The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00045
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00045

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text







S I T At.f0 N

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS r
ITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICU TtjO E ,

S- BER 19411



ARRESTED FOR BEANS: PRODUCTION, CRUSHINGS,
S.AO PRICE. UNITED STATES, 1924-44
1-l l rrr- m


150
S...-

100


0
-D iOLARS
PER
BUSHREL

2.00


1.50
1 l..


. .:. ..:: ..




~i:..i : : :

I '..
V1. ... .


tII 1924 1927 1930 1933 1936 1939 1942 1945
YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER
PRODUCTION AND CRUSHING FOR 1944 ESrMA TED ON BASIS OF DECEMBER I INDICATIONS
S; ePAtTIRTlT OF ABRICULTIRE NEG. 43291 BUREAU oF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

*'::..j' ".:... : .. .... ."
rII s,,'Cl meybaen crop is expected to total about 179 million bushels compared with 196
rq bw*t : iNdS, The yield per harvested acre will be smaller this year than last,
4lea. f m .nusuhally dry summer in Ohio, Indiana, and Il linois. The base support price
bli:..s :d:A' ea:it.tt sea on is $2.0t per bushel, 24 cents higher than last season.



"


Z'I' .







nUmDers or pri a o, agus L y j mmB Ji unimesuguS


l1k4 .:"


PRI




Butter, 9-score, Chicago ......................................
Butter, 92-score. New York ..................................... :
Oleomargarine. don. ee.. Chicago .............................
CEmpounad animall and veg. cooking fate), Chicago ..............
Slard, loose. Chicago .................... ..............
:l rd, prime setma, tierce, Chicago ..........................,
lard, refined, eartons, Chi nao ..............................I
ilso oil, No. 1, barrels, New York ............................:
l0eostearine. bbl., N. .....................................
.allow edible, Chicago ........................................

ICorn oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mlls .......................
Corn oil, refined, bbl., 1. T. .................................
Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. 8.1. mills.................
:Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., tank cars, N. Y ........................
Peanut oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills .........................
Peanut oil, refined, edible (white), drum, I. T...............
Soybean oil, crude, tank cars, midwestern mills ................ I
Soybean oil, edible, drums, 1.c.1., N. T ......................I

Coconut oil, Manila, errde, bulk, o..f. Pacific Coast f ......
Coconut oil, Manila, crude, bulk, o..f. I; T. ..............
Coconut oil, Manila, refined, edible, tank care,f.o.b. .. /.T / I
Olie oil, California, edible, drums, N. T. ....................
Palm oil, Niger, crude drume, 7. Y ..............
Rape oil, refined, denatured, bulk, e.t.f., N. T...............
Sunflower oil, seat-refined, tank cars, f.o.b. I. T. ...........

Tallow, go. 1. inedible, Chicago ..............................I
Grease, A. White, Chicago .....................................:
Nenhaden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore ...................
Sardine oil, crude, tanks, Pacifle Coast ....................
Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, drum, T. ..............
I
Linseed oil, raw, tank cars, Minneepolis .......................
Linseed oll, raw, drums, carlote, N. ........................:
Olttleca oil, tank care, f.o.b. N. T. ..........................
Tung oil, drums, N. T. ......................................

Castor oil, No. 3 bbl., I. ....... .......... ...........
Castor oil, No. 1, tanks, ................................
SCastor oil, dehydrated, tanks, N. ...........................
Codiliver oil, med. U.S.P. bbl., N. I, .........................:
Ci Cd all aNwfoundland drums. N T.


