The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00053
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00053

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text









PT A::STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRIC : ,R E '
.- N .. "



1TIN OF FATS AND OILS (CRUDE BASIS)iN SPECIFIED
55 OF PRODUCT PFOR MESTIC CONSUMPTION, 1d 1-43


Laird and othea EDIILM usES
.. : ....e




SButter and
R i margarine

.. ... t.: ..,
|.*.. :';", *; ..7 qF .. Other edible
I product







,,:;*':~~i: I NDUSTRI-AL USES




E :JPa, linoleum
...." : :i tfr'al: ... printing ink
|' ~pr i'!: r ':ro
~i:,;;: : :. ... ...
"::.:.:":. ::'Other d str _________



1 1933 1935 1937 1939 1941 1943
NC.;!-' ...L:WS;E ESTIMATED USE OF FOOrs
: L;Ki.:;.:p .IC t NEG .969 BUREAU or AGRICULTUIML ECONOMICS :


.i.;itiliin of at. a d. oils in. 1943 by the civilian and inilitary popula-
: ....';ti. h: 1,2. Chign .Air tr quantty used In eab h of the vr ious '.-:
"44ar. l fre S1wwi veriit restrict lo-n a cvil-ian rses of fatal and
'd" ::""e, l"ar0 a doerese. In butter produ tion. In 1941, domestic
ai i U,:t uof *fatb ind oIls in domestic soap probably will in- -
.:r:t:i:ii k *: il.l fI oekig and al.ed oils total use of fats and oils...






Table 1.- Wholesalo prioe per pound of ftis ad oil at spoified araet., Ia IadMs
numbers of prices, roeh INS aa 1MI, Jenuary-ra 1914

PRICE


9 Mrean


I


a *

Butter, 92-daore, Chiago .'..................................I
Butter, 92-ore, w York' .............. ....................
Ola01argarli don. veg., ChlAgb o ......... .....................
Comound (animal d ,T. a6oking fatt), Chicago .............
Iard, loose. Chioq ... .................................
Lard. price stem, tierpis. Chicago .........................
Lard, refined. carton Chicago ...............................
Olso oil. No. 1. barrels. New York ............................
OleosteMrine, bbl., N. T. ............................ .....
Tallow, edible. Chiao ............................. ........

Corn oil, orud, tanks, f.o.b. mills .........................a.
Con oil, refined, bbl., N. r. ...............................
Cottonsed oil, orude, tanks, f.o.b. 8.3. mill ................
Cottoneed oil, p.a.y., tsk oars, I. T. ......................
Peanut oil, orude, tank. f.o.b. mill ........................s
Peanut oil, refined, edible (white), drum I. .............
Soybean oil, orude, tank ouar, midetem mills ...............
Soybean oil, edible. drum l.o.1., N. T. .....................

Cooanut oil, Iala, rude, teaks, f.o.b. Pacific Cout / ....
Coconut oil, Nanila, erade, bulk, o.l.f. N. T. Y/ ...........
Coconut oil, anil refined, edible, tank oars,, f.o.b.R.T.. s
Olive oil, imported, edible, drm. H. T. .. ....................
Olive oil, inedible, drums, Y. .............................
Palm oil, Niger, orude, druam, Y. .2/.......................
Repe oil, refined, denatured, bulk, o.l.f., N. I. .............
Sunfloaer oil, taak oars, f.o.b. N. T. ........................

Tallow. o. 1. inedible, Chioag ..............................
Grease, A. Ahits, Chioago ....................................
Menhaden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore ..................s
sardine oil, orude, tanker, Pacifi Coast ......................
What oil, refined, blached winter, drum, N. T. .............

Linaeed oil, rt, tank oars, Ianumapolis ......................
Linseed oil, raw, drum, earlote, N. T. .......................
Perilla il, rude, drums, ..............................
Oititcia oil, tank oars, f.o.b. N.Y. ..........................
Tung oil, drums, ........................................

Castor oil, No. 3, bbl., I. Y. .................................
Castor oil, Jo. 1, tanks, H. Y ................................
Castor oil, dehydrated, tanks, N. T. .........................
Cod-liver oil, med. U.8.P. bbl., I. .........................
Cod oil, Ne oundland, drua, N. ..........................


~I


I


Sn BHUBERS (1924-29 a 100)


Lms

.u-


19.0
17.0
11.4
IU.
15.5
18.6
13.2
10.5
9.8

IU.6

13.6
14.0
18.0
17.0
11.8
18.1

16.1
--



59.3
12.e
/15.5


9.1
9.6
8.9
8.9
11.1

12.4
8/12.9
24.6
25.0
40.2

13.0
18.0
17.2
84.1
11.8


Eight domestic ats and oils (1910-14 100) ..................
Eight domatio fats and oils .................................

All fats and oils (27 ittm) .................................
Groped bg arigim
rl ats .................... ........................ ....
hrine malal oils .........................................
Vegetable oils, dometio ...................................
Vegetable oils, foreign ....................................
Qrped by uI M
tter .........................................................
Butter, seasonlly adjusted .................................
Lad .......................................................a
Other Tood fait ..........................................
All food fat ...............................................
oap fat ...................................................
Drying oils .................................................
NLmeollaneous oils ........................................
All industrial fate ad oils ..............................


