The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00059
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00059

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

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.. : : TIBUiREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
.I NiTED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

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5.QYBEANS HARVESTED FOR BEANS: PRODUCTION, CRUSHINGS,
AND PRICE, UNITED STATES, 1924-43


I .. Production n


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2.00



1.50
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27 1930 1933 1936 1939
YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER
DATA FOR l94 FORECAST ON BASIS OF SEPT. I INDICATIONS


P ANdrICUtLTlUE
! .i ': i


NEG. 4S291 BUREAU OF AGRJCLITURAL ECOMCMICI


g:' 4otinuf to mount and may produce about 1,400,000,000 pounds of oil and
amdn.mea.l in 1943-44. In addition, some soybeans will be used for seed,
l Hr. fuTl-fat flour,. and exported. Soybean prices are being supported at
. "fi9, when most soybeans produced'were used for seed.


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ON


OCTOBER 1943


1945







Table 1.- Vholesele price per nound of fats and oils at specified markets, end Index
numbers of prices, Seutember 19161 rod 191?, July-September 2943

PRICES
Ite Septenber : l~
: 1941 : 194 : July r A int
Cents Cants Cents Cants


Butter, 92-score, Clcago .......................................
Butter, 92-score, New York ......................................
Ole-margarine, dom. veg.. Chicago ...............................
Compounds (animRl and veg. cooking fate), Chicago ...............:
Lard, loose, Chicago ...........................................
Lard. prime team, tierces, Chicago .............................
Lard, refined, cartons, Chicago ................................
Oleo oil, No. 1, barrels, .rw York ..............................
Oleontearine, bbl., N. Y. .......................................:
Tallow, edible, Chicago ........................................

Corn oil, crude, tanks. f.o.b. mills ...............................
Corr oil, refined, bbl., N. Y. ..................................
Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. 5.3. ails .................
Cottonseed oil. p.s.y., tank cars, N. Y. ........................:
Peanut oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills ..........................
Pecaut oil, don., refined, drums, N. Y. .........................:
Soybean oil, crude, tPnk care, midwestern mille .................:
Soybeen oil, edible, drums, I.c.l., N. Y. .......................:

Coconut cil, Manila, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Pacific Coast ?/ ......
Coconut oil, :anila, crude, bulk, c.l.f. n. 1. /. ...............
Coconut oil, Manila, refined, edible, tank cars, f.o.b. N.Y. ~/h/:
Olive oil, edible, drums, N. .................................:
Olive oil, Inedible, druns, ;:. Y. ...............................
Olive-oil foots, nrime, drums, N, Y. ...........................:
Palm oil, Niger, crude, drump, N. Y. 9/ .........................
Rbe oil, refined, denatured, bulk, c.i.f., N. Y. ...............:
Sunfl*)er oil, tan ercrs, f.o.b. N. ....... .....................

Tallow, No. 1, inedible, Chicago ................................
Grpese, A 'iflie, Chirago ......................................
Menhaden oil, crude, tpnks, f.o.b. Baltimore ...................:
Spreine oil, crude, tanks, Pacific Coast ................ .......
'Alle nil, refined, bleached winter, drums, N. Y. ...............

Licrned oil, rew, tank rare, Minneapolis ........................:
linseed oil, rew, drums, carlots, N. Y. .........................:
Perlla oil, crude, drums, N. Y. ...............................:
Ottlicea oil, Orums, N. Y. ......................................:
Tune oil, rums, N. Y. .........................................:

Castor oil. No. ), bbl., N. Y. ..................................
Castor oil, No. 1, tanks, N. Y. ................................:
Castor oil, dehydrated, drums, rarlnts, N. Y. ...................:
Cod-)lier oil, med. U.S.P. bbl.. I. Y. .........................:
Cod oil. Ne.foundland. drums Y. Y..............................


P366
1/36.9
16.5
15.9
10.7
10.7
p12.4
11.8
9.8
9.0

12.L
15.6

13.6
1P.7
15.8
10.5
13.9

9.6
.210.5

71.7
52.3
17.0
11.2
4/15.6


8.5
8.6
7.8
8.0
71.0

10.3
3/11.0
pp.6
PP.2
35.5

11.8
11.0
16.5
38.0
In.5


U7/3.
1/h3).9
19.n
17.0
11.9
12.9
1,.5
13.2
10.5
9.9

1P.8
15.5
12.8
13.6
13.0
17.0
11.7


11.0
11.1
1P.8
56.7
51.7
19.0
12.1
/16.0


8.,
8.8
8.8
8.9
11.1

12.2
5/1j.o
?u.5
25.0
39.0

11.8
13.0
18.6
36.41
12.0


" .8

19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
13.5
in. 5
9.9

1P.8
15.5
12.8
lb.0
13.0
16.5
11.8
15.0

il.n
11.4
12.8
71.5
55.3

12.1
16.0
114.3

8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
1P.3

14.14

i.5,
25.0
39.0

13.5
13.0
18.6
36.5
i;3!0


ID12 NUIkBEHS (1Pla-PQ 100)


Light domestic fats and nils (1910-14 = 1.0) ....................:
Eieht domestic fats and oile ....................................:

All fate and oile (27 items) ....................................:
Grouped _y origin:
Acrimn fats ...................................................
Marine animal oils ............................................
Vegetable oils, domestic ......................................:
Vegetable oils, foreign .......................................:
Grouped by use:
Butter ............................................ ......... ..:
'utter, seasnally adjusted ................. .................:
Lard ..................................................... ,.
Otter food fats ................................................
All f eod fats ..............................................
Soap fats .....................................................
urying oils ...................................................
,iscellaneous oils ............................................
All industrial fpte and nil .


12 1U3
88 101

96 107

Sg 99
117 127

142 145

83 98
82 97
8P 98
135 132
92 104
116 119
116 13
103 117
1 12


Prices comDiled frn' 011, Ppint and Drup Re-orter, The National Provisioner, The Journal of Commere (New York), and
reports of the Food Dirtributton Administration and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Prices quoted include excise taxes
end duties where annlirsble. Index number for earlier years beginning 1910 are eiven in Technlcel Bulletin No. 737
(l1'9) and The Fete and 011i Situation beginning December 19h0.
1/ Reflects open market sales only. Current figures refer to all tynes of wholesale tradlnF for eash or short-time
credit. j/ Three-cent processln. tax added to price as oririnrply quoted. 3/ Tanks, f. 1. I/ uoted in drums.
5/ Converted to present bslis if quotation.


