27 Major fats and oils (195-39 100)


: a : Clailtfie by ortln Cls.afled by uee
a : : : Tegetsbl. ; Ibool : raltiS
11910-14i1935-39" items :Anbiml:Karine :Domestie-foreig: : oap J 1i :Dr7iln:lse.-. 11
1: : : 100 1 (.731 :(.69: (.77") : o :riin orl n: : e :o fate I *1 01.eln1 ra
(.72) : : : :(.S4) c : .1. : 67 (. (.S ( .. fate '
____________________ G1__ .9*9 fatsj oiM.


1910 a 105 107 ---
1911 I 91 90 ---
1912 1 101 100 ---
1911 : 103 101 --
1914 97 96 ---
1915: q1 94 ---
1916 1: i 1 --
1917 170 16 ---
1918 : 26 3 --
191 : 25 ---
1920 : 109 196 --
19 : 124 122 -
1922 125 124 122
lq23 : 142 110 140
1924 I 1 13 133
1925 : 1q 11h7 1L5
1926 : l 142 13 r
1927 1: l 139 137
1928 141 1R 137
1929 1 153 133 133
19 11 113 111 111
193 : 5 3 s84
1932 : 60 5s 60
1933 : 65 64 66
193 4 82 81 81
1935 121 110 107
1936 : 110 10 o10
1937 : 14 112 112
193 : 90 89 90
S193 81 79 S4
1940 : 83 82 88
19141 109 10 1n6
1942 13 135 142
1943 146 144 151
1944 1 142 Io 1148
1945 : 144 142 149


-- --- --- --- -
-_--- --- ---.. ... --- -
-- ----- --- ---.. ---









146 127 124 117 157 114 121 lk in 1E 1g
136 29 125 116 140 123 121 135 1Ep 128 n 5
15) 134 126 15 149 158 124 ll6 139 123 156
l45 7i 129 llU ib6 l1* 130 142 130 111 131
ii8 1?7 n!o 11' 155 131 13 l1p 119 Ill 134
l48 126 !.VJ l.-7 157 115 1l; t4? 12_ 10O 1g
!4l 1'i !!3 105 149 113 110 117 1U8 IO i14
14 11) 100 97 119 103 14 111 q 1 6 u 11
87 '7 74 71 99 76 73 86 6 80 101
62 6'. Lq 59 69 45 51 62 49 60 ao
65 61 66 70 51 56 65 52 84 83
-- 77 79 78 84 76 76 2 69 88 93
o106 91 113 q8 99 15 113 108 105 98 92
109 qh 1 08 102 1O q 110 10S 110 102? 101 101
114 ia o 11,5 115 112 110 111 121i 109 11i
90 lo 90 91 93 7& 90 90 8 91q 97
81 4h go 93 87 63 80 S2 84 101 92
87 11' 76 101 99 53 77 87 78 111 125
11o 14? '17 144 115 87 1. 114 124 126 127
133 164 151 173 134 12- 161 I. 154 156 152
145 1. 157 176 146 115 1?' 149 150 175 155
139 170 160 177 119 132 iGS 145 150 175 154
142 170 1.0 177 142 1 13 1'3 148 150 17 1514
------- ---- -
-- -- ---- -
--- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- .. .

---- ---- -
-- -- ---- -






















142 170 1-.60 177 1L2 I1 lc; !A 149 150 17Z 254


Theae inAex numbers are based on price series i' table l. The method of com rutation is described In U.S. Dept. of Agri.
Technical Bulletin No. 717 (September 1940). / Revised beginning 1938.
*eIltily by thin factor to convert to the basis of 1921-29 = 100.








- 23 -


Table 12.- Fata and oilsl Wholesale price per pound at specified markets,
annual average, 1910-45


Animal fats. oleonargarine, and shortening
r


Butter, 92-score
oreamery


TYear -
New York

1: v


.IS" 1
loll
r



1912

1913
1915
1516
1917 a
1918 g
1919

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925 s
1928
1929

1929

1930
1951
1932
1933
1934
1935
196 a
1937
1939


1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945 6/


Centa


31.1
27.9
31.6
32.2
29.8
29.8
34.0
42.7
51.5
60.7

61.4
43.3
40.6
46.9
42.6
45.3
44.4
47.3
47.4
45.0

36.5
28.3
21.0
21.6
25.7
29.8
33.O
34.4
28.0
26.0

29.5
34.5
40.1"
44.e
42.2
43.1


Chicago
' 5
|


: Oleomargarine, white,
a 1-pound cartons. Chicago


S S
animall

I I


Nut


Domestic
Vegetable
I I


Cants Cents Cents cents cents


16.2
16.2
16.2
17.2
17.9
18.8
18.8
23.6
27.6
33.8

32.4
21.5
18.8
21.4
22.3
22.5
21.5
21.2
21.0
20.5

19.0
14.0
11.2
10.2
9.8
15.1
15.3
15.6
14.6
13.3

11.8
13.3
15.1
16.4
16.5
16.5


m--






28.8
29.0

28.8
22.0
19.4
20.2
21.1
21.3
21.5
17.9
17.3
17.5


16.9
12.7
8.8
8.2
9.1
12.6
12.0
5/13.5

8.9

8.2


lard, Chicago


Prime stesl Refined,
: 1-pound
Neutral Tier Loose cartons
Tlrs L oo a 4/
*" | I -


Shortening
-oontaining
animal fat.
1-pound
cartons,
'Chicago Y/


cents Cents cents Cents


12.2
8.9
10.4
10.8
10.2
9.3
13.2
21.7
25.8
28.4

19.5
10.5
10.8
11.7
*12.6
16.1
14.4
12.3
11.8
11.5

10.4
7.7
4.6
5.3
7.7
13.8
11.3
11.3
8.0
6.4

5.4
8.9
12.8
13.8
13.6
13.8


15.8
15.5
14.7

14.8
15.8
19.0
19.0
19.0
19.0


18.6
9.7
10.4
11.1
12.0
15.6
13.8
11.7
11.2
10.9

9.8
7.2
4.2
4.8
7.4
13.6
10.7
11.1
7.7
6.0

5.0
8.6
11.8
12.8
12.5
12.8


5/22.1
13.2
13.1
13.9
14.6
17.9
16.9
13.7
13.3
15.0

12.0
9.0
6.2
6.4
8.8
15.1
12.2
12.7
9.2
7.5

6.4
10.1
14.5
15.6
15.6
15.6


Sources iven in general note at end of table, page 29.
Quoted as specials before May 1912; extras and firsts. May 1912-December 1917.
1910-1942, prices refer to open market sales only 1943-45, to all types of wholesale trading for cash or
ort-time credit.
/ uoted as butterine before November 1924.
Tierces, 1920-26, hardwood tubs, 1927-June 1940.
Average for less than 12 months.
I Preliminary.