127 181 142
90 108 101

a 114 108

d4 105 96
126 127 1i2
128 182 154
160 186 186

7T 1056
T7 102 92
ST 105 105
142 138 141
IS 111 108
U28 119 120
186 180 149
114 117 117
1I0 1L2 131


Prices oampiled from Oi. liPat and Drug Reporter, he Natieal Provislomer, Th Jounl of Cmmero (Ne Tetrk). ad
reports of the Wr Pood Administraton ad Buranl of Ibor Statitioe. Prieso quoted inoluds maois tuaes ad dtloe
where appliable. Inde nmbor for earlier year ber~lanlt 1910 ar gvei in Tebhnical Bll9etn No. 73S (104) atd
The Pate and Oils Situattan.begiaim Desmber 190.
_/ aflets ope market sales only. Currat igres refer co all types of wholeale trading for ah or short-tle
credit. !/ Three-ent proossing tua added to priee as originally quoted. ( Quoted ln dre. Y Revised.
6/ Converted to present basti of quotation.


i


--


i


:


I 1M
a iot
-w<



19.0
17.0
18.8
18.8
16.6
18.8
10.8
9.9

13.6
11.8
18.6

14.0
18.0
16.5
11.6
14.T

11.0
11.4
12.8
60.3
88.8
51.7
/11.6
16.0
14.3

8.4
8.8
8.6
8.9
11.1

14.7
15.8
24.6
25.0
39.0

13.8
18.0
17.7
86.6
12.0


41.5
43.2
19.0





10.6
9.9
U.8

12.8
13.0
14.8

16.8
11.8
25.0

11.0
11.4
18.8
71.5
565.3
11.6
61.0
14.5

8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
12.8

14.3
16.1
84.5
26.0
39.0



18.1
58.6
32.0


FW I



41.5
42.3
10.0
17.0
32.B
15.6
16.5

13.8
lo.6
10.8



19.0
6.e
11.6
18.0
11.0
1U.8
130


11.6
16.0

11.0
11.4
18.6


11.1

14.8

8.4
8.B
s.9
86.1
12.8





15.01
2E.O
89.0

13.8
18.0
17.7
86.6
12.0


41.8
43.2
19.0
17.0
'12.
13.6
15.8
15.6
31.8

9.9

U.8
1U.6
U3.6
14.8
18.0
16.1
11.8
13.0

11.0
11.4
U.6


11.6
U8.0
14.8

8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
12.3

14.8
16.1
-
31.9
59.0

15.8
13.0
17.7
88.8
ls.0
13.0





3os.86 3-


;I S.j 0 D I S S I T U A T I 0 N






e S .ma- l.. pm..t.... .... ...m.. e... :.
;.. itecant. .rslidpments ...m........rs.. 2
Recent Government Actions .......... 6
*.... Outlook *.pm. m.seaq.su.a. saee* 9 9
SUtilization of ats and Oils in :
1943 by Classeof Prodcts ..... 10

Summary

Stocks of fats and oils are at the highest level since the spring of

1941. On the basis of an expected domestic and export disappearance in 1944

of around 12 billion pounds, however, stocks are still below the normal level

indicated by the pre-war ratio between stocks and total annual disappearance.

On February 29, the latest date for which complete data are available, factory

and warehouse stocks of primary fats and oils totaled 2,439 million pounds

(crude basis), 410 million pounds more than a year earlier. During March,

cold-storage stocks of lard increased 66 million pounds to a total of 427

million pound .pat the end of the month. The increase in total fats and oils

stocks from thp low of 1,885 million pounds oh last October 1 reflects a

record high rate of output of fats and oils, Government restrictions on

civilian uses of fats, and difficulties in early 1944- n holding to export

schedules.

Under the influence of strong civilian, military, and lend-lease

demands, wholesale prices of fats and oils remained at ceiling levels in

SMar eh except for oiticica oil, which was below the ceiling. The. index number

of wholesale prices of 27 meaor- fats and oils (including butter) in March

stood for the ninth consecutive month at 108 percent of the 1924-2' average,

compared with 114 percent in March 1943.







Apparent domestic disappearance-of primary fats and oils in 1943,
exclusive of the fat contest of exported'sOa matigaine, and compounds and
vegetable cooking fats, totaled about 10.0 billion pounds compared with
approximately 10*3 billion pounds a.year earlier.. Disappearance in nonfood
products in 1943 declined 60 million pounds from the 1942; level of approxi-
mately 3.6 billion pounds. Disappearance in edible products declined about
250 million pounde-.from approximately 6.7 billion pounds in 1942. With indue-
trial activity at a record high level in 1943, 35 percent of total domestic
disappearance of fats and oils was in nonfood products compared with,31 per-
cent in the period 1'935-39- In 1944, with production of ,soap expected to
increase materially and totdl industrial production expected to remain at
a high level, the use of fatd 'and o'ils'in nonfood products will continue high.

Disappearance of food fats in 1943 for civilian consumption is esti-
mated to have been about 45.8-pounds.per capita---roughly 2-1/2 pounds less
than in 1942 and roughly 2 pounds under the 1935-39 average. This estimate
includes the actual weight of butter and the fat content of other products,
and is computed on the basis of the estimated civilian population, plus an
allowance for military personnel on leave. Supplies of food fats available
for civilians in 1944 may be approximately the same as in 1943.

-- April 22, 1944

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

BACKGROUND.- Production of domestic oilcrops was encouraged
in 1942, and the output of fats and oils in the 1942 crop
year totaled over 10.7 billion pounds, 1.1 billion pounds
(11 percent) more than in the previous crop year, and 3.5
billion pounds (nearly 50 percent) more than the 1935-39
average. Both domestic and export demands for fats also
mounted in 1942 so measures were taken to control prices
and distribution. Production was again encouraged in 1943,
and present indications point to a further gain in the current
crop year of about 550 million pounds (5 percent) over output
in the 1942 crop year. With a reduced pig crop expected in
1944, no further expansion in total domestic fat production
appears likely in the 1944-45 season, and a decline may occur.

