The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00044
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00044

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text
















STATION OF F TS AMD-.QLS IN PAINT, LINOLEU A

m W': H WITH INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION AND WITH BUILD
,: ACTIVITY, UNITED STATES, 1916-43 .
... EX NUMBERS 1 1935-39=100) '*


SI industrial l production

Li -


- m mi 0 IN
ist


19.16 a 1920 1924 1928 1932 1936 1940 1944
*, ~al Aa VOLUME ADIUSRED FOR CHANGES f! COSTS OF CONSMUCI ON .


I' .lDEPsMaxrlIET .NiGCuLTiE


MEG. 436BB BUREAU Or AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
*


ld~ ist,:eacetimt years, use-of fats and oils in paint, linoleum, and other products of
h4 p.ir 0lid1iestries. has varied closely with industrial production and. has been affected to
aI!i'Z e:: biljdidng acqvity. However, war and early post-war years (1917-1919, and 1942
6bueiiJi acstiitvlt apparently .has been the more important factor. Government limita-
i lhb d dits dLmis since September 1942'also served to curtail use in drying-oil pro-

.mmmm*if.ls bythe drying-oil industries in 1944 may be about the sawme as in 1943.
.,,.oills. are.more. p)ltiful this year than last, Government restrictions
W:FL diCFteased soewIht. ti "i'ling activity will decline in 1944, but demand for
S. l r.d J fdusLres .h for c iv i ian ma intenance and re~ Ir,w ill cont inue strong.

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Tble 1.- Ihoselale prices per pond of rate A d ll at apeatYi ard at, il
number at priaa, April 19X wad 194. Februar4prll 194,


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r an ... .
"**'/ iffiy fihk' *et m SLo
- "^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r ^i c l < ~ T S *itt o ^ B i B


butter, U-socre, Chieago ..C... .............,. ....,...,.... T.1 ,
RBtter, 92.eore. New Tork ................ ............
Olearapriane do Te., Chiago ...................... 1....9. .0
Compound (sanim and veg. oooking fats), Chicago .............s 17.0
lard, loose, Chiago ........................................... 11.
lard, prime atem, toreas, Chicago ............................ 3S.T1
lard, refined, cartons, Chloago ............... ................i 15.0
Oleo oil, No. 1, barrels. Nw York ........... ,,................ 13U.
Oleoatearine, bbl., 1. Y. ........................... ........ 10.6
Tallow, edible, Chisap ........................................ 9.8
1


Corn oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mill@ ...........................
Corn oil, retired, bbl., 1. Y. ...............................
Cottonseed oil, orlde, tank, f.o.b. B. *uill ................
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., tank care, N. T. .....................
Peanut oil. rude, tanks, f.o.b. aill .........................
Peanut oil, refined, edible (white), drunk, N. Y. .............
Soybean oil, crade, tank Oare, iddwatern mulls ................
Soybean oil, edible, dr 1.e.1., N. T. .................... I
I
Coconut oil, lanila, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Pacific Coast / ,....
Coconut oil, Ianlla, orude, bulk, -.ol. N. Y. / ...........
Coconut oil, Lhla, refined, edible, tank care, f.o.b.N.Y./ i
Olve oil, iaparted, edible, drum N. T. .....................
Ollve oil, inedible, drum, N. ..............................
PNli oil, Niger, orude, drum, e T. Z/ ........................
Rape oil, refined, deatired, bulk, o. .f., N. T. ..............
Sunflower oil, tak OarI, f.o.b. N. T. .........................

Tallow, No. 1. ildlble. Chicao ...............................
Grease, A. White, Chicago ....................................3
enhad n oil, pdra, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimre .................I
Sardine oil, irude, tanks, Pacifio Coat ......................
Whale oil, reftied, bleahed niater, drunm, Y. ..............

Linseed oil, raw, tnk oare, Mineapolis .......................
Linseed oil, rwr. rut, earlost, I. Y. ........................
Rerilla oil, crude, drum, T. ...............................
Oiticloa oil, tank cars, t.o.b. ..........................
Tung oil, drum. N T. ........................................

Cauntr oil, No. 8, bbl., B. ................................
Castor oil, No. 1, tankt, I. T. ................................
Castor oil, dehydrated, anks, N. ............................
Cod-liver oll, nad. U.SIP. bbl., N. T. .........................
Cod oil, Nefoundland, drua, 5. T. ............................


18.8

14.0
11.0

11.8
16.2


16.1
59.8


1.5
0.6

68.
8.3
11.1

18.1
8AIS.T
24.6
29.0
40.2

18.8

11.8
15.1
Bh,


".3
479.
11.0
14.8

18.6







15.0
10.6








U.8
14.T
3.I













866
8.O8
16.1

1S.T

11.0
11.4






71.3
88.
1.8




8.0
8.87
6.6
8.0
11.1

15.1
1.T
39.6
25.0
39.0

23.8
8.0
1T.T

U3.0


41.3

29.9
4.2.


