The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00041
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00041

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text
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iW NTEEPICS 99,2
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PRICE
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r
Baterp 92-soore, Chicago ......................................
Bubter, 92-aoor, New Tark *.1.....................................
Oleasrgrine, dam. vag., Chiago ................................
COopounds (anil and veg. ooeodag ats), Chaago ................
Ird, loseo, Chicago ...................... ......... .............
Lard, prin ste, tierl e, Chag .............................r
Lard, refined, cartoon, Chicago ..................................
01so oil, extra, tierces, Chicago ................... ...........................
0eoatesrine, bbl., Y... ......................................
allow, edible, Chioago ..........................................

Corn oil, crud, tanks, f.o.b. Ails .............................
Corn oil, reined, bbl., .TI. ................................. :
Cottoneed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. 8. B. mills .................
Cottonseed oil, p.e.y., tank care, N.T. .........................
Peanut oil, rue, tank, f.o.b. il ............................
Peanut oil, do. refined, bbl., .. .............................
Soybean oil, crude, tank cars, a mesatern a lls ..................
Soybean oil, dom., crude, draa, N.. .............................
Soybean oil, refined, drum, N.. ................................

abaenu oil, tanks, f.o.b. milla, Pacific Coast ..................
Olive oil, edible, drma, N.Y. ....................................
Olive oil, inedibe, drms, .. ..................................
Olve-oil foot, prime, drum, N.Y. ...........................
Palm oil, Iiger, crude, druma, N.Y. / ..........................
Rape oil, dru, .. ........................ ....................
Rape oil, blown, drums, N.T. ......................................
Teaseed oil, crude, drums, N. ..................................

Tallow, inedible, Chicago .........................................
Grease, A white, Chicago ........................................
Ibnhaden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore ....................:
Sardine oil, crude, tanks, Pacific Coast ........................:
Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, drum, N.. .................:

Linseed oil, raw, tank cars, UNnneapolis .......................:
Linseed oil, raw, druam, carlots, N.Y. ...........................:
Pertlla oil, drums, N.. .........................................
Olticica oil, drums, N.Y. .........................................
Tung oil, drums, N.Y. ..........................................
Cantor oil, No. 3, bbl., N.Y. .....................................
Castor oil, dehydrated, drms, carlots, N.Y. ....................
Cod-liver oil, mad. U.S.P. bbl., .T. ............................:
Cod oil, Newfoundland, druma, N.Y. ..............................:


INDEE Iwts (1924-29 10


Sight domestic fats and oils (1910-14 100) .....................: 78
Eight dmestio fate and oils .................................... 56

All fate and oils (27 items) ..................................... 61
groped_ by origin;
Lr i ? Iats ................................................... 56
Marine animal oils ............................................. 90
Vegetable oils, dramatic ....................................... 64
Vegetable oils, foreign ....................................... g 87
Grouped by use:
i r ...~................................................... 60
Butter, seasonally adjusted ................................... 65
Lard ........................................................... 42
Food fats, other ............................................... 63
Soap fate .............................. ................. 60
Drying oils ...................................... ......... 95
MLacellaneous oils .............................................


-emU gg9 .Ee..
1. 9..4 3 T.2
26.9 ".6 37.9 S37.
15.0 10.0 19.0 ,0 .
9.2 13. 17.0 17.A
4.7 9.2 21.4 31.4 .
5.5 10.1 12.7 2.6
6.2 10.6 15.0 14.6
7.0 10.5 13.0 2$,0
5.0 9.9 10.5 lfl ,
4,2 8.2 9.8
..... .. : :. .ii .
5.5 11.3 12.8 .'
8.4 13.9 15.5
5.1 10.4 12.6 1 ; i
6.0 U1.5 14.0
5.7 10.3 13.0 l ip
8.9 13.9 17.0 .i
4.7 9.6 11.8
6.6 1U. 13.0 Ws .
7.3 11.9 14.2 1.2
8.8 10.7 20. i'.
62.8 75.7 71 .d
19.5 45.1 59.3 5.8
9.1 16.8 19.8 .
7.5 9.0 12.0 12.0
15.0 13.3 15.5 .. *
17.5 16.9 18.2 a. 2
12.5 20.2 -

3.8 7.5 9.3 9.."" ..
3.8 7.6 9.6 94 9.6
4.7 7.1 8.9 a....
5.4 7.5 8.9 8 i.::
9.5 9.9 11.1 11.1 ..

