The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00063
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00063

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text









.,. BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONO ICI /
UNIT-ED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL I

zA B


. ..~


lARCH 19S5


jT A.:NAMD OILS USED IN OLEOMARGARINE, UNITED STATES, 1922-44

Domestic
vegetable oils




:q Soo Foreign
vegetable oils




14/
S^\ Animal fats
t; o o: a "nd oils




.'Cottonseed oil
1 I




-- .. ,ft.
......;=.:,.:^ "'too .. ;:i -- .i/ .
t a 1 : ,....t'. .:. :, "I" I Il"


T: I,. 1 1927 1932 1937 1942 191
; *i' /::.. ^ *'' *' 1941 an Am PRt"I. :T:
1 "844 AMR ABi PRIsIMINArF
l :o 11::nl L1.TU.r~ 11111 E URUAU OF AI IIU uTuNAL LE NOMI
|Os."a "l In margarine .n ... w...a early a rs :a.. u.ns of .
i*''l ....... ]i ". ltih i..i'l In margarlne In 1944 wa sIrly ai llral e uo of on
a v a s o f


l .


t00410;Id b tirl declthed sharply after 1936, reflecting Federal eKlSeat
U. 4, Statit.xes" n rargarlne contilnlng Imported olls, and, duri4tl
AI o:t 'iulc oils for Industrlal-..wr mils. Total consumption of' f.i.
S. arirlp In 144 I .lwa 479 million pounds compared with 600 million -.pn.

7 W :: ". "" P., :" I :. : : 4a







-2-


Table 1.- Wholesale prise per pound of fats, oils, and glycerin at speolfled markets, and .nde
numbers af prices of fata and oils, February 1943 and 144. Deaember-ebruary 1944-46


PRICES


SIta


I.1j6Ta"


I u5a5s
Butter, 92-soore, Chiesao .......................................
Butter, 92-soore, Ne ork ...................................... .0
Oleomargarine, dom revsg. Chioago ............................... 19.0
Shortening containingl animl fat, 1-pound oartonb, Chicago ......s 17.0
lard, loose, Chioago ............................................. 12.8
lard, prime steam, tieroes, Chicago ............................. 15.8
Lard, refined, 1-pound cartoan. Chicago ......................... 15.6
Oleo oil, extra, tieroes, Chicago ............................... 13.0
Oleostearine, bbl., N. Y ....................................... 10.6
Tallow, edible, Chicago ........................................ 9.9

Corn oil,' rude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ............................ 12.8
Corn oil, edible, returnable drums, 1..1., N. ............... 16.2
Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. 8.. mills ................. 12.8
Cottonseed oil, p.a.y., tank oars, N. Y. ..:..................... 14.0
Peanut oil, rude, tanks, f.o.b. millla .......................... 13.0
Peanut oil, refined, edible (white), draum, N. Y. ............... 16.3
Soybean oil, crude, tank oars, midwestern milla .................* 11.8
Soybean oil, edible,druma, I.o.l., N. T. ........................ 14.7
Sunflower oil, semi-refined, tank oars, f.o.b. N. Y. ............ 14.3

Babassu oil, tanks, N. Y ........................................ -
Cooonut oil, Manila, crude, bulk, o.l.f. Pacific Coast / ........ 11.0
Coconut oil, Ceylon, crude, bulk, N. Y. / ....................... 11.8
Olive oil, California, edible, drums, N.N. .................... 59.9
Pala oil, Congo,orude, bulk, N. Y. / ........................ 11.4
Raps oil, refined, denatured, bulk, New Orleans ................ l /11.5

Tallow, No. 1, inedible, Chicago ................................. 8.4
Grease, A White. Chicago ........................................ 8.8
Menhaden oil, rude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore .................... 8.8
Sardine oil, crude, tanks, Pacific Coast ........................ 8.9
Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, drums, N. Y. ............... 11.1
Cottonseed oil foots, raw, (560 T.P.A.) delivered, Bast ......... 3 .65

Linseed oil, raw, tank oars, Mlnneapolis ........................ 13.6
Linseed oil, raw, returnable drums, oarlotes, Y. .............. 14.3
Olticiao oil, drums, f.o.b. N. Y. ............................... 26.2
Tung oil, returnable drums, oarlots, .Y. ........................ 39.0

Castor oil, No. 3, bbl., N. Y .................................. 13.8
Castor oil, No. 1, tanks, N. Y. ................................. 13.0
Castor oil, dehydrated, tanks, N. Y. ............................ 17.7
Cod-liver oil, mad. U.S.P., bbl., N. Y. ......................... 36.5
Cod oil, Newfoundland, drums, N. Y ............................. 12.0

Glycerin, soaplye, basis 80%, drums or tanks, N. ............. 11.5


Cenu
41.8
42.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
18.0
13.0
10.5
9.9

12.8
16.2
12.8

15.0
16.8
11.8
15.0
14.3


11.0
11.8

11.4
_/1.5
8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
12.3
3.6


15.1
26.2
39.0

15.8
13.0
17.7
56.5
12.0

11.6


DeOnbr I Im


gmenu

42.2
12.2
19.0
17.0



18.0
10.5
9.9

22.6
16.5
12.8
14.3
18.0
16.3
11.8
15.2
14.8

11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7
11.4
2/11.6

8.4
5.8
8.9
8.9
12.3
5.6

14.3
15.1
20.0
59.0

13.8
13.0
17.7
80.8
11.5

6/10.0


41.8
42.8
19,0


15.6
16.
1B.0

9.0

12.6
5/16.6
1U.
14.1
18.0
16.6

14.2
14.3

11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7
11.4
11.0o

/11.6



8.4
8.a
8.9
8.9
12.5
5.6

14.8
15.1
20.6
39.0

15.0
13.0
17.7
30.6
11.5

610.0


INDEX nUMBER (1924-29 = lO1)