Cents

1/40.9

19.0
17.0
11.9
12.9
14.5
13.2
10.5
9.9

12.8
15.5
12.8
13.9
12.9
16.6
11.4
14.5

11.0
11.4
12.P
57.6
/11.6
1/16.0
14.3

1.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
11.1

12.5
5/13.?2
25.0
39.0

13.8

17.7
36.4
l-0


Cents

41.s
42.5
19.0
17.0
1P.8
13.8
15.6
13.8
10.5
9.9

12.8
15.5
1P.8
14.0
13.0
16.3
11.1
.0

11.0
11.4
12.4
62.7
4/11.6
16.0


8.4
8.8
8.9
8.9
12.3

14.4
15.3
25.0
39.0

13.5
13.0
1.70
3U.
12-0


Cents

41.5

19.0
17.0
11.9
13.0
15.6
.123j
10.5
9.9

12.8

12.8
14.3
13.0
16.4
11.8
15.1

11.0
11..4
12.8
6o.?
60.7
11.6
16.0
14.3

1.4

1.39
8.9


15.1
19.2
39.0

13.8
13.0
17.7
34.5
11.7


~~~~~~. ..... .. 12 20.
In=5 HUNHES (19P"ld 100)


Iirlght domestic fats and oils (1910-1 *- 100) ................... I
right domestic fate and oils ...................................

All fats and oile (27 item) ..................................
?Grouped by origin;:
Animal fate .................................... .. ........
Marine animal oils ...........................................:
Vegetable oils, domestic .....................................:
STegetable oils, foreign ......................................
mOrouued by use: 9
Butter ........... ........ ............................... .....
Butter, seasonally adjusted ..................................
lard ......................... ...............................
Other food fats .............................................
All food fat .................................................
Soap fate ....................................................
Drying oils ........................................................
Miscellaneous oile ........................................
All industrial fate and oil ......................... .......:


139 142 141
98 101 100

105 108 107

95 96 95
127 132 132
12 132 134
147 157 156

9 93 93

98 105
135 139 1
101 103 102
119 120 120
135 150 1rg
117 117 116
125 132 131


Prices compiled from 011, Paint and Drug Reporter, The National Provisioner. The Journal of Coamerce (Bew Tork), sn
Ir.ports of the War food Administration and Bureau of labor Statistics. Prices quoted include xe oe taxes and duties
i:Where applicable. Index numbers for earlier years beginning 1910 are given in Techical Bulletin No. 737 (1940) and
Ie Fate and Oils Situation beginning December 19i0.
/ Reflects open market sales only. Current figures refer to all types of %bolesale trading for cash or short-tim
credit. j/ Three-cent processing tax added to priee as originally quoted. J/ Quoted in drams. 4/ Revised.
C/ Converted to present basis of quotation.


4W


Aues t


IPP = IFT = *Tagg : .7 p supygy


COrate

41.5
42.2
19.0
17.0
11.5
13.0
15.6
13.8
10.5
9.9

12.8

12.
14.3
13.0
16.5
11.1
15.i

11.0
11.4
12.8
60.7 -
11.6
I.E
16.0
14,3

8.4
8.7
8.9
12.3

14.3
15.1
19.0
39.0

13.8
13.0
17.7
31.6
ILI?


41.5
he.2
- *.2 -
. 17.0 -
12.4
13,4
15.6
13).
10.5
9.9
12.8

22.8
14.3

1101
15.5
110.8

11.4





8.4
8.8
0.7
S,1

8.9
12.3

14.3
15.1 m

390

13.5
13.0
17.7
31.6
11-7


-:-- ---- --


i


i1= m~


^ rui-e


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GontentG


: Rcent Devalopftentr -4... ...
: overnmertt Actions ........ 6
.tI..o k .... ....................1
PO.t.war respectss, forPeanuts .

summary
Prices, of vegetable oils, which are sunported by the Commodity Dredit

Oprpratilor4:guarantees, will remain at or near ceYn evl houhu h

Crop year. Imported vege tablea o ilIs probably will continue in short