9.3 9.8 13.1 23.1 12,.
10.0 10.9 14.2 14.2 14.0
- 18.9 24.6 24.6 24.6
17.5 20.2 25.2 25 *2 .9 .
24.0 32.0 40.2 40.2 40,2
12.8 11.1 13.8 13.6 4 iXii
16.7 15.3 18.5 186 ma.6 ,
28.8 35.8 35.3 36.4 ; &
-- 10.0 11.3 11.5 I.


0)


116 133 139 '
82 94 4 :""

90 102 ot O .
.89 89 : .
108 126 26
106 130 1 '...
131 161 40 ,

S 85 65
88 89 93
77 97 96
118 142 14
105 128 W' .-.
108 140 14
96 114 fl%


..,. :,


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rriowu compuileo ra U0L, Pranm an urug Bsepoar, ine s MLoIL rroneaioner, and reports ofr se AgIauulu
Administration and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Prices quoted include aoise tames and duties sare applicab
numbers for earlier years beginning 1910 are given in Technical Bulletin No. 737 (190) and The atsa ad 6di
beginning December 1940.

I Three-cent processing tax added to price as originally quoted.


I


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t7

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X,
ot
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oall, doi6t c inlit,
116
rut-,



to so ci 35

t Awt
4"t. p 't t t t

4f ,,*W,
"tV
nio -




Aseed-oil vere rslomo
441 t F
het wholosal

4 =14C, g in,
t17 "a" r-lc win,9
11 l -

p,6& tds t of te IftexitVve

prospctlve large
'A "I
L94P ioi* IF, a 0 Iavo in
t-+S,,*O`m, bda
;l 0.


",A6e',Kn& with9naxilq= retail
T)Pwar dqi+,it
Ott 'A'
v fAs 'and oi Is izi

th$n tj 1, 9'41 6taj.




-X-f-







e tAlcq7`1' equsa b'i ths,e lI 19O1 oti o

-0* a oers ttoklzCn f ft sphed 034 1W e

year. ..

The increase An domesticarvt o

bsntal 1ryal :fAfall 'p 9ett

.and ftl eat tion -t ports, SBtacks 1* 671 9

pemateil que n14 mleqs do aegg!mp

overnmen'action..




UACKG.ROUN,-, Prices of ftsk and oils,, which, *erp
low 'in 19q ad}40, advmnced shar-ly A4th frs
Sof 11941, reflectinpg a L~~ t-ttgsituati~qn, t
materiide zmrr.Od, Imppovpment -in 4omerstic. 4mande
meni:!purdhaie~s of- lard for ex-port., In."the2irat,
oil'* XIMaxim L whlesge prices forfta +1 g

maximum pri ce. ache lul e %4as revised, npwa~rd., OA 24)ru
further increase in the maxima ptice, of: lard was, mat,
the ceiling on, linse~i vasremove),asEfgt
ceil ng pr .Iceb. were esi lge -nretail prices,,a
oils, except butter and lih.e olathihetpr
charged` Auring March 19,)

