The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00051
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00051

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text






THE TUATION

SITUATION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

__ SEP


TENBER 1943


OILS: PRODUCTION FROM DOMESTIC MATERIALS. APPARENT
DOMESTIC DISAPPEARANCE. AND INDEX NUMBERS
OF WHOLESALE PRICES. 1912-43


1920 1925 1930
I9g4 PRODUCTION DISAPPEARANCE AND


1935 1940 1945
PRICE FORECAST
NEG 43f72 AUijEU OP AGRiCutiuqtl ECONOhi-:


Domestic production of fats has increased sharply since 1939 and is expected to increase
further in 1944. Domestic disappearance, which includes military as well as civilian use, has
been reduced since 1941 by limitation orders and rationing of food fats. In 1943 the United
States will be a net exporter of fats and oils for the first time since 1924, reflecting loss of
imports from the Far East and large lend-lease shipments to our Allies. Prices of fats and oils
are restrained by ceiling orders, but are now about 80 percent above the low level of 1939 and
slightly above the 1924-29 average.


IBILLIONSI I


U 5 DEPARTMENT OF AGWILuLIURE


L _































































1INELX IMUMMM ( 18i4M 2 = UUJ)
117 139 14


Right domestic fate and oils (1910-14 100) ....................
,Liht domeatic fate and oils ...................................I

:All fats and oils (27 items) .................................
.i:ruuped by origin,
SA alnmi l fats ..................................................
Marine animal oile ............................................
Vegetable oils, domestic ......................................
Vegetable oils. foreign .......................................I
roedy uses
'i ser .........................................................
BOtter, seasonally adjusted ...................................
lard ........ ................................ ..............
Other food fae ...............................................
All food fate ..............................................
Soap fats .....................................................
Drying oils ...................................................
Uisoellaneous oils ............................................
All industrial fate and oils ...............................


117 1,9 144. "
83 98B lC ... !

91 105 100l D.

50 96 0 s
114 129 132 .
110 128 18 1U
141 147 1S7 .


go
1B3
186
101
119
135
117
* 125


sa
108

" i! 189
104
180
150
111
112


aTn.


Prious compiled from 1il. Paint and Drug Reporter. The National Praisioner, The Journal ac C mor e .e.iw .
reports of the Food Distritution Aditnistration eon Bureau of Labor Stntletices. Prieee lusted tI li. i
and duties where applicable. Inde numbers for earlier years beginning 1911 are given in Tee shagaai Bitt
(1940) and The Fats and 011i Situation begimning Desember 1940.
SReflests open market sales only. Current figures refdr to all types of wholesale trading for aneh orj
credit. 2 ThJe-oaent pruoesteng tea added to price as originally quoted. / eanks, I T. V QUOlWI::i
Revispd. / Converted to present bLasi of quotation.



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sEPTEmB 1943 1 6 "

coMparatively large, the cotton goal Vse eo41
million acres in cultivation July l.. oortonaoreage al1Ugg
alisedI in 19'3, and~marketing quotas were eli,04ated, lt,)@4
demand for war crops in the Southw incl~uding penkats and, soiba
million acres of cotton were reported in cultivatl~on July I-j 46
23.3 million acres a year earlier. This will mean leas cottons
.1943-44. Nevertheless the' outlook is for an inereasa-ot-tar10
total vegetable-oil production. With increased beg and cattle
prospect. a gain in animal-fat production also will Dbtur,
Peanut Pro ram

'The psain* program in 19 UK ftfi q ftb avkierenit from
year. Then a two-price system prevailed.' ieianut s P,"W n
by the Agricultural Adjustment Agend.* 3%'kfWU as #9t oaP _Pdyg
to the edible peantut trade under very favorable price condtzm
grown on-other acreage, known as Ilexcesst, peanuts, Leould be sof
agencies designated by the Government. Direct sales of vd
were subject to a penalty of 3 cents per pouncl. Since prices, 0o
and peanut meal were covered by ceilings which wer considerable ,
coiling prices for- edible peanuts, grower,- of "excess" peanuts
less favorable returns than nquotaOI growers. This situation wa'
remedied by sales of excess peanuts by the designated aaenciez
trade at a profit, which was distributed to. growers in the form

Marketing quotas andl-acreag-e allotments :for 1943-'r-rp p
revoked in June 1 73 by the War Food Administration. -CommoditY
Corporation was constituted the sole purchaser of 1943-cropf
peanuts other than those used for planting or Tprocessed by grw
farm. The purchase program is being operated through contradtit
including producer cooperative associations, crusherz, and ghd61
are guaranteed prices averaging $140 per ton forLSpaniah and VIr
peanuts and $130 per ton -for the Rwaner type, wdth differantials