tpr'ly. IT the war. in Europe should en& -In 194'1-45,. a tem-porary -period of

IAkbtainty in wholesale markets night develop, with -prices of agricultural

.6Asodities g generally t ending to decline. Prices of lard and certain other
amlfatst Probably would reflect fluctuations in the general -orine lvl
A.4




o eit is likely that any decline in prices of animal fats would prove to

.*jo'd(irate Alyd -temporary, as thwo underlying demand for fats and oils in 1914-45


With continued improvement during August in the condition of the cotton

q,'t he indicated -produiction. of. zottonseed this year is now 4,762,000 tons,
lglymre.tn in193r.cespi'e -a 7,percent reduction in cotton acreage

3 yearr: Oxi theCb a si3.s of_ the September 1 -condition of major oilcrops,
'e'sectz are good, for an output of domestic edible oils in 1944-45 about as

Sas, in9 34.Lard pro~duption, however, will e much smaller than a year
andel reductions arle, expected in, output of, lIne oil fmdosiC
:i see oi rmoe


272~ J L 2...








flaxseed and In production of gr a's e s. -,The' tytal igpg a't
iqb4_45, Including stocks a~t thbs beginning of tYe season WAId
around 700 mill ied pounds'less, than in 1)-,'The edI%*,ftv
particular probably will be tiffht6.

Prices of lard returned to ceiling levels, in mti"Ag4st
of grpeae, :however, were sold slightly, under ceilings 'n lae. ep
September. Prices. of'other fats arid oil's were mostly at oil #ear, ca
The index number of- wholesale prices Of: 27*maJor fats and oia -reg
August at 107 percent of the 12-9ae e hscpapvf
la year earlier.

'The average price received byfresfrfaseed in '1d1
at 12.89 per bushal, wasi -c cnhhge'.trniAnamthal Wh
reflected an increase in thle deilin~g price f or flaxseedl'at, $orthweIL"
terminal markets.

--September 25, 19

RECEWT DBVELOPMEITS

1BACKGROUND., Product~ion of fats and ois from dpmestio
matesrialz in the 1944-45 crop year, may -total about .10)
billion. poundi4, compared with an indicated 11.43 billion
pounds i n 1943-44. This decline Ie is: largely a re,"lt of
reduction of,25 to 30 percent in the 1 44 P-ig crop and a
reduced flaxseed acreage. An output of, 10 billicyn pounds
would be nearly 2 billion p ounds.(22 -percent) more than the
Output in 1 939,
Production and Stocks of Fats and4:
Oils Reduced in Jl

Factory production of fats and. IlI r in JulyF, at 769 million p
72 million pounds smaller than in June (table 7) 'Output: of lArd -an
pork fat in federally inspected plants declinedL million pounds, and'
butter -production wr-s down p4 million pounds. Linseed oil: productilo-
reflecting seasonally large crushings by California mills

Creamery butter production in July this year was down.27 4il
(15 Percent) from July 1943. Output of federally inspected lardng
pork fat was 11 million pounds (6 percent) less than a yeaq eaplie ri.
the -first month since, January 1943"that l1ard production vAe bmallI6r
output in the corresponding month a year earlier. Linseed oil, product i
July was up 38 million pounds -(62 percent) from last Year, and-th*-e'94
increases, in output o inedible tallow, greas~esj castor oibl.-ad. f ishb-i

Stocks of primary fats and oils in factories and: warehouset on
July 31 totaled 2,6,-z million pounds (crude basiss, 71, million, pounde 16-"
than a month earlier but 646 million -nounda more thaM on 'Jul'Y 31, last 70a







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hter to Now prieppnOF