Price Is Decl ine: iti June

WMN lower wholesale, 'prices Urt June fortqy e~dible,!t
for linseed oil., the Indei number of *hol e sale -price6s- of 87 1
ois as :at.-the 1924_2q averaged 2 point,,j, owpr than InMp y-40
higher "txm tinJune L941. Butter- :ricez, during June remathed V.
(bov thesuport eve of -Pr, 'qts Pe ound for 92-secre at
cntrast to the peak of 39 cents in late April. L ices fo u
fil fo~b. =11l49, ;remained at ceUl#Wivs,4 pieso
wee lower., On. ihe other hand._ ptiaes. of refinecl soybeyg ol1
unc eagedat ceilin4 levels,. while. the -price of teeqeo
was somevIp lower. In early, July the, pri-Ce, of cru~adelsApy_
.,sharply, to 11.,25 Dets erpound,-V/,'c~ent under,,t e 14I
oil' a eaed 0.2. to 0-3 cOnts e o lower tialoe 'hm@toM

lower prices for edible. oils ,and tor- lnsked o, rf44i
1iaht. demand iA wholesale markets. TH:; waii ranartecl htli wet, ffpr,














f o:: Cipeavare animal faftt and oils.

.4:h the general lack of strength in prices of edible fate and oils,
Sthe price of prime steam lard at Chicago failed to advance in June even though i
i.ts celliig price was raised early in the month. The price of loose lard
f ei:l, however, returning to a more nearly normal relationship to the price of
t ,teroB lard than.-had been., ossible under the preceding price ceilings. During
m: e the price 6f loose lard averaged 11.8 cents per pound, 0.8 cents under
I:: ee rice of tierce lard.

Mf ni_8e inODilseed Meal Prices Halted

During the second week in June prices of oilseed meals reached the
.1;,viieait levels in several months. Soybean and cottonseed meal prices rose,
hii' weVer, -following conferences between oilseed crushers and officials of the
Commodity Credit Corporation regarding a program to support prices of oils
Sand oilseed meals at levels that would allow crushers a fair margin after
Spaying prices for oilseeds at least eoual to the support prices that have been
announced by the Secretary of Agriculture. larly in July, bagged soybean meal
: (bl percent protein) was priced at $41.20 per ton, Chicago, compared with :,
ii":. $35.70 per ton in the second week of June, and cottonseed meal (41 percent
protein) was selling at $35.50 per ton, Memphis, compared with $32.50 in the
second week of June,.

STerminal market prices for soybeans tended to fluctuate with prices of
soybean meal, but they also reflected freer offerings of beans by farmers,
P planting of soybeans was completed during June, and supplies of beans that had '.;
S been held back to meet possible demands for seed became available in the
', .regular market. The price of No. 2 Tellow beans at Chicago averaged $1.72
S per busheL in June, S cents lower than in May.

i q:* O nernent PThrchases Continue Large

SIn June the Agricultural Marketing Administration purchased approxi-
I: at;. ely 66 million pounds of .lard and. rendered pork fat, about 26 million
.. pounds of-salad oil, including soybean and corn oils, over 3 million pounds .j
bf -edible tallow, and small quantities of butter and ,ler oil. The quantity. /,
of-lard purchased in June was somewhat smaller than in May, but an unusually, .
..' .large purchase was made July 3. A.total .of about 420 million pounds of lard
L.,bas. been bought this year through July 3. Monthly purchases of lard during
the remainder of -the year may average 0S million pounds or more, compared
wieth estimated total production averaging 240 to 250 million pounds per month.
Pr.chases-oTf edible' vegetable oils probably will increase considerably in the.
.second half. of 1942, '



ku .
.; :,3:








Imports OrderRevised .

General Imports Order M-63, originally issued in December 1941. 6 .jai :
*subsequently amended several times, .was reissued in June 1942 in' revised
form. A few additional changes were made in Amendment-No. 1 to the revii
Order. As it now stands, the Order includes all fats, oils, and bil-Fe:':.
materials covered by the original order and amendments except eo&d-liver,i1C'
Shark, and shark-liver oils.. It .also includes the following additional it|i.
Cashew nuts and cashew-nut kernels, cashew-nut eil, oleoltearin',palm ]i
palm-kernel oil, and vegetable tallow..