-- 8
b2.5
19.0
17.0
!P.B
13.8
15.6
13.8
10.5
9.9

1P.8S
15.5
12.8
14.0o
13.0
16.5
11.8
15.0

11.0

12.8
71.5
55.3

12.1
16.0
li1.3
15
8.9
8.8
8.9

IP.-3

A .4
15.3
?p.5
?5.0
3<.o
3Q .0

13.8
13.0
18.6
36.5
12.0


'ents
euteabe


ap,,
2P.5
19.0
17.0
12.1
13.8
15.6
13.8
10.5
9.9

2P.8
15.5
12.5
14,i
13.0
16.5
21.8
15.0

12.0
11.4
12.8
71.5
55.3

12P.1
-16.0
1h.3


8.9
8.9
5.o
12.3



.5
P5.0
39.0

13.8
13.0
18.5
36.5
19on


14p
101

108

96
132
132
157

93
92
205
139
103
120
150
117
112


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lr e e


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-- --- ----

S-. V

I Contents
C
4. .. '.
: Summary ................... ... .. .. 3 g
S. Outlook .. .... .. ... .... .... 4
: Recent Develonments ............ 5
: Recent Government Actions .. .......... .8
SFactory Production of Tallow, 1921-43 12 t
.. Tables ............ ... .... ......... 15 1 :

: .!
Summary

Total production of fats end oils from domestic materials in 1943-44

is now expected to be'in the neighborhood of 11.5 billion pounds compared with

10.6 billion pounds a year earlier (nearly 11 billion pounds in calendar 1943)

and 9.5 billion pounds 2 years earlier. On the basis of October 1 indica-

tions, 1943 flaxseed production will be 51.5 million bushels compared with the

54,7 million bushels expected a month earlier. Minor reductions also occurred

in the indicated 1943 production of soybeans, peanuts and cottonseed. In

terms of oil output these reductions from the prospects of a month ago 'amount

to more than 100 million pounds.

Improvement in ocean shipping conditions may permit an increase in

imports of oils and oil-bearing materials from South America, West Africa, the

South Pacific, and Ceylon in 1944. On the other hand, exports of fats end

oils to our Allies and to European areas under Allied control also are likely

to expand. Despite increased production in North America, world supplies of

fate outside the Japanese-pontrolled area are still substantially under the

pre-war level.





OCTOBER 1943 4 -

The order limiting 'mnufacturers' use of fate and oils was amended in

early October, principally by changing the permitted use of fats in civilian

soan from 80 percent of base-period use to 90 percent for household soaps,

110 percent for commercial bulk package soap, and 150 percent for mechanics'

soap. The new soap quotas if continued will involve the use of about 500 mil-

lion pounds of lard in soap in the next 12 months. The permitted use of oils

and fats for.civilian paints and related products was raised from 50 to 60 per-

cent of base-period user -

Production of inedible tallow and greases may not be greatly different

in 1944 than in 1943. The number of cattle slaughtered probably will be

larger next year than this, but average weights are likely to be less. Hog

slaughter will be very large next winter and spring. However, with a smaller

spring pig crop expected, hog slaughter (and grease production) probably will

be reduced beginning in the fall of 1944.

Under a recent government order, the 1943 crop of soybeans may be

crushed only by mills having contracts with Commodity Credit Corporation.

Soybeans must be purchased at previously announced support prices. To protect

crushers, the Corporation when requested will purchase oil and meal from

contracting mills at prices slightly under ceilings.

-- October 21, 1943

OUTLOOK

BACKGROUND.- With the entrance of the United States into the war
in December 1941 and the subsequent loss of most of our imports
from the Far East, the fats situation was transformed from one
of comparative abundance to one of critical supply. Production
of domestic oil crops was encouraged in 1942. "he total output
of fats and oils in the 1942 croD year was'about 10 percent
greater then in the previous year. Both domestic Pnd export
demands for fats also mounted and measures were taken to control
prices and distribution. Production was further encouraged in
1943.






.. -. .a 1
Fa. nd .ile ii .toIncrease.in 143-44
1eahrebnts.A.lso ikel, to -adE* : '

Both domestic and imported supplies of fats are expected to increase
in 1943-44. On the basis of the latest crop indicatiens-and, robda.le .lve-
stock slaughter, production of fats and oils from domestic rnateriEals in
1943+4, seese0 likely to amount.ta.about 11.5 billionpounds, 0.9 billion
p nus;u orSethai in 1942-43. With a favorable outlook for an improved ocean
alpptig situation. .some increase'in imports also seem; probable. Exportable
44l6plse in. South.America, Africa, the South Pacific, anadCeylon, which have
beenpartly unavailable because shipping space could not be found to carry
:~he, probably.will be drawn upon to an increased extent in 1943-44.

1:, .xport. requirements for fat. and oils are expected. to show a further
ipcreasp. As indicated ih The Fats and Oils Situation for September, the food
;.it. supply in continental Europe in 1944 may total only 6 to 7 billion pounds
Compared with a pre-war level of approximately 12.5 billion' pounds. When the
war in Europe is terminated, a substantial quantity of imported fats will be
S,. prd. Part .of this probably can be obtained from Argentina and other
sat fups-producing areas, but for a year or 2 the demand for imports from the
..Untp.d .States will be comparatively large. Resumption of whaling activities
,ia1 .a large .eale would help relieve the European fat shortage, but this cannot
beaomplished before the 19$4-45 season and may not be achieved before
,'.6 .

RIECET DEVELOPMENTS

Oilseed Crop Prospects Deteriorate in September

As a result of less favorable crop prospects indicated on October 1
than ,a month.earlier, the probable output of oil in 1943-44 from cottonseed,
,. peaAuts, soybeans, and flaxseed is more than 100 million pounds less than
expected. a month ago. Total production of fats and oils' from domestic
,Materials in. 1943-44 is now expected to be in the neighborhood -of 11.5 billion
...ounds.
'The flaxseed qrop is now estimated'at 51,486,000 bushels, 6 percent
less than a month.earlier. The prospective yield per harvested acre this year
,.. i.$8. bushels compared with 9.2 bushels in 1942. The indicated soybeanrpro-
4i ution of 206,86g,000 bushels is down slightly from last month. Farmers'
intentions on August 1 to harvest about 11.5 million acres for beans are not
likely to be realized. A large acreage intended for beans in States outside
the Corn Belt has been cut for hay because of drought damage and a need to
supplement other hay crops.

Largely because of unfavorable weather in Oklahoma, indicated peanut
production shows a slight reduction from a month earlier to 2,769 million '
pounds.' The estimated 1943 crop by areas, compared with last year, is as fol-
lows: Virginia-Carolina area, 494 million pounds, down 4 percent; Southeastern
area, 1,665 million pounds, up 53 percent; Southwestern area, 610 million
pounds, up 1 percent. Prospective total production in the United States is




OCTOBER 1943


- 6 -


25 percent over 1942 production. Cotton prospects also declined slightly
in September. In terms of cottonsee4, the reduction amounted to about
90,000 tons. The total output of cotton*eed-ie now expected to be about.
5.1 million tone compared with an output o- 547 million tons last years

Production and Stocks of.Fats pnd.Oils
Decline in August

Factory production of fats and oils in August totaled 738 million
pounds, 13 million pounds less then.in July. Output of vegetable oils rose
3j million pounds,..largely as a result of seasonal increases in cottonseed
and linseed oil production. With cotton picking beginning early this year,
August production of cottonseed oil was 40 million pounds compared with
28 million pounds last year. Animal-fat production (including marine animal
oils) was 51 million pounds less in August. than in July. The output of fish
oil increased seasonally about 10 million pounds, but creamery butter and
inspected lard production declined 29 and 35 millionn pounds, respectively.
Production of creamery butter in August was about 10 percent smaller than a
year earlier.