Eight domestic fats and oils (1910-14 = 100) .................... 151 1 142 142 142 14
Eight domestic fats and oils .................................... 107 101 101 101 101

All fats and oils (27 items) .................................... 113 108 108 108 108
oGroued b origin 0 9 *
1 fate ................................................... 106 S6 96 a 96G
marine animal oils .......................................... 127 132 131 131 151
Vegetable oils, domestic ...................................... 131 134 134 184 134
Vegetable oils, foreign ....................................... 150 156 156 166 156
Gro edby use
a .ter -..................................................... 105 93 3U 9 9
Butter, seasonally adjusted ................................... 101 90 85 90s
Lard .......................................................... 106 105 10E 108 106
Other food fats ............................................... 16 141 141 141 141
All food fats .............................................. 110 103 103 105 105
8oap fats ..................................................... 119 120 120 120 120
Drying oils ................................................... 14 149 19 149 149
S isoellaneous oils ............................................ 117 117 115 116 115
All industrial fats and oils ................................ 129 131 151 151 151
Prices oompiled from Oil, Paint and Drag Reporter, The National Provisioner, The Journal of Commeroe (New YoTrk), and
reports of the War Food Administration and Bureau of labor tatistias. Prices quoted include @aise taxes and duties
where applicable. Index numbers for earlier years beginning 1910 are gi e in Technical Bulletin No. 757 (1940) -sad
The Fats and Oils Situation beginning Deoember 1940.
1/Reflects open market sales only. Current figures refer to all types of wholesale trading for aash or short-tl m
aredit. Y/ Revised. Three-cent prooemaing tax added to price as originally quoted. C.i.f. Nmw York. S/ Soap
s. took, 50percent f.f.a., f.o.b. consuming point. 6 Tanks only.


w8 rul 'g


m


--1 ---


*


43.3
41.6
42.2
19.0
17.0
12.8
15.8
18.6
15.0
10.6
9.9

12.8
16.6
1U.8
14.3
15.0
16.8
11.8
18.8
14.5

11.1
11.0
11.8
60.7

11.6

0.4
8.8
8.9
B,.
8.9
12.3
3.6

14.3
15.1
22.0
59.0

18.8
13.0
17.8
30.6
11.5

3/0.0


I 1













Contents :




11nargamdw, 944 "ad 195 .s....o.... 5:
Re elbdIt Maa mt ........... .1 4,
Gdverkment Attions q..,. iii.. ..A .... 16 i
Perei n*7rade Statisic VOratsa
Oilask,939-43 ................19


SkRIAR ADOUTLOOK1

Noesn fthe present tight situation in fats and: oils is 'in:

680et Proddwationt from domestic materials in *1945 is Oxpected to tot41,

94 bli~ p cds a scored with 10.9 billion pdaunds in 1944. Ms

1;fttedecre&se mill'be in-l1ard. Stocks of' fats: and oils5 at. the` liegimning

5Wore abdat. thie sawe a~s a year earlier,,. Rd significant increase lih

li*tofiis e etedi 195. Mii rqiements f or f ats and oils,, in-

4aig qua ti te r' civilian relief in tarope., are ending. Requelt S

allocations to lend-leasef and liberated'countriel continue large. Any

kenn i 1,iliary procurementtha, mig t occur -with an early en o.

tli ies in Unrop probably wouldd bp offs-et, by, increased exports throw

rchannels.. Even ih oecurtaSilmifent in.%.natiodml income civilians

pt Oofisidtn ndb satal larger than it.i.

4-qu a ,prupplxeds were available.

0,pl 4 ,of, bUtr for civilis in recent month'ss have been a

,o0*st Ie71 ie n many years.. Ia Tii has'been~reflected in an icea

symfio a argrin, Txopid itdrawals of i ga~rine for c o

Ila A 0014, Stts aeben er 50 million pounds, each monl I











1944.. :

Despite the recent set-aside...order -on lard,. War.Food IN 'I
purchases of lard in. February and' early March contnired rel4i..
This was partly a result of expanded military procurement. 1'T."'
on lard was revoked on March 4 in the 20 East and West Coast .'A
a particularly tight supply situation existed. 'Wittfilge"ar
requirements, -no improvement in the lard situation for th-e co6
whole id anticipated-before next fall at least. .

A recent amendment to-War Food Order 42, -slightly ,eduseael4j
fats and oils for the manufacture of civilian shortening and.i. R
effective April 1. Civilian supplies in the April-June.quarter t
be significantly different from a year earlier, When manufactur aX i
not operating at the full quota level. But the reduced quotas .T".i'~ai
will result in a somewhat smaller civilian production in the aie 4 :ti i
1949 than a year earlier. .