Commodities-named in the Order may not be'imnorted into the Un.tled
States without written authorization from the War Production Board, except b
authorized agencies of the Federal Government. The commodities are grj .ed .
into 3 lists. List III includes commodities that are not needed so urgently .
in the war effort as the items on list I and list II, and in view of the
scarcity of shipping space, import permits are less likely to be issued for .X
commodities on list III. Of the fate, oils, and oilseeds covered by the Order',"i
Only oleostearineand vegetable tallow are included in list III. Itdms on list.:i
I are distinguished from those on list II by stricter control over their move.-e::
ment and utilization after importation. '

Oiticica Oil Bound Free of Duty

In a recent reciprocal trade agreement with Peru, effective July 29,
the United States has agreed not 'to place an import duty on oiticica oil
during the life of the agreement. Brazil is the chief source of United States.
imports of this oil. Like tung oil, it is a fast-drying oil. Supplies- of such=',
oils are now very short because of the loss of Far Eastern sources.

OUTLOOK :'

Large Crops of Oilseeds in Prospect

Greatly increased acreage of soybeans, peanuts, and flaxseed in culti-'.%
vation on July 1 promise much larger oil crops in 1942 than in 1941.- he
acreage of cotton, however, estimated at 24,005,000 this year, is only 3.
percent greater than last year when the average yield per acre was somewhat
higher than normal.

The 1942 acreage of soybeans grown alone for all purposes is -etimated..
to be 14,.241,000 42 percent more than last year. Definite indications are
not yet available as to what proportion of this acreage will be harvested for
beans, as weather conditions between now and harvest time, the rrospecftive
yield of beans, availability of harvesting machinery, and the need for hay will,
all affect farmers1 plans. But on the basis of present prospects about 10.4
million acres may be harvested for beans compared with the nrodduction'goal of .i:
9 million acres set early this year, .Ten million acres could make 145 million:
bushels of beans available for crushing. This would be roughly equivalent to
1,300 million -ounds of oil. In certain areas the'crop will exceed'the
capacity of soybean crushing mills and means will have to be found to move the .
bepns from such areas to mills that normally crush other kinds of oil-bearing .:i
materials. :..i

. :








This'year the acreage of peanuts grown alone for all purposes, esti-
mated at 4,027,000, is nearly double last year's acreage. If the .same acreage
is used this year as last for purposes other than picking and threshing,
4,327,000 acres would be picked and threshed more than twice last year's
acreage and .7 percent of the production goal. It is difficult to-estimate
what proportion of the peanuts picked and threshed will be crushed for oil,
but with antallowance of 1,000 million pounds to be cleaned and shelled and
normal allowances for seed, farm household use, etc.., perhaps 1,500 million
pounds of farmers' stock peanuts would remain for crushing. Together with a
normal proportion of crushing stock from cleaned and shelled peanuts, this
quantity would yield approximately 450 million pounds of oil.

Acreage planted to flaxseed in 1942 is estimated at 4,675,000, slightly
.above the production goal of 4,500,000 acres and 39 percent more than in 1941.
Growing conditions so far have been unusually favorable and a harvest approach-
ing 42 million bushels is now indicated. From this production, excluding seed
for next year, the yield of oil should be nearly 750 million pounds.

Pig Crops Largest on Record;
Lard Production to Rise

The number of vigs saved in the spring of 1942 (December 1, 1941 to
June 1, 1942) is estimated near 62 million head, 25 percent more than in the
spring of 1941 and 15 percent more than in the spring of 1933, the previous
record year. This is the second record-breaking crop in succession, as the
fall crop of 1941 of about 36 million head was greater than any previous fall
crop. The fall crop of 1942 may exceed the 1941 fall crop by about 22 percent.

Marketing and slaughter of hogs in 1942 will be greater than ever
before, probably reaching 83 million head, about 16 percent more than in 1941.
This figure will be materially exceeded in 1943, when the market supply may
reach 94 million head. Production of lard may increase somewhat less in pro-
portion to the number of hogs slaughtered. The average weight of the hogs
marketed may be slightly less than in 1941 when weights were the highest on
record, and the yield of lard per hog also may be less unless means are taken
to increase the lard cut-out in packing plants. Lard production may reach
2,650 million -ounds in 1942 and 3,000 million pounds in 1943, compared with
an estimated 2,280 million pounds in 1941. .An additional 3 pounds of lard per
hog probably.could be obtained from commercial slaughter if appropriate price
and other measures were taken. This would mean a further increase of 100
million pounds of lard in the remainder of 1942 and about 225 million pounds
in 1943.