Stocks of primary fats and oils in warehouses and factories declined
61 million pounds in August. The total of 1,931 million pounds in "tore.'
August 31 included 313 million pounds of butter and lard held by Government
agencies mainly for future military and lend-lease requirements. CottonSeed
oil stocks declined 61 million pounds in August, and there were substantial
decreases in stocks of coconut and linseed oils. Increases of 21 and 19 mil-
lion pounds in creamery butter and lard, respectively, were largely accounted
for by Government accumulations.

WFA Purchases of Fats Relatively
Small in September

Purcnases of fats and oils by the War Food Administration in the
5 weeks ended October 2 amounted to 68.million pounds compared with 47 million
pounds in August and a monthly average of 175 million pounds in January-July.
The September purchases consisted chiefly of 30 million pounds of vegetable
oils (mostly edible linseed oil) and 29 million pounds of butter. The figure
for butter is nearly 2-1/2 times as great as in April 1943, the previous peak
month for butter purchases. The War Food Administration recently announced
that except'for butter set aside prior to October 1 no butter will be pur-
chased by Government agencies during the October-March period, when production
is seasonally low. Stocks now held by the Government ere sufficient to supply
military end lend-lease needs through this period.






SI


Table 2.- Purchases of fats and oils by the War Food
Administration, 1941-43


tem .
-
," :,';,i ; ", ,


..1.. .. .
ttalf **r W:8 l
rd and rendered.pork fat ...I
hbr.aial .ate and-oils 3s.
geteo l oils <..............


. : 1943
s 1941 1942 : Sept. aJan.-Sept.

:il. lb. M11. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.


V1I
326


31w*13- h ..........e..m.. 8 -
erga a (fat content) / ..a: 1
Oga .atc. content) &/ ..... : ---
qtal Eat equivalent ...: 329


34 12
654 3
.30 6
170 25
46 1
77 .
16027
1,027 47


29 81
2 587
4 55
30 485
1 62
1 50
1 20
69 1,340


bmppl:4 from reports of the War Food Administration.
;aj5taE ..ended O.ctober 2. 194..
ggri teds from unrounded numbers.
SLeas than 500,000 pounds.
Includes fish-liver and fish oils.
Fat content estimated at 80 percent for margarine, 55 percent for soap.

Prices of Fats Unchanged in September
Prices of fats and oils were unchanged in September. The index number
of wholesale prices of 27 major fats and oils stood at 108 percent of the
S1924-29 average for the third consecutive month and was only 1 point higher
than a year earlier. The effect of increases since September 1942 in prices
S of lard, linseed pil, cottonseed oil (prime summer yellow), and some rela-
tively minor products, notably edible olive oil, has been approximately offset
by the reduction made last June in butter prices.

Flaxseed prices declined moderately in early October, with No. 1 flax-'
seed at Minneapolis quoted at $2.96-$2,97 per bushel on October 19 compared
with $3.05 per bushel, the ceiling price, at the end of September, Demand
from crushers is less urgent, as many have accumulated a sufficient reserve
for capacity operations for some time ahead. No' 1 shelled Spanish peanuts,
S fo.b..shipping points in the Southeastern area, were quoted as low as 13.75
centq per pound in early October compared with the ceiling price of 'l.25
Cents per pound, which had prevailed through most of September. Prices of
Spanish peanuts also declined slightly in the Southwestern area in mid-October,
These declines apparently reflected some uncertainty over the possible effects
of Food Distribution Order 78 (now suspended indefinitely), which would have
limited uses of shelled peanuts. The declines may also have resulted from
the announcement in September of a plan to reduce retail prices of peanut
butter* With demand for peanut products still unusually strong, cleaned and
shelled peanuts are not likely to be quoted for long periods at prices
materially below ceiling levels.





L .




OCTOB R 1943


RECENT GOVEREIMNT ACTIONS

Soybeans to be Crushed Under Government
Contracts; Purchase for Use as Feed
or Fertilizer Prohibited

Under Commodity .Credit Corporation Order 6, effective September 17,
1943-crop soybeans may be crushed only by mills having contracts with Commodity
Credit Corporation. Theie contracts require the mills to pay previously
announced support prices to producers or to buy from country elevators which
have paid such prices. The Corporation is committed to buy soybean oil'-and
meal from contracting mills, when requested, at prices near the ceilinsa.
The support prices to producers (which were first announced on April 5) vary"
according to grade and moisture content, with a basic price for No. 2 grade,
13.1 to 14 percent moisture content, of $1.50 per bushel-for green sad yellow
beans or $1.60 per bushel for black, brown, or mixed. Support prices to be
paid by Commodity Credit Corporation to mills for soybean oil are 1/I: cent per
pond under ceiling prices. In the-Midwest this would be 11-5/8 cents per
pound. The support price for soybean meal, bulk, f'.o.b. plant, 41-percent
protein content, is $43 per ton, except at mills in the cotton States, where
it is $48 per ton. Under a freight adjustment clause, the Corporation absorbe
freight charges on soybeans shipped to contracting mills in the Pacific Coast
States. Processors' margins are determined by contract provisions which
require mills to sell beans for crushing to the Corporation at a fixed price
and to repurchase them at prices varying according to size of plant and type
of equipment, with allowance for oil content of the beans.

Purchase of soybeans in whole or ground form for use as feed or ferti-
lizer is prohibited by Commodity Credit Corporation Order 6. The order also
forbids seed dealers and manufacturers other than processors to purchase soy-
beans in quantities which would result in inventories in excess of requirements
up to October 11, 1944. Country shippers are forbidden'to have on hand at any
time after March 31, 1944, inventories in excess of quantities contracted for
by eligible users, plus 2,000 bushels or a quantity equal to purchases during
the 30 days immediately preceding, whichever is greater.

Cottonseed Uses and Inventories Restricted

Commodity Credit Corporation Order 7, also effective September 17'
restricts uses and inventories of cottonseed. It prohibits the purchase of
whole or ground cottonseed for use as feed or fertilizer. It restricts
the purchase of cottonseed by seed dealers and manufacturers, including
processors, to the quantities needed to meet requirements up to August 16,
1944. Inventories of ginners and handlers at any time are limited to the
quantities necessary to fill contracts with eligible users, plus 30 tons
or the total of purchases during the immediately preceding 30 days, whichever
is greater.


- 8 -






FOS-g 9 -

Use of Fats in Manufacture of Civilian
soap and Paints to be Increased

Food Distribution Order 42, which limits the over-all use of fats
and oils, was reissued in amended form effective October 14. The principal
changes are increases in the permitted consumption of fats and oils in the
manufacture of soap and of paint and other protective coatings for civilian
use. The permitted use of fats in the manufacture of package and bar soap
(used mainly in households) is raised from 80 to 90 percent of average use
.in the corresponding quarters of 1940 and 1941. In the case of bulk package
oap (used mainly by commercial laundries, hotels, and restaurants) the per-
centage is raised from 80 to 110, and for mechanics' soap it is raised from
80 to 150. Contrary to tentative plans announced by the War Food
Administration in September, use of fats in soap supplied to public insti-
tutions, hospitals, and factory washrooms will not be exempted from these
quotas. Use of fats and oils in the manufacture of paints, varnishes, other
.'protective coatings, linoleum, oilcloth, felt base floor coverings, and coated
fabrics will now be permitted at the rate of 60 percent of base-period use
compared with 50 percent since April 1 this year. The special quota (100 per-
cent of base-period use) established July 10 for protective coatings for metal
food containers, closures, and closure liners is eliminated,

Other important changes in the amended order are as follows:
(1) Manufacturers who Ase 10,000 pounds or less of fats or oils in any
quarter are now exempt from the order. Formerly the exemption applied only
to those using 6,000 pounds or less. (2) To simplify the order, restrictions
on inventories and.processing have been removed. Necessary inventory limi-
tations and special restrictions on processing will" be enforced under food
distribution orders for individual fats and oils. (3) The prohibition on
use of certain fats and oils in nonfood products is removed. Restrictions
Son uses of particular fats will be effectuated through the orders especially
dealing with them. (4) An exemption from the order is made for soap used in
contract laundering for the armed forces and the merchant marine.