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boyneans anad ottonseed .. -iii;
Restricted .

SWr Food Order 110, effective August 25, restricts aurcihares
soybeans produced in 1944. Seed dealers and processors, including *JS'taii
ers of soybean Products other than oil, may net purchase more soybeiith
needed to bring inventories to the level of requirements for the ..pi
October 10, 19q5. Inventories of soybeans held by country shipper .." $uiA
after March 31, 1945, may not exceed undelivered contracts to or,.ep.b.,l
S facturers, and dealers, and Commodity Credit Cornoration, plus.. theA|i
purchases in the immediately preceding 30 days or 2,.000 bushels,
greater. Whole or ground soybeans of the 1944 crop may not be pur t L
use as feed or fertilizer or for use in the manufacture of feed or f -
.. :. .. ...i...
These provisions are similar to those established for the 19i
soybeans by WEn 27 (originally Commodity Credit Corporation Order 6) ..
last year's regulation, however, TFC 110 does not restrict purchases" .tJ
i beans for processing for oil to firms having contracts with CGOQ ..

:ar Food Order 23 (originally CCC Order 3), restricting pura.'d l
1942 crop of soybeans, was terminated August 25, 1944.

rr Restrictions on purchases and uses of cottonseed. prpduoed in .i
established by War Food' Order 113, effective September 8. Proces.ardt.., a
S facturers, and seed dealers are prohibited from accumulating more cotto4e
than needed to meet their requirements up to August 16 19~45. Ginnerse.
ognized handlers may not purchase more cottonseed than needed on any
increase inventories to a quantity sufficient to fill contracts with
S manufacturers, and seed dealers, plus the quantity purchased inr the 30
S mediately preceding or 30 tons, whichever is greater.. No cottonseed,
i ground, may be purchased for use as feed or fertilizer or for the.an
Sof feed or fertilizer.

S. War Food Order 28 (originally CCG Order 7), which contained. i |
visions regarding cottonseed produced in 14.j, was terminated tet etrfi
I


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Surnmorts Continued SE

Contracts between C00 and soybean processors for handling tha.e i i
bean cron are similar to those used for the 1943 crop. Minimum prce Ao'bi:
paid to farmers this year are 21 cents per bushel higher than last ye .t
a support 'price of $2.04 per bushel for No. 2 green or yellow soyb.eufiii
percent moisture, at normal producer-delivery points. Contracting pr 412B=1
are to purchase soybeans for their'own account, sell them to CCC at. ooA.k'
then repurchase them from CCC at prices which vary according to the typ
equipment pnd annual volume of the processor. These prices may averkg6 .
$1.75 per bushel, apTroximately the same as last season..

The contracts providee for support of soybean oil and meal prices, ~i
through CCO purchases from contracting processors at near-ceiling levels,
Crude oil will be nurohased-upon request at 1/8 cent per pound under.tbi.4i
maximums. This would be 11-5/8 cents per -ound, tankcar lots, at Midwestdki
mills. Bulk meal will be purchased upon request at $2.00 per ton tindp1
ceilings: for example, at $43 per ton, Deeatur basis, for meal of 41 .ipea
minimum protein content. .







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to,
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Nis f,4,- uz q I zp Ap, co Ce p ty L a Im
t oo I I I'll, 1 1, ,, ,,