U.O
13.0


U.8

10.5
9.9

13.6
112.

U.8
13.0
18.0
16.5
11.I
13.6
16.0

11.0
11.4
12.82


11.6
12.0
14.8

8.4
8.8
8.9
s.,
8.0
U.8
16.1
85.0
11.0

18.0

165,O
13.0


g1.a
4.8
19.0
1T.O 0
35.8
U.O
U.l


U.8
10.0











13.1
114





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11.0



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11.4
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8.4
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183

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11.9


IUB NUMBES (1l4S40 100)

light dameta fat sand oil (1910-14 100) ................... 18 1i 142 14 1
light daetio Mhts and oils ................................... M 10B 101 10D 10I

All fatal and oil (27 items) ................................... 10 114 1 106 10

Snir t ................................ ........... 89 106 6
Marine ml1 oils ........................................... 186 T U1 Im
Vegetable oils, doamtio ................................... 110 138 4 1I 16
Vegetable oil, foretp ......................................1 181 1M IN 11 1M
Grouped )y use
r ......................................................s a u0s s a U
Butter, easeanally adjusted ................................ I B 130 s90
ILrd ......................................................... 9T 10 SO 6 30
Other food f.t ............................................... 14 141 Si M4
All food rate .......................................... ...T 111 101 S IS
Soap fate ................ .... .................. .. 1I6 130 30 I
Drying oil ................................................... 140 I 340 13
isaeellaneou oils ........................................... 114 111 1T T IM
All industrial ft ad il ............................. ... 1W 3 11 3 l1 U
t1iceu ompiled frongOlt. Paint al Drug Reporter.. The ational Preotlemer, Tho Joural of Cmeere ( W tr ), M a


reports of the War Food Adminisitration and Bureau O Labor 8tatistioe. Primes 0ted include meSa.1 "Ma a da1"a
where applLobbl. Inade number for earlier year begiaLmi 1910 are gLtm l T ekalel uI9el t flo. T (100) Mi
The ate aend Oil. Situbtia begiannlg Decdfer 1260.
y Refteoe open market sales only. Oulrrb fi ures refer t al l te ac Wholepale tdng for ms ar l-t
oradt. / ThrY -obea processing tLn added to price arourmUal quoted. V /M a a r j Oflas.
8a Camerted to preeat basic aof quotatioa.


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cogtinued at a high rate n 1adMylh













ed-4,rsu -O -ro acio n or &,'hl elo qn r s

on x,'Cts a#A ua i W p 1nte Virt :M()er nt',ua~ t






ed. Factory pn wrhou

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oils will be smaller than in the. current season, largely because a~
lard production. Export requirements are expected to be as ..*1q.; "4..'
than those in 1943-44. The outlook is for renewed tightness i .' -l ..
oils situation beginning next fall.

EO DEV:.EL:P ES .

BACKGQROUND.- Output of fats and oils in the 1942 crop 'a.". ^ii
totaled 10.7 billion pounds, 3.5 billion pounds. (50 perct)
-, more than the 1935-39 average. Present indications -poi
Sa further gain in output in the current crop year (194
of about 700 million pounds (7 percent) over output. in: .
1942 crop year. With a material reduction in the pig orb-.,i
expected in 1944, a decline in lard and in total domesi::..;s:i;: .
fat production appears likely for the 1944-45 season. .....
.. .. :...-.i
Output of Fats and.Oils High in March;
Stocks Reach New Peak at End ." :
of Month

Factory output of primary, fats and oils in March was 915C,': 3n i
compared with 928 million pounds in February,. 965 million pounDs tis JF
and 762 million pounds in March 1943 (table 9). Production of anir.tat.
factories in March was only slightly smaller than it. redbary, %6 i '. '
increase in butter production nearly offsetting small declines ithej. i
other items. Vegetable-oil production declined moderately b dMii R 4tIr4
seasonal reduction in the outout of cottonseed oil. Compared i'it'.a :
earlier, most of the increased output in March this year was i i .l
also was a substantial increase in inedible tallowi !ad greases a., I .:
oil.