No major change in total supplies of drying oils. other t..
oil is likely in 1945 as a whole. Domestic production of tung iiIW
is forecast at 9 million pounds compared with 2 million-pound&i ..
The castor-oil supply apparently will be somewhat smaller this...a
last, reflecting reduced stocks at the beginning of the year anda Roai
reduction in castor bean output in Brazil. The crop of oiticica' *f i
Brazil this season is expected to be about as large as last year1:~
supplies of linseed oil short until next fall at least, deandid *$WiS i'
for the other drying oils. Prices of 6iticica oil have risen 3 ;:.
since December, and in early March were close to the ceiling,(.24 is as
per pound, tank cars, New York). Prices of castor beans at Braq..fi '..t.
advanced from a low of less than $.60 per long ton last November44' j I:
4$76 in February- ,-.: ::".-
Use of fats and oils in civilian soap in April-June will
reduced from the January-March level by Amendment 4 to War Foo&:i
issued in late March. This amendment establishes manufactPrers aiji]au
fats and oils for civilian package and bar soap, which are larg'i ba
for household use, at 80 percent of average use in 1940 and 1gi4, ra
with 85 percent allowed in January-March. Maximum use.,:pf fats qan4i :..
all-types .of civilian soap, .including -bulk package soap, in.Aprt it.!,54
would be about 2 percent less than was allowed by the January-Ma ota
and about 8 percent under the average.. 1944 level -of actual useT. a* i::
of all soap-making materials in April-June may be restricted *someiS w gi d
:' than this, because use of rosin in civilian soap is limited by War :b'iaftiu
Board Order M-387.

Marchf23t:i9.R
,< .:
.4'~"
.:,..* !!







by 6 Q09$ORUMPTION OF M4AUgRIMNE _9N19AAND 1945.



Outypt Of gine'inj,944 was 588 million pounds, 4 percent loss-
oi p 1 tyunds produced: year' earlier., bqt 66 percent larger
MA197hl 19;of 3154 million pounds (table. 4 )
_he declginO f rcm 94-3, to il-9,,4 wqs.Bemil osahpledo Government
4 p~t'o-'Wit-dyd 1"of UlfArt :1efpaMan t res 'hahnds by
s ent agencies-in,194 totaled 91,million pounds compared wi tU 110
t111i-oh pounds a year e'qrliers'. Some of tlhe mar garine purchased yGer
,,uai ageages is used in Rea Cross'packages Aent to prisoners of war.: Mo*:,
Wov6Vj is, for'leand-lelagsq export*. Deliveries of mgrne at hip-side
"'xe*,esent~atives .o,,lend-lease counttiqes were 74 xillio1n pounds in 1944
parewit-92millo pounds a.. Year egarlier.
Totaldomaesti~c appearance of margarine in 1944 (qciilian anid
litary) is- estimated to have been 500 'Illion poundss Icompared with, 504
jilli on pounds a year earlier (table 5). Nearly all of the' total wa or
VVilian 4se. Procurement of margarine by th& armed forces has been small,
ftn ha's been-mostly for sale in post exchanges.



In tUhe firvt half of 1944,. civiliaii takings of margal-ine wmre: about
perc ent lerag than. a ye 4r earlier. Butter- wsrlailybudn and
sowslwrpriced than a year earlier._ Because of a reoduttion in price
iWlings for butter tn June 1943,. the average retail price of butter 11in
~rly, 1944 Vas -50, cent s per1; pound compared. with 56 cents per poudd in early
"f431 fdrgarime prices,*. on. the father haad., averaging .24 cents per pound in.
y 944-) were ab~ot L cent higher than a, year earlier.,

By late, 19141, ci9ilian butter supplies were. materially smaller than,
the 'first half q~f-the' year,; Butter. was scarce, in retail ptores8 ia-many
18A'o te qui ry Diapaace of margari e into civilian. ,trade
danribs increased lo 49 tillioli pounds in Septeinber qand to over. 50 million,
themonthl, dwring.tbie 'remainder.:qf, 5te a Tax-paid.. withdrawa-ls .from
M6 fa Aur qr s' habds in the -,qcober--Decembe%1 zquarter toae million
'I t















Is qUaLt withdrawals In January-Miarch 19Q3, the previchs peak
for -whn' dealers -wre acemultnating stocks in the pre-rationing period,
`,,O~~ n, takings of margarine in the second half of:1944 were up about 5
.Tiirimiaiyearearli r.

ddhi nn0unce4-manufacturers'. uotas of fats and 0 ils .wv6uli
an ihqepase ot ?0 percent b egihning AprIl1,'over cor respondingg 9uar e
1944 In the output of margarine for civilians. With 'a'substantiaI Pqn
dut-tioh in cxivilian butter, supplies s in 1945 compared with 19644, civi
takings of margarine probabl, will increase. .Tax-paid withdrawals
aury, at more ha59mlinpouns were larger than in any ppa,
ju ii iiii[j
4. _ji. .. ...... i ........










































Tax-paid withdrawals Bf colored margarine fobr..do e ti' .po
1944 were 16 million pounds, 11 million pounds more than a' ya...i
the largest since 1929, Use. of colored' ragarine in tH e 'Untl.;
subject to a Federal excise tax of 10 cents per pound (opmparele$
per pound on ulholored margar'ine); it is. als subject prahbi
.in.several States. Very littlecolored margarine was Iu'ed.b.epa
194S. Substantial-inareases took place in .1945 and 1944, w 4Ifi
., of butter were, reduced sharply. A. frthr m ,inacease a'i"u i tr qe
I: is likely in 1945. as butter will continue to be high-prti,9 l.
:.'Virargarine and probably will be in smaller supply for oa lia

'Increasing sales of colored margarine are refle a by a erl
Aip : ber of retailers and wholesalers who paid the.special annuaL Feda
:, uif.red, in order to deal in this product. There. 'aso,.mere .itrp i.i!
2045 and 1944 in the number of retail dealers l ce8estdi. to' gell uIrom
h,':ae. ( Tables 7 and 8.) / .
.i: .^,'" .. .E : .