B84h, mxo# 'Ttt :rqp 6i ctj'li,lll 121inn cc,
toot

kohn we"'
i rb t.edtpbjf sheA, Alp, lgoj r -,19,W2, Only
its 'vs r
t om rest=,"

babij of. all. to a t r i
C and
0; Oft
two
re's
Qn
5 MAP, lot op y res
TO 'At heon verta
qu 0 10 excel
Timat"s T1 t, 611 and p0jority vrejulatinni,
d rid dill
Tv 114
nhof all r0sphs,

et' raft
4 i& Oak
t Tor is i
M
GthE',
4W,
Wing use
'74-key" tyro In and UP-1
04

4,
A 41
Te 4ml nat tot, a
lem vf fatty act4a; Thime in 04 Wes H",























held by dealers and users are limited to a 30-day supply, except that .a nia
may have minimum stocks of 600 pounds. Also, any person may deliva :atQr
accept delivery of 10 pounds or less for any purpose other than the
manufacture of cosmetics.

Minor Changes Made in Ceiling prices
for Margarine and Soybeans

Maximum prices for margarine sold from branch houses are to be ':
determined by adding to the ceiling p. ie for the margarine, f.o.b. ;it i
facturer's plant from which the margarine is supplied, the lowest q4tA bd
'freight rate (on a per pound basis) from the plant to the branch IMa'SN .-l: :
However, if the maximum determined in this way i's higher than the maRxiS ".
which may have been previously established under provisions of the t
Maximum Price Regulation, the lower ceiling shall remain in force. Sleis i
regulations are contained in Amendment 33 to Maximum Price Regulation 5 |
effective September 22.

Margarine manufacturers whose maximum prices were recently det6fw
by application to the Office of Irice Administration, in accordance i ;" A
Amendment 28 to MPR 53, -are required by Amendment .37, issued *Sdptember.i.
to notify wholesalers and retailers tu refigure their ceiling prices. i:
wording of a.provision added to MRR 53 by Amendment 28 was changed sliA|
by Amendment 36, effective September '~. :

Minor changes were made by Amendment 2, MPR-515, effective :I
September 19, in price ceiling regulations for 1943-crop soybeans. One OtiM
the changes Was to exempt emergency sales of soybeans to Government agenoti
from the price regulations.

Ceiling Prices Established for :
Imported Feanut Oil

Maximum prices for imported crude and refined peanut oil, at the.
levels as for domestic peanut oil, were established by Amendment 35 to 1








rq@ e 6 agnbeition, pailingp Vere establi shed' fqr, imported
eawa 1 at 4 Ao Newark, zdeaePiaapi~aeBlioe
4 e no a g a 4 giPs rices for domstic emh pl.Th
a fo $4ortd c eanffi tank cart,, f -.b.B mAill, 'tow Yr i
nt1 1 0u4 P neredined peankit cil, dometic or, imported1, tark
verY,- w .t has, a'epil-ing, of, I4.'33 ,eAt ,8 peir pound.




en et 3%o azi~m ric Reulaion53,effective Sepptember 23

i se 'em i4ipflhi Cost per pound that may 'be inceuxred for olive oil by
o'f 41iv6z vho has the olives qruzhed on a Ms~tom ai.Ti
-,P" 'pe ound isr to be the game as .he:,ceiling price for: olive Oil
; th-thheesMil.Got s to be. calculated: as the cost of the.
Oht b wnt iAte hrefr rsig inus the value of pomace
a y dt4 retained by t-h' crushier.- The charge for rsig a o
hesrmmpric e f or thi s .service establishedd under Revised maximum,
-giAlaion 16-5. Oliva growere -without.,auzhing Taiiiso hi w
'OXeP*it f'iom this rP-gUlation',

OUTLOOK

TOPr oets Implrovecl for OCil seed Cro-ps
',er Th hlaseed,

Wi th tje corditba~io of the cotton 4cop jmproved- in. August -ih- most
ngoigStateii, ina"i cated pro duction. of lint b n the: ba's is of
ember I 'Qo-nditions i 191i430 bae%,, percent more thtan: indicated a