Factory and warehouse stocks of primary fats and oils O.fJMi
excluding butter, lard, and rendered pork fat held outside. o.L's
totaled 2,552 million.pounds, crude basis ,(table 10). This was I':
pounds greater than a month earlier and 502 million pounds grease
earlier. It was only 9 million pounds less. than the record. ~b
stocks reached on March i1, 1910. More than hif of the i.n
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Min
VO

Owl
'U>11 PO died',With
s t S-PAivloii record
-T
la 'Yeav, ea w,'
Oarlipli woii !)`k "b tte'r,,` ble, tall
Adh:s:&Ed o 1,,, an 11. There.: e
'N iz ,
t N .
65 Oillion,,OTUIdillh to 1&4111
bap to" totai Of mil4l
4W hei 3, Vml ion. i ds, 1 6 0 mi Ilion m r e
-J,
et,"on April 30
V' -0 A e rj
""A tb nt ea
io raimda"' thatL' "'a h' rli dr S to ck's
aha tle D, '1oting,
dilip-111 Olulaq-f w6re, lliqn po lose that a moat)i
V

to


qf f at s, an,& Ott's by the- War Food' A&duistltati6ain.AMA week
,t6ta, 61 Tj till' rL pouncls,-comparbd vrlth'a'bbiithi averagpf
The Ap rA, I total comrised 53 mi),4io,N-
pounds 'of t t e'r
'bu axid
VAtalle oil, marg4rnp, shortenin&,:.and so
Z*,
#,Ohaq6-q 6flid gna,rbrAerecl'pork fat from: ariuary,
Mon un4, over as great w In the...
f17` '44 44E,M nt of "the"total 6r tbe a- tir
At to 55 rer-ce
*in 'Jamiary-4r -944 totaled'16bout
per6ent inore 't4ah'in the- ame, period' ULst a4d
Oroent "6f, the' t'
Qt,-l Ot'. Al Of 194"-

oils 'by the
1,9tlat 1-42-44,
A
'Item 1943 r
r 4px-,
k
It MJL lb.' U!I. lb. L]-.: Lb-

'6 .4
ILK`4
"'P )6`54-
'j
70
IA
46 39
I" 62 .3
V 4 Aw
A,.
wr -77 7 2' -:53
2
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SStockis : uti-a .....i
--- ---otal : Exports:
Total and :
: : : : and : :
:Produc-: Begin-: End :apparent: sti- :
Period dis- Crush-
tion :ning of: of: Crush-. mati-ed
period; period: appear- ngs use for
ance : :full-fdt: :
: .: : : :. :: flour ::
:Million Million Million Million Million Million Mi
bushels bushels bushels bushels. bushels bushels b


1942-43:
Oct.-Dec...: 187.2 6.0 169.7
.Ja.-Mar. ..: -- 169.7 116.0
Apr.-June ..: --- 116.0 45.3
July-Sept. .: --- 45.3 12.5
Crop year : 187.2 .0 12.
1943-44: : -
Oct.-Dec. ..: 195.8 12.5 168.5
Jan.-Mar. ..: -- 168.5 110.1


23.5 25.1
53.7 37.6
70.7 41.2
32.8 28. .
180.7 132.


39.8
58.4


0.4
3.3


.1

.3
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.7 K .
.3 ''


1/ Includes use for feed, use as dried beans for direct human consumqpti, :7
changes in stocks held by'seed dealers, and loss. "

Prices of Fats and Oils Continue
Mostly at Ceiling Levels, Some
Sales of Lard Lower in May '

The index number of wholesale prices of 27 major fats a .l.lS ;.,.I "
stood for the tenth consecutive month at 108 percent :of the 192 i
Despite the large output and record stocks of lard, prices of flar bi

1] Disappearance for feed cannot be separated from disappearancee of soylhJ
as dried beans for direct human consumption or from' ihanes in ta.t*s i
by seed dealers. The total for the three items in October-March;t.' 11.1
was 24 million bushels compared with 14 million bushels a ye.a i ,:.S
Changes in food use and in accumulation of dealers' -stbcks prsba
in relation to the change in the total. Hence most of the-change.$ '
in feed use.


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Ohioan, X4 ent cky, 'together V&iAn 6w h 6-4* thdi- t $
00.Loaas, will 'be available 'thrwagh Jagho ak 5
f dsmahd, but not later. than April 30, 194115, he, rA 1e
Percet
Flalvded," The -rm wtt bylasd$b
pri.,6s'Tao flaxseed IpN 4t Ao pay.a rt Uri rt6.r
194 4-rp flamseeq ,The spe idd-pti t are 13. 9 ate
milMinnespols -, ise04 n $per teh f 6'*,b ld-
WA i s alg efe opyteepiae efor liatest dil and"
from potdfase ucgeia from tht" o4;ceigh, 1conmimc Ad
Non.recurselo~s o NA ofNew2 f1 xseed: -afkes0
wlbeMade b- 3rh4 000 1o farmers at suipport prites loss frei
charges. If -the flaiseed. is sto red .6n famnsj a naxitum of 71oL
Neill be paik.