Continued -


o s-io6


r ,







JAnUART-FMBUARY 1946


Table 12.- Fats and oilla Wholesale price per pound at specified markets,
annual average, 1910-45 Continued


Animal fats, oleomargarine, and shortening continued

U Grease Tallow Oleo oil
I U I 3
Oleo-
Year Loose. New York Inedible No. 1, Iterin.a
"A" White. Edible, Etra, barrels, barrels.
Chicago White House Chioago No. Speoal' Chicago New York New Yolk
Cn : i_ Chicago s loose,
S: ew York
SCents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


1910 7.5 7.5 6.7 9.0 7.3 --- 12.0
1911 6.2 6.8 6.2 7.1 6.4 -- 9.7 --
1912 6.2 6.7 6.0 7.9 6.4 --- 1-.0
1913 6.5 6.8 5.7 7.9 6.5 --- 11.2 ---
1914 6.5 7.3 5.8 7.3 6.4 --- 11.0 --- 9.2
1915 6.4 7.4 5.8 7.6 6.0 --- 12.2 --- 9.5
1916 9.6 9.5 8.6 10.6 9.4 --- 14.3 --- 11.8
1917 15.9 15.3 14.1 16.6 15.4 14.8 21.8 20.6 17.8
1918 17.3 5/18.4 15.9 18.5 17.2 3'16.9 25.7 24.8 20.5
1919 14.4 P17.7 11.3 Id.8 14.0 3/12.6 30.6 29.9 22.4

1920 12.4 12.9 10.2 14.0 11.8 3/10.2 21.3 20.2 15.2
1121 5.8 6.6 4.3 7.0 5.3 4.5 11.4 10.6 8.7
1922 7.1 8.2 5.8 7.8 6.4 5.7 10.6 11.5 9.6
1923 8.4 8.8 7.1 9.1 7.6 7.7 12.8 13.4 10.5
1924 8.3 8.7 7.3 9.5 7.4 8.1 15.2 15.9 11.6
1925 9.8 11.2 8.8 10.3 9.2 9.4 13.7 14.2 13.1
1926 8.5 9.6 7.8 9.5 8.1 8.4 12.0 12.7 12.2
1927 7.7 8.7 7.0 8.8 7.5 7.8 13.4 14.1 10.5
1928 8.3 9.0 7.5 9.4 8.3 8.5 14.0 15.. 10.6
1929 8.0 8.4 7.3 8.9 8.0 7.9 10.9 11.2 10.5

1930 5.6 6.2 5.1 6.8 6.6 5.6 10.5 11.0 8.9
1931 3.5 3.9 2.9 4.6 3.4 3.3 6.3 7.2 7.6
1932 2.6 3.1 2.4 3.5 2.7 2.7 5.6 6.3 5.2
1933 3.0 3.3 2.8 3.7 3.0 3.0 5.9 6.4 5.0
1934 4.0 4.2 3.8 5.0 3.8 4.0 7.6 7.9 6.9
1935 6.8 7.0 6.1 8.6 6.2 6.5 12.2 12.9 10.8
1956 6.3 6.8 5.5 7.8 5.8 6.1 10.4 11.2 9.0
1937 8.0 8.5 7.4 8.6 7.5 7.7 12.4 13.1 9.7
1938 5.3 5.9 4.7 6.1 5.0 5.1 8.8 9.1 7.2
1939 5.2 5.6 5.0 5.5 5.1 5.3 8.0 8.5 6.8

1940 4.2 4.6 4.1 4.6 4.1 4.3 7.1 7.5 6.0
1941 7.3 7.6 7.1 7.7 7.2 7.4 9.7 10.7 9.0
1942 9.2 9.3 8.8 / 9.8 3/ 8.8 9.1 12.9 13.3 10.6
1943 8.8 8.8 8.2 9.9 8.4 8.5 3/13.0 13.8 10.5
1944 8.8 8.9 8.2 9.9 8.4 8.5 ?'13.0 13.6 10.5
1945 4/ 8.8 8.9 8.2 9.9 8.4 8.5 13.0 --- /10.5


Sourees given in general note at end of table, page 29.
I' Tieroes before January 1940.
Q. uoted as prime, 1917-21. Tierces before July 1921.
Average for less than 12 months.
/ Preliminary.


Continued -


- 24 -








2 25 -


Table 12.- Fats and oils: Wholesale price per pound at specified markets,
annual average, 1910-45 Continued


Marine fate

SrCod-liver s Menhaden oil Sperm oil. Whale oil,
SCod oil, i oil, a Herring 1 Sardine s drums. New York a refined
Yar lNewfound- *medioinal.s oil, s Light oil,arude, bleached
a land, I U.S.P. s tanks. Crude, refined. tanks, Natural bBleached winter,
drums, INorwogian.s Pacific tanks. drum Pacific 4 deree 38 degrees drums,
New York barrels, s Coast : Baltimore New York Coat s / ew York
I / e N ew orke / e/ s New -Y or
SCents Cn a CentB Cents Cents Cents Centa Cents Cents


6.7
5.5
5.0
6.2
8.7
11.6
17.6
15.3


1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

1920
1921
1922
1925
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939

1940
1941
1942.
1943
1944

S1945


13.2

12.5
12.8
8.6
10.7
11.6
11.4
11.0
11.6
11.6
12.1


Y14.3
12.9


6.5
8.4
12.6
9/18.5
17.1


14.4
12.2


9.7 9.4
3.2 4.0
4.6 5.4
5.6 9/' 6.4
5.9 6.6
5.3 / 7.1
6.3 9/ 6.4
5.6 6.0
5.3 _9 5.6
9/ 5.3 9/ 6.2