,ale Assuming that. the 'rat-io, between, cottonseedzproductioA aad
a li t Qutut will1 be equal this year to. the.aeaefrtels
fe cdtton!3eed P37oduct.-on in, 1994 yould be 4,762;000 tons,, 2,percent more
'tiithek6, 800 th reduced last yepr.
f
Pru s for zobagipoe lightly duxingAugusEt, An average
_,Old6f 16. ,,-ushelo per. ha;vYset~ed. acre is indicated on the basis of
brer 1 dtos op d wih1. ushe' s: indicated, a month earlier
i.1 bushd41 in -9)L Jndic~at-ed 19,44 prodiet-ion is, 179, 024, 000 bushels,
igtincrp:ea, o-ver the Augqst estimate.. Rains in the latter p1art ipf
Agrjust Ilargely'p-revent ed a hreaterked, deeirto nthe opiditi~on of6 the
a rmthe Aueggst I level. in- India and Illinois Protpects in Oi
6 binud t delin duingAugst, but there was some. improvemetinoa
bad, Minnesota.

Thd up ok'fr~te patutofo imroved -,slightly. d= i-ng Augs ud
1944 prodducti6n- i's foreeazt o4 the basis of Septemibar I conditions at
,3$mi hlioniLpunda picked. and threshed.
Prog ionof faxsed in 94i siae on the ba-sis of SOppember: I
IMAtos 2,88000 but hels, a~bout'h~alf A million butshel s, 1 s :than in



























































LnuwCver, is su~ii resriczeea. ly war Dooad urder 4 to iS percent or. pVeragp
use of all fats and oils in these products in 1940 and 194l. (An exenstiQa
from these restrictions was granted for lard purchased between May 15 and&
July 1 and used by October 1' tIAs year.) It is estimated that under the .;


i. .,:. .- .: ;:







"A xpm-,Lnd:odlt -tip 4,b-
o n t d
e4i i L, 'he old
7
a
_A 1-9 4 4'5 zao
vo oced 91
t p'o:rt, &id, mli4a'Z7' requi'remon'ts are pet.''

kAA11i't


Low, an greases o, A&gust a t 310 millioll
TaitO- thar. a -year earlier, larg(j as a
la'Ot wlnter aAd spring. In addition, on
znap :- _71 00 llli;n pouxid of lard., Oz tho
aWers, ownL,4 'D er_ Ra
inventarit-b of palm, b3d and, oi'6 w&x* below
atd, PrQrPe6t,*;4We not good f or an Mprovement 1n supplies of -these
tuxre :Vrod-u t,!Gn pflnedible tallow. an, reases in
ed WW*ha reduced fron the,.i943-44 '1&vel, at
l4r&r t1jan. in any,,dthe earlier -aeaton_ With, some dX a ft
ile expectecl reqi1irements ,for s pap fatz, :pXobaabjy


Ca t, e E;, i TL 14orting fiamsee& from- Argentinamay re sul t in a
M;p Sittia ion in lins edoil by next sun-fter. With this ex6eption,
fats a oils for indu ,. -.r ial us
Or "' P Alemlis ezPectid 1'1 sup)lies..p: nd es
'Undei, pr,S('ent restriction The. se 4t 0 -inclu4e mot,",ly 6astor
tLan) akl" heat I 346'ot oil:' sperm I oil, derivatlvez, of .,inedible tallow and
rape Oil -nd,,iriio quantit io-p:, bf:. toy
'A
W: I-OST-WAA

t lhicr e 6s ed by
70
0 0 ti t
an4 thrtA 66.2.4
me, Crops of pe"Uts picked ed, estim-atod at-2.2 1
LO ii are rore thaA 5D Percent. lat-gbr than
70ou 14-2, 194, ana
av avage Gf 1_4 bill _,an ponnas (table
k1937-41) 5)- This iner a
-Vroauat idn lixto Con'uming -h ls, ai pri ces approximately t4 ce :&b
'klgh as -before t 6). The vaiue of Lf armer s s t4o ck ppanut s Sold.
SiJbIling, 0r abcut
comparod vifii,. faW
1941-42.,

'The w4rlme increase, in demand .1 was partly a.result of increase d
i4c4tez bAt Was d1W SlSo to su_ztitiitibn of peanut P'rodud.t Q for I
becaaze, of wartim,, cqnditioas-4-epecially:Of I .
',qC4rre
butter and roas.ted or salted peanuts :Cor 4pashew
1V11vjpPOrvS 6fl' were greatly red, d With sugar ana
were in, unusuajly str ng demand f.o r,


ezd oils also incr a '.a.S :a re t f warkimo c o Ai