Peanuts., fnder the, p'rovi sions of War Tood Cee 0',
fames socpanutt pro duced in 1-944 Aa esl only, to th,6
natead p rwducebis I cooperative associations or hanalsrs, buyi -ng ixs
with coattracts vdith the 000, or to a prm ucer fo0r' P1 na -1 ggs;
tracts"' rnidlers or designated wi so ciatilona wilIl pa,, 9M'90%g
oir b*Uqx-r Fhrmerz1 s~toc-k peanuts of :the 1944 crop tihy bb 6
shl dkor othierws Pro cessedC! o~nly aqplcifitzal~l aauthe4Q'
speifi kuhorzaionis equred mhweer# tq, tolean 'add
ckent for planting, byT the. gromer wo 'Onp 'te; rtot
fo 1 sqle, 564,.potnds 'or7`less-oS farmers I.stodk :pAaomts'l *if
selling is a'na an Ihe f a rm ai here thib peanum hsptdcd

Restric1tonx on Use of lard% p

Restri iots 0on use- of lard. ancl rendered-povik fat ilus
proucs er %epoarlysuspede on thy15" Axlenament 7 011
ri zed: --o'ap makers -to -use lard! ofr Xe Ad6redA pork- 1,t pilrohasvd
f romn May. 15, thringh I-une' 30 Witho-ut charg-ing: such' tpe -agitaat
of tot-al. fats and!'o~i# 4-nder 'MK)42-fo-r thezivanufatture of-pI
civilianss. Under th#-aneftdzfgt, lp-rd.o rendered pork ftpt
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May 15% and June. 30 nay 'le, used in the -0,1due fedt
Octoer 1withut 'being charged- against quotas, W4gp~ah
July 15 the gantity. on hand June GO intended to be 4sed in thiz,

short eging in breaA Aough to a maximunm of prt fa!tto 100 p
Fill va.s lahende Id, to allows tem-porar.ily.:unrlelstricte,'*d use of lIard bfdj
fat.' Amendmen-t 8 authorizes Ibatkets to use: nore jhsA -3 pirtg ,
to June 30, provided the additional quantities econsitk ofa
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z t
an 1,perfG use
b no sr% e V's, 'tkp

r bad, rbad,-, riWpv-qd
16pb
Or T, food"
i lnl`rl&S 'or Anlw,

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ou napescea ai .

Under Amendment 1 to WfO 35, effective May 15, specific :s 4
is no longer required to use rapeseed oil in marine engine oils, i
engine oils, pneumatic tool oils, and factice for insulation or
rubber. Rapeseed oil has been allocated for these purposes on t e :b s
specific requests by users since March 1943. Stocks now are eu~ft~ ati
permit unrestricted use for these purposes. only.? This amendment 01 ;i
mustardseed oil from the provisions of the trder, .;..f

Tuag Oil Allocations Liberalized; May .. .: .
Allocations of Wool Grease
Restrict ed

The WFA announced in late April that allocations of tunig, fi:4:
granted more freely, because of a favorable outlook -or the domesti'i.A
crop to be harvested next winter. Stocks of tung oil.have been ca -Ae
conserved since imports from China nere cut off in eaty 1942. Aliln t
have been granted only for the most essential military and civiliia,
Beginning in May, tung oil is to be allocated for certain military .W
such as aircraft, without regard to further information previously. .t
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T; t ph-an improved situation in ocean shipping in certain areas, supplies
t ,# Oiticw-,castor, .and cashew nut shill Oils are expected .to be adequate to
,!.. 4all...~jpds without .restriction. -Effective May 8, War Voo.d Orders 31, 32,
i..3; i 136, ich .limited uses of these oils, were revoked. This action followed
~ 1 .. btia completee suspension of the .astor oil order. since' last October and
~sa~ .e:a bt orders siace January. Users of more than 6,000 pounds of oil
~:n. Pi ie la lar qartor, however, 'aro 'still required by WrO 42 to'report their
u1 use lto.tihe ur iu of the Cernsus,

W 63, limiting deliveries of linseed and linsoed replacement oils tc
tetailors and consv.mers, also was revokod.,offective May 8. ,This action was
mado possible by the improved supply situation in linseed"oil,' .Manufacturers'
total use of linseed and other oils in civilian products of the drying-oil
nr,4!. ;a i4it .ios remains. subject to quotas under WO0 42. Also, the oil content of
A... a; "iata ured. paint is still limited by Conservation Ordor M-332 of the War
f'tiqqrtion Board. The snne order prohibits retail sales'-of linseed oil in
; ,:WP iiak.ne.rs larger than a pint, unless the oil is mixed with a volatile thinner:
t..i:: ;,::t educe. the linsood-oil content to 70 percent or less, or unless the oil
S.s:',::i:. ,o .be.used for .human or animal consumption.
k < o K
S;.,.. .... OUT LOO