Household Fat Recovery Program
Inaugurated

As part of the National Salvage Program formally begun July 13, home-
makers have-been urged to recover waste kitchen fats, such as bacon drippings.
These fats iay be strained and sold in tin cans to meat dealers who will resell
the fats to-local renderers. The waste kitchen fats will be refined and
marketed by the renderers as inedible tallow or grease suitable for use in the
manufacture of such articles as soap, glycerin, lubricants and candles. It is








hoped that at least half a billion pounds of industrial fats and greases .i
be added annually to the domestic supply of fats and oils by means of th'I i
program. This quantity would be about equivalent to 1 pound per *monith fM: l. i
every family. 1

Production of inedible tallow and greases (excluding wool grease) "Wa i
shown a marked upward trend in recent years. Output increased from 929 iaflhli
pounds in 1938 to 1,551 million pounds in 1941. On the basis of retu'rnkfo>f6
the first quarter of 1942, it seemed likely that total output this year might :.'
be about 1,750 million pounds. If household recovery of fats and greases
reached the 500 million pound yearly rate, however, total production Of in-
edible tallow and greases might be about 2,000 million pounds in 1942 and
perhaps 2,300 million pounds in 1943. The rate of household recovery is not
accurately predictable, and the total production actually achieved may be muCah::
more or much less than the quantities indicated,

LARD.AND OTHER COOKING FATS, 1941-43

Hog Production at Record Levels

High prices for hogs and a consistently favorable hog-corn ratio since'
the spring of 1941 halted the downswing in hog production that began with a
small spring pig crop in 1940, and have influenced farmers to raise more hogs
than ever before. The 1941 fall pig crop, the 1942 spring crop, and the ex-
pected 1942 fall crop are p.11 larger than in any previous year. Hog slaughter
is now at or near record levels for the season.

Less Lard for Domestic Consumption

Production of lard does not respond readily to changes in the price of
lIrd, but is determined primarily by the number and average live weight of hogsai
marketed. Packers, however, can vary the take-off of fet within rather wide
limits by trimming closely or widely. Average monthly yields of lard in com-
mercial plants during the last 20 years have varied from 9 pounds to 18 pounds
per 100 pounds live weight of hog and from 20 to 42 pounds per hog.

Hogs coming to market in 1941 were the heaviest on record and the yield
of 32.9 pounds of lard per hog was the highest in 8 years. Accordingly, pro-,
duction of lard in 1h41, at 2,282 million pounds, was only 3 percent less than
in 1940, although 8 percent fewer hogs were slaughtered than in 1940. Domestic
disappearance of lard in 1941, at 1,967 million pounds, was virtually the same
as in 1940. (See table 2.) If the same yields of lard per hog pre realized
this year and next as in 1941, lard production may reach 2,650 million pounds
in 1942 and 3,000 million pounds in 1943. Additional production of at least
100 million pounds in 1942 and 225 million pounds in 1943 would be possible
if measures to increase packers' take-off could be worked out.

Export requirements will be much above normal in both 1942 and 1943.
Purchases for lend-lease are expected to amount to at least 900 million pounds
in 1942 and to exceed 1 billion pounds in 1943. These quantities would_b in
addition to exports to Latin America. Unless measures are taken to increase
the lard cut-out in commercial packing plants, supplies of lard available for
domestic consumption may be less than 1,750 million pounds in 1942 and 1i,00
million pounds in 1943.