More Rosin and "Extenders" to be Required in Soap
Manufacture; Users' Inventories Restricted

Beginning November 1, soapmakers will be required to reduce the pro-
portion of fats and oils in the manufacture of packaged soap flakes, chips,
granules, and powders and bar soaps not sold in bulk. This is expected to
increase production of finished, soap for civilians by 9 percent. An addi-
tional increase of 19 percent in soap production is expected to result from
the change in fats and oils quotas under Food Distribution Order 42. The
use of extenders in soap is made mandatory under Food Distribution Order 86,
issued October 18.

Under this order, an increased proportion of rosin will be used. Rosin
forms soap when combined with alkalies, just aA fats do, but no glycerin is





OCTOBER 1943 10 -

produced as a byproduct. A materially greater percentage of rosin was used in
soap manufacture in the early 1930's than in recent years. Other ingredients
to be used in increased proportions include scouring materials and chemicals
for softening hard water or increasing the "wetting" ability of suds, The
changes prescribed by the order are in terms of percentages of total weight
of the finished product. According to the type of-product, these changes are
to be reductions of 2 to 15 percent in the content of anhydrous soap derived
exclusively from fats and oils. The Office of Price Administration has
amended its price controls over soaps to permit manufacturers to comply with
the program as long as the serviceability of the soap products is not reduced.
Food Distribution Order 86 also is designed to help prevent uneven distribution
of soap supplies, through a provision prohibiting users of soap from making
purchases that would increase their inventories to more than 2 cases or 45
days' supply, whichever is larger.

Restrictions on Use of Glycerin Eased

As a result of an easier supply situation in glycerin and the expec-
tation of an increase in domestic production in the fourth quarter of the year
with increased soap production, the use of glycerin in the manufacture of
products for civilian consumption was permitted to expand in October.
Permitted use under specific allocations to drug manufacturers was increased
from 80 to 100 percent of base use (one-twelfth of 1940 use). This percentage
was raised from 0 to 90 percent for cosmetic, dentifrice, and shaving cream
manufacturers, and from 0 to 100 percent for manufacturers of food other than
shortening and margarine. Unrestricted use was allowed in shortening and
margarine, up to 1 percent and 0.06 percent, respectively, of the weight of
product manufactured. Specific allocations were not required, either in
October or previously, -for monthly use of glycerin in these products up to
1,150 pounds or 70 percent of base use, whichever was lower.

The order controlling use of glycerin, Food Distribution Order 34, was
reissued in amended form, effective October 20. The basic provisions of the
original order were not changed.

Limitation on Uses of Castor Oil Removed

Restrictions under Food Distribution Order 32 on use and delivery of
castor oil for the manufacture of civilian products were suspended during
October, November, and December. This action was taken in Amendment 1 to the
order, issued October 1. Manufacturers may use the oil for any purpose up to
the limits prescribed for over-all use of fats and oils in Food Distribution
Order 42. Inventories of castor oil (including dehydrated) rose from a low
level of about 22 million pounds in early 1963 to about 44 million pounds on
August 31. In view of improved shipping conditions, .an increasing volume of
castor beans and oil probably will be imported from Brazil, where supplies are
plentiful. If expectations are realized, it may be possible to extend
unlimited use into 1944.

Restrictions on Use of Lard Oil, Tallow Oil,
and Fleshing Oils Eliminated; Control over
Red Oil and Neat's-Foot Oil Extended

Lard oil, tallow oil, and fleshing oils will'be free of allocation in
October-December under Amendment 1 to Food Distribution Order 53, issued





i ke-8so 1 -w

October 2. An improved inventory position in these oils made the action
possible. The amendment, however, limits manufacturers' and distributors!
inventories. Red oil (oleic acid) and neat.rs-foot oil, also covered by .
Food Distribution Order 53, remain under allocation. The exemption for small
users kda- bhaiged so that it now covers only those using 450 pounds or less
Pmonthl Formerly ubers:of as ..much as 2,200 pounds of red o.il. or 500 pounds
Sof neati:'rfot Oil monthly were exempt.
at' E UB lUsai Limitation Order Suspended .

The'har'aod Administration announced October 1 that the quotas uner
Food Distribution Order 78, which limited the use of cleaned and shelled "
peanuts and peanut butter, would be suspended for the period from Septermber 1
.to November-1. On.October 2. the order was suspended indefinitely. A new
order 1is being considered to require penufacturers of peanut product' to
report theit monthly use of peanut.s... These reports would furnish needed"
infotation ion which quotas could later be based if necessary. Total ,use of
farmers' stock peanuts of the 1943 crop for cleaning and shelling i's i.mited
to 1,400 million pounds under Commodity Credit Corporation Order 4 as a:etieded
on Agust: 18. :

Vegetable Oil Refiners Permitted to Sell
at Tentative Prices Above Ceilings

Under Order.. 22.to Maximum Price. Regulation 53, effective October 13;
refiners of peanut and. soybean oils are permitted to make bulk sales of
refined oil.for the manufacture of food products at tentative prices to be
adjusted later to new imaximm m prices that may be established by the Office of
Price Administration. Similar action with regard to cottonseed oil hPd been
taken in September under Order 20 to Maximum Price Regulation 53. The Office
of Price Administration is considering requests by'refiners for an increase
in present maximum prices. In the 1942-43 season, Commodity Credit Corporatio
funds were used to enable refiners to buy crude oil at 1/2 cent per pound
under the ceiling prices for crude, provided the oil was for'ultimate use in
food products. No program of this type is contemplated for 1943-44.

Tentative Plan Announced.for Reducing Retail
:Peanut Butter Prices

S In early October the War Food Administration and the Office of Price
Asainistrati-ontannounced a tentative plan for carrying into effect the
rBdaction in retail prices of peanut butter proposed in September. Manimum
prices of peanut butter would be adjusted downward at the retail, wholesale,
ad'manufacturers' levels, but no change would be made in the ceilings for
shblled peanuts The resulting "squeeze": between prices of the finished'
product and prices of the principal raw material would be offset by Commodity
Credit Corporation payments to manufacturers at the rate of 4.5 cents per
pound of peanut butter sold for home consumption within the continental
United.States.. The -proposed reduction in retail prices was from the July
level of 331. cents per pound to 26.5 cents per pound as the United States
average, 'or about 6.6 cents per pound.