Priatiori of. Tait a.d Oils
January-March Culminatos
U.ward Trend

*P': .oduction of fats and oils in the first 3 months of 1944, including
-. st4lmatd. utut of farm butter, farm and other noninspocted lard, and unre-
portpd4tallow and greases, totaled over 3.3 billion pounds.. This was the
s; 'asonal peak in production, exceeding cstinated total output in the previous
S;: carterrter by :appro imately 2 percent'. It also probably wan .the. culmination of
;.:, thi upwSrd .trend which has bedn underway since 1935 in UTiite. States output
of fats and oils.

': The unpreccdentod output of animal products in 1943-44 was made possible
i by drawing on'the large stocks of foed grains that had.acnduiated before the







war and were still available, to a large oxtent at the beginning of 1943J-A 4*
With these- stocks now reduced to normal levels or less, the 1943-44 letb of j
production of livestock products cannot be maintained. Much of the dGetl.ne
in livestock production in prospect will come in hogs, which can be.iad |
quickly adjusted than most other classes of livestock. As a result, lard aead
grease output will be substantially reduced in 1944-45. Shorter feed supplies
in 1944-45 may result in some liquidation of brecdor cattle and hence 'res
increase in tallow production, but this increase probably will not be etbugh
to offset the reduction in grease output, Present prospects do not i'iaecte
any increase in production in 1944-45 of oils from domestic oiltcrops, *loess
1944 yields of oilsoods per acre are exceptionally high. Hence, total ~f tput 6i
fats ~nd oils in 1944-45 is likely to be appreciably smaller thl~adi-: J 4 .
billion pounds expected in the .present season. .

Output of Inedible Tallow and
Greases At New Peak This Season :

Total apparent production of inedible tallow and greases 11 in January
March reached 553 million pounds, compared with 403 million poun~a a year
earlier. Apparent production in the period October 1943 to March i:1944 was
983 million pounds, compared with 818 million pounds in October4-eath 1942-4,3
These increases reflect increased cattle and hog slaughter, and to:ef6-extent,
increased salvage of waste kitchen fat. It now appears likely th't~i ro tion
of inedible tallow and greases in 1943-44 (October to September) will total
about 1,900 million pounds, compared with 1,626 million pounds-in s14243 and
a previous peak of 1,733 million pounds in 1941-42.

Domestic Disappearance of Fats and
Oils in April-June to Total
More Than a Year Ago

Apparent domestic disappearance of primary fats and oils ip Apflgr-June
this year, including estimated consumption of farm butter and larI.d' probably
will be considerably greater than the disappearance of about. 2;.6 'lid"
pounds in April-June last year. In January-March both this year dt last,
apparent domestic disappearance was roughly 2.65 billion pounds. "1ith food fal
rationing in effect in January-March this year but not last, disappearance
of food fats was reduced, but use of fats and oils in civilian soap was greater
than last year, under higher manufacturers' quotas. There probably.was an
increase in miscellaneous industrial uses, most of which are closely related
to war production and are quota-exempt. In April-June di.sappearau e.ds food
fats will be considerably greater than in January-March, as a result of
several recent measures making additional supplies available to civilians. '

Ration point values were reduced to zero for lard. on March 5, and for
shortenings other than lard and for cooking and salad oils, on April 2. At
the end of April, the point value of margarine was reduced from 6 to.,2
Manufacturers of edible products may use lard from May 15 to October 1 with-
out charging such use against their quotas for fats and oils used tb 'civilian
products, provided the lard is purchased before July 1. Lard also May be


1/ Computed on the basis of factory consumption, foreign trade and stcks.
et'-S. "


I |





n
V eblh
iastr" may te ia i
U -the sr;aLrino, shortoai
't 6king ana salad,
a aWle" to,%uaa re laid i
io, a
I t1kon a. e, cj6sely
0111 o r
Y p&.tdon,-m4 on the m4tWlt by- qi=ti ell
PIIXI t ty'Cf
nc-f produ tion. will
aad 14 juae 'f ro m c
A
Y' h LAd In, April, and appraximatel'y 1-00 ml is inmost
pip,-O&rl-yia t:e spro_ng o: 1943,. Total supplies for civil 3'_,Ftn'O
Ollrjt,,, 6,V6Ver,, Wil butaz pro"Ced onfaTts and some-
Ap! '4GCU=Aati' 's of 'Comerplal stock F=," kkt'ter piboLdu6t
-,SL, I Pk_ _jj M4r'and June le farm butter enters combiercial
co=emial b ttor proba'yjsle
6, ilo- trm but te'r--output