Farmers': 'stock peanuts purchased by the Corporation -are'b,
for crushing as well as- for cleaning and -Ahelling. ?rices 'rebi
Corporation for peanuts vf6or ac.rushing will' a-verage about $90 po*A,
reflecting the value of peanut oil and me,41 a~t ceiling prices*
cleaning and shelling are being sold in 'line with dealing prica
prices for peanut a that..may be paid -by eleaners and. sellers r
$154 to $176 per ton, depending on type and grade. Profits from
cleaners and sellers will be used to cover loses from sales to
and other costs of operating the program such as 'inspection, hanX
storage.

Imports of Oils and Oilseeds Placed.
Under Control

The Combined Food Board announced in Se~ptenber 1942 that W,
had. been reached providing for exclusive purchase of fat~so othaw
for the United Nations by the United Stat~es in certain prescribe&
of the world and by the United Kingdom in other areas. The supplibat













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WnOUMBE 1943 i
the place of butter awge 04e civil~o pp"Ot"*
margarine goea to the W t and'i*4he a
oi 44er short before the vwtr i
p~ro,duotiv~e axeases vuppliea hala V004<
per capital comp~umption of fati 'SOA Ot ,f
wes less than halt as grogptsid% 4,0
Prices at Xats aLd Oils Unah~al

Prfaes of fate, =d otl epa 'IOVOI*I!
index number of wholeigsale priced of E
at108 pereen't oX the 192;4;29 ave"g~mpqhn
1942. Flaxueed prices, declined about 11 0, 8.9 buhej
as harvesting of the, Northwest crop bqclm' d# .
demand f roz crusher for seed conttginung bttroggypki-ASI
ceiling le $l 3.05 per bushel, b* "the 'A" A4 40 moth
export requirements for Taesed qil will 18 o 4,
civilian consumpti on hsee gr ee y4 $4
necessary quamtitieo available for-war ne"Pas' 'NAW24 fo* $11
feeds also to eixpected to contin-ae vezry -stra QuA1i9I"044


Retail.1 Pri ces of Teatut Rut te r &khd food 0 ts
other Th E tr EEEiIZo
The Office of P~rice Afminiztration ashoutced Septaliber "I
program to reduce. retail priopeso~f certain food iould. 'e Mo'h
during' the next-2 months. This action is dpsigupd, to help bxlIng
back to the level of Septeiibar 15s, 1942. The United States ee
price of peanut butter was to be reduced i4der the anzouncod yriq
cents per pound from its present level to. 26.5 ceats. per.an
of I cent per pound were to be made in retail prices of oleo
shortening other than lard' and refined vegetable Ji

Governmexit funds were to be usa4 to, jg e~thes, ,Ar,61-,bb
without aff ecting prices to farmers Full" daahpls''f V4, Apro
been anno unce'd, but funds origInally zatended to ;eclute cfe
to be furniLshed by the Reconstruction Finanbq Corporation to rv
butter and lard pri-es, Commodity Cradjt Oorpqration fundo I,
to reduce margexlneo shortening, and vegetable_ oil prices-., 1
Corporation purchased crude vegetable oVI hk-cdilihg pr~cidsa,
to refiners for ultimate use in food products, at a lose to 'the'
of 1/2 cent per pound.

Minor Chances Made in Fats and 01,lo

Recent amendments to Maximum Ptica SchedAO,53 ol
modif ications irL makim= prices for lard,, linseed oil I nIrA
Maximum ~prices for &enitured edible lard, untIl Xov e0)9 0
















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In Ax4asto odftewummetev
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Rozj rictlnqn Suap-qWa aj ZoUxur 4e

Tho War P"d Adiadhiotr;ktUiz4 141k i
wIll not be required r
o-r corn oil to refiners, laftt 'kb it,
Of Poo4 Dtatribution Qtft;,2
suvonded to facilitate Rxo" -to f
zeasOA4, With crude Oil-ot'
this season, refiners sbbulA' 'fe
ments,, Other provisione of the Grdori irwlldl
refined oils for pnrpasos otborthiin re:fWi&' I

,pal rKrease Place dentioz p6ttga
Direct allocation''Coli*61 OV 'V' 6g aP4" g
'ber 1:unaer rooTMt
derivatt'ves was bag= Sopto At "l, "
fractures OuziO I V'
Cosmetic manu 'IL#V'
-from tho order, provided thpy -obtain 'the'r 0 M
Single, suppliori,, All otbor porsot D40t obtwG
fr= the Director of Ybod Mstributtoil t44, cU311v"Prs
refine, process,o.r'uss thase-products.- ft6',twit
manufactmert and distributtitrs
exempt users,

Wool greaso is in great 4emand by,i.r, ioa-ut'T a*"4,
and leather processing agent,, Imports# vhieh
cent of the supply i-a pre-war-yearol, have been vUft,4,30
Although dome stic production has been greatly iomaasok,
:of the war,, further eippnoion is llLpdted, Vy tbA 444'if4r
equipment.