OCTOBER 1943 12 -

Minor Adjustments Made in Maximum Prices
for Flaxseed and Linseed Oil Products

Flaxseed for medicinal purposes and for industrial uses other than
crushing for oil was exempted from price ceilings by Amendment 3 to Maximum
Price Regulation 397, effective September 20. In Amendment 4 to the same
regulation it was provided that the maximum price for flaxseed purchased in
California but grown outside the State shall be the ceiling price at the
originating point plus transportation charges. This action was -takin to
correct a-price structure under which an abnormally large share of the
western Montana crop had been moving to California mills.

Amendment 7 to Maximum Price Regulation 53, effective September 11,
extended to December 1 the previously announced exemptions of linseed oil
shortening and hydrogenated linseed margarine oil from ceiling prices.
These are new products, manufactured to meet lend-lease requirements, and
no past experience exists as a basis for determining ceilings.

Under Amendment 34 to Revised Supplementary Regulation 14 to the
General Maximum Price Regulation, effective October 1, maximum prices for
linseed-replacement oil for use in paint were established at approximately
the same levels as the ceilings for pure linseed oil. The cost of produc-
tion is about the same, since the linseed oil content (approximately-70 per-
cent) now authorized by the War Production Board must be of exceptionally
high quality. The sale of 100-percent linseed oil at retail has been pro-
hibited since late June to conserve the limited supply; the replacement oil
is of about equal serviceability for paint mixing.

FACTORY PRODUCTION OF TALLOW, 1921-43

Factory Tallow Production at High Levels in
1942 And 1943. Reflecting Record
Cattle Slaughter

Factory production of inedible tallow in 1943 probably will be only
slightly smaller than in 1942, the peak year to date. Factory production
of edible tallow, oleostearine, and oleo oil also will be at a high level in
1943, as well as 1942, but may be slightly under the peak reached in 1926.
A marked upward trend since 1921 is evident in inedible tallow production,
but until 1941 output of edible tallow, oleo oil, and oleostearine showed a,
slight tendency to decline. Tallow production has been strongly influenced
by cattle slaughter. Part of the increase in the output of inedible tallow
between 1921 and 1943 was due to the increase in total live weight of cattle
slaughtered under Federal inspection, and in most years during this period
cattle slaughter and inedible tallow production varied in the same
direction. (Figure 1.)

The division of total factory output of tallow between edible and
inedible fats in 1921-43 was affected by the difference between prices of
edible and inedible tallow. When the price differential in favor of edible
tallow was high, output of inedible tallow tended to be small in relation
to edible tallow production, and vice-versa. The increase in this price















r. .;:ifl output rose slightly.

....i.lf Change in Tallow Production
T.In 194

:,: : A detailed Pnplysis of 1921-42 data indicates that the principal
t:. ;h:::!: :tetf affecting factory output of both inedibli and qdibl~ tallow in that
i p'. ~ro old wr-r thl number and average live weight of cattle slaughtered under
gii:.,::.pal inspection, the difference between prices of edible and inr.dible
':iaf w, and tr.,nd. (Tables 3 and 4.) Prospective changes in thise factors
e'I:a 1944 will tend to offset each oth r in their effect on tallow production.
':i' ,'steed feed supplies pr animl unit in 1944 may result in an incr.-as.
a- ..the number of cattle slaught-redd, with a decline in average live weight
,::.i:. because of a greater proportion of grPss-f'd animals thpn in 1943. It
pft rnts impossibl- to predict accurately the extentt of the chPnges in
i-e,. thase factors, but they will tend to cancel each other as far as tallow
i pro;iuction is concerned. On the basis of 1921-42 relationships, P reduc-
Stin of about 7 pounds in average liv- woilht would offset an increase of
: 5ii0;i 0,000 in the number slaughtered. A rather small increnpsin inedible
t&llow production might be expected on th. basis of the trend factor. At
1 ast partly offsetting this, however, would bp an unfPvorPble effect,
i .':. persisting into 1944, of the increase thrt occurred in 1143 in the difference
between pric-s of edible and inedible tellows.
;'::i..

On balance, it anpe'rs that a slight incr'nse may occur in 1944 in
factory output of inedible tallow. The likelihood of an incrs s' in pro-
action of the --dible items (edible tpllow,, olio oil, and ol-osteprine)
lM',."'"is greAte'r than for inedible tallow production. With a slight increRns in
-I': :fetaQry production of grease also possible in 1944, the outlook points to
.i in~ rnase next year in total production of in.dibli tallow and greases.
.l rent production of in-dible tallow and grease is exp-cted to amount
about 1,600 million pounds in 1943 compared with the pek of 10741
::i'".. i .i pounds reached in 1942.
S:e :: : :
J 9...




i' through an error in duplication, page 13 of another report was published
S as page 13 of the October "Fats and Oils Situation." This page should
be substituted in your copy.


V :.. :
A "."L ,
j.:"' :'




ii!..;


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASHINGTON 25, D. C.


Penalty for private use to
avoid payment of postage $300


OFFICE I.L BUSINESS


I...


F .. -.-


'HE








i'i: this season will be based on the actual cost of the raw product to the
i;" processors, up to a maximum of $22 per ton.

I POTATOES AND SWEETPOTATOES

A record large potato crop is being harvested in the United States this
g y Production on the basis of October 1 conditions is indicated to be 470
iT ...i ion bushels a crop 27 percent larger than that of last year and 29 per-
cai .above the 10-year (1932-41) average of 363 m11ion bushels. The quality
of the potatoes is exceptionally good in the surplus late States, which
provide most of the marketing during fall, winter, and early spring.

Prices for potatoes continue intermediate between support and ceiling
levels. In Maine recent.f.o.b. prices were about half way between support and
ceiling prices whereas in other important commercial areas they were nearer the
ceiling. Ceiling prices for October range from $2.05 to $2.60 per 100 pounds.
U. S, No. 1 grade of all varieties of potatoes, sacked and loaded on carrier
at country shipping point..

Because of relatively favorable growing conditions during September,
prospects on October 1 were for a sweetpotato crop 3 million bushels larger
than indicated a month earlier or a total of 75 million bushels. Such a
crop would be 14 percent larger than that of 1942 and 8 percent above average.

Prices for sweetpotatoes declined seasonally during September as
increasingly large quantities were marketed. Prices, however, continued well
above support prices, which, for the months of September, October, and
November, are $1.15 per bushel for U. S. No. 1 grade sweetpotatoes, packed
in crates, baskets, 'or hampers, f.o.b. car or in storage warehouse.

DRY EDIBLE BEANS

The dry bean crop this year is indicated to be the largest on record --
approximately 22.8 million bags (100-pound bags, uncleaned) or 16 percent
larger than the previous record crop of last year and 59 percent above the
10-year (1932-41) average.. Production of all major bean varieties with the
exception of the red kidney is expected to be substantially larger than in
,1942. Largest increases are indicated for Great Northern and Pinto beans.

Stocks of dry beane September 1 were smaller this year than last.
Such stocks this season were comprised of 265,000 bags uncleanedd) on farms
and 1,883,000 bags (cleaned) in commercial storage but not in direct con-
sumption channels. This compares with 540,000 bags on farms and 2,909,000
bags in commercial storage September 1, 1942. Increased production this
season will more than offset the smaller carry-in stocks, and total supplies,
therefore, will be larger.