SIEit rel6Ltiv6- abundancl. df total.z,14 lies: ok::,;rood-'-fmtO available.
a retultof: thw.'record tputaf,,14'rd in: re ceht m o at
7, 'h aelfty --OXOrt 'cheaulb. With Ijara_ p
r wa- -a in S f the 0 r iginA
`a4 db_lnlng seasonally ar-I all restrictions, on ase o f lard teft
d stdtks probably will deel ine., i;a -coming weeks'. Soybean oi isxiov
P Iad' t6 be ly cvailaie, ip'quantities.,.sufficient to meat dim4hd. for
e- r-'o &uc t n un Ie r qiio 14 restr ct io no, b4t the' sup'017, 8311U.,4,tion
-,r,"Gra, bmdl acttonsbed oils4rernalps tigh. Id -,' t h thez de 1
or4t,ut'p -VoketA'2_e oil rAnd, laid cown in, the pum Mwr,' a reduction
gupbliez' o' fco d fat s `avail lkly by.Rte
f abla.tor 6iviliarls VQ.PS
or ear, y U.

-:0ilizaloff CYOjLS AND FATS:.dvir T[R-DYINGOIL .,I= 0. 9 'MD 44'

Oftg ahd:. tat's,
t 1)


fAts::11i P.,
Pint g injC's 1943, (Aud i n insee
Zn Ilse of M C1
14 ..... .....
uhd s bio 4).
W4-Ing ,)ad thinning paint, tot4jecl .779: Mill-ion -Po (ta
A thM-a mar ea 'd TTa *the smallest total si"
i Q of oil and 'fat s i:L pmd-ar-tt f cx'c I'vil Jq#8 wit-% limitodthroughout
`* bl 'Fb dd,,'C &r 4 1 m u'i,. n as'Fbod I M :srb t-'11 bn io I raer I 42,frOM'. AP ril 19
`,Al 144 eA,";es G't_-n,tai Prof)bre-trce -Ord,6r M 11 of the V,:roaaqtion Bcor
'PtiOZ ta A-Pril 7-143). With relati'vely jAinor exoebtiots, Manufaatur6t.T, quotas
U ma. pRi-nt varnishos, ;,in0leWa, andQ11010
voro, Ob4taltshe4 -t 70 percent of base-per' 4,
3.6due: in the irst 4-aarter of 19
o' I and third 'qwx and pe*rcont in the iourtbL,
e'. is z-Va' a c use in the
*41-1,e:l quaia,-t6r Prlllting I-Aks t4roilg-hout 1943 #e- r e 90 'ercani of'basa-,%

















































Utilization of oils and fats in drying-oil products doesa g
the curve of industrial production in Wartime years, Z adoubted
of a shift in the kind of products produced in wartime. It hbI a I
that 66 percent of the industrial outputin the Unifted Stai &Ai
measured by the index of industrial production) was. 6fr wvit'
compares with 53 percent in 1942 and 20 percent in 13 1. i. ,





T7 71,71
IT

45 if C) 6 UCI Perr,
'\do d Lvi ian goods
IT


and
MI
vmj a Imo++ whexi the Watur e, of the'
g# IrQAuction i r'adicallyAlterqd,
403* and oiTs'vould show a r-18stIr"'


W t lh- lis4k han 'im 31
7
dryltk-pitl inU'ties :tor: whr w-, er'l ana
T UCts of,, the
'f indus`tt a -i-ad rTesidentialpropert wi to m ,tv
ai, zat,* oil ana f,ts b:t+ Ithe drying-oil indlotridz 'in 1944,
''for e.iTtklx voin es cially s"goo'
f t' in 1945, pe
el, "been,, 6 age-dl s6wtqhat as-a rea'u",'of,'a bette- supply,
I fnozt arying OILS'

d-Oil to T 6 tsa Li -1--
il 11 Ind-Ustries 1 Increased
IM" h rt V" U d 6i
an ti, i6a 013s b. tor:bban,.wttlally
"rlyt ,,194, us &, Of the se quick
51 -dring oi wa c it,= 44 d. to taling,29
Wi 5,nIII 0 PO a year e I dr lier Utp- of
'sO-Ybe= oils An drying-oil" Prodlictis was '161#4" G6,, t
from a total: f'52 MI on Pounas
,P 'uhas, in, 1943. The quantity'.of linseed oil iitil"ed- lsc
eaf-- earlie"VIt I S resuat: of the' rettri,&-tiong"
of o-11sand fats.ih a iv i I i an pro diie t s but R died od I
#early 99 percent ff-t Used., 'cot red
or' the total od 1 s an
perc,6At iA: 1942. a4d aA, d7vrrai'ge:, jprc ent in
4
SUP lyprospect8 for, qui6r-dgy!gg'.otIt a, 19 nigterially 'bttterl
good &rop of 'Pitipica, olil is repoi,IeA to halvebeen
in contrast t-o:,Aear-f;ai1-qrqs. Qf'th.e 'qr-op in, 1:421: and
14orts of castq beans hd,-Oe increaced. AlIocation of oiticica
4 s bexi+ repo7ed slim',e 'Jabuary, and aill sinre October last..
"Ro"AtT 1 CT t i0 04 .,&V'inoa t red6ntly bicalise
tio"tung nut crop I S e xpe-c it, e d
donsict6m-.Ojy.- in '19.4-4.