oil A%, a, 40irAbla ediblg oil. Cruohizigs, of farmers
agq OU Vounds in 1942
A aVfr' of a t 400 mi -43 and
vith Azi'6veiage C)f about 250 million poandrz in 1937-41,





































































million Pounds in these uses ft*oa the level of the past two :e aonhi n
ments for peanuts for seed also would be redau!ed'." 'AesumIhglo maieaiei
increase in the quantity of peanut to be crushed.,'ttaok r.eireea


S.... ... '...
AW ., .. .:. :.. '. ::. .






4 A 'i

'I'Or AA




j cko(l ,or thr Is
wa Gigq Polincls per
a, (647 polt s),
El r 'is as s-a
N. G pound
of -Pea'nut zP;UCkP_(i, a.-nd thro,,,he 4 would,,, be


.4 mU1jieTi, ,es, picaced aAd tbteshc-d
ALMIOn 41Cre q, f or h,


texitative.- Xan,$ f actor will operate,
d Ch Ot b-e,
g"tba,_
V 26 liatlons'of whqt the n4pr flat-ure iaight hold fa-1
fte a44 ,pTAft:n t i 0 xL t do' tionz. Ovir a Inyiger'
UMPtofj POCUrL.,_
'in

r0tial* 01 -by farmer z and- prices a ',terminal m- ,e_
g mataria:Ls, Anqst i94; .nl 1943,
,t Siell 17be ar it T-dnO-Ataqt 19

ew, i t
D6;4rtL .U, ol I ar, s Dollar Dollars Dolla3s
i I Jan.
-64, Zt Z, b4D9 tQn A 75.()0 15 Ob: ';5 754
0 St
44.o4 ..53 20_1
rt
-A'* s- 13&h' 2.-,40 Cf 3'05 3 Cr
trtiWA t at, 6-,
2

n
-,-!QOpouAc1%; 1, 2. it 14.2 .25.. 14.;25 1

5 .99 7 1:175 7A
w
.71 1.92 5

1.59
4,
t d IiPr TY 0,0;2]T cv, 'D a i I yv Naf
iL 'f'Agri a tar E 1-4' Ucs+,'- 7'
PO 4t q'pbt t 2r 01 the, T4,r 0 a 0 n al co _C'M



I fl










































































S. ... .. ,
e o H u 1 PN LCr z r -- w 4M E l.

.10 "I "- r "i H r- i -* -4 *t 4. r.
i r ... .. .. ..3
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k ILI
T,
-4`


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al



4, ",V;, ck a
44
'r.Lq t Vf leN,







V Miz-
T T1 ta,
it A* -".A
1-t % 1, 1 1 -
T
4z
Vq

T,
TIM" I

'UN-tt "ka tr 1- -4- ia-vio A,
P4- 4'"' 1

w to I-- t--- to _o t-TILn D --k
JPI
4-4 44
V
CV V* 6 _0 tlsliso ill ,o 4"I'o -4 I..b -4 1' I-
t"'A o
1 V--Q .o IN 0 C) o N 0 no zd,,p -7k 0 It ;o
TO, li-4 (?N'





to X(VO k- w4 rq i4
to ui It- c ao-V '(\j r-4 LCI a"I 1-0 0

r4
i+ I

iL tr;A

V4 jcT 461 I-Lo 1--,,4 Y-i
1.114
I 101

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TT

'YTi bo
tok
aa r-4
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7"t cv

rill, Ali
'TT
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Total, animal ................ 5_56_
Vegetable oils, crude basis ::"* ,.':
Castor oil .......11.7 5.S 13.5 l?3 'h. .
Coconut oil .....................: 7.6 6.7 13.5 17,7
Corn oil ......... ........: 20.3 17.6 16. 16.6
Cottonseed oil ...................: 21.5 19.7 43.4 22.5 |;
Linseed oil .................,....: 76,8 61.0 74.1 87.7
Olive oil, edible ................ ---- -
Peanut oil ...................... 14.0 9.1 8.7 8,9' .
Soybean oil .................. .:. 59.8 96.3 107.9 96; .
Tung oil ..,..... .............. -- .4 5 ....
Other vegetable oils ............. .6 2.8 1 7 1
Total, vegetable ..............: 21P?. 231a 280.1 2
Grand total ............... : 0.9 750.99 765 T
:Inaicated production fr6m doeatle
:Year :19 41 O 41 -4: 412 192h_
:beginn :mlg m
:Mil. lb. Mil, lb. Nil. lb.


-Butter, including farm .............: Oct. : 2,287 2,153 2,Oa;
Lard and rendered pork fat, total .. Oct. 2,285 2,440 2,860
Inedible tallow and greases, total : Oct. :1,492 1,733 1,6
Edible tallow, oleostearine,
,oleo-stock, and oleo oil .... t Oct. : 218 277 '271