Vae. of Gasitgr to RjMg#!j-j,'
5mg gA. bak)Air AUtgictecl W,

The War Food Administration rectutly isqV10b, nk-
Increased use, of castor oil but to &Otalluoat
sperm oilp and tung oil, Stocks of bastot OU, 14 th,
a record loV level sprly this year* 'u "tU*. tOV6 "fa#43Z410,
tion% of recent weeX# bave bellied to
Manufaoturers have %aen a*,ed U uublatl'UO ma0tatott
oilo Oleie noid (retf oil) and milfbnated UW4 Otl vhO
their requests for 41004, to;is, It w4a pte;t04L tb4*
allooations of castdr oil :ro.3r us 4 mt1itary pTLOtO]OUVO''








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level, bili, rao6via 14
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6 19







factory grease production as report 04"h urg
from 260 million pounds (1935)'to 54o million pounds ( 1 "a,
290 mi; qn~povnds. An most years the outpixt was witin lko Da
of the line of average relationship with inspected hog 81,4*itar,
oated in the.1over section of figure 19.

In the low price years of 19q2a'ind'1933i grease produetlon
unusually small in relation to hog slaughter, possibly because of
operations by readerers, in 1941 and 1942 tlhe output of grease,
than would have been expected on the basis of hog slaughter, Ote
in these years we"e the highest, ,with'the ezeeption of a single,''
World War I, and d-emand for soap. fate: was usually strong. Wb
but not serious scarcity of. meat in retail stores during much af
packers were able fo leave more than the cu 'stomary amount of 4
cuts, Part of this extra fat apparently was trimmed and reachdM
as shop fat from-wholesale-and retail butcher shops. Tn V43o
much of the excess fat reaching butchers has been uoed In ssauoP.
with the meat, and this may largely explain why the' output of gre:
1943 has fallen below the 1941 and 1942 level in relation to hog
,Lard Production More Reslponsive Than
Grease to Changes in MMg Sjyggte

xIL 1941-42, t4e: output of lard tended 'to izicrease or decre aW p
what more than in proportion to changes in the live weight of hogs's to
under Federal Inspection* In most years. however$ factory produe14 0-,
grease has increased or decreiased 1les than in proportion to echa 4'#
the live weight of hogs slaughtered* This fact, as well as the ft)i i
scatter about the line of average relationship* indicates that oS0 th
than hog slaughter have had a rather important role in determitn;'n
production* Some greasesp particularly bone. house, and garbage,
fat from cattle and sheep or even waste fat of'vegetable origin.
recovery of grease by renderers is not directly connected with ho
Facilities for collecting the waste fate accumulated by, butchers,*4,,
quantity discarded by housewives, the'number of fallen animals* &A44 the
profitability of rendering operations are factors affecting the r*4* 9ay
grease.

lard and Grease Production to
Continue Higah in 19

Total live weight of-hoga slaughtered under Federal ihspectlog,.
1944 probably will be slightly greater than the 16 billion pounds ,"at #
in 1943m The number slaughtered will be up substantially in the 19
marketing year as a result of the record 1943 spring and fall pig- f
But hog slaughter will be reduced in 1944-45 (october-september),,s
a decrease in the 1944 spring pig crop. The average livd weight of
slaughtered in 1944 may be less than in 1943 becauvp of a reduction*
supply of f eed grain per animal unit., Production of .lard and, grps
be greater in 194 W4 than in 1942-43, but probably will ,be reduced,'.

