Prices to growers will be somewhat higher this season than last because
of the support-price program. Support prices range from $6.50 to $7.50 per
100 pounds, U. .. No. 1 grade, f.o.b. cars at country shipping points.






-14-


I,,


TOTAL LIVE WEIGHT OF CATTLE SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL
INSPECTION, FACTORY PRODUCTION OF tALLOW, AND DIFFERENCE
BETWE.ENPRICES PER POUND OF EDIBLE AND NO.1 .
INEDIBLE TALLOW AT CHICAGO, 1921-43 .


SLAUGHTER
POUNDS
(BILLIONS)


IJ.
8 .N.



I 1


T tAL OW
PROUtiCTIO'
pburN'os
(BILLIONS)








0.6


0.4


0.2 .



0
O
CENTS



2



1..


1921 1924 1927 1930 1933 1936 1939 1942 1945
EfiBLE TALLOW OLEO OIL. AND EDIBLE ANIMAL STEARIN
1943 PARTLY FORECAST


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 43333. BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


Figure 1


Factory production of 'tallow is related to the rromber and average live weight of battle
slaughtered under Federal inspection. Output of inedible tallow has shown a marked upward trend
.since 1921. It also has tended tovary inversely with the price differential in favor of edible
tallow. The number of cattle slaughtered is expected to increase in 1944, but the effect of this
on inedible tallow production may be largely offset by a decline in average live weight and the
relatively wide difference between ceiling prices of edible and inedible tallow.


'i





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80 .\\ -.15 -
Table 3.- Catt slaughtered under TFederal inspection
and factory production"of tallow, 1921-43

: .. A s a. r under.actory production
SFede ral. ingapet ion -
-.. : :Average a :
.. live Total a 'Edible Total,
-Number: .weight: le Oleo .: : Edible: :Inedible: All
S. ": ...wlive animal .. edible ,
S~. per ;i oil tallow: tallow a"tallow
Sweight stearine. .products
: ," _* animala: *

S Mi Lb. Mil. lb..Mil.lb. Mi. lb. Mil.lb. il. lb. il. lb. Mil.lb.

i921 7.6 999 7,600 1i48 71 4 260 327 587
i'192 : 8.7 981 8,521 165 -75 49 289 363 652
19 9.2 953 8,725 159 72 -53 284 38 66s
1984 9.6 950 9,o10 156 78 -52 286 3 674
1985" : 9.9 954 9,398 141 74 '50 265 78 643
1a6 10.2 964 815 l6l 79 58 298 25 723
4927 : 9.5 946 9,oo4 -.128 67 49 .244 4o4 648
1928: 8..5 948 8,027 .124 61 41 .226 392 618
1929 : .3 955 7,947 .123 60 4- 4 .227 '426 653

S.1930 : 8.2. 956 7810o .116 56 42 .214 '448 662
1931 : 8.1 958 .7,767 94 47 70 .211 '491 702
S1932 : 7.6 943 -7.189 .. 75 36 53 164 4SO 644
1: 933 : 8.7 954 .8,261 *89 39 186 566 752
;193 9.9 928 .9,229 79 34 78 .191 589 780
41935 : 9.7 910 .8,794 752 74 191 392; 583
a936 l11i.o 921 1o,io4 98 49 98 245 481 726
1937 1l.1 -899 9,051 75 44 78 197 635
.1938 9.8 921 .9,004 88 46 9 227 517 744
.1939 .9.4 943 .8,906 76 38 .9 20 602: 810
194b. 9.8 9 940 9,175 69 6 79 184 712 896
19i41. 10.9 961 10,518 92 46 91 229 21 -1,050
.1942 12.3 954 11,773 106 55 112 273 920 1,193

vAprage:
;1921-+2: 9.4 947 8,997 111 55 66 232 497 .729
1943 A11.4 960 1o,940 95 45 150 290 860 1,150

correlation analysis of the relationship in 1921-42 between factory production of
all tallow (Xi) and the number of cattle slaughtered under Federal inspection (X2),
Arage live weight .(X3), and trend (X)5 gave the following results: R1.234 = .96;
"81.234 =.45 million pounds; .rl .,4 = .83; r13.24 = .89; rl.- = .90. The
eatimating equation is X = 4142.5 4 6535 2 +: 4..57 X1 + 8..11 X4. Standard
rors of the regression-coefficienits are 10.26, .54, and $;06, respectively.
Vttle slaughtered under Federal inspection compiled froip reports of'the Food
distribution Administration; factory production of tallow from Buread of the Census.
EL.recast.
,.I : .
I, .
I,:




OCTOBER 1943 16 -
Table 4.- Wholesale prices of oleo oil, oleostearine, edible and inedible
tallow, and production of inedible tallow as a percentage of all
tallow, 1921-43

Price per pound t Price differ- Produo-
-: ence between -: ton of
S t : : Weighted; Year I inedible
S. 1: 5. a;Edibl average to tallow as
Year: Oleo : Oleo- EdibleWeightedInedible and three : year
Soil, ;stearine,:tall, : average: tallow ; : items- .change: a e-
in-a*aownge centage
Extraa: barrels:C hic three: No. 1, edible and :: in 2 ofe all
:Chicago: New York: ha items 1: Chicago e linedibl o all
:tallow; t tallow i 2/
____ _t__L_ 11218(I (11)
Cents Gent enT entts CEntes Ces cCensCts eis t e Percent"
1921 : 11.4 .7 7.0 10.0 5,3 1.7 4.7 -- 55.7
1922 : 10.6 9.6 7.8 9.9 6.4 1.4 3.5 l.: 55.7
1923) 12.8 10.5 9.1 11.5 7.6 1.5 3.9 -+ .4 57.5
1924 : 15.2 11.6 9.5 13.2 7.9 1.6 5.3 + 1.4 57.6
1925 : 13.7 13.1 10.3 12.9 9,2 1.1 3.7 1.6 58.8
1926 : 12.0 12.2 9.5 11.6 8.1 1.4 3.5 *E 58A8
1927 : 13.4 10.5 8.8 11.7 7.5 1-3 4.2 + .7 62.
1928 : 14.0 10.6 9.4 12.2 8.3 1.1 3.9 3 63.4
1929 : 10.9 10.5 .9 10.4 8.0 .9 2.4 .- 1.5 65.2
1930 : 10.5 5.9 6.8 9.4 5.6 -1.2 3.8 + 1.. 67.7
1931 : 6.3 7.6 4.6 6.0 3.4 1.2 2.6 1.2 69.9
1932 : 5.6 5.2 3.5 4.8 2.7 .8 2.1 .5 7145
193 : 5-9 5.0 3.7 5.0 3.0 .7 2.0 .1 75.3
1934 : 7.6 6.9 5.0 6.4 3.8 1.2 2.6 + .6 75*5
1935 : 12.2 10.8 8.6 10.5 6.2 2.4 4.3 + l.:7 67.2
1936 : 10.4 9.0 7.s 9.1 5.8 2.0 3.3 1.0 66.3
1937 : 12.4 9.7 8.6 10.3 7.5 1.1 2.8 69.0
1938 : 8.8 7.2 6.1 7.4 5.0 1.1 2.4 69.5
1939 : .o 6.8 55 6.7 5, .4 1.6 .8 74.3
.190 : 7.1 6.0 .5.8 .1 .5 1.7 + s1 79.5
-1941: 9.7 9.0 7.7 8.8 7.2 .5 1.6 l. 78.2
1942 : 12.9 10.6 9.8 11.2 8.8 1.0 2.4 4 ;8 77.1
Average:
1922-42: 10.5 9.1 7.4 9.3 6.2 1.2 3.0 1 67.8