Production Continues Large;
Stocks Increase Further

Factory production of fats and oils continued at a high level in
February, totaling 928 million pounds. This was 37 million pounds (4 percent)
less than in January but greater than in any other previous month, except
December 1943. The principal change was a decrease of 39 million pounds in
cottonseed oil output. (Table 6.)

Compared with a year earlier, total output of fats and oils in February
was up 164 million pounds, or 21 percent. Production of inspected lard and
pork fat, at 259 million pounds, was'122 million pounds greater than a year
earlier. Reported production of inedible tallow and greases, at 155 million


APRIL 1944


-4-




-r 4 4*


OS-86 -.5 ,, .

S i- nm.iiion..- on o g r Yit a rler- and at' the-highest-
S.-eg in J, ul12. Output of linaeed and soy-
.Is tfl. i R'st^i^ s u'bei *llr 7titan-a year earlier, but
pi p otion of %tono~t *e"i 611'dd''amE9'r was smaller.

.: As aresrult of -te high ljel of Bpoduction of fati ,4 .o ..n ,1n
Seiua, re atrictionsion domestic consu ition, 'and difititiqts in export-
:. duled quantities, -ctory and warehoeue stocks-of primary fats and oils
i greased 165 million pounds (crude basi during the monti i. ',he totaL on
v Pruary 29.was 2,439,11llon pounds, thg~reatest since'the spring of 1941.
S Aiuseof II4 million pounds iuicold-storage stocks oa lad ,and rendered pork
SL was the chief Febriary increase. Theie also were suibstanial increases
-SEtook. of inedii He tllowian'iteaseir bybean oil, lizauM 61it and -
cottonseed oi;l. tock. olTi.sh l eatii&trutorage hbiottigs -: bueter
declified. (Table 7 .)

Total stocks of fatal and oils on February 29 werp. 0.: million. pounds
greater -than:a year earlier, largely beca e.. of increases.in lard and rendered
pork fat (239 million pounds), butter (95 million pounds), and soybean oil
(58 million pounds).

During March, cold-storage stocks '6f lard and renderjoedork-fat
increased 66 million pounds .to a total of 427 million pouidsat the end of
the.month. The previous peak was 383 million pounds,. on June 30, 1941.
SIi 'ood Administration cold-storage holdings of lard at the end of March
.' lbrse 303 million pounds, 103 million po%.n, greater than a month, earlier.

-, Stocks. of creamery butter. in cold storage declined 26 million pounds
d lfsg. March to 82 -million pounds at .teb end .of the month. Holdings of the
War Food Administration ,and the Dairy productss Marketing .Association on
March 31 totaled 52 million pounds, 22 million pounds less than a month
earlier.

Government Purchases of Fats
Large in March.. .

..Purchases of:fats and oils by the War Food Administration in the 5 weeks
..ended April.1, including maarGaine and soap in terms of their estimated fat
,content, totaled 15 million pounds oompared with 181 million pounds in
s:'. ,:3.ebruay ..188 million pounds in January, and a. monthly average of 140 million
S'pounds-Ain:1943. Purchases of lard and rendered pork fat in the 5-week period
were 117 million pounds, 44 million poundsaless tiah in February, the peak
month to date for lard purchases. Also included in March purchases were
substantial quantities of margarine and. butter and. smaller quantities of lin-
seed oil, shortening other than lard, s'ep.'-d miscellaneouss fats and oils.
t.'Z h-aiSater bas: purobased fram stocks ac umoaated prior to last October 1 by
2 tftb DaIry frtodfptcs Marketipg Aspociatione. .



4 : *
": .*, ..:. :




vr- a, /*;';
APRIL 1944 -'6.. -

Table 2.- Purchases of fats and oils by the..-.:'
S War Food Administration, 19_42i-441
---- -- .. "-- !" .
Item f .4

g I N.. i..:: 3
Butter ....... .............. 34 120 17 29 55
Lard and rendered pork fat ... 654 S82 161 11
Other animal fate and oils 2/ : 30 61 .
Linseed oil ..............,..z 70 391
Other vegetable oils ;........ 100 71 --
Shortening *...e........ ...... .46 62 / 8
Margarine (fat content) / ...: 7 72 31 ';55g.
Soap (fat content) 4/ ..T...... '2 1:---
Total fgat euivalent ....i I7 b, i1- r-
Compiled f roa reports of the w 'Aar Food -inistratin--
1/ Five weeks ending April 1. '
SIncludes fish-liver and fish oils.
Less than 500,000 pounds.
Sat content estimated at 80 percent for margarine; 55 percent for sop.m:.r

Price of Oiticica Oil Reduced in
Marh; Other Whl-esale Prices
of Fats Unchangead

Prices of oiticica oil at New York declined in early March fr e
25.0 events per pound in tank cars, the ceiling level, to a range of ~t'Oto
21.25 cents per pound. This reduction was a result of lower prices inwBrazil
for new-crop oil* Wholesale prices of other fats and oils remained at ceil-'
ings in March. The index number of wholesale prices of 27 major fats and
oils stood for the ninth consecutive month at 108 percent of the 19i429
average compared with 114 percent in March 1943.