Under presuent-5.price ceilings domestic consumption of lard is encouraged 3i
by.. the low price of lifd in relation to the price-of cottonseed oil. Normally i:
.,the price of prime summer yellow cottonseed oil-at New York is somewhat lower
than the ptlce of prime team lard at Chicago. (See chart-oh cover page.)
With a larg6 production of-lard ii 1940 and 1941 and restricted export outlets,
eiwever, 1&rd.prices were at abnormally low levels and Chicago lard sold for
".. less.than New York cottonseed oil, The price ceiling on Chicago lard is 1.4
o enter below the ceiling on cottonseed oil at New York.

'At present prices, packers are using unusually large amounts of lard
t n the marifacture of compounds. In 1941 over 50 million pounds of'lard and
I;r.tendered pork fat were used in compounds, and their use in the first quarter
',.f .this year was apparently at an even greater-rate, with total factory con-
-u.'miption of lard and rendered pork fat reported at 23 million pounds, Cornm-
i:,i'Ionds containing relatively large amounts of lard are tending to displace
.,. vegetable cooking fats 'n retail sales and thus to reduce consumption of cotton-
-40:ad and soybean oils,

7 -'Ai.duction and Consumption of Other
S' .Cooking Pats at High Level

If Production of compounds and vegetable cooking fats can be adjusted
... fairly easily to market conditions. When lard is plentiful and cheap, pro-
"," dction.and consumption of other cooking fats decline, a.nd when lard is scarce,
they increase. (See tables 3 and 4.) Total consumption of lard and other
cooking fats remains relatively stable from year to year, although there is a
'tendency for consumption to rise in years of high consumer purchasing power
.and there has been a gradual upward trend since 1920. In 1941, with consumer
I. purchasing power at a new high level, per capital disappearance of lard and
other cooking fats reached a'new peak of nearly 25 pounds, compared with a
I : recent average of about 22 pounds per year. Part of the increase in 1941
apparently resulted from an expansion in inventories by dealers and'industrial
c. consumers Purchasing power is still rising and with ceilings on retail prices-
I '.total 'domestic disappearance of lard and other cooking fats may be expected to, ii
r .remain at a high level, assening that supplies will be freely available.

Proportions of Peanut Oil, Palm Oils,
S and Lard i' Shortening Increased in 1941

.Utilization of fats and oils in compounds and vegetable cooking fats in
1941 totaling 1,418 million pounds, was 222 million pounds greater than in
1940, With increased supplies available, the use of peanut oil increased from .j:
2 percent of the total fats in manufactured shortening in 1940 to 6 percent in:t
1941. The use of palm oil, similarly, increased from 3 to 6 percent. With
S low prices for lard in relation to prices of vegetable oils, the use of lard .
also increased relatively more than that of most other fats and oils. Lard
including rendered pork fat made up 1 percent of the total ingredients in 1940'.:!:
and 4 percent in 1948. Although increasing in absolute quantities, the use f:i
I.-...cottonseed and soybean oils was reduced relative to other fats and oils.
l nevertheless, cottonseed oil accounted for 63 percent of the total fats and
iii:oils used in shortening in 1941, while soybean oil accounted for 15 percent,' .
tablea' and 6..)





- .U -


Table 2.- Lard, including rendered pork fat: Production, trade,
stocks December 31, and apparent disappearance, 1912-41

t Production r :Ship- : 1 2 j
m : I... Iments : Total I Cold-
Watotal. Dsp
ie ; l : t to :exports: stor- T pi.',
Year I:ederally: :3SxportaeUnited; and I age : sap ;e ..paran
Other Total !nsUnotea
*inspected: : l States: ship- I stock sa f lard
S: : terri-" ments ADec, 31"Pearance:as lard
S: : S stories : -
SMil Mi il, il. il. Mil. M1, Mil, Mil,
: lb_ I. lb. Ib -. Jba.


