The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00040
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00040

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text











.T : : UA

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

1 ~..,-,


IN THIS ISSUE:
UTILIZATION OF FATS AND OILS IN THE
DRYING INDUSTRIES.


:" :i .


.. :: '...

'* E : *: *" <
i' :

s 7:



a*



i


PROPORTIONS OF PRINCIPAL OILS IN TOTAL VOLUME
OF FATS AND OILS USED IN DRYING INDUSTRIES*,
UNITED STATES. 1935 AND 1940


CASTOR
SAND 0.5%
.OITICICA


1935 ._.._ 1940


jh 4.

TOTAL: 707.E

... .

i...::: DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


DIFFICULTIES
OIL FROM JAPAN HA
':'. SEED, FISH, SOYBE
I NDUSTR I ES. THIS
SEE TABLE 7.)

...


4 -iwk~:


119,000 POUNDS TOTAL: 796.411.000 POUNDS
*PAINT, VARNISH. LINOLEUM. OILCLOTH. AND PRINTING INK


NEG. 39161 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


IN OBTAINING SUPPLIES OF TUNG OIL FROM CHINA AND PERILLA
VE RESULTED IN MARKED INCREASES IN THE PROPORTION OF LIN-
AN, CASTOR, OITICICA, AND OTHER OILS USED IN THE DRYING
TENDENCY IS EXPECTED TO BE ACCENTUATED IN 1941. (FOR DATA


T,1 ON




May 1941


Ix






Table 1.- Price per pound of specified fats and oils,
April 1.939 ard 1940, February-April 1S41

-- : April : 1941
Itemn
: 1 9 : 1940 : Feb. : Mar.: Apr.
.: Cenr.ts C-ens Centss Cent- Cents

Butter, 92-score, Chicago .........................: 22.0 27.1 30.1 3C.8 32.5
Butter, 92-score, New York ........................: 23.1 27.9 30.8 31.6 33.2
Oleomargarine, don. veg., Chicago .................: 14.5 15.0 14.5 14.5 14.5
Compounds animall and veg. cooking fats), Chicago .: 9.2 9.4 10.5 11.1 12.4
Lard, prime steam, tierces, Chicago ...............: .3 6.1 6.2 7.0 8.6
Lard, refined, cartons, Chicago 1/ ...............: 7.3 6.4 6.8 7.3 9.0
Oleo oil, extra, tierces, Chicago ................: 7.5 7.0 7.0 7.2 8.9
Oleostearine, bbl., f;. .........................: 6.2 6.1 6.3 6.8 6.4
Tallow, edible, Chicago .............................: 5.3 5.0 5.1 6.0 7.6

Corn oil, crude, tan-s, f.o.b. mills .............. 5.9 6.2 6.6 6.6 8.3
Corn oil, refined, bbl., i:. 7. ....................: 8.9 8. 9.4 9.1 10.8
Cottonseed oil, crude, tav:s, f.o.b. S.E. mills ...: 5.5 5.9 5.3 6.4 7.9
Cottonseed oil, n.s.y., tank cars, T. Y. .......... : 6.6 6.8 6.2 7.1 8.6
Peanut oil, crude, tar.1:s, i.o.b. mills ...........: 5.5 6.2 5.3 6.2 7.9
Peanut oil, dor. refined, btI., '. Y. ...........: 9.0 9.3 8.5 8.8 10.6
Soybean oil, crude, ta! cerz, nidwestern mills ...: 4.7 5.5 5.1 6.0 7.6
Soybean oil, dom., crude, crur's, T. Y. ............: 6.3 7,2 6.8 7.9 9.2
Soybean oil, refined, dru.ns, I. Y. ................: 7.5 8.2 8.0 8.6 10.0

Babassu oil, tanks, f.o.b, mills, Pacific Coast ...: --- -- 6.0 6.8 7.8
Coconut oil, crude, tanls, f.o.b. Pacific Coast 2/ : 5.8 5.S 6.0 6.8 8.1
Coconut oil, edible, druns, i;. Y. 3/ ........... : 8.2 7.8 8.0 8.8 10.4
Olive oil, edible, drums, I Y ...................: 25.1 25.3 42.9 46.9 53.3
Olive-oil foots, priwre, drurms, II. Y. ..............: 7.0 8.2 10.6 11.5 13.2
Olive oil, inedible, drums, 1. Y. ................: 11.3 12.6 30.4 30.8 35.3
Palm oil, Figer, crude, drums, T. Y. 2/ ............: 6.8 7.5 7.2 7.7 8.3
Palm oil, Sumatra, bull, P. Y. 2/ .................: 5.7 5.5 5.2 6.6 7.8
Rape oil, refined, bbl. (drums), l!. Y. ............:4/10.8 4/13.7 12.7 12,7 12.1
Rape oil, blomn, bbl., Ii. ............. ..........: 14.2 17.2 17.5 17.5 17.5
Teaseed oil, crude, drums, NI. Y. ...................: 9.5 12.4 17.2 17.4 18.1
Tallow, inedible, Chicago .........................: 5.0 4.5 4.5 5.4 6.8
Grease, A white, Chicago ..........................: 5.1 4.6 4.6 5.5 6.9
Menhaden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore ......: 4.2 4.4 4.7 5.4 6.0
Sardine oil, crude, ta-ks, Pacific Coast .......: 4.4 5.1 6.0 6.9 7.3
Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, drums, IT. Y. .. 8.2 4/ 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.8