RECENT OOVERNME T ACTIONS

Soybean Meal From 1944 Crop Reserved
for Soa Producers
The War Food Administration announced on April 5 that a portion of
the soybean meal produced from soybeans harvested in 1944 would be set aside
for sale to soybean producers. Each soybean grower will be giten an oppor-
tunity to obtain the equivalent in meal of the q antity of 1944I erp soybeans
he produces and sells, or a quantity sufficient to fill the feeding require-
ments for his livestock, whichever is smaller.

Butter Reservation Order Amended

The regulations concerning butter to be reserved for Govers ent pur-
chase under Food Distribution Order 2 were modified by Amendment 2,efSfective
April 1. The principal changes made by the amendment were to raise the
minimum grade from 89-score to 90-score (except in certain limited cases)
and to shift the base period under the order from calendar year 1942 to the
12 months ended March 31, 1944. Producers of more than 12,000 pounds of
butter in any month during the base period are required to set aside a






- *.7 -


designated percentage of their monthly output for: purlihae..by ievernment
S noencies. The percentage for each month Tl a irin Quncei j t~ ar.tood.
d ministration. No butter was required to be reserved from'October 1943 to
Maf.~4 .. )pt:, in .4rP lO.10 ppraoq tyo the, qia.tciS pr ced.. was required to

jws* ntBQ -'asi ,, .- : -t.i' m + "' "-, ..... .. .. .. .

,a sr ^ rP : ;ti:' ,, .. .- -,, .., ....- : .,. -
Amendment 6 to War Food Order 29, effectitqq:ar 22, ,orabids these
of cottonseed, peanut, soybean, or corn oil, or a faif.ty 'dj k 'tCne of these
oils, in the manufacture of products for thinning or redii i paintn, varnish,
'. dji. .r tther protactitve jco*ig.1 'A..pet Mse.of these. oils and fatty
.ij. .the. Arynag .atadustres fpr ,ciTi .a an. profits was already prohibited.
by therod.rdre exc t that., soybean oil. my. be used for reein,, and as .a plaeti-
5 I d .qu rs. -.. 1.. ... .:.. .... .. .
3 *. ; ;-,- .- ." + .
S AA 6Oa, tEsa... on. Use of .lycrin. ..
.. ..Mf^ o imial.OiLs-f Wool Sree- .
-. ; iptaee d.Q ., .:
R restrictions on civilian uses of glycerin were suspended for the April-
S June quarter by a partial suspension of War Food. Order 34,, issued March. 22.
This action was made possible by a favorab e A.ppilyposi:tion, which has
developed principally because of the high level of fat production in recent
month .. ...... ...

;. ; th aSxplies incr eased, the use,.of, ard. oil, tallow,.oil, pig's-foot
S' oi, pressed eat s-foot oil,, .p, dieti le& re i oil is., allowed. in the April-
June g ter,. without specific authorizati n under Ai endient 3 to 'War Food
iOf.er5'.4~.assued March- 27 Al1oc'cat.on of .ard.oil, tallow oil, .and pig's-
"foot pd L~ i been. suspended, since. epteper 1943,, and saponified undistilledd)
ad b. ws kiemoved. ro allocation. on.February. ., 194.. Authorization to use,
...prq p.r' refine raw neatr!s-foot st*ck.. however, is still required by FD0-53.
m Aendment 3 forbids'a user o...pressed neat.s-foot oil to. accept delivery
of a quantity which would increase his inventory of this oil to more than
5,000 pounds or to more than he used in 2 consecutive months during, the period
July-December 1943, whichever is greater. The amendment also requires saponi-
fied red oil to be reserved for certain purchasers, through provisions similar
to those for Qis.t4l;ed red oil undte.A leidmenmt. 2 .as, described in The Fats and
Oils. Situation for. January., -... .. .. .

Ao..A.ril actions of inustrial faP and oils included two iacreasea.,
.' ,p. allocatib'ns in earlier months. Al.,u ers. f rapeseed oil *ere allowed
I' .Qrgcent o.f their 'requirema Ont. FQrmarly.-use of ,this oii had beeq author-
S fl onl,.. .for TUlbe faQ#io, n.bber; inflating compound ds and marine .engine
S. i:. do pip .man.iitrers .were gr .ed. a lii. ted ,quantity of.woo rease,
X "' r .ner.~ o ntha had. been daled. to them.. Other users of *ool grease
S" were. percent. of .their. re~ rements cp.opred. with the restricted
N borize. reviouqJ.jnt.s.
Iw*~I"l~~~i'. '


F0S-s6






APRIL 1944 8 ': .

Remaining Gonerntent Stocks of Pish 7 r h
Oil Released in -ril -

Remaining Government reserves of fsis b1, aboiut20 million 1 P .
were released to manufacturers on April 24 for essential war usge. !e s lFdion
pounds had been released on March 10, and it had been originally planned to
release an additional 5 million pounii a'mAmtL..ft& eutra'b1e8.afl.ie.
sold in April, however, to free storage &paic for otqh.X eabeiti4 .i erimalu.

. Marine Defined for Purposes
of War Food Ord2er "

Amendment 5 to War Food Order 42,. effective April 11, definth4~ n~
to include not only products, defined se oleomprarfine by the Internh L t b'ab
Code but also any solid product comprised of fats and oils,- package f t'
cartons containing not more than 2 pounds nat weight, and sold with t6i7%1 g
and a butter flavoring agent principally for use as a home table spread,
Prior to the amendment, this latter type bf product had beeat o.lasiL
shortening and hence had been subject to a fats -and oils marufatai tt,
of 88 percent of the average for 1940 and 1941, compared with th&:. \if 167
percent allowed for margarine.