959
945

956
966
738
1.155

1,207
1,379
1,575
1,971
1,923
1,452
1,513
1,557
1,750
1,763

1,521
1.554
1,573
1,679
1,341
662
992
759
1,034
1,272


: 11,527
21 : 1/1,526


699
.708
0oo
733
.740
713
759
765

751
729
727
747
737
701
693
706
708
698

706
753
807
796
750
614
687
672
694
765
816
756


10658
1,653
lo 689
1,.7o6
1,551
1, 995
1::,920

1,958
2,108
2,302
2,718.
2,650
2,153
2,206
2,263
2,458
2,461

2,227
2,307
2,380
2,475
2,091
1,276
1,679
1,431
1,728
2,037

2,343
2,282


553
1575
'487
454
382
555
784


556
5o0

492
146o
386
558
788


1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
19?2
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939


201
if


642
903
797
1,074
986
719
733
717
801
866

674
6oi
576
6 -..
458
-115
137
162
234
311


31 232
If 5f


-a-
-a-
63
81
55
10o4
63

48
49
149
61
42
50
55
85
82

51

133
118
53
146
54
107
162


1,102
1,073
1,190
1.197
1,228
1,091
1,291
1,174

1,319
1;217
1.503
1,644
-1,662
1,452
1,465
1,541
.1,626
-1.,598

1,583
1.706

1,772
1,648
1,226
1,449
1,361
* 1,.440
1,671

1,979
* 1,967


1,076
l,o41
1,163
l,l66
1,188
1,045
1,242
1,125

1,273
1,172
1,463
1,603
1,623
i1,41
1,432
. 1,506
1,588
1,549

1.556
1,684
1,795
1.754
1,633
1 217
1,442
1,352
1,430
1,656
S1,949
1,898


Continued -


635
893
787
1,060
971
708
717
702
783
848

656
578
S552
584
435
97
112
137
205
277




































-g pwci *-v uuou pjumuiunQ .L.J
SpOands; 1941, 5,000,000 ipunds.

elable.










It.
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Table 3.- Compounds and vegetable oooting fats: Production, trade,
stocks December 31, and apparent disappearance, 1912-41
-- ,' i- ._'._-


: Factory : .aorts
Year production for con-
Ss.dumption 1/
: 1,000 lb. '1,000 l'b

1912 876,927
1915- s 1v000000 f 563
1914 : 1,136,522 545
1915 : 1,075,000 258
1916 s 1,027.133 51
1917 : 1,173,446 428
1918 : 1,146,236. 801
1919 : 1,352,000 3,846
a


192Q :
1921 :
1922 :
1923 :
194 .-
192,5 :
1926
1927
1928 B
1929

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934 :
1935 :
1936 :
1937
1938
1939 :

1940
1941 4/
:


747,255
811,095
784-180
75.,522
8b.0,435
1,152,620
1,1.4,708
1,1';,d395
1,143,349
1,220,102

1,211,268
1,171,559
945,441
952,580
1,204,331
1,546,795
1,586,741
1,594,929
1,514,028
1,403,551

1,190,322
1,409,402


14
5
35
2
83
25
319
250
181
257

92
101
221
189
281
7,949
6,235
1,909
1,924
1,245

505
y


I l i Tn


: Net *: Factory ,
Exports exports : stocks,
;December 31
1,ooo000 lb. 1,000 Ib.. 1000 I b.


73,724
63,700
63,556
63,870
49,822
49,300
43,977
124,963

32,051
48,207
41,765
17,067
14,371
22,313
18,167
14,420
10,394
9,975


8,791
5,994
3,498
2,602
2,181
1,219
1,623
1,723
2,255
3,237

3,805
y


73,724
63,647
62,811
63,612
49,771
48,872
43,176
121,117

32,037
48,202
41,730
17,065
14,288
22,288
17,849
14,170
10,213
9,718


8,699
5,893
3,277
2,413
1,900
6,730
4,612
IG;j
331
1,992

3,300
5V'


-Ii-











15,515
10,689
19,517
22,857
22.926
26,770
.--a
















29 -29
31,669

26.672
24,751
26,265
27,301
27,690
39,890
44,932
46,031
a---
--a
-a--
--a





















55,662
56,621
56,621


Pea.