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LIVE WEIGHT OF INSPECTED HOG SLAUGHTER POUNDS5 BILLIONS)
*REAU OP CENSUS *DAT7A; EXCLUDES WOOL GREASE


NEG. 42 21 '" BUREAU AGRICULTURAL ECOwOMICS


..i.$ oth lard and. grease is related to hog slaughter.. L
.t,:2e ,isakh.er.A in A:..the: ast I vears,. reflectiti.takis


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Production of grease, 1921-43

: Number of hogs :
Total live Lard production
slaughtered : we T .a.tery
:--- saughtred : weight of Pactor.-
Total, :
hogs
Total, In hos : including : In pro
Year : including : federally : lautered: production: federally of gresu*
in excluding
:uninspected: inspected in in : inspected I wlex .
inspected awool grease
:slaughter : .plants a uninspected: plants O
: : plants plants a


- : (X2) : (Xl) : (
: Million Million Million Mllion


: Millions Millions pounds pounds


pounds 0pundg


S1921
S1922 :
1923 :
1924 :
S1925
1926
S1927 :
S1928 :
S 1929 :

S 1930
1931 :
1932 :
1935
193 :
1935 :
1936 :
1937
1938 :
1939 :
1940 :
1941
1942

Average
1921-42

1943 l/


61.8
66.2
77.5
76.8
65.5
62.6
66.2
72.9
71.0
67.3
69.2
71.4
73.3
68.8
46.0
58.7
53.7
58.9
66.6

77.6
71.4
77.9

67.3

93.2


59.0
43.1
2.9
43.0
4o.6
43.6
49.8
48.4

44.3
44.8
45.2
47.2
43.9
26.1
36.1
31.6
36.2
1.4

50.4
46.5
53.9

43.7

64.6


8,811-
9,738.
12,024
11,755
9,713
9.555
10,180
11,414
11,226

10,235
10,419
10,397
10,909
9,709
5,905
8,151
7,139
8,439
9,735
11,716
11,214
13,229

10,073
16,200


2,108 '
2,302
2,718
2,660
2,153
2,206
2,263
2,458
2,461

2,227
2,307
2, 80
2,475
2,091
1,276
1,679
1,431
1,728
2,037

2,343
2,281
2,455

2,184

2,874


1.579
1,575
1,971
1,923
1,452
1.513
1,557
1,750
1,763
1.521
1,554
1.573
1.679
1,341
662
992
759
1,034
1,272

1,527
1,526
1,724

1,457

1,997


3?
360
387
376
311






328
343
308
3o9

303
322
343
259
308
303
322
371
443
500
537

364

555


Analysis of the relationship between lard production and total live weight ob
hogs slaughtered in federally inspected plants gives a correlation coefficiesn
of .91 and the following regression equation: X1 = 397 + .184 X2. A eifili
analysis of factory production of grease in relation to total live weight of
hogs slaughtered in federally inspected plants gives a correlation coefficiena
of .79 and the following regression equation: X1 = 67.543 + .0295 X2.
Scatter diagrams of these relationships are shown in figure 2,
Data from the Food Distribution Administration, except factory production '
grease, Bureau of the Census.
.. Forecast.








T-f! 19
4 ,f


1900I 5 -
t 7 Iwo 4, 4L 0

.. ...... .

4' to,
J
104, 1 *1 g.g
0, .4, -68
4 L3 1.5
6 9
9*7
it" q ?"*f 1 Opotl v #.p'o o 7
b
11-7 11,3
T:
7 4-7
20.1
20-3 174'' '11,
2
.6,
26-3" fti-0 4t -30-4. 'i9-0
V 7 -8 50-7. 71.3
4. 1 6 6-3
.6 9 1j,
X.A. '59. 1.?2Lt 7 li4a 96 3"t
03 "'A
f6 7 t
S. t
219*
R1 9
-786.-4
0"wto tp -I s 4k 11 v I -12-8-5 1 ,
t", Lndicate4Arp- produloti
ig4y-;42 1942
.194c -4r 3' 2'
e inninf,
.114 11to Mill, I
6#' 0 ;,Tuly A1,281 ?-,.170
2pZ75 2,44o,
ftt u 00to Rj 700
OCtq 1 49,. j-,732
I o"-, It",
iu* bT Oct, IV 277
290'
'17_.5
t, to 4t 1215 1" "1
oetf 195 242
4t
425' i 4oot I
I a5O
July 707 989 949
tj t
tj 4 111111 4 0 Oct. '10,
Oct*_, 174 76 10
Ott '564 -701 V1,200''
4 4/, 2,
reo'I6 f" aw rf, %--ilinxe -and, Ae p at iTY04tur6,
40,v p i produdt t 63i 'of butter, larla,' iziedAle tallo%4, 'said

136,oQd on m st reepat indiatio svjept
"fr,

;A,





9SUMMER 1943 E* ,7

Table 5.- actrry and Wareb6it6 gtodi -of, qpooltrid4 fd' 410g
JulY 1i1 1941 3, MAw 51 az& Jute '3o,*3