Adjustments Anthorised in Manufacturers
Ceilin
g :Prices for Margarine


.., Z ...


-- *....
Adjustments in manufacturers' maximum prices for margarine werV::
authorized by Amendment 23 to Supplementary Regulation 15 to the General
Maximum Price Regulation, effective.April 8. -An adjustment may be mae () if
the maximum price is below the general price level prevailing for iil" e
products; (2) if the manufacturer cannot maintain his production at i~ ''
maximum price; and (3) if the loss of this output would make it necef a ry fw&r
consumers to pay higher prices to obtain the nearest substitute Oj;'idtd6-.
No adjustment may be made that would raise'the ceiling price to a Ievelv ''''
higher than the general level of prices for similar products. Subjict'o" this
limitation, maximum prices may be increased to a level deemed sufficient to
enable processors to continue production.


Minor Changes Made in Maximum
Price Regulation


Amendment 19 to Maximum Price Regulation 53, effective April 21r' "
reduced the ceiling price for liquid oitici6a oil, commercial grade, tUnk
cars, New York, from 25.0 cents per pound to 24.5 cents per pound, Current
market quotations were about 21 dents per pound. In anticipation of'posei-
ble imports, maximum prices were established for coyol, chia seed, andtdg ia
nutens oils, which are new in United Stites trade, Coyol oil is a he .
lauric acid oil. Chia seed oil is similar in its properties to peril f
and garcia nutens oil is similar to tuij' oil. The amendment also 'et sp-e: Tic
ceilings for imported vegetable oils at Pacifit and Gulf ports, Alnd '*ial"1
specific maximum differentials for sales of tung oil in less than carlz 'lb
quantities. Most sales of tung oil are now in small lots, as this seod :
oil is allocated mostly in small quantities, for the most essential war uses.




.i: ros-g 9 ...

StnA 01 c: .:In V
h30 kis. 3R 1 :r*c;-Q as ps I : 2 -; PAR*

7'^f ^ M ^ .a re.r.. t:z,.; c -

: Qc a S P*tP w a9hw4.^6B .-dj..g let-a41 j.r?6Ila ,i .gArl-yere
at the highest level since the beginning of food fat rationing. The..quantity
o butter available for civilians in the April-June quarter this year is
eected tq saO t qn;.pqV -max!o qaaa qnh 1 noun
1 Jnuar *AMrl4Vagp410&a 33.tDII,.pouads 4 3Ear .ije i.iQ.; Butter
17tliticiTrE'~o h~irs-lgt i -afxTretiR ih i i 4'i. "Squeatta,.; tnd in April
this year the a4oen1tage qi crqamery butter output required to be set aside
for Si naa..... ... S.. ,q .i -vlian ure wAs oly 10 percent compared
cmAbS .4nV% n m ly '.
Lar4 tfor civij sppas been plentiful since early March, when the
tifjPjh" whi~t. jijvas:-si te&a ti j4. to qenoaqf e 'cWiaGiptiOn an- prevent
coiwnir or$i7ilabliflfgag.e qa;f. In enrly April;-the ratipn-point
valUes of compounds end vegetable cooking fats and cooking an~ salad oils
als,~.pre redqqd to szez~9 Howevern quarterly use of:-pimary .fats ond oils
goitg jnto the rAnnufactiy a of the pq.:roducts remains e9,stricted9 byVr P.od
OrdO,~sfi 2 to 8 percent of .average..u r in the oorrespondIng quarters, 0 1940
and 1941.
:" ?' ", ". L
.' Civilit'supplie of butter in the second hplf io 194+ probably will
be a-*}east a grPeat ast;Fear earlier. The rate of Zard production in
Aprll-,eptembA ,is expegtqd to be,-.easonally les th in the f8ret y, qrter,
and suppliess for civilians probably will not remain as plentiful as in March
andA~Vil. BegnAning ipQctober,:.,pr.oductioq f lard is expected to. decline
belogY he levr1of a yerTearlier, as a resyltt of a reduced 19,4 spring pig
O & ^ -:; .'. ..+ ? : .'; : "_ ,j :. -..- .. *:.. '.. *. : "...:.. ._ ":. .:.... ".-.. :' -: ...... ... '.:
,.n. -.. a te1rBll At .pA t.:, .gate. ..d ir. s roQ..ee se..material.in the.1944-45
slanan.,besi+;a. q a .Z9149, probably .rlj. be subBpapntlly, under the peak
of about 11.3 billion pounds anticipated in 1943-44. This will be reflected
in :at Aew e npl.y, s euat fopr ,ivTlian.fo d,.faty i-.;194&han. in 1944t in
particular, the present relative abundance is not, lijwely o .r 1our is. the spring
of 1945. Potential demand from continental Zurope for fats and oils remains
an importMa., fal t Ovatt-the woft eua and -oits .%,oqL9r ..: ~:,p9an..import needs
may intensify the prospective tightness in total supplies available to the
..:.* .J ti d., atetina9.4 ll .' .. ,. .., .*
". "* :..\' ,S'f n u '., : ... : .. ;: "' .- .. .- ,..,.. .-s,
^tA' ^-^e .l'&.aiiaye a? ..: .r..-. ,. .. .. ,: -.
-.1-- .. ..
Complete data nov availablee for 1943 ridicate' tiht civilian disappear-
Sfa.e. i..eof ..fat#sA-, ta-;. ,anr 4,nld.ting the, act.nl vweigt of butter and the
fi t coaent~s a, oater:.product.e, t.talf ...aboui.,eS.po..dp pe capi.ta, roughly
2-1/2 pounds less then in 1942 and 2 pounds less than the 1935-39 average.
'Ve' jiniaei1'tsgu .i 19143 oW S- 'a redftetiba *of more thin 3,5 poundss per -
aia t'i in %Wtei"'n M' iacrewbe :rfitQO pbdnd per bapita in lard. These
*rbi 6jes'. ftliedtA Ihm vev in produlrton, There WAs a iet: decrease aof roughly
;. *. -