--- 4.6
3.0 2.7
2.1 1.9
2.2 1.8
2.3 2.6
9 4.1 4.0
S4.1 4.3
--- 5.2
--- 4.4
--- 4.0


25.3
35.2
35.9
36.5
33.6
52.9


4.7
5.6
5.9
6.3
6.6
5.6
5.4
6.1

4.4
3.0
1.9
2.2
2.7
4.6
4.5
6.0
4.7
4.1

4.9
7.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
8.9


8.8
8.5
8.9
8.9
8.3

9.5
10.8
12.2
12.8
13.1
13.1


10.0
9.7
10.1
10.1
9.5

10.8
12.0
13.0
14.0
14.4
14.4


16.6
9.8
9.9
10.3
10.3
10.5
10.7
10.7
10.7
10.7

10.6
9.2
7.3
7.1
7.3
8.0
7.8
10.3
9.1
8.5

9.5
10.3
11.1
11.9
12.3
12.3


ginning


12.8
6.0
7.6
9.4
8.3
9.9
8.6
7.9
8.1
9.3

7.2
4.6
4.1
4.9
5.3
6.7
6.8
8.3
7.4
6.7

7.1
10.1
11.6
12.4
12.6
13.0


Sources given in general note at end of table, page 29.
SBarrels before July 1941.
Converted from price per gallon on the basis of 7.5 pounds per gallon.
Converted from price per barrel on the basis of 230.4 pounds per barrel.
4 Barrels before 1925.
Barrels before June 1934. Drums. carlots, June 1934-November 1944; less than carlots, bi
December 1944.
/ Before July 1942, converted from price per gallon on the basis of 7.5 pounds per gallon.
Quoted as natural before May 1943.
Barrels before April 1933.
S/ Average for less than 12 months.
O/ Preliminary.


Continued -


OS-10o6


14.1
6.3
7.3
8.9
8.4
8.4
8.3
8.4
8.9
8.3

7.2
5.0
3.3
3.6
5.5
4.7
5.6
6.9
6.0
9j/ 5.3

9/8.6
9.9
11.7
12.0
11.8
11.6








JALNUaT-FRESUART 114 L


Tatle L'.- Fats and oils: 'IholepEle "rice per pound at specified markets,
annual bveraao, 1910-15 continued

o.aatable fate

:*.st3r oil, Sew Yrk Coconut oil I/ Corn all, crude
Year : 1 : : Manila crude : Ceylon, :Manila, : Tank. Tank
Stands, : o. 3, ?io. 1, : Dety- C..f., : Tan : crude, edible, "
No. 3. : tasTanks, mid- w orks.
: : tarrels tanks : rated, : bulk, : w : bulk, : tank, or
York : drume Pacific f : ew ork Nework ;esten e
S : I York mills


: ent


s Cents Crnts Cents Cents Cents


Cents


10.1
10.5,
10.0
9.1
6.3
10.1
17.5
22.4
29.0
21.6


10.0
10.0
9.0
8.5


15.6
1!i.2


17.9
17.9


5.6

b/10.9
1.0
11.0
11.0
11.0


/ 3.7
6.5
7.1

6.3
4.2
3.5
3.2
-.S
7.7
8.)
9.3
6.11
6.11

;.0
9.24


16.8
10.0
e.7
9.5
10.0
11.4
10.7
9.8
9.6
8.5

7.14
5.h'
4.6





11.5






11.8
11.8


Cents


10.4
/ 9.6
10.1
12.2
12.6
12.6
15.6
17.5
18.7
18.8

17.9
10.9
9.6
10.4
10.6
12.3
6/12.0

9.8
9.0

e.o
6.0
5.1
4.8
5.7
10.0
10.u
11.5
8.3
7.6

7.0
11.0


Cents


6/10.3
9.9
10.0
8.5
9.0
8.3

7.U4
5.8
3.5
4.1
5.9
9.5
8.1

7.1
5.9

5.7
10.0
12.7
12.8
12.8
12. 8


Cents





1--



18.1
/.17.i

15.2
L--





10.0
11.6
12.0
12.1
12.1
10.8
10.5
10.14

9.14
7.E
5.1
1.9


9.0
8.5
7.2
6.0

5.8
10.2
12.7
12.5
12.8
12.8


Fjarces lver. In general note at end of table, page 29.
j/ fricee of crjde coconut all as originally quoted heve been adjusted to include the 3-cent-per-pound tax an the
first domestic processing effective May 10, 193l .
1] Tanks, f.>.h., before 1942.
S.-otud as Zeylon. domestic crude, barrels, before 1934.
Situated as Cachi, barrels, before June 193-. 1941 average estimated by subtracting 0.9 cent per poun-. from the
average price of this grade of oil sold in drums.
Scrrels before April 1935.
SAver'.g, for ?3as than 12 months.
Ij Preliz!nary.
Continued -


- 2f -








10S-1n6


77 -
-y1-

Table 12.- Fats ana oilsi :holessle price per pounc at speciiaec marveLs,
annual average, 1910-43 Cojntinue


U Vegetable fae Continued

Corn oil, Cottonseed oil Linsee8 oil, raw I Olive oil. edible
3 refined, :Cottonseed: : drums, i.EW York
S rude rime White :oil foots, : Nun- a Oit : ic:
Sr ediblerum n s mner :deooorized: raw (5J-' : Tan.. :returnaulc: o0l,
drums, .nKSs,
S .e soth- yellow, : (ediale) I T.F.A.) cars aruns, : drugs, Imported :CaliZorniaa
SNew York eastern :tank cars,i barrels, :delivered : kinne- : carlots, : ;en 'orrk C/ / :
I /1 "ill : ':ew York s Cncago : Last 4/ : apolis : ew ork
Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cants Cents Cents


1910 --. 8/O.7 8.1 --
1911 --- 5.0 6.3 --- --- -- 11.7
1912 --- 5.1 6.3 -- -- -- 9.0 --- 10.4 ---
1913 --- 5.9 7.3 -- --- --- 6.2 --- 11.
1914 --- 5.7 6.6 --- -- --- 6.7 --- 11.9
1915 1 7.1 5.7 6.8 --- --- -- 7.5 --- 12.2 ---
1916 1 10.8 9.3 10.6 --- --- --- 10.0 --- 12.5 --
1917 1 16.3 14.0 15.6 --- --- --- 15.1 -- 23. ---
1918 8/21.6 17.5 20.1 --- --- -- 21.1 --- 51.0 -
1919 ~/23.6 16.6 22.5 --- --- 23.4 41.-