A -
T- .. ... .. : .
::..; ... :::.
!*4









RRIT! I!
VIA,




'* W71
X

N"y,;1, Y
also 01,01


0 r-7V-7,",
ma A,
V `8
VII 7" R oil


WIN As
nl 1 I I- A ?

SAO
71-
,I of
tn'
J T'4
Tr We- ,eau 4

mot 1o 11114""1"
ei
I
op ANY



RAW
opt
AIR
I 71rl
4r,
`v
If. In

440,jo to 04
kedt -Od', tb
Ing ph
10A'Ad ae W6 mi
gar qNryse
I'm WHO& All W 417'

G a ELnd ats-Aa, 44 were, g
pop"" A" fto' sid-o

.1 W4 law
1110111%100 pates
liq
On
n" n
VIP a'Q,







Table. 4- 011kmarg10Ue: Produatipn sa s'a
Mar: Food Administration sfagA t" '3%W' O
Internal Ravenu," 39o-



Year :Vogietable4 Combine&*qg abeCombined
and : antpal tal nd randa
nut 4 il m o il
vegetable: vegetablee,
100 1,.00,0 11;000 1 000 1,0 1066
P.ounks -pounds 'oPId& IMaS udon. Lndn

1930 :211,130 .97,017 299,147 4.7 8,5 360s
1531 :162,1 5.876 -2150 2' 150 3,,1 .6 ',1".. 2
1932 :155,674 38, 6b4 19z' 278 971 2. 1,7 3,43S
.1933 :199,009 40# 719 239,727, T03 log0l '2, 5o4
1934 :207,46s 52511 P590179 792- 2,129 2.921 ,
1935 : 2.64 t6osT 375A!5 936 1 R$90 2.,826 3
'1936 34: 3 137 48-090 3,89S-2 1*252 1.4i9q 67
1917 : 4977 409520 3M9.,797 955 74, 2573
'1939 340,300 38,9267. )191567 1,o6 500 1,526
1939 :265,901 34,492 390,393. l.'045 392; 1*37L3
iiOio











1940 277,375 40,991 319,256 1,942_ .y 16
i941 : 309,771 50,661 360.432 375 152 ,777'3'
194p ; 305,65o 53,759 359 409 61,25 ,63 3,8 42
14 :447,993 45, 765 -49396. log,26 79 164 5
194 .1/: 446,312 33:975 480,187 9Z,925. 10,v5 10D .579...
10ompiled as follows:.
War Food Admini'stration, margarine Production,.
Bureau of Internal Revenue, annual re-oorts of the Commissioner*
Production'reports to the Bureau of Internal Revenue are reqquired to
considered to be more accurate'than reports to the War Food A&m-
which are voluntary-, the latter are useful beaue ,te re ri
special classifications.
IV Prel imina ry.
J




"9 WW
1, AW0%

jt


1 -

0 m
II
IIY
Al 'A,
0;4 NO-'i







R l e2oqararine: ProduqtionA41
.9tate '..
Mt.al nolored and :1,000 lb. Tow0 'A. 1^60 0
uncolored:

-4. J.* P..:. .934 ,5,96,6 .?%044-,' '5,
Ohio .....: 50m934 50,706 51,678 75.94
Ind. 4....t 33.162 75427'*34 59,042-
$l...... 9, gia 104,349 072956.5
Mi eba....... 16'57 '63516, 72 a23,699
Minn, .... 5g4 87----
Mo. 9...,. ,597 9#3621. 1 0,5 ,
Ka2s o.... 2,6e 23,701 23,747 29,531
Md, ........... 9,827 10,702 149853- 16.905

S.0,.....t 400 11889 2,651 3,834
Ga.,...... 2,937 4. 7938,7 17.016
Ala .......... 397 293 138 35
Tex .......: 10,6813,.0 26,935 32,952
Oreg. ....: 1,424 ol -
Calif. ... : 44,186., 65, 4
U.. S, 1/jg :_ ,717 34,9W 05
,Colored
....... : 213 569- '9591 20,31T
In ........ : .62 2522 ,
Ill ......: 412 1,125 2%053, 771
i ch. .. : .- .!/ .0 .2 1"
M. .......... 32 1031,914
Md........t417 1,143 2,.4 5.3P
5 c. ........ --- 77q69 3 od
Ga. 1.. ...,, -14o 71. 293
Alans .......... 236. 320 42/0 4,70 -C
Te,........ 7. 1,038 ,45 5s 1


S Calif ......, ---- -6
U. S. 1. .. J960 T, T5
Tot ai ctoloea, and unoploe ees
o Cf Uinited- ta tes' roduction: in IN meci file
:Pprcent P-rcenit Percent, Pprpgnt