1943 /: 13.0 10.5 9.9 11.0 8.4 1.5 2.6 + 62 74.8
Correlation analysis of the relationship in 1922-42 between factory production of
-inedible tallow as a percentage of all tallow (Xl) and the price differential
between edible and inedible tallow (X2), 'year-to-year change in this differential
(X3) and trend X14) gave the following results: 1.234 = .96; S1.234 = 2.3 percent;
r12.34 = .80; r13.24 = .68;. r14.23= .59. 'The estimating equation is 21 E ,
79.20 5.23 12 + 2.79 X3 + .43 X4. Standard errors of the regression coefficients
are .95, .72, and .14, respectively.
Price of oleostearine compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter: all other prices,
from the National Provisioner.
I/ Weighted by factory production shown in table 3. 2/ Computed from data shown in
table 3. V/ Indicated prices assume continuation of present ceilings during the
remainder of 1943.








Table 5.- reactor proanction or fata mis oils', August 1941 and 1942,
June-Angust 1943 and indicated crop.year pr r


Lqne------atadt c ---e -r-vf
S: specified items, 1940-42

IAutem 194
___ 1941 June a July Aug
L, : NMil. lb. il lb. il. il. b. Mil. Ib.
al fats and oils .
Sreamery bui tr .,............. 168.8 167.3 02.2 181.3 151.9
In spected lard and rendered .
Spork fat................ ......: 9.1 1067 191.0 200.1 165.4
r : Geases excluding wool grease ..: N.A. .0.1 48.4 48.1 46.6
i SIeatt'-fout oil ................: ." 5 2 .2 .2
r oleo oil .,......... .....,......: 10.1 6.7 7.8 7.7
Stearine, .animal, edible .......: 5.52 2.7 3.1 3*9
i: allow. edible .................: 10.8 9.5 10.1 11.5
iM allow, inedible ,.,.......,.......: .8.4 66.1 65.3 68.5
Wool grease ........ ..........: 1.3 1,5 1*2 1.2
- is.. b-ive, oil ............i.. : .5 ..9 .9 .-
iFitsh oil .......................s 271 11,8 13.8 23.3
2otal,.animal .(............. 4.0 54 51.9 481.0
i Vegetable oils, crude.basis :
SCastor oil ......... ...... ... 0.6 11.3 5.8 10l.
Coconut oil ... ............: 9.0 9.1 6, 11.
Corn oil ....................... .21.0 17. 17.6 19.5
Cottonseed oil ................:. 34.1 28.2. 30,, 19.8 40.0
SLinseed oil ......,.........,:.. N.A. 76.3 .71-3 .. 61.0 68.0
SPeanut oil ................. ..: 1.9 .5.6 6.3 9.1 13*5
Soybean oil ....................: N.A. 57.4 114.8 96.3 91.2
'ung oil ...................... .-,- ..3 It 1/
Other vegetable oils ...........: ." 8_ 8.7 .2 5
Total, .egetable.............: 208,9-. 2 219" 2 .
Grand total ............: 6569 811.2.. ..5 738.
.. :Indicated cropyear production
t 'Year 194041 -l 1941-42 194-43 2
beg. inning.
.Mil. lb. Mil. lb.. Mil. lb.
A tter, including farm ..........: July 2,281.. 2,170 2145
d and rendered pork faV, total :. Oct. 2,275 2,440 2,700
..adb -e tallow and greases, total;. Oct. : .1,492 .. 1732 1,600
bLa e tallow, oleostearine,
oleo stock, and oleo oil o..,....: Oct. 218 277 280
Marine animal oils .............. July 175 215 153
orn oil ................ ........ Oct. ; 185 242 240
tonsepd oil ...............,.: Aug. 1,425 1.250 1,400
inseed oil 3/ .................,.: July 707 .988 849
1Yive oil ....@.. ......... .... ...: Oct. 11 8 10
Peanut oil ...........,.,.......: Oct. 174 76 130
Soybean oil .....................: Oct. ; 564 707 1,200
gUg oil .......... ,........,,.: Dec. 4 2 5
compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census and the Department of Agriculture.
thly reports do not show total production of butter, lard, inedible tallow, and
eases.
Included in "other vegetable oils." / Based on most recent indications, subject
Change. a / Includes production from imported flaxseed.


- 17-.


;80 .


; : .. ..




OCTOBER 1943 18 -

Table 6.- Factory and warehouse stodkd of specified fats and dile, crude basic
ugust p1, 1941I-43, June 30 and July 31, 193
"-.. "; ....
Item -.. Aug. 31,: Aug. 31, 1 __
-_ ___ __ --e yJgk41: 1 : June 30 July 31 t Angl
Mil. 1-b. Mil. b. Mil. lb.. Mil. ,1b. MilI
Animal fats and dils .b. :
Butter ........ ..........2......., 200.2 152.2 157.5 .210,5 231.
Lard and rendered pork fat .....;: 2'88.1' 85.3 220.8 241.0 260,
Greases, excluding wool grease...: N.A.. 102.6 78.8 9742 98:.
Neat s-foot oil .................: r '2.' 2. 2. 3 2.
Qleo oil .....................,: ." 45 7.0 10,9 9.
Stearines animal, edible ........: '".2' 3".3;6- ". 8 3.
Tallow, edible ................. : 12.6 17.1 16,0
STallow, inedible ................: 258.4 111.9 118,6 18.
ool grease .....................: n. "*52' 3.7 3.2 3.
Cod and od-liver oil ...........: "12.6 12;7 12.4 13.
SOther fish-liver oil ..... ...,: 2.7 1;8' 2.1 .
Fish oil ...................: .8 -87.5 87.4
Marine mammal oil .............: ;5' 56.7 4.0
Total, animal ......... .. .. ... --~gj-'' 89.
................................
Vegetable oils, crude basis ,
Babassu oil ......................; N.A. "'131 .....17.5 14),2 10.
Castor oil 2/ ...................: .. 37.3 398.- 34.7 .43.
Coconut oil ..................: 136.0 187.5 170;8' -'157
Corn oil .............. ....: .g..... 3 6 33.7 32.
Cottonseed oil .............: 274,7 '259.6'. "299.0 24.5 183.
Linseed oil ....................: N.A. '230:3 '..l191.9' '19.8 177.
Oiticica oil .................'..... ** 6.4. 6.2 6.,
Olive oil, edible '....... T.5.......: "* ., ** -4 *.. 9 3.2 3.
Olive oil, inedibl'e and foots ...: 12e.3 ..**. .6 7.7 7.7
Palm-kerhel oil ................. i ** .6 1-... 3
Palm oil' ....... ............ ... "' 97.8 :77,4 t 75. 75
Peanut oil ........* ....... '.....: : 24 ..... 43.9 l4e0 42.
Perilla 'oil ,..'.... ... ... "....:. .9. .* 1-. 1 .1.0
Rape oil .......... *......... .., : 6.8 24.2 25.7 23*
Sesame 'il .............. 9. ..... .1 1.5 1.7 1.
Soybean oil ........-....... .....: : 141.0 211.6 223.2 217.
Ting oil ............. ...- .......; ". 33.5 29.0 29.6 28.
Other vegetable oils .;..........': 332 "" 9. 6 0.4-" 3IX
Total, vegetable ........... : 1,100.1- 121 .2 1.1 33. 1,0
Grand total ................: 1,90 2 1,9 7.8 .992 ,
Compiled from.reports of the Buredu of the Cendus; except butter and lard, Food
Distribution Administration. TotAls 6omputed ft rm't rounded numbers." Includes'
stocks held by Government. .... ....
I Crude plus refined converted tb crude basis:by'a idirg'by' the' fllowihg fact.
Babissu, corn, .cottonseed, palm-kernel, and pafi'bilb'0;9~ ,'bbbfiut tpeanrit, and
soybean oils 0.94. ................ 1 *'
2/ Includes stocks of dehydrated castbr oil cohA rte' tb' cruae' bablei by dividing'
0.88. ; .... .. ......
N/ !ot separately reported, "* **
. .. ..... .. ... .- i
S. .,