1920 18.7 13.2 15.4 -- --- --- 19.4 --- 4a.4
1921 10.2 6.? 8.0 10.1 -- --- 9. -- 2P. ---
1922 11.7 8.6 10.2 11.6 --- -- 11.2 --- ?.7 ---
1'' 23 12.5 9.8 11.3 12.7 --- --- 13.1 --- 2.1 ---
1924 13.1 9.1 10.9 13.0 8/ 2.6 --- 13.0 --- 27.9 ---
1925 13.2 9.3 10.8 12.7 3.1 --- 13.9 --- 2.4
1926 i 1.4 9.4 11.8 13.8 2.0 8,/10.4 11.1 --- 28.7 ---
1927 11.6 8.3 9.7 11.3 2.3 i.7 lu.4 --- a. ---
1928 12.0 8.4 9.9 10.8 2.9 9.1 l. --- 31.5 ---
1929 11.3 8.1 9.7 10.7 2.9 11.6 12.2 --- ---

1930 10.3 6.9 8.2 3.8 1.G 11.8 12.5 --- 26.9 ---
1931 9.0 5.3 6.1 8.5 .9 7.8 8.4 --- .4 ---
1952 6.1 3.1 3.8 6.4 .8 5.7 6.3 --- .8 ---
1933 6.9 3.7 4.5 6.6 .8 8.5 9.0 --- 20.6 --
1934 8.0 5.6 6.5 7.7 1.4 9.0 9.3 --- 23.1 --
1935 a 12.1 9.2 10.4 12.1 2.1 .86 9.4 86/1.3 23.1 ---
1936 a 12.0 8.6 9.8 10.6 1.3 b.6 d.8 12.6 24.1
1937 11.5 8.0 9.2 1'.8 2.2 10.3 1l.8 12.9 31.9
1938 9.8 6.7 7.9 9.3 1.2 8.7 9.1 11.1 26.U ---
1939 : 8.8 5.6 6.6 S.2 1.5 8.8 9.3 1.0 26.3 --

1940 8.3 5.3 6.2 6.9 1.4 9.0 9.7 1.9 8/2.0 ---
1941 13.0 9.5 10.5 11.5 2.7 9.7 10.7 20.2 62.5 8'/64.9
1942 a 16.1 12.7 13.9 16.7 3.3 12.3 13.3 25.6 CC.3 61.9
1943 16.2 12.8 14.0 16.8 3.6 14.4 l j 26.2 Cb.4 62.1
1944 16.4 12.8 14.2 --- 3.6 14.3 15.6 --- 8/60.9
1945 9/ 16.6 12.8 14.3 -- 3.6 14.3 15.5 23.7 --- 60.7


Sources given In general note at end of table, page 29.
1 Quoted as refined, barrels, before 1941.
Barrels before August 1930.
Type of container not given before August 1921; August 1921-March 1522, pacsages.
/Quoted as soap stock, 50 percent f.f.a., f.o.b. consuming point Oefore 'brch 1943.
Barrels before June 1940. Before uctober 1925, per Eallon prices converted on basis of 7.5 pounds per gallon.
December 1942-April 1945, 0.5 cent per pound added to original quotations, which were for oil in returnable drums.
6 Barrels before March 1940.
Converted from dollars per gallon at the rate of 7.5 pounds per gallon.
SAverage for less than 12 months.
Preliminary.


Continued -






JAhUm T-mIBRIT 1946


Table 12.- Fata and oilis Wholesale pries per pound at specified markets,
annual average, 1910-46 Contlined


Vegetable fat Coutinued

Olive oil& Palm oil. Iw Torky Pal- Peanut oil
inedible. 01to al 8 kernel lnd Forill
Yeaor (dIn I o oil, I efned, a
Tar d I p ri Id euautured. I edible a r ,
ta aed) drum. I Bmtra, Nger, Congo,. bulk I Crude. I (white). d a
n m e Tork s tanks a c e. m ipmntemI t I, a wrm a
New Y or Nel N ar I ml New York
ark 5/6/a a T ,
a Cents Centa C ent ct ents Cats cti eMn, conue


19120 --- -- --
----- C nt--C- t-- Cl--- n-- Crot--- ~ \. -Can--- A--g-t---


1913 11.6 7.8 --- 7.4 -- --- -
1914 1 12.4 8.7 -- 8.1
1915 11.9 8.6 --- 8.5 -----
1916 a 12.8 10.7 --- 12.2 -- -- ---
1917 1 23.9 20.5 -- 17.9 --- 16.4 15.0 /18.6
1918 51.5 42.6 -- 33.5 -- 18.1 918.1 21.8 --
1919 9/31.9 -- /1.0 --- 9/18.2 /20.3 26.0 20.0

1920 9/9.3 16.6 --- 12.6 --- /17.5 --- 20.6 16.0
1921 20.0 8.5 --- 7.0 --- 9.5 6.9 10.9 9 7.6
1922 16.4 8.9 --- 7.4 --- 8.6 11.2 12.5 /12.6
1923 15.3 9.0 -- 7.6 --- 8.7 14.6 16.3 14.9
1924 16.3 9.7 --- 8.2 -- 9.3 11.8 15.1 14.2
1925 16.2 9.0 --- 9.3 --- 10.3 10.7 15.6 16.0
1926 16.9 8.8 --- 8.6 -- 10.0 12.2 15.7 13.6
1927 22.3 9.7 --- 8.0 --- 9.0 11.3 14.4 14.8
1928 a 18.0 10.2 --- 8.1 --- 9.1 9.6 13. 14.4
1929 a 16.0 9.7 --- 8.2 --- 6.4 9.0 13.3 15.0