Si


S- 10-


APRIL 1944


1,0 pound per capital in civilian disappearance of cooking and salad oils and
shortenings other than lard, with cooking and salad oils decreasing nearly 2.0
pounds and shortening increasing 1.0 pouns t ppere~_ae ifat. gtl~ + in
margarine manufactured for civilian oonmdnpttas. iaesawa.t S M1U4A4!5.
pounds per capital, the highest level on record. In terms of an ctl
civilian disappearance of margarine in 1943 was 3.9 pounds per capital. In 194L
the total-.supply of fo6A fat fat civilias-e'41y e'aprdlxmately thei same as
AIn 1943- ,: *. ::- *.:: '. ... *: : t. ; :
; ,' -." : ". .. .'t '.* '- "' *.. .:' i
Table 3,- Estma.it per-capita difappearane of feo4 flitd fo9 :
civilian onumpthon, 193-4, and forecast for :9~, :. __
1 : I "" "p o .-. u- fdb ndls ''. -i' ,,5. Ui'CO .?!
Sri and" r- Other i
S. Mrga7rine, .ag etBibl. l Irp 6. ct;.. .Wt a. -
Year Butter :(fat con-e Lard o u fatda:faWt1
:tent) : ookitj tatod: feot6 o e
Stet :fats (fat: tant) li/
__ ___ : ontent)*'. ''
-- unds P.ds- --- d- --PW9de Po-nd- -9 -.gE a -
Av. 1935-39 6.7:. 3 9 16'' r' ... =-3- 9-

1940 .........: 16.9 1.9 14k- 9.0' : 9-. .e;
1941 ....... 15.9 2.2 14. 1o0.4 .3 .O '
19422/ A..... 15.6 2.2 1365 8 9 *.
1943:2/
Jan.-Mar. ..: 2.90 1.0 40 2.6 1.5 12.0
Apr.-June ..: 3.1 .5 3.0 -2. 1 107
July-Sept.. : 3.0 .7 0 2. .5 6
Oct.-Dec. ..: .9 5 1.6 23

Year ...;'a 12.0 3.2 9.9 6&3
19W4 3/......: 12.6 .)14 5.2 9;8 o
Totals computed from unrounded numbers. Disappearance represents as nearly
as possible net movement of finished products ready for consumption from
factories and commercial Warehouses inclidingr'creaelies and'padkiQ houses,
plus estimated consumption of farm butter and noniiteo6ted lad i incluatag
farm lard. % -- '
I 'Ihcludes mainly, cooking and. salad ol,, mayihnnais e and lao. a Bsing.:
2/ Preliminary. / recast. '
UT -I zAI ON -1 PFAS 3ND OILS BT CLASSES OF PRODUCTS':, :1943 :

Total domestic disappearance of primary fats anaddils in 19143~etlusive
of the fat content of exports of margarine, soap, and compounds and vegetable
cooking fats, is estimated to have been 10,010 million DOuiM :.'appron44.y
300 million pounds less than in 1942 but about 900 milliocpuj As aiv: .han
the annual average in 1935-39 1/ (Table 4.)

Disappearance in food uses 2- 1943 ras' 6,47} million pounds. 253 -illio:
pounds less than a year barliert Domestic disappearance bf- 'btttr t e'lieit
I% The estimate of total- domestic disappearance-of primary fats and o~la4.,
1943, including the fat content of exported manufactured product,..has ban
revised. The original estimate, reported in table 4 of the.February l4. issuc
of The Fats and Oil. Situation, was 10,378 million pounds. The revised
estimate is 10,209 million pounds.


1




Fos-86


about 380 million pounds. Utilization of primary fats and oils in the prepa-
Srtion of cooking and salad oils, salad dressing, and mayonnaise and in
miscellaneous minor food'uses was approximately 230 million pounds less in
,91943 than 1942. But disappearance of lard, exclusive of quantities used in
manufactured products, increased about 160 million pounds, and the use of fats
for margarine and for shortenings other than lard increased approximately 120
', ad 80 million pounds, tespectively.

S. onfdod eeis of primary fats and oils in 1943 totaled 3,510 million
pounds, 60 million pounds less than in 1942. There were declines of 145
,million pounds in utilization for soap and approximately 135 million pounds in
utilization for paint, linoleum, printing inks, and other products of the dry-
ing industries. Use in other industrial products increased.about 220-million
pounds.

Utilization of fats and oils was materially affected in 1943 by
Government orders' designed to distribute the available supply in accordance
.with war needs. Total use of fats in the civilian manufacture of edible prod-
.ucti, soap, and products of the drying industries was limited throughout the
year by War Food Order 42. The utilization of fats in other industrial prod-
S'ucts was regulated to a large extent by orders for individual fats and oils,
which prohibited use for specified purposes or required manufacturers to obtain
specific authorization to use stated quantities each month or each quarter,
Commercial supplies of butter, lard, linseed oil, and fish oils were limited
.during 1943 by orders requiring producers to set aside a.certain percentage of
output for purchase by Government agencies. Civilian consumption of food fats
was affected by point rationing of such fats, begun in.lPte March 1943.