S;






80 19 -
Table 7.- Prices.of specified.oil-bearing materials,
September.1941 and, 1942, July-September 1943
--- ---'--- --
S- Se.t.
.. 194l '-1942: July Aug. Sept.
r Dollars tDollars Dollars Dollars Dollars


" ". t" 1 i
amana, Brasilian, :
tt friiiiasiaa port 4.: Long-ton : 1/68.00
t:abseed, Unite -States '
%.fam price ..............: Short ton ; 49.83
0 No. 1,Minneapolies Bushel : 1.99
Ot !eed, United States
i fi price ..............: : 1.85
hntt,. No. 1 shelled
s~tMi h, Southeastern
Otipping points ........: 100 pounds: 7.05
Pea ts (for nuts and oil), ;
.-f ted State. farm price .: 4.49
Soyeane, United States
fasm price ...............: Bushel : 1.61


75.00


45:-3
2.43

2.24


11.00


75.00 J75.00 75.00


44.50
3-05

2.83


14.25


5;69 7;15


50.90
3.02


51.90
3.05


2.80 2.84


14.25 14.25


7.17


1. 7 '" 1.70"- **1.68


7.15

1.69


Copfl4Sd. from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, Daily Trdde Sutltti --0hioiao, Chicago
Journal of Commerce, Daily Market Record (Minneapolis), and'rep'drts 6f the Bureau of
Agric~atural Economicss.
If C. M fh .Nevw York.
.. A fog.

Table 8.- Price per ton of specified oilseed meals,
September 1941 and 1942, July-Septemberl1943 .-

Sept. 143
Item 1/ 1941 1 142 : July I Aug. 3 Sept.
SDollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollar
a Dollars DOllars Dollars Dollars Dollars


Ora. meal, Los Angeles ................ 39.60
e oDnseed meal, 41 percent protein,
! 96phi ............................ 39.75
seed seal, 41 percent protein,
ah o lo s......................,, .....: 45.65
*iBiPd meal, 34 percent protein, : ,
Kaneapolise .................a....P...: 39*o00
UgsBeed meal, 32 percent protein, :
1ew York ............................. 33.20
Pfnut meal, 45 percent protein,
f.e.b. Southeastern mills ............: 38.55
Soybean meal, 41 percent protein,
-Chcago .,....*..........q......u.....I 41.4o


52.4o 51.50 51.50 51.50

35;60 38.50 49.00 48.50
41.35 46.75 54.47 54.47


S36.o0o

'35.20


4550o 45.50
" m | .


45.00


"36;94 38.00

4350 4o.o4


45.50


45.00 45o00

53.00 53.00


51.90


51.90


-_ & -.-_.____--. "..... _
DOmpiled frQm.rcords oI, the Food D5itributiin Adinistration.
/ Bagged carrots.





OCTOBER 1943 20 -

Table 9.- Oleomargarine: Production, withdrawals for consumption,
and materials used in manufacture, United States,
August 1941 and 1942, June-August 1943
Item '3 1
:*j j 6 1 5 -June Juil-- .
Io000 lb. 1,000 lb. 0 1,000 .b9, io 1.000 I br
Production: 2
Colored ...................... 252 15360 22,828 28,978 15.377
Uncolored .................... 255 21 13234 4977.l
Total' 2/ .......... =... 2 8


Tas-paid withdrawal's for
United States consumption I/ ..I 25,179


Materials used:


24,379 24,509


Oleo oil ...................: 1,241: 1,639 1,006
Oleostearine .................: 162 278 193
Lard stearine ................:. --- --- .12.
Lard, neutral ...............: 538 388 .507
Oleo stock ...................: 132: 266 ". 197
Tallow .,..,...............m..: --- 1 : 23
Butter ;.....................: --- 3 --
Monostearine ......,.........: 10' 7 28
Total', animal ............. 2083 2,599 1o
I


Cottonseed oil ..............: 10,131
Soybean oil ..................: 4,002
Linseed oil .................: --
Peanut oil ...................: 183
Corn il ....................: 43
Cotton-sad stearine ....... ---
Soybl-.-i. :t-arine .........;.,: --
Soya Z..B .................;: --
Tot i--de n6mtic vegetable ..: 35

Coconut oil ...............: 2,421
Palm Li. ..... 7........ ...: 847
Palm-k'rnpl o-' ............. : 285
Total, 2o.reiVg vegetable ..: -3 5513
Total, fats and oils ..... :_ 1995
S


11,312 9,736
17,288 15,o40
3
34 713.
85 1,065
25 5
4
_27KE


31.042 38,144

1,210. 1,191
252 272

753 S09
293 315
22 23

28
2,3558 :2g

15,051 20,650
16,796 17,498


569
201
191
5

--- a~


2,641
266
214
7
7
6
ZVI7_289 9


- -34- -9= -
* --- -


Milk ........................: 4,582 6,629 5.960 7,352 9.0
Salt ................. ...'... 850 1,225 .... 181 31 1
Derivative of glycerin ......: 53 69 67 79
Lecithin .a............. .... : 15 .. 21 29 34
Soda (benzoate of) ...........: 11 23 25 28
Vitamin concentrate ...:......: :3 9. 7 9
Color ................. ..,: -- ,r-- 6 8
Miscellaneous ;..........._o...: --- .... 9
Total, other materials ....; 5,.5I .8' 2 I 99
_ Total, all materials ......I 25.509 2,.28 3b07 H! 2.3
Compiled from Internal Revenue records and Internal Revenue Bulletina
1/ Preliminary. 2/ Total of unrounded numbers. 31 Excludes withdrawn free of
tax for use in Federal institutions, and withdrawn for export.


463.
758
98.

34
11
9
* 9


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