1930 11.1 7.0 --- 6.5 --- 6.9 7.2 12.5 12.1
1931 a 10.2 5.5 --- 4.8 -- 5.6 6.2 18.3 8.1
1952 a 8.3 4.6 --- 3.8 --- 4.B 3.7 10.0 4.9
1933 a 9.0 5.5 --- 5.8 --- 4.3 4.1 9.6 7.0
1934 a 11.4 7.1 -- 6.4 --- 9 5.3 6.0 9.7 9.0
19356 11.4 8.6 7.6 7.7 --- 7.5 9.6 13.3 8.2
1936 a 13.3 8.7 7.6 7.8 --- 8.1 8.8 12.5 6.8
1937 a 19.4 11.1 8.0 8.6 --- 9.0 8.6 12.1 12.1
1936 12.9 8.0 6.1 6.8 --- 6.9 6.9 10.2 10.4
1939 a 12.9 7.8 5.7 7.0 --- 9/6.5 5.9 9.4 11.7

1940 19.6 9.0 5.4 7.2 -- --- 5.7 8.8 18.7
1941 45.1 15.1 8.8 9.7 --- -- 9.7 912.8 20.2
1942 55.6 19.3 --- 11.9 11.4 --- 1.0 16.9 24.5
1945 a 54.2 19.0 --- 11.6 11.4 --- 13.0 16.6 24.5
1944 --- -- --- 11.4 -- 13.0 16.4 ---
1946 10~ -- --- -- 11.4 -- 13.0 16. ---


Rources ien in gmeral note at end af table. pae 29.


1/ Barrels before April 19401 converted from dollars per gallon at the rate
Barrels before September 1939.
Prices as originally quoted have been adjusted to Include the 3-oent tax
of palm and palm-kernel oils, offeotive Bay 10, 1934.
/ Shipments, bulk, before Maroh 1940.
Quoted ae Lagos before IMy 1934. Caslk before February 1940.
SQuoted as natural before Ootober 1930. Barrels before October 1954.
Quoted as domestic refined before 1964. Barrels before June 1943.
Barrels before January 1950.
Average for less than 12 months.
Proliana ry.


of 7.5 pounds per gallon.

on the first domestic processing


Continued -


- 28 -







06-r406


-29-

Table 12.- Fats and oilas Wholesale price per pound at specified markets,
annual average, 1910-45 Continued


Vegetable fats Continued

Rapeseed oil I Soybean oil
9 Sesame s Sunflower Teaseed
Tear Refined, Bl oil tak Crude t Edible, i aoil. a Tung oil,
denatured,, Blown, drs, iDonesti, dram I refined, crude, I drums,
ulk,e..f. drums, Nw York s Imported. Tank care,s crude, d s tank oars, dru s Ne York
New York new York" / Darrelssmidwestern drums. New York I New York I New York V
Sa oew York a 1llas New York lnY/
:1'S!:s 4/ 3/
a Cents Cents Cents Cents Cent Cents Cents -enta ent


1910 *
1910 1 --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
1911 -- -- -- --- --- --- --- -- --.
1912 -.--- 6.6 --- --- --- --- 10.1
1913 -- --- -- 6.2 -- --- --- -- -- 7.3
1914 8.7 -- --- 6.3 -- --- -- -- -- 7.3
1915 10.7 -- --- 6.4 -- --- -- -- -- 7.0
1316 13.2 --- --- 9.2 --- -- -- --- --- 12.53
1917 18.6 19.6 /9.6 14.5 --- -- 17.4
1918 23.4 24.6 -43.0 18.4 --- -- -- -- -- 26.0
1919 20.6 21.8 l_/3 0.6 16.8 --- -- 22.6

1920 19.8 21.2 --- 15.3 --- --- --- -- -- 19.7
1921 12.3 13.5 20.2 8' 8.0 -- -- -- -- -- 12.8
1922 11.0 12.2 8/15.3 10.2 --- -- -- --- --- 13.2
1923 a 10.7 12.9 13.3 11.8 -- -- -- -- -- 23.7
1924 11.7 13.5 12.4 12.5 --- --- --- --- --- 15.9
1926 15.0 14.4 14.8 15.4 --- --- -- -- 13.5
1926 a 11.4 15.7 13.7 13.4 --- ---- -- 14.3
1927 10.7 13.1 13.1 12.1 -- --- --- --- -- 19.3
1928 11.4 13.7 13.8 12.3 --- --- --- --- --- 15.2
1929 10.8 13.6 12.5 12.6 --- --- --- ---- 14.6

1930 8.5 11.2 11.5 11.0 8.6 10.3 11.0 --- --- 9.6
1931 6.4 9.5 10.4 8/ 8.8 5.5 6.8 7.6 -- -- 7.4
1932 4.7 7.6 9.4 --- 3.1 4.3 4.9 -- --- 6.3
1933 6.2 8.2 9.9 --- 5.4 6.6 7.4 --- --- 6.8
1934 5.4 8.1 9.9 --- 6.0 7.4 8.2 8/ 6.4 --- 8.9
19365 6.3 8.3 13.5 --- 8.1 9.8 10.6 10.8 9.2 17.0
1936 8.3 10.2 13.5 --- 7.5 9.1 9.8 10.5 10.6 16.1
1937 12.3 14.0 11.9 --- 8/ 8.1 9.9 10.9 --- 10.8 15.7
1938 8.8 12.2 10.4 --- 5.6 7.2 8.4 --- 7.8 15.5
1939 7.1 10.5 8/ 9.7 --- 4.8 6.3 7.4 --, 10.5 21.0

1940 9.8 12.9 8/14.8 -- 4.8 6.4 7.2 --- 15.5 26.3
1941 a 9.5 12.9 -- -- 8.5 10.4 11.7 --- 22.3 32.2
1942 11.2 13.7 8/14.3 --- 11.6 13.0 14.9 /14.3 8/29.8 39.6
1943 11.5 --- 14.3 --- 11.8 --- 14.9 14.3 --- 39.0
1944 811.5 --- 14.3 --- 11.8 --- 15.1 14.3 --- 39.0
1945 / ~/11.6 -- 14.3 --- 11.8 --- 1.4 14.2 -- 39.0


Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter. The National Provisioner, The Journal of Commere (New York) and reports
of the U. 3. Department of Agriculture. Prices of Imported oils quoted by these sources include applicable import
duties, excise taxes on imports, adx excise taxes on first domestic processing, except in s few cases for whioh
spealsl adjustments (explained In footnotes) have been made in this table.
/ Barrels before April 1941; drums, April 1941-July 1942.
2/ An excise tax of 4.5 cents per pound on imports of rapeseed oil became effective August 21, 1936; but on July 1,1938
rapeseed oil for use in rubber substitutes or lubricating oil was exempted from the tax. Since these are the major
uses of rapeseed oil in the United States, the prices shown here are exclusive of tax after June 1938.
Quoted as refined before 1941. Barrels before 1931; drums 1931-40.
V Barrels before September 1953.
Quoted as refined before 1939. Barrels before October 1933.
SQuoted as refined, drums, before 1937.
SBarrels before June 1934.
Average for less than 12 months.
Preliminary.
C.l.f. New Orleans.