14 O*411
- Br S...,'



1,11, 74
"''i" nAS "
.0.462


1.fQt88 .e
78.,3.:i






1,123,791 I
1,160,1961 *i
1,129,977. i
1.208,644

1,207,586
1,167,587
940,650
949,131
1,202,042
1,641,526
1,586,311
1,594,016
1,504,066
1,400,600


53,741 1,189,902
53,351 -1,407,573


Continued -


II


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Lordt~ I I~ Iaaon~
p--ak I 'cooking:



:194, i 08 .96 2. 6*5
1914~~; 11? 1. 5` 17.
$9)$ 4 11.6 10*1 21 12
1% 1696 41, 17,
117 : 10.1: 10,9' _M8 U1.0 '. 15,7'2,
$$l I >.9 10. 224 7'_.. 3
149 10 62 .22. 02 )3

190a 11,9. 6 7 ig186 1 83.4
0,2 :. 17, 0, 1 8: 6.2- 2.0 .O:
192' 1. 3 'M7 0,0 1. ,
1.9 ,, 14jj3 6jL6 20.7.82,0,
l- : 142 7. 21:3,3 80 200
95 : 12.2 .9. 619 1.0aoo
A926 'A 12.6 ]9&,6 2191,52000
292 a132 ,4 222 6 7)26 K0
ig9% 12.7 2. 174, 203,
9 3 .2: 26- 24 1, 949
:L2 14 4' 7 5' 21. 'I, 1,6 1
't1V.140 -7.S 21.6 17*;9 19 1.
4 20







94 : 2.9 9.5 :24 1803'21 0
935 90.6 1. 2, 1,2 3 0 A t
6 : 13 12 2307 1. 3,a:94
,4410.5 1a.4 22, 31..1:-, 19.
7 1 110 1 6 22. 16.} 3. 90
ww









i 2. 07 23. 1J423 9
: 14. 9.0o 23.09- 1 0 841.
41.: 1453 1. 249 116 4 2714

Ooptv ed as: fllowsm, -sing population figores as of July' 14 14 d4
vegetable cooking fat; from data shown in -rcdi tabftsd wtor
`O1eomagarine f rom data showv in the April 1q42:-:Ond-Fobruary 19 2 Insk
Pate... an fDl iatozP~uto dtLfr"utr 9 0*
an.-uy 192



















iC .tl. i*.-. L 1,5 2 6 -r --- .. .-
me Bi u ...i; Ie 1314.l668 1,241,287 1,159,715 1.058,938 1,186,667
s e$.. 8e ... .. .e 13,677 115,033 113,078 33,224 86,486 ,
t:oll ....... 2 12 ,531 26,199 '20,659 17,576 22,069
nil o.f., ..... s 29;269 5,435 724 24 226
Sa.... ....... 50203 : 297 37 ----
i odl i*... ...* 127 950 506 581 -
: i 1 oil .....: 47 614 266 1,146 4
*e. ....... '.870 '695 887 32 93
Foreign ...... 171724 149,223 136,157 52383 108,878
marine
dible.T ......: .66,278 74,251 56,671 39,595 41,227
tarin6e 6.4.. .. 29,664 32,845 25,574 16,940 23,103
: ** a*. ** ag915 s 9i5 2,825 7,398 16,786 5,257
A pork: 'ft 2/ --- ...- -- --- 45,550
3 1fi *,,ns......., 242 291 470 880 1 282
d.'lard, animal .: 97,99 110,212 90,113 74,201 116,399
.E........'... 21,284 16,529 20;321 10,902 6,165
a.?ll wmn.l oils o..t 66 48 12 --- 6
itWa Cfats agd oils 1,604,841 1,517,299 1,406,318 1,196,424 1,418,109
Wd irom Buteau of the Census, Animal and Vegetale Fats and oils. Data
^:i*1imr years beginning 1912 given in The Fats and Oils Situation, May 1939 .

,iAes u~ bntienad vegetable oils reported ps "other". A small percentage may
,i*ti.'ct arbitrarily placed.in foreign group,
I::9td6 d with lard prior to 1941,



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li~u s for........... 2oil* dpl.20e
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