0i ........... 17. 15 14 14

11 .. .........: 30 30 p929q
c .. ... .... .. 5 5 4
v. .. .. .. .. :3 2 3
s, ,. .. .. .. :7 7 6 5
a .. .. :3 3 3
,x .. .. :3 76
i ..........: 13 13 14 -1
he .....:2 2 4 L
"xot~al ..... 100 100 100 100








him
n p


n r a y




1' MV


J qp


II 'TY-





Table 8. wakeyr, of rot,1i deAl to 4#mi*ty1Tv ii "V tvd
sale m 't


Xea. 'I, 65 97LS 1 94 I

40.3 35T1 T7 37
*R I 8T24 50 632
Cons. ? 812 566'. gl
f.Y 2,2W2 11vo 15 6 ftisl W
JN. : ,9 3, 1,4 '3
15A i: .. .3 .1 .. ..
0hc :1.136 99 7'6 1 M24 I.N 159
Znd, : 9,5.536 96 8,4 ,
-Tr 1-5,535 3..4 1/2 10 21
1e$ E 797 10,'647 10911 i4 81 50

I qua : ~2, 302 1 7 ,4 93
84 a8,750 0,1 5:W224 49
X., Pak, go -
S, Wak. L 27 .5 ,n1f 1
East : 5# 310 5.-V)9 4:6 ., k ,
e.. 425 053. .43A 4
/a 13m22 3 .055 o,961 2,0982
6,0 5 2, 674 7
Va, '4oi J 1781 ,7
W.ya* 4; ,562 4,4L 395
4 :2,846 218 ",9 ,3
$.Q :1, 751 71 3 g8 2 0
Gq.. : 3.3 320 5*19 -3 60
,a 4'36t '3 j: 37 6 `150
an< < 317 '250 ,7
fi< :261 2*735 00857
2, 15' 2, 267 '2. 4a5 41;Z f
Tit:'2,3 3, 2i4 ?41M 5
as t -#ok 2M1 '93 4
1 $1,715 91 TRY9 8 s

& t }51 369: 35050 -
as ~ In24 2,355 .29 2, 2 4
e. : Gs 653 7,13 6K R M
c t 1,0 1 1,09 1 02 1 9
: 25 ~259 759
S 14q 151 167
; 2,7 5 2,'71 2,799 2,753 .7
:19, 49 1.2, 274 11,997 IP2v 391 A11
: 173,4g6 162.434 161.,677 163.395 1g6







2,9
9 51
63 i
I~ ~ ~ ~ ~-i ..........................................
T| L87'++ 13 19 a
'4 +54 1 y


*67' 114 3
4,4'-- 91
63A ,9
79
13
7.3 4i4
.2 -
25,1 7, M1L
A 2 t c
l[]R,11 9 7 5 -0,
235, 7, ga- M3 1,6-4







V u-tput of Fatts AAd Oilb-.15 Pereent
Below. Lat "Year;, toks
'RContin -line

Pr~oduc tio of, ftts 9nd otls in factories in Jan ory, -,tOU
pudyWis 42-millliepoundsAgrta'd eiberbt 4
'(15 percent))below 'the eak ou~tpdt of January 14 bbl .
OvrDcmbrwsdue 'lafgely-to .0, con traseaeg rise 0 iL otton
'and to, increa:ses-i prdcih0 -s,6yb~eaA- oil ad Ide le a
from -last yetr was mainly ih lard ahd, lins eed' -oil

7~actofy ,and, wrehouse. 'stocks. of fats and, oils de411iijd :6aS
.urin Jaur,1x2107% maillion %pounds, dru'ae-bas 'is -at th,6 4d 6a
t.(tablle 6. Thiscnpae `wtBatksocs'mouxitgngto iii92
.on January -31,j -1944- "There was, a large -daeldwe% in, h 1rd inventav
,,January, reflecting. substantial. lend`:-lase s..inaeftts- auri_,g Sp :te
x..sductian inla-rd sto661s, 'together withy a decllhe in, 1od-"tora, e"
Sof but tgr, d imin ished: -0to l 'factory &nd war house stocks o f -ed Ib
87 million -pounds during the month. Partly offsetting thisa-ms at4
.7.mllonpounds in stocks .of edible .vegetable oils, mostlyct:,t
Moderate--reduct-ions, occurred in stocks pf s~oap Bats and in. ri

AFA: Pureqhases, or, Fats -and. Otis


Purchases :of ats. and oils by the,76Ta f~oq Adpinis treqn J
totaled 69 million pournqs (including mftargarine and, soapi es:f
This .total was ,.core t h= twi ce a s large 'as in,.January and was-Tjo A
last kugUSt6 February pafthaaes of' lard and..ewndered pdrk" ft, werq,,'
potznds, only 2 million-pound& larger than ;a- month earlier. -'MIfj,,tkpig
margarine and soap were up sharply from other reet on hs TeF
includes 16 million p ouq ds of sunflower ,oil mfa4 available, by. Cm
Corporation,

Tale 10-Purchaaas Of fats and oils6 by the War Food Amnsr
77771l

















Item .1941: 1942, 1945 : 9,V4

A1i 1, lb. Mil. lb. il. lb1b Zb
But r ...............: 34IMn
,,Aord and. r-endered pork fa t ..: 16 654 882 e09
Ohranimal fats and oils 3/ : 2 30 61'2
-+Lis~eed oil .........: 70 391 18
gYbpan .oi1 .................... 1 Y 17 7. 120
'-thek. vegetable oils .........: -' 2 15

a rik e' )fat content). 4/ ..: 177725
on(fat- pontenjt) .,/ ....... :0.: Z- ed3l
Total fat equi-valent .... :329- .1,02 6 k,, ,1.11
4cpiled from rep>orts- of th aFodAinkridm
11 thn500,.,000 pounds.' 2/ lIncludes- buter ontnt f A y
'Fs-i6~ndfs is 4 -netesiae I80pret o
p-ecen fr sap