Tbble 13.- Impots and sports of fate oil. oil-bearing msrtilel, ad fat-maudt. produtUs.
Jeanry.4Oeobow. s'rng 1B7t-41, l944 amn 194



a 1987-41 7 T41 a a /
,&, MiLI. lb. mi. lb. lb. Mil. lb. m1. It. NII. 11.
Anial tsu I
or ................................................. 5 .2 1.7 1.0 T, 8S. 1 .
Lard .............................................. ... 3 1.6 77T l3.T
1O*o oil ............................................... I.1 ..
St arin, hanial, edible ................................ .1 ---I .1 .1 --
01 o ito k ............................................. --- --- .
tallo edible ......................................... d.b 10.8 l.t .3 1.5
tallow, inedible .......................................g 4.6 46.5 Bl.T 1.3 19.6
lrea ses ................ .............................. 4/ 5.5 .0 .
Wool gras .............................................. 2.6 T.o
E-at's-foot oil ........................................ --- .4 .8 .1 .1
total, anim1a .................6.................. .... 1..6 8 7.3 0.3 8.1. I1
trine fato a
P- -liver alls ........................................ 59.6 18. 19.11 --- 1.4 1.
FPih oll .............. ............ ...................... 1.8 10.8 10.6 2.5 8.0 14.4
trLUe mmmal oil ................................. ........... 24.4 1.5 1.8 2.9 1.0 2.4
Total, mrino ......................................1 7 50.6 31.7 5.! 12.4 61.0
VTlotNablo Mt n
nlbsm u oil ............. .......................... .9 2.8 -.. --
Cabew nut shell liquid (oi0) .......................... 1.9 4.2 .2 ...-...
Castor oil ............................................. .4 14.2 1.5 .8 1.0LO
Coomut oil ........................................... 91.1 49.1 31.4 82.9 4.9 .1
Corn oil .............................................. 12. .
Cotton eed oil ................................. ....... 6 .3 1.6 S .1. 4.B 8.
Japan aa (tallow ..................................... 2.3 ---
Linsed oil ............................................ .2 65.9 5B.8 2.4 882 .T 8.3
ltioles oil ............................................ 14.2 8.6 20,0 -
0li e oil, edible ...................................... 4 .2 .2 8.9 --- .1 .1
Olivl-oll "foots" ...................................... 17.9 --- --- --- ,
Olve oil, inedibl .................................... 4.3 .1 .1 ---
Palm.kerael-oi ........................................ 28.1 -- .. -- .- -
Pal oil ..................................... ........ 261.1 59.8 65.3 13.1 0.9 14.3
Peanut oil .......................................... .... 14.0 4/ --- i1 .
Perills oil ........................................... 24.7 --/ -- 4/
Rap* oil ....... ............................. ....... 8.0 15.0 17.7 -- .B
B" aw oil ............................................. 9.9 .9 -- ..
Soybean oil ............................. ............... 5. .1 4 8.8 6.68 8.0
ufloer oil .............. ............. ..................1 .1 49.0 17.2 / 1/ 1.T7
teamood oil ............................................ 9.5 ............-.
ung oil ............................................... 8.9 1.8 .1 4.4 .T 1.$
Vegetable tallw ....................................... 2.6 4' .5 --
Other vegetable oils and fts .......................... T.2 1.2 10.8 12.3 .8
Vegetable oils. shipments to U. B. territories ......... --- --- --- 6/ T.1 T.6 8.,
Total, egetable .................................... 97.9 209.7 512.4 a86.0 T7. J.
Total. primary fats .................................. 977.1 '69. 3--81.6 31.4 1,2T3.1 70T.1
Oil-bearing materials
Bbbaeu kernels (68 peront) ............................. 41.0 4.6 41.7 ---- -
Castor baene (45 proent) ................................ 74.2 129.8 116.46 -
Copra (85 peroet) ....................................... 270.6 98.4 188.4 22.5
Cottonsied (18.5 percent) ................................ -- .. 1.0
Flaoed (54 percent) .................................... 264.9 18.7 --- .1
Nuruvmi kernels (56 parnt) 7/ ........................ .9 .4 .5 -- -- -
Palm-ut kernels (4 poront) ............................. 13.6 18.9 S7.5 --
PJnts. shelled (8 percent ............................ --- 1.6 -- -
Porilla osed (37 peraont) ................................. .56 .-
Seamu seed (47 percent) ................................. .9 3.4 .1 --
loybean (16 poroent) ................................... --- --- -- 18.7 4.5 49.4
uoma kernels (45 peroent) ............................... 2.5 .9 8.8 --- ----
Total. oil-bearing materials .......................... 691.9 4443 413.3 16.2 6. 50.6

anuf atretd products
rparino 8e ......................................... 1.6 --- --- 1.2 5.1 664.
herta n ............................................. 1.1 / / 14.8 1U.
ep ..................................... 2.4 .8 .9 / .18 6B.4 1.3
Total, mnuftotured products .......................... 0.1 .5 .9 85.6 3i.l 135.
Craned total

All it em................................................ 1.674.1 1. 795.8 400.9 1,871.7 m5.1