Neat's-foot oil .... ... ... Oct. 4 5 3 .
Wool grease ......................: Oct. : 4 15 i
Marine animal oils .................: July 175 215 163
Corn oil .........................: Oct. 186 242 :246
Cottonseed oil ................. ug. : 1,425 1,250' 1,400, i. f
Linseed oil ................... July : 4946 729
Olive oil ..........................: Nov. : 11 8 10
Peanut oil ..................... Sept. : 174 77 130 Z.l
Soybean oil ........................ Oct. : 564 767 1,19
Tung oil ................. ........ Dec. 4 2 5 ,
Total ...... 9.3 -.67 107
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census and the Department of .Afpi
Monthly reports do not show total production of butter, lard, inedible talle
greases. 1/ Based on most recent indications, subject to change. 2/ Ref
tl.Domest c pouction, calculated as total production minus oil ivleS"
; et imports Of axseea
:;::~ .. .. ,- : :" ......... *: .... *:.. -- :,^ B ai..i:a=.. ..


I
?:'
,.::.$











4''
.... .... hT


'6 3.2
2,39 4 654.6 6
15Q 9 lt5 t2
2.3 3,
'41
-*6
6,
P_
5
-4:
V, 5 2
4" 91T, 97.4- 746`
.......... 5 3, -Z '
4i 54.0 '5
52.7 7 I "2i,9767 '71 7 3
V ,
1, 4 9 14,8, 3
6 56
39.0
1 -9 11T. T 3-C
44,b
104 ............. 246 423.5
211 335
7,
6.2 4.2
P, 2J,
.7
ki
j, 61.5 59
75 i.
A 4F,
N_ 4.
5 J i9 17
7_1
.2719 27il:
5 4, .6 2,
........30.4
,q --q-t, 7 7

7 J,: '7 L
eau 6 f the Wav Food,
'8L'&'r_ tji' 3%WT bell;jus; eX64 ti-e'r
wfiroi4ded nuuitmrta,; ,,ncx bc d
U s suo


bacig IRg_ oy, te 6 6,wine, ao
&iid
AV pal

bl
-,c r e
P'l


S




UNlVIRSITy gOF FLORIDA


Table .- Oeonararie: Proda tior ..t. .s.... .

... ..- ............: 2 ;; 2: i 4
andi materials ,sedta". -in nSin V Vi.. ... .'

Item '.: :: : y Z
i942- 190--mm
1.000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1.000 lO b. 1.
:Ikr oduct ion: .
o- Colored ..................: 4, 453. 14, 977 ,
:. Uncolored ... ...... .... 23,6. ,9. 0- 51*
S Total .l........ .. 29 ,414 ,955 3



D. Meters iatsied::
01, Oleo oil 1,706 1,o210 1,6 5
SOleostearine .............. 196 252 297
'Lard, neutral ............: 403 753 s95
Lard, stear.ine .............
Oleo stock ................: 305 293 255
Tallow ....................: 37 22
Monostearine ..............: 07 2 '
Total, animal ..........: 2,714 2,558 3,13 2

Cottonseed oil ............ 10,400 15,051 13,7.2 1
Soybean oil ............... 10,631 16,796 18,018
Peanut oil ................: 32 201 46:
Corn oil ..................: 178 191- 1,037'
Cottonseed stearine-.......; ---5 -.
Linseed oil ..... 59 ........:.. 569.-
Soybean stearine ..........: ..-- --
Soya flakes ........... 51
Total domestic vegetable: 21,241 32,816 33,034 0,516

Sunflower oil .............: 15 .. --.
Total, foreign vegetable: 15 -- ---
Total, fats and oils....: 23,970 35,37 36,217 32, 68...

Milk ............... 5,255 7,352 742i
alt ...................... 971 '1.431 ,1 72 .
': Derivative of glycerin ....: 53 79 65
Lecithin ..................: 19 34 37
.Soda (benzoate of .........: 13 28 .
Vitamin concentrate ....... 5 9 10
Color .....................: 3
Estearine .................: -- 7.,,
Miscellaneous .............: 1 4 --. .
Total, other materials..: 6,320 8,945 9,0 l ,2
Total, all materials....: 30,290 44,319 45,26.6 1 :I
I. H
I'ompiled from Internal Revenue records and Internal Revenue Bu2X1tin.
/Preliminary. I/ Tota of unrounded numbers. 3/ Eocludes wAt. Assa fri
.:.tax for use in Federal institutions, and withdramt for export..

: i L:!r ..