771
IT



t Ti,
sal6vpi'lbiez,;, '24 Ak f" d 6 Us'-' re-'

;r, Y 'Rt6h "''but 4t 24
I
T_
5,TVfT,,A 3 mother f aAid b.11 t 8v ELtth j

4, 'W r,
"'T
1A P iI-February kveraged 10 per
A
th 6 616-111
lb hu-1
ror pil"ting, i S" 2 p ei- ut
r I's 't ` hd"atn'ce' bove i s',
e6d are, An ad"nd2e,
s', Par peanuts tnd f x 0 3 likdly
TI h7ba, p o.r po=d P or
Saed, z Pd,: froia a im nth, p4rlier


r
6 Pldl

'10 -Pevdiifta, ifi: ho 2 oil g
t%- er- JN4throdgh Au&btL 1945" may be around DO-millio'n, n 'S'i
IT- VW, Zk,)nillio5n ppunds a dar 'earlier. Procurement of peanut bltt6"
RAtlliv, aOy ;by amed florces i S e S t imted.. to"require
type peariutS
;'r '01 crop of Virginla 30'perclmit pf the
I "', -
ja 20 poroQnt oC' ian (I()-
rodl4ptr, i J,Q iq Istrcllr, H vlilt', he 1944 crop,'stlirhtly
T,
aar pai-liov, the-iqi,antity of fa.mrs I s.tok`p 4n,ts reiwining
"A.-45;-I be materiall "lle, pu" in 1943,44.
Y
'framzetterftber 1944 to -bX
:.F.e III 94 5, on
mu 'S were -rushed tr P ar ed w m
t i0i 26
"or 4, P PK 1), :Mldund
ler Cru Ug&,Of Is
ishelled pepnuts'j _Jn c I u OU! g,
Ek' d euta",W
ero pvisiderably than, a y ed.r.. earli er
l- stcre k pe"Uta Au -iS6'LQpmbor-P6 bx-.: 3'"',
ymr, dAnller. Pmdu ot ion',
S,+,Oq]c, aiid dafa6 0
s tip- and impiv'rtbol 11
-Fabrp ,riqd totl-e6 58 'm" I bri PounIda this se S
-Od t' lar < -- :::, Ait
T', q_
4
I Lf_ of, eaiipt ,b il will be ausulented modeimtel
P-Prt 4 -'AIrAe4tilvP p'axi tki o b te,1!6 d -'Combi-nod-,
e4zw W.,mell, 4ac
k ftTl 'Outpu Q (Al frdTH "a's t
qtiop-'of pea-nti%'ojf in 144_4t- a r in
riy" b P, 1615, -t
'Tt 1 1,

1 7,T j
Lit
1'. T,
AT' m
t TT
IT 11`4 JT
T v
I
7"
;T
A,
'A AITT, ,I
All










t quotas or rats and Oils for use in
Other Edible Products Reduce a i

Amendment 13 to 'far Food Order. 12, effectiveAAD r1.
basis for calculating quotas of fats and oils to. be used id Ihbe
facture of margarine for civilians. The new quarterly quolt-'ac:5
percent of use in corresponding quarters of 1944. The former
167 percent of average use, by quarters, in 1940 and.1941. .'.....l.
1. be about TL'qual l'-e aggregateu to etwe old, tat quot as' b.ofti
manufacturers will be adjusted, in effect, in accordance with
of margarine sold in 1944. In t.ie margarine industry, prod.ittb e
closely in line with sales. Manufacturers who were able 'in 19~ JI '
Full quantity of margarine that could be manufactured urder' theW
likely to expand production and sales under the new quotas.' ..... :.'i
., ..'. !,,::,: .. .:.... ....
The amendment also reduces quotas of fats and oils used in. t..i...
edible fat and oil products other than margarine. Thid redueti.K ift l
88 percent of average use in 1940 and 1941 to 85 percent of. iO,:. ,::
: .. i "... ...
East and West Coast States Exempd from .
Lard Reservation Order
;- ', ..".:' "" i .. ...i
Amenkdment 9 to War Food Ord.-r ,75-3, effective'March 4, ew ".i
from,the lard set-aside all federally inspected slaughtering es t'en20
in the North Atlantic, South Atlantic, and the Pacific States lIl.'. "
January 21 federally inspected slaughterers hav'.been required ti !sai J
for purchase by Government agencies 7.5 pounds of lard for each. / "i;
live weight of hogs slaughtered each week. The amendment was.. AiS e i;tre
lieve a tight lard supply situation for civilians in the exeamre&4tatie..,;
These States are deficit producers and normally import lard fr-qI a tr pa
of the country to meet consumer demand. Production of f edeilZrali Xfen '"
lard in these States is estimated at 10 to 15 percent of ,he .natktl tN:i

Fat Quotas for Civilian Household .
4. Soaps Further Reduced ,,:
Manufacturers' quarterly quotas of fats and oils for'use. tviili..
package and bar soap were reduced, effective April 1, .to. I: p .Qt f,.
average use in corresponding quarters of 1940r'and 191. : This aeb t oe wa.t
in Amendment 4 to War Food Order l2-b. The new quota percentage'.eplach1 "
percent allowed in January-March and 90 percent throUghout 1944. The r4A.9
tion to g5 percent for Jnnuary-Yprch wns not announced until the e::nd ;i': '. ~
and actual use of fats and oils in civilian package and bar soap; L 1 :: V R '
continued in January at about 90 percent of the base-peri.odrate,: .Fim.
in February and.Mardh, it probably was reduced to around 80 percent;. .:"..