Coopiled from Monthly l ary of Poreign Comerse of the tited States, reoords of the Burau of the CenmU and report o
the U. 8. Departht of Agriculture. Total aamputed from aurounded nambrs.
The following ites ar not included above Prouroement by the Amy in 1944 for European relief, 5 million poads a
lardl in 1964, 88 million pounds of lard end 6 million pounds fat ootent of soap. Proouremnt of argarine, shorting, and
oap by the Amrloan Red Crooos in term of fat amaom t, 17 millilm pounds In 134 and 11 mlllio pounds in 1945.
SInoludes shlpmnts to 0. B. territories of butter, l.rd, and anuraotured produtol roeeporte of aooanutQ pal. an tung
oils, olive-oil foos. and oopraa mnd rssparts in 944 and 1946 of osrtain quantities of whale oil and unflower oil reported
in imports for onsuption. Shipments include spooial program at USDA la 1944 and 196. 3/ Preliminary. h/ Insludes miat
light of hter oil uad prnead (Amy). These were not reported separately prior to 1945. _/ LeI than 60,000 pounds .
Slot reported eparstely. I/ te-twelfths o annual average. 7/ 1957-41. 55 percent. 8/ ported argarle soe largely
o Puerto URo and the VirgLna hands.


* 30 -


JAECLRT-nm T 1949




0 o4O" 31 -
able 14,.Jats and oilst Total factory production, January-October 19h4 and 1945,
Factory and warehouse steeks.at end of donth, October 194, and September and
__ October 1945
SItems ground by : Production : Stocks -crude basisT
Major use :Jan.- ct:Jan.-'ct: Oct.31 :Sept. 30:0ct. 31
.... 1 __ __ 945. : 144 :. 19.45
:Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. -til. Ib.Mil. lb.
Sfats and oils
iaerr iT7 ......... .-..... ...: 1,314.7 1,233.8 123.6 189.9 164.6
Sand reIndered pao fat 2_ ...... 2,042.0 998.9 435-7 76.9 60.1
e b oil, edible animal stearine, "
h*i d edible tallow ................. 167.1 174.1 11.5 16.2 10.5
S otal'edible'animal fats .........: 353.8 2,406.8 __.i7.8O. 283.0 ?'5.2
Corn oil 3./ .....................: .172.4 172.1 19.. 16.5 ...-14.-3
: C:ttonseed oil3/ .................: 777.7 959.3 290. 273.6 343.3
Olive oil, edible ..................: 5.5 4.3 1.6 1.8 1.3
.Manut oil 3./ .................... 88.1 90.8 33..2 46.3 .38.9
.Sesame oil ........................: 4/ 4/ 3.2 1.2 1.1
Soybean oil 3] ................... 1.039.2_ 1,115.9 155.5 216.0 185.0
S Total edible vegetable oils,......_ 2..0S2. 2,372.4 5o0..7-. 5.55_.4 583.9_
Sia fats and nils
F: Tal-low,inedible .................. .828.6 782.3 15i1...... 97.8 109.8
Grease, excluding wool grease ......: 51.2 425.5 143.7 67.4 62.1
I. Palm oil .........................: 56, .. 56-.1 54.2
i Fisroi ...........................: 163.7 12.6 162.7 93.2 106.9
iSarine mammal oil .................. .3 --- 42.8 ... 23.4 22.1
.live oil, inedible and foots ........:... ___ 4/ _3.0 1.4 1:_3
Total slow-lathering oils ....... ..: 1.38 1. 0.4 .7 333 356.4
Babassu oil J/ .................. ...: / 3.7 7.7 2.9
Coconut oil ...................: 102.9 145.7 104.5 14o.6 149.1
Palm-kernel oil ./ ..,........... .:__ ___ 6/ 32.1 6/ 34.5
Total lauric-acid oils ...........: 102.9 145.7 108.2 180.4 186.5
.Dryingu oils. .
Castor oi1, dehydrated J/ .......... 70.7 46.2 11.3 9.2 7.8
Linseed oil ........................ 830.9. 390.7 93.4 168;77 167.5
Oticica oil ........................: 4/ h/ 4.8 9.7 10.1
Perilla oil ......................: -- -- 3 .1 .1
ITung oil ...........................: _4/ 4/ 22A.8- 9.5 7_.7L
Total drying oils ......... ...: 90, 436.9' 32." 197.2 193.2
Othee industrial
N eat's-foot oil .................... : 2.. 2.1 2.6 2.1 -1.9
ool grease ........................: .14.1 14.7 .4.1 3.7 4.0
Cod oil and-fish-liver oils ........: 8.6 5.1 17.2 12.2 12.0
Castor oil, No..1 and No. 3 8/ .....: ..65.1- 76.4 34;9 l4.l 9.6
t ape oil ...........................: -- ...11..5. 20.8 19.1.
their vegetable oils ............: 29.0 102.0 39.1 46.4 4.1
Total .... ,......................: 116.3 200.3 109 .Q 93 9.~7
_cGand Total ................. ..... ..63. 6,912.5 2. .4 1.654.6__ 1.64.
:--piled from reports of the Bureau of the Oensus, except as noted. Data include
iocks held by Government in report& positions. Totals computed from uhrounded
"aimbers.
-~ Creamery butter production and cold-storage stocks, U.S. Department of Agricul-
re. j?/ F eerally inspected production,USDA. 3/ Stocks, crude oil plus refined oil
ionterted to crude basis by dividing by the following factors: Babassu, corn, cotthi-
|set, palm, and plam-kernel oils, 0.93; coconut, eanut and soybean oils, 0.94. 4/
eluded in other vegetable oils. 5/ Not reported. 6/ Crude bnly. 1/ Converted to
:i0 e basis by dividing by n.88. ,/ Estimated quantity used in manufacture of deby-
ji~4 e~~ator oil excluded from -oroductinn.