I tama July 311 ;JE$ ua 1


Animal fate an& ails:
Butter ......... ...:179.5 149, 5E 820
Lard and render~ed pork at...:340-3 99-3 166.1,
Greases, excluding Wool g!re~sae *..W 1"11 100.,5 19.1
Reatls-foot oil .......... : -V 2.7 2.0
Oleo oil ...... ... .... It 7#4 6,7
Stearine, animal, edible ........2 4,5
Tallow, edible .......,. 11-3 16 ,7
Tallow, inedible.........6 26248 121 9
Wool grease ...........: "5535
Cod and cod-liver oil -.....: a.12,. I3,
Other fish-liver oil ....... 4-5 1
,Fish oil ... ,...,..,.. 7..6 99-5
Marine mammal oil 4g....... 85. 62.9
Total,.animal ........:6R
Vegetable oils, crude basis I/:
Babassu oil .........., 3 .
Castor oil 23.......,,..58,, ),5
coconut Oil a* a.a. a a 0 44 ..0 4, 1. 9 4 193-21
Corn oill .........v.:.W, .3 .
Cottonseed oil W-....'...: 680.325
Linseed oil ...........: NA 11 ,229.9
Oiticica oil ..............: 14.5- 6-7-
Olive 6il, eIte.......4. 7-1 309
Olive oil, inedible and foots so*: 2 12,6 s. .6 9
Palm--kernel oil .........: a1-7 1-5 1*8
Palm oil ...*********: 95-3 95-1 v
Peanut oil ............ 10 45.6 4
Perilla oil 3...........: l1.
Rape oil ............ 15-3 23.2
Sesame oil _0........... 3 1.6
Soybean oil L........... 5641 2-314,
Tung oil ... ..........:' "354.4 29-7 Ik
Other vegetable oils .a.m. ....... 34, 04o
Total vegetable ...,....:121. 1,3330 1
Grand total ....9..... i O. 9 1,
Compiled from reports of the Burea~u of the Cendu6; except butteran
Distribution Administration, Totals com buted from unro-unded AumherE4,
stocks hold by Government,
IfCrude plus refined converted to crude basis by kivididA by' the toi,
Babassu, corn, cottonseed, palm-kbrual, and paxim oil's 0,69;,acownuto P







1 Tif TIIII "It


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t

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t T
7,1-
If ,
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9
2,.4Q
4

2. 6 ,
IT
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'4134



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r rs Dd S i Rallarb


T4 37
Id,
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I ; It 4 0 43 ?50
V! 33, IiIi, 50 3 ''-'T 5 43 5
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tit
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Table 9.- Oleomargarin'e': .rotdution, *witbdrs*,U to '
and material 'used In manuf aoture, tUbited Mtatto#
-Tuiy an& z1 MzD
Item JU
124 12 ma

production:
Colored ..** ..... 290 5o473 12 171 22 $2
Uncolored _........., 8 '^p 19,604 3
%ote WO-'___7o 5 -2'393 10*
Tax-paid withdrawals for
United'States, onsmto n '/. 2.1 255 2 51' 24,"

Materials uised:
Oleo oil ...........: 135 176909 1
01eostearine .........: 237 196 174
Lard steariue ...........: --- 20
Lard, neutral ........; 6l 10 391
Oleo stock ...,......: 10305 i203
Tallow .. .. .. ....: --371
Monostearine ....... ...........: 12. 67 2
Total, animal 2'...345.... '2 1

Cottonseed oil w......:11,413 10,400 9,917 9:
Soybean oil ......... 4,91a i0,631 13,033 15, 0
Linseed oil . : -- -- --
Peanut oil ................ 221 32 282 711
corn Oil ......,....: 55 179 165 1,00
Cottonseed stearine ..........: -
go7b'ean steariue ......... .... ----
Soya flakes ..........9- -
To~tal domestic vegetable,.. 16,6 2,1 2714

0Coonut oil .. ..... .. 2,474-
Palm oil .............. ;.......: 667 -
Palm stearine ...... o.........: 29 -
Sunf lower -oil ...,...: 1-
Total, foreigA vegetable l; 1
Total, fatd and oild a... 22,11 2 0;

Mik'................: 4,919 -5,255 -5,095 -5460
saltW: .......,0.... 935 911 996 1,8
Derivative of-glycerin ....: 60 53 55 61
Lecithin ........... 51 2
Soda' (benzoate of) ......:1 713 21
Vitamin con-entrate .....: 6
Color .. .. : 3 5
Miscellaneous ..... .. .: 1 1-
Total, other materials 504. 6 0 4
Total, all materials w....: 29 62^10 31
Compiled from Internal1 Revftue records and Internal Itevenie A 2i lats






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