No change was made by this amendment in quotas for bulk paci.gq 0'
Which were reduced on January 31 from 110 to 90 percent of base-pprf$ u~p
Bulk package soap is the type usually purchased'by large users,. uajlS laI
.. commercial laundries. Package and bar soaps are mainly used in h

INi:: .. ::.: :


















a ~ ~ o oakl a r us eae i quniiea thantitwould reol

alo thtue t hano Pir hereae th 4at would -
es.*%thvrislaof hs tota delvh i esi th oef, bse
use inthe vise eion was po

aintqw aonidn Greasesan


n-0ecein ve aung thases perio
bnt~ri s ofce"e iblig tall e is exemp trom

c .k Iftab6 imlo no ed tall0oi; and greaseIpx lsoet,
r'P, iqlo-ehi oi ~nedzr on sch at ins 194ute sp to





-Ai~~deiler c are s~urA t oi were established Mar
i~ereto 111 ard lotsr f s ax. benuse In -r
io inr dele c-i fs at
06 tise oil.d



1r a drin Il

notgh interiore
Oly 's S.WP-bly, H5 ebate erta coundi oa% u dealr








































changed from' a net.import .of 1,527 millionn poundd. of fatgs aA
'in the pre-war pjt.odt to a. pe.t epobrtr'of,:S9%' 1likn. pcnstlds'
....... ... !. *. ... .. .. ".:'.
SThe effect of lend-ledse shipment.' s n qxporfts off' a,
illustrated by a comparison of total exports of princ. slp.-3 tt
and in 1939. Exports of',.uttler in 943 i wire 100 million p
million pounds from:1939.; report's o lard in .194. 1re-736
up 459 million pounds; exports of domestic edibtl'e.ege;v e. ahl a1
soybean, corn, and peanut) totaled 118-millidti 'mounds .in gi
Pounds from 1939; exports of linsebd oil, .lagely. to.B asi-a. 's
edible oil, totaled 222 million pounds 'in 193.O qlareS
:; in 1939 .
`2' :- A
".. '-..: The ,orincpal. changes in .imvpots in the .a1i
--and coconut,.oil, palm oil, tung v1t, olive oil, anfl lbtilitr 4
a Minor-extent, the reduction in these .imorts-way .1fi.s : iy *tli
imnorts of sunflower Qil. linseed oil, and talleqw. Th 3,:rf
the princi al source of these increases. *



12A M 4, ...
'* : *. .:
-. .. .. *t:.. .. ,










I Fvl
,4
41 -,i


4 IT



Ti J-
44-` 63 67`l 3

T 57
'iq



%41- 1,% 005 7,996, 17
49
I XT, A;
IT
230 4 8 66"

'41,V -,'2- T 2j.
82, 54-n A

W,,T,

7 3, 21,8 Gal"

3 4o5 '3
4, 4j
T, 4
311 61,7,-'' 12*w"T, 25 399-..
,3,
13, 41
47V
fA 45 942 66 6,
J*,
"67 -15,537, 46, 5 If, -4
31,
2i #,027;"
V71,

26
T. T 'k 3,779 3,17-9 8-119
PI TJto, TO 41 61,,5 74 A '641,
I 14 919 3-1,45
T, T, IT

6
3'0
Tt,
43j$b
"leg,
Ito T,
9


Y





































/ Item Unit t. "C
vaear beans, Brazilian, ::Dolla-s Dollars r ao1re ar
S.p.f. b. Brazilian ports .....:..Long .ton-:. .75,00 75 00 .
Obqttoinseed, United States
e vi age .................., Short ton: 44,8g 52.60 ..
flpsseed, .No. 1 Minneapolis ..: Bushel 2.97 3.05 3'412:
#axseed, United States
..#rage ,........... ......... Bushel : 2.66 2,85. 2,90
el. s,. e, 1 shelled. ....... M.
:i1.'uni sh, Southpast'ern -
LB;4rnping points ... ......:100 pound: 1470T 14 25 X 25- 1
ts, Unitod States '
.N ege ..:....................-100 -owud: 6.45 7 39 .
-9ii emans, No. 2 Yellow, Chic a Bushel- 1,9 --
iileans, United States :
S........, ....... ": Bush~ l 60 1 S5 g5 5
leff frob Oil .Paint An' .g Rportef,- Chicago Joi a -
ti:lt- Recotd (Minnea~6ois), and. rnoftt"of the Bureau w of*Jri ,w
': ; :i: vi ':::






4" IT


9 4e



"al
-4, "y'
4 'U" LZ
171, R


3


44, ta

I t als-
9`74
-9 ,
.1, `

1 1 4
""'I" IT
79 4,149
Alz i4j


T.
9g,


rI 31 T
-7 13"* 6'
86 1 2
WW, Z
77 04'
32';,3,3
17 23014- 4
Z li"67,9`
,7
'%' 1,2'fb,66 9,14
'I-g- 4