JAEUARY-FEBRUAP.Y 1946 32 -


Table 15 ..- Price received f.y.. armer.s and prices at .terminal .
markets for specify. d.il-Iqaring materials and il'neal ".
December 1943 and 194.4 October-December 1945""


,, i see s


S" December .1945 .54
Item ... :. .Unit .
__. 943rs r 9 Qct;:NOV,.
.'Ddllars Do-llarE 61las Ddlarf rlSr


Castor beans, Brazilian,. .. :
f.-'b'.: Prazilian port -.-....;.: -Leng ton. :-
Cottonseed, IUited StAtes -- :.'- -.
average .............,......:,:.Short ton
Flaxseed, io.'1 L'inncapolis :Bushcl-*
Flaxseed, United State :
average ...................:.Bushel-
Peanuts, no. shelled; .
Spanish, Southeaster -....- .. '.. --"..
shipping points .......... punds
Peanuts, United States .
average "............ .. ,.....: 100 pounds
Soybeans, No.' 2 yallovw,
Chi'cagp ........*....".....,.....: Bush l1
Soybeans, United Statct *
average ...................... 7:Bu shell
.--: :
-. ... :



Copra meal, Dos N.ngc-ls. ........:Short ton
Cottonseedf meal, 41 pc-rcent ....:
protein, i:ienphis ............... "
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent :
protein, Chicago .. ........... : "
Lindeed meal; 52 percent
protein, Minneapolis *...........: "-
Linseed rval; 34 percent ........ ;
protein, Iewv York ............: "" :
Peanut meal, 45 percent
protein, f.o.b. South- :
eastern mills .............. "
Soybean mc-al; 41 pcrcer.t :
protein, Chicago .............: "


;75.0o-- -62.40 -84.50' 8bh.0 950S
.. .. '

:62.60 6*-10-- *6-.1 0 .s0 Oi ao
: 56 6.12 -3.10 3.10-' .'10
..... .. .. ...9 *, 9
*2:.85 2.90-2.89 89 :g 9
: ....... .... ......


:-14-.25 14.25


* 1. -6 ....-- .

: *". 81- .-... .05


2 ,. 0-
2'.06O


.....- -Oilsc-ed heals 1

.. .. ... .. .. .... .. ..


14.25 14,25 14.25

6.06 8.30 '8.32


z2.18 '?.18

2.09 "' .2">9
/


S51.-53 -. 50 w00 -/49. 50/ 49;502/4'9.-50

S48.50 48.50 48.75 48T75 481..~
* "
: 54.45... 54.45 54.75 "54.75' 54.75
: ... . -
.45.50. .45.50 45.50. 45.50 "45 5
- ... .
S2/4900..2/ 49.00. 49.00 49.00 49.00
.. .

S63.00. .53.00 53.25. -53.25 53.2

'.15i90 52.00 52.00 ..52.00 52.00


.

Compiled. from Oil, Paint, -and-Drug Reporter, Daily. arl:t Rcord (E;i~)L ,.
Chicago Journal of CommercuL,reports of the Bureau.of Agricultural. leppomiosa
and records- of Production and Uarketing Admniiistra.tion ....... ,
I/ Bagged, carlots. "
2 Original quotation adjusted to bugged-carlots"basis. *.
.' .




.. ..


-8-.08 -






.Tabe.l.eL.- Oleomrargarine: .Production, ":it'irr-:.alIs for conrsunption, and
export,. and materials used in nmanufac-.xre, United States,
SJanuary October 1943- 45, October 1943 45

SItem ---LUa04y nr.ni. l .-h__- October
9-i :1443 1944 I/ 1945 I/D: 143 : 1944 IT 1945
:1000 Ibi 1000 b.000 ll 1000 lb61000 lba 1000 lb I
......-.. .. .... .


$red :102,732 102,095 88,727
Lored : 409,262 578,394 434,084
btal i/ 511,995 480,488 522,809
s*ale:
x'a'paid for consumption in:
Ahe Uni.ted States and
lr'-ritoriee :410,424 389,727 439,257
; t*ar-free for U.S. Government 99,006 89,450 69, 87
ti;*t-free for export : 569 988 13,566
Total :509,999 480,145 5b ,210
i~'abrials used:
"leo oil 15,148 10,634 7,557
.!ieostearine : 2,965 2, 64 1,924
i.:ad, neutral / B,998 ^/',27 5,195
SOleo stock 2,541 1,9-.- 1, 20
allow : 440 1%8 19
STotal, animal : 30,092 23, 52 16, 55
!i ;*


2,447
55,910
55,357



57,139
1, 754
52
58, 96.

1,498
286
1,023

29
2 5,9


3,439
53,743
57,182


?,995
45,725
419,720


56,496 46,438
1,385 9S3
190 929
58,071 48,299

784 345
215 298
803 187
61 37
,863-- 871
T,8 63 W 1-


SCottonseed oil : 205,126 169,342 222,473 28,?27 24,116 18,650
Soybean oil : 169,629 175,598 169,971 14,E19 18,4?3 18,328
- Panut &il 3,769 11, 2-O 7,664 ,47 1, .?0 1,735
Corn oil 3,599 9, 1- 7,698 I511 953 827
.Linseed oil 4, ?'0 41 -- 427
*'Cottonseed sterirne 65 26 --- D2
CU;l:ottonseed flakes : 21 --- 5 --- .. 2
Soybean stearino 1: 0 3 21 --- 9 1
-sOya stearins flakes : 1,038 --- -- .. --
Soya flakes : 44 129 SI. -- 6 -<-.
STotal, domestic vegtct'ble ;p 686,575 367;,4.5 .0"8,38 44,551 44,827 3, 544

Sunflower oil --- 1 -- ...
Total, foreign vegetable : -- 1 6 ....
Total fats ard oils : 416,667 391,039 424,599 47,510 46p.690 9-5O1S

Milk : 86,51 62,770 89,8533 10,079 10,207 4414
1xat 16,441 15,839 16,261 1,372 1,912 1,511
Deitative of glycerin 886 744 884 98R 91 90
Lecithin : 409 4. 556 b4 64 58
Monostearine : .22 358 423 -0 44 S
da(benxoate of) : 302 C 341 35 36 52
vitamin concentrate : 9 90 100 12 10 8
C lor : -1 6 0o 2 2 2
Atear ine-- 76 95 --- 10 12
idellaneous : 16 11 17 1 1 1
Total, other materials 19390 100,69. t103,600 12,193 12,277 10,163
.Ttal, all materials : 5.22,0F7 4 ,' 7R 199 595 f3 R .-,7 7R
d from Intcrnnl R1vcnuc rr.n^rds and itcrnAj 'evcnuo Bullotin.
Fbi minury. 2/ Tot':l or unroundec, nuim.btrs. _/ Includes 32,000 pounds of lIrd.
4/ Includes 92,000 pounds of lard flakes.




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