In 1944, utilization of fats in soap is expected to increase 'under
:present quotas for soapmckers authorizing a higher rate of use of fatal sns oils
than in the first three quarters of 1943. Utilization in miscellaneous in-
dustrfal productseprobably will remain at a high level because of the continued
high rate of industrial activity. The quantity of food fats available'for
civilian consumption may be about the same as in 1943. '

.Most of the changes' in utilization of individual fats and oils in 1943
continued wartime shifts that had already begun in 1942. The most notable
developments were as follows (table 5): (1) Major increases in the utilization
of inedible tallow and greases, coconut oil, fish and fish-liver oils, soybean
oil,.and.lard in miscellaneous industrial products. '(2) A reduction of 6 per-
cent in the total use of soybean, corn, cottonseed, and peanut oils (Bexluding
foots) in nonfood products. This was a result of Government orders and
odcurred despite an increase of 12 percent in total domestic disappearance of
these oils (excluding fpots) for all purposes. (3) An increase in the ratio of
linseed oil to total fats and oils used by the drying industries, reflecting
a scarcity of quick drying oils. Linseed oil accounted in 1943 for 90 percent
of the total compared with 85 percent in 1942. New supplies of tung and
.oiticica oils were .vey'small in 1943. Also, production of dehydrated castor
oil was substantially less than in 1942 because of reduced imports of cestor
beans in the first half of- the year (4) Almost complete diversion of coconut
and babassu oils from food uses. With minor exceptions, use of these oils' for
food products has been prohibited since March 1942. (5) A substantial reduc-
tion .in imports and utilization of palm oil. Use in tin and true plate was
reduced about 10 percent; use in soap was reduced 42 percent, and in food
products, 97 percent.


- 11 -




APRIL 1944 12 -'

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Table 6,- Factory production of fnts and oils, February 1942 and 1943,
December to February 1943-44, and indicated crop-year production
from domestic materials. 19 4-43
.Item :_ 9 1 ______4 _
:Mil. 1 l, 1 il. lbDe Mil. J Mil Ib
:Mil. Ib M il b. Nil. lb. Mil. 1b. il. b


Animal fats and oils
Creamery butter ...............: 117.0
Inspected lard and rendered :


pork fat ..................
Greases excluding wool greas
Neat's-foot oil ............
Oleo oil ... ...........
Stearine, animal, edible ..
Tallow, edible .............
Tallou, inedible ...........
Wool grease ..............
Fish-liver oil .............
Fish oil ....................
Total, animal ..........
Vegetable oils, crude basis
Castor oil ...............
Coconut oil ................
Corn oil ...................
Cottonseed oil .............
Linseed oil ................
Olive oil, edible ..........
Peanut oil .............
Soybean oil ................
Tung oil ........ .... ..
Other vegetable oils .......
Total, vegetable .........
Grand total ........


. .. *
e .;
'


...:
..,:
...:
.*i iI
*
.. i



* I
*.i:i

...,_I
:


128.
N.A
ir
It
nI




I'


122.0


5 137.3
S 44.o
.3
8.9
4.3
10.7
70.3
1.1
.4
_3.9
S40.2


97.6

260.1
55.3
.2
5.6
2.9
9.1
81.2
1.3
1.0
13.3
521.6


104.1 .105.7

265.9 259.1
59.7 .62.3
.2 .2
5.8 7.3
3.1 3.8
11.0 11.8
90.4 .92.3
1.1 1.2
.5 .7
11. 8 1.
553.6 945.7


N. A. 7.5 13.3 12.0 13.1
..: 8.9 8.4 12.4. 14.4
..: 19.8 19.2 20.2 18.8
..: 128.9 123.5 176.7 145.2 106.5
...: N.A. 69.3 98.0 90.9 88.2
3.5 .6 2.5 2.1
4.6 17.2 17.4 12.8 11.6
..: N.A. 107.7 98.4 112.0 123.9
..: 1.1 --- .2 .4
____ __ io ___4 __4___2.9___ ._
if: 1.95 14 2.j 2.8
...: 360.0 433.4 411.1_ 381.8
...: a 76.2 __61i. __ 96. __2215
: Indicated production frgkmtdestic mAriails
Year 1940-41 1941-42: 1942-43: 1943-
beginning: _____ .


: IIil. lb. Hil, lb. Mil. lb. Mil_11..
Butter, including farm ..........: Oct. : 2,287 2/2,153 2/2,082 1,960
Lard and rendered pork fat, total: Oct. :2,285 2,440 2,860 2/3,400
Inedible tallow and greases, total: Oct. : 1,.492 1L,7.33 1,626 -1,750
Edible tallow, oleostearine, : :
oleo stock, and oleo oil .......: Oct. : 218' 277 .271 275
Neat's-foot oil .................: Oct. :'4 5 '3 4
Wool grease ....................: Oct. : 14 15 15 15
Marine animal oils ..............: July : 175 215 :163 165
Corn oil ........................: Oct. : 16 242 '240 2/ 225
Cottonseed oil ..................: Aug. : 1,425 1,250 1,'040 1,240
Linseed oil 3/ .................: July : 494 546 729 900
Olive oil ................ .... : Nov. : 11 8 10 10
Peanut oil ....................: Sept. : 174 2/ 77 2/ 130 150
Soybean oil ....................: Oct. : 564 707 1,198 1,200
Tung oil ................: Dec. : 4 2 5 _
Total ................... : c9 6 2... : 333 7 0,732 11.2g9
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census and the Department of Agri-
culture. Monthly reports do not show total production of butter, lard, inedible
tallow, and greases, 1/ Based on most recent indications, subject to change.
2_ Revised. 3/ Domestic production.