13-39,
539-

RU,
-2'9 4U -bo 61,
IN
IM,

2-' 9



1411,









Item igb 39




8n11 M: 1,0 b :,

Shpetas toUnitea StateB --
teritorieps .............. 42151 63 /

Toa..................... 666SI 25
ort .. .. ... .. ... ... .. ... 1 ,85 3,9705,. .3 3
-5ipments-to Uni-ted States :*
tertories .......4!................ 35__L 4,93Ei .6.3o V 2
4 Total ........................ Ob2 99 ag



f riled -from To~reign Commerce and Navigation of the Vhited States, re'-i
," uof the Census, and reports of the War. Food.Admiaat rat'iadi
Includes -War F0ood Administration s. pents to United States.t~xtre*
IndludQ's 11other animal greases and rats, inedible,"-grease. an lr a e*
line litle," 1 Ad 4"hog grease and wool gredee.fl3 Reported
ior to 194 V. Publication prohibited by national' security rgl Po
de oil plus refined oil convertedto crude basis, dividi4 by the folwpC
ctrs.: Coconut, peanut', and soybean oils, 0.94;.,.corn and coittonso
ors.)/otsearately'reporte.8 Wi thdtawn 'ta-%-f r ei for
rau Df.Internal Revenue.

Table 14.- Price per ton of specified'oi~'se'd' pieals,:9
Februax- 1943 and. 1944, December to e~brer 191 45y

Item If: Febru-ar-
:Dollars Dollars.. Dollars Doli

pa meal, Los Angele~s ...........: 51.55 51-50 _V50.0co /5
taseed meal, 41 pDercent protein-,:
a .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. : -- 4g.50 49.50 4 .
toseed meal, 41 percamn protein,* .

Gedmeal, 32 percent protein, :
01aeaois .................. 47-90 45 50 45.60 45.:5
nse R eal, 34 -percent protein, :
........ .....: -- 45.do0. 45.00 5d 4A"
Vaitmeal, 45,percent -orotein,:
Southeastern mills -....:39-00 .53,0 OL. 53.00 53
Gnmeal, L'1 percent brote~in*, :
............... ,39.6o, 51.90 5,2.00

10*v~edfrom records of the War Food: Administration.

Pe tiaded to bulkqutio todutt ng









-vi
ij t
II
"gT 7,"
lii 16 064:


.2 7:

if
qf3 ,I
', w T4 Ge G I "e bj

PA iI !
IkLl 8(
I m l ................... .


40
























STallow, inedible .................. 175.4 152.2 1.7 .1]p. 11iU' J**T
Greases, excluding wool grease ...; 103.0 94.6 132.1 I.li J ;i
S Palm oil 2/ ............. ........ 4.3 62.2 54.2' 59
S Fish oil .........................: 133.0- 131.6 172.0 165A .tt1 $
S Marine mammal oil ....... ........: 57.1 63.5 47.2 t5.9:
Olive oil,.inedible and foots ...: 10.8 '4.9 24. .2 s;_
Total slow-lathering oils 5636 509.0Z~ 50.0
Babassu oil 2/ ...................: 12.7 8.0 2.7 ..' ..
Coconut oil 3/ ..................: 142.1 119.9 97.0 1,Q1,
: Palmn-kernel oil 2/ ............... : L_ --
Total lauric-acid oils ........ 155.14. I_ f 99.7 f j .l6
Drying oils ::
'Castor oil, dehydrated jj ........ : .9 11j3 "10.8 1 2'. 9: 0
Linseed oil ........... ............: 289.2 287.3 274.8 26 3. -t.
Oiticica oil ....................: 7.0 6.1 .4.9 6a.
Perilla oil ......................; 2.2 ...6 .2 .: .
1ung oil .........................:_ l.Q 6.6 1.g5 2j2._L:g-1a
S Total, drying oils ............: _33.3 331.9 31.2 ;1
Other. industrial
S eat's foot oil ........ ..... ..: -.3 3.7, 2. 2. 5 .
.Wool grease .......................: 4.1 4 .9' 3.9 .:;T ,'.
Cod and codiliver oil ...........: 12.4 13.1 12.9. 15,. *:I
Other fish-liver oil ...............: 3 1.6 4.5 ,l.a1
Vdstot oil, No. 1 and No. 3 ......: 13.6 56.0 32.1 29.-0 1"
I ape oil ...................... 20.3 19.2 L.7 18.1
Other vegetable oils g]..........: 27.8 0 51.
Total ......................... 82. 1_ 115.7 121.
Grand total ................... 2.037.1 296, .122.1 g_2,1~
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census; except butter, War P4A:' ..nd .
:. Administration. Grand-total computed from unrounded numbers. Include s.toii ":;!
held by Government in reported Dositions.
I/ Cold-storage stocks. 2/ Crude plus refined converted to crude bastb*.*l
by 0.93. 3/ Crude ulus refined converted to crude basis by dividing y ii.. .
l/ Refined only. 5/ Not shown to avoid disclosure of individual Opersl c.'
/ Crude only. J/ Converted to crude basis by dividing'by 6.88. S/ InUeld
ir food oils.









-!4
7- 777






__s9s
.......... V HHHH
291 202 AMi
I2
42 i5 0





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Ct r.2-I
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