TI
T`










































































1939-41, it is assumed that the difference Detween mne repour~c
other vegetable oils" and 300,000 pounds represents oiticipA oil.


.......... .. .. ........*. :.....
. . .. ..".... .. .. i .:,


...,...


: I





-T 3





i,9410 15206 43
7g T7
e ~ b. Jh ess xeta t
m1j






24a a13,3 2ia 13,-71'ie9
i fen 3 6
<1 155
.. .. G 5 -3 2 1 2 5 ,,
3, $ 4 25I


2170 09P 159 52j
*%iiiHH 2.,0 4 40 0 316


IT 5 1,j q8 _
Wi07






Vab i 6.7. JN4tox7 coonnap i*,do'q
li"4lem ao 0
Item 159 i g 1 9

Llaseed oil i.........
Fish oil .............. 17.395 1-9,001 :1 ,68 7
'Perilla oil ....... 10,759 2 S8 340 36
Tung oil ............: 3.763 ,Vp& LA,96 s
Sbyybean oil .......: 6.4 72 1 1.46
castor oil ....... 89 17 129
Oiticica oil 2/ ........: 1.264 706. 36$
R pap oil ................:..
Corn. oil .. .. .. -- -1
B abassu. oil i.............:- -
4.Coconut oil ........e .- -

Grease ...................1- -
Tallow, inedible\ ........121
Total ............ 107.721 '111,,813 136.940 11
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of Uhe ,CeUsus4
I Preliminsry.
2 19-1 reported as "other' vegetable ols auedob ii

Table 7-- Factory consumption :of fats and oili in-the meannf
printin inksi, Uni ;ed States, 193,14-1
I tem 1939 1*4 141 1
1 1000 lb. 1000 lb. f-006 lb. 000,;
Linseed oil .......: 1.2 718 23,547 1
Tung oil ........: 2,105- 1.729 2.960
Verilla oil ..........: 1,915 1,109 931
Fish oil ................: 2o4 179 179
Castor oil ...... :......., 317 352 760
Oiticica oil 2/ .........: 79 20 ,89
Cottonseed oil ............ '192 .352 05
Soybean oil ............. 62, 82 25
Pa m oil ................ : 5 21
Peanut oil ...............: --- -* -
Babassu. oil ............. : -- -
Coconut oil .............. 21
corn Oil ...............: 4- -
01ive-oil'foots .........: -
Other vegetable oils... ----

G~rease ............... 40: .449 410 472
Marine mammal oil ...... 4 7 1.0
Tallow, inedible ......... 12 10 .
Tal-low,. edible ..,........: 1 4
Lard ................. .... 13'.
Neatis-foot Oil ........... 4-
01eostearine .............. 2 .6
Total ............... : 2_, U1 21 18 2,1719 qV3
("omplied from reports of the Bureau of the Census,
-1/ Preliminpry,
2/1939-41, reported as "other vegetable: oilsat0 assuhed :to be 14





iTv
e"I


t*
I Z 3 2. -
J ,2 ,T'- .
""t 'i-5 8 3

i2 jTS
4.7 4.7 8m
ll2"
-9 `l 5 3,. 5
ol3'
t,2 Am
1,0, 1050 50.01+0.) 600 001

72.5 47T
4041 2 ,4 44 '
.2 1j24 1
[3.63. 7 .4724 T f,
2. 1
6 65. .
9 4. .
1 ,.
0,10p0 -0 .0lo
-100100100-.op o


























vuorn oi ............ ............ ..15,6 Do .U. oc. ; .
Cottonseed oil ..... ......... : 105.6 106.5 .86.6 378.0 395-l:iF, i
I Linseed oil .....................: 65.2 88.2 98.0 258.7 204.3.4
SOlive oil, edible ...............: 2.0 2.1 .9 5.9 8.
SPeanut oil ......................: 15.0 11.6 12.'9 12.1 4 :.
Soybean oil .....................: 115.3 123.9 129.9 188.8 2,, 3V
Tung oil ........................ 1.2. .4 .4 2.5 2.
I.,: Other vegetable oils ............: .9 2.8 1.0 18.7 .
l" Total, vegetable ............. 352.3 1 70.3 10.6 1,1
,.,.. Grand total .............. : 27 .6 915-.0 -200.-~2j. ~2J
SIndicated production from domiatt"Al
Yar 19lo.4 1941-42 .194'
beginning._. .......
: :Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil.