APRIL 1944


- IS -





POS 86


- 19 -


Table 7.- Factory and warehouse stocks of specified fats and oils, crude basis,
February 28, 1942-44, December 31, 1943 and January 31, 1944

Item :Feb, 2,:Feob. 28,:_. 19i3L~- '
Mi: l. lb42 Ml. ,143 L Dec. 31: Jan. 3lb, FebM.
Miu1b.. MilJ. 1b. Eul, lb. Mil. Ib, Mil. Ib.


Animal fats and oils
Butter ....................... :
Lard and rendered prok fat ......:
Greases, excluding wool grease ..i
Neat s-foot oil .................
Oleo oil ...................... .
Stearine, animal, edible ........:
Tallow, edible ..................
Tallow, inedible ................:
Wool grease ......... .......... :
Cod and cod-liver oil ...........:
Other fish-liver oil ............ :
Fish oil ........................:


63.7 12.3
206.6 122.2
N.A. 92.7
2.1
5,1
5.1
3.4
6.2
n 166.1
4.0
1 4,0
14.o0
2.9
133.5


154.6 130.2 107.6
161.s 248.0 361.5
80.0 94.6 105.9
3.4 3.7 3.7
3.1 3.3 3.9
3.1 3.0 3.4
10,4 12,1 16.3
139.6 1/ 152.2 16m.6
4.0 4.2 .1
12.4 13.1 13.1
3.3 1.6 1.5
135.3 131.6 117.5


Marine mammal oil .......... ......: 4.2 67.7 63.5 63.2
Total, animal ...................: ". 61L8. ...17 86.l.__.7L.3
.Vegetable ois, crude basis 2/
Babassu oil .....................: N.A 10.9 4.2 8.0 7.1
Castor oil 3/ ......................: 23.9 624 67,2 66.1
Coconut oil .....................: 151.5 129.1 119.9 117.8
Corn oil ........................: 31.9 26.0 24.7 24.6
Cottonseed oil ..................: 544.0 487.7 433.2 486.9 504.6
Linseed oil .....................: N.A, 278.6 276.8 287.3 305.2
Oiticica oil ....................: 7.5 6.5. 6.1 6.0
Olive 6il, edible ...............: 7.4 2.3 2.7 3.6
-.Oiive oil, inedible and foots ..; 10.4 53 4.9 4.6
Paim-kernel oil ..................: 1.6 4
Palm oil ........................: 6.Q 61.9 -62,2 61.3
Peanut oil .............. ...: ". 40.6 54.5 53.1 51.3
Perilla oil .....................: 1.9 .6 .6 .5
Rape oil ....................... : 20.3 21.4 19,2 17.3
Sesame oil .............. ...,.: : .6 .1.0 .4 1.3
Soybean oil .................... : "; 183,2 186.6 211.9 241.0
Tung oil 313 ..................... 1.3' 27.1 26.6 26.3
Other vegetable oils ..............: 34. __ __..6, 0.5__ 2_.1
Total, vegetable .............:.. ..410. ..102..0 1.11.2 1 46L..
Grand total ................: 2,028; 8. 2,103.8 1/2,274.4 2,439,3

Compiled from reports of the Bureau. of the Ocnsus; except butter and lard, War
dod Administration. Totals computed from unroundod numbers. Includes stocks
held by Government.
1/ Revised,
I/ Crude plus refined converted to .crudq basis by dividing by the following
factors: Babassu, corn, cottonseed, palm-kernel, and-palm oils 0.93; coconut,
peanut, and. soybean oils 0.94.
I/ Includes stocks of dehydrated castor oil converted to crude basis by dividing
by 0.88.
1/ Not separately reported,







After five days return to
UNITED STAi.ES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREi.U OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASHINGTON 25, D. C.


OFFICIAL BUSI SS


Penalty for
payment


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1111111 M111111111111111
3 1262 08905 1634
private use to avoid
of postage $600


UflVEPS'-y 0' FLA LB RARY.
REFERENCE DEPOT
-. F:S-X C-I:;SSVILL FLA


APRIL 1944


Table 8.- Prices
March 1942


Item


Castor beans, Brazilian,
f.o.b. Brazilian ports ....
Cottonseed, United States


20-

of specified oil-bearing materials.


and 1943, January-Man

I Iar
Unit :
Dollars D
: :Dollars Dol
** .


; Long ton:1195.25
*. ? -


'farm price ................. :Short ton:
Flaxseed, No. 1, Minneapolis .: Bushel :
Flaxseed, United Status : :
farm price .................:.
Peanuts, No. 1 shelled
Spanish, Southeastern
shipping points ............. :100 pounds
Peanuts (for nuts and oil), :
United States farm price ...: "
Soybeans, United State.e
farm price .................: Bushel :


44.18
2.59

2.-36


13.75 3

6.03

1.79


A





~1



ch 1944


L9 i 4: Jan. A L Wo
llars Dollars Dolas M


r5.00 75.00o. -T5.oQ 5.0

L5.73 52.80 52.60 5270.
3.17 3.06 '3.05 3.o05

2,83 2.85 2.85 2.S5


L4.25 14.25 .14,25 ; .

6.83 7.19 7.34 ,:: *S

1.65 1. 2 1.85 i


Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, Daily Trade Bulletin (Chicege.
Chicago Journal of Commerce, Daily Market Rooord (Minneapolis), and repolii4
the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. ,
1/ C. and f., New York.


.


7