|,Sutter, including farm ............. Oct. 2,287 2,153 2,08. -
Lard and rendered pork fat, total .: Oct. : 2,285 2,4O4 2,PCC
lnedible tallow and greases, total 1 Oct. : 1,492 1.,733 1, 01G ?
'E dible tallow, oleosteraine,
:. oleo stock and oleo oil ..........! Oct. 218 277 271 '
LNeat s-foot oil .................. : Oct. 4 5 3 3 ':..l
'.Wool grease .......................: Oct. 14 15 :.
'Marine animal oils ................ July 175 215 163 '
&- Corn oil Octa 242
Corn oil .......................... Oct. t 186 242 .40 *f
SCottonseed oil ....................: Aug. 1,425 1,250 l,.400.
PiLinseed oil 3 ....................: July 494 546 729 .
,Glive oil ......................... Nov, 11 8
PE, eanut oil ........................ Sept. 174 77 130
VB: oybean oil ...................... Oct. 564 707 1 .19
jTung oil ..........................: Dee. __ .4 2 .Ze
Total .........................T: __93 ,70 o. .,
Ibmpiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census and the Department of
.Monthly reports do not show total production of butter, lard, inedible t4f
greases. l/ Based on most recent indications,, subject to change. V/ i4
t ./ Domestic production.
E ,s ., .. ;,.. :;








OifiOA kbhd d il!
19,4i, 9

'%,41- `31 4
-iq


6.,7. 13b -07 6
24-g.,c) .1
t, ,29,3: 361
83 jjo5
3.7 .3, 7
14, 4
M 3
gj
6
'4 o.
0 7 .13.0 15, C !Toil
kte r 41 6.; 3j.
131. 6; 17-5,
2, 6 4 63 g
1,0 4 "'6

00 74:

I r-1 66.,2 11)q 117,
'30.7 .7 4., 6
'463. 6, 48.6. 9:
-57 ...5o4. 6
235.9 ;299.6. 297.3. 305 2
p 4, 94 7.5.: ..6 o
7 6
"ind OQt 1-3.3 9.6
i 6
, ki
1-5
3,
41 '47 53
31.1 -5i
34.
3
'4,
146 0 211,9 2kll 0
31:3 30 26,61,
A
4 A. 461
27 4 4
2,20t 2,434-3',,

mi, r Or '0 tc Omsi8iw 'Oxcept buttor h4d.l.,Lth:
rpm irmipdbd i--znmb6r's.


-iz 1 r di,ri4ing by thcF ftllol4ng f
o, 'tiut, 0 anlx
o'i, i>,,a M, b A '6,93 bo

ph, dr6,tLp, te(,"t
4$14 b dx


il j6



































e 1L.- rrices 01 specalea .-o i-oearing matl
April 1942 and 1943, February-April 1944


I' tem

C ..astor beans, Brazilian,
f.o.b. Brazilian ports ...:
: Cottonseed, United States
farm price .............
F'laxseed, No. 1, Minneapolis:
i Flaxseed, United States


Unit : April _
::_ __ i 2 UJ1947 Feb. ^
: Dollars ars Dollars

Long ton :/ 96.50 75.00 75.00

Short ton: 43.90 45.89 52.60
Bushel : 2..62 3.21 3.05
:


'dvli

524,


ij farm price .............: 21.41 2.98 2.85 2!
t.'Peanuts, No. 1 shelled :
':: Spanish, Southeastern
shipping points ......... "100 pounds: 13.88 14.25 11.25 I.
I~:Peanuts (for nuts and oil), :
L United States farm price .: 6.25 6.98 7. 3
Soybeans, tLited States : : ,
farm price ...............: Bushel : 1.76 1.67 1.8
:Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, Daily Trade Bulletin
t Journal of Commerce, Daily Market Record (Minneapolis), .and reports btfA2
.of Agricultural Economics. ..A
1- C. and F., New York.
.1A4
7~


- ...


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i'




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

II i12 09ill5IIIIIIIIIl
3 1262 08905 1465


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r It STARSR' NPAR t A-'MItICUi i
SBtBEAU DF AGRI CT $U.L .C6NOBIN01.
WASHIR N*R 2s, D. C..
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