Linseed oil, raw, tanl: cars, l:inreapolis ..........: 8.7 10.3 8.8 9.0 9.6
Linseed oil, raw, driums, carrots, H. Y. ...........: 9.0 10.9 9.6 10.0 10.8
Perilla oil, drums, P. Y. ....................... 4/ 9.7 4/19.9 18.1 18.2 18.2
Oiticica oil, drums, i'. Y. ....... ...............: 10.1 18.8 18.1 17.2 17.1
Tung oil, runs, I'. Y. ............................: 16.0 25.4 27.6 28.6 30.0

Castor oil, dehydrated, drurs, carlots, N. Y. ....: --- 18.1 13.2 13.2 13.7
Castor oil, Tro. ? b'.bl., ...................... : 3.4 12.8 9.8 9.8 9.9
Cod-liver oil, -ed. U.S.P. bbl.,F.Y.(dol.per bbl.) : 21.5 48.4 68.5 71.0 79.4
Cod oil, Teufounrland, bbl., I. Y. ...............: 4.3 -- 8.7 9.0 9.8
Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, The Pational Provisioner, a reports of
the Agricultural larketinc Service and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Prices quoted in-
clude excise taxes and duties where applicable. 1/ Reported in tubs prior to July
1940. 2/ Three-cent processing tax added to price-as originally quoted. 3/ Prior to
April T941, prices for this series i.ere given on the basis of sales in tlcks, 0.75 to
1.25 cents per pound lover than the present basis of quotation (drums). 4 Revised.


M.iY 9Inl


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----------------------------------------
THE FATS A D OILS SIT U ACTION


Summary

Strengthening factors in the price situation for fats and oils this

year.are increases in incomes of consumers, the high level of building ac-

i.. vity, and the probability that imports of vegetable oilseeds and oils will

.'b smaller during the remainder of the year than a year earlier despite the

S availability of abundant supplies of most kinds of imported fats and oils in

surplus-producing areas. The growing scarcity of ocean shipping space has

.altered the general price outlook in the last several months. It now seems

probable that prices of most fats and oils will average substantially higher

in 1941 than in 194Q, rather than moderately higher as indicated last fall.

No reliable indication of the probable production of domestic oilseeds

in 1941 is yet available. However; it seems likely that prices of oilseeds

in the 1941-42 marketing season will average higher than in the current sea-

son, even if output should be increased. The growing strength in domestic

demand, plus the probability that imports will be reduced, will more than off-

set the effect on prices of any increase in domestic production that may take

place this year. Normally, 10 to 15 percent of our total fat supply is

imported.

A sharp advance in prices of fats and oils took place in March and

April. Prices of animal fats and oils in April averaged 14 percent higher

than in February. Prices of imported vegetable oils, already comparatively

high, were up 19 percent, and prices of-domestic vegetable oils were up 29

percent. The general price level for all groups in April was 24 percent higher

Than the relatively low prices of April 1940, and was sliChtly higher than the

L: 1910-14 average, although it was still considerably below the 1924-29 average.
I








MAY 1941 4-

Despite rising prices, total consumption of primary fats and oils Was

16 percent greater in the first quarter this year than last. Nearly all items

shared in the increase. Notable exceptions were perilla oil and fish-liver

oils, imports of which have been below average for many months. Factory pro-

duction of fats and oils, as a whole, was only slightly larger in the first

quarter this year than last. But stocks of primary fats and oils, which were

increased considerably during the first quarter of 1940, showed little change

in the first 3 months this year. And net imports of fats and oils were small-

er in the first quarter this year than a year ago.

-- Nay 15, 1941

REVIEW OF RECEI'T DEVELOPICTETS

BACKGROUIID.- In the summer of 1939, prices of most fats and
oils were at the lowest levels since early 1934. World pro-
duction of vegetable and marine oils in 1939 probably was
at or near an all-time record level; foreign demand for
American lard was weak. Following the outbreak of war in
September 193C, prices of fats and oils in this country ad-
vanced approrimetely 20 percent. But most of this gain was
lost durir.n the first 8 months of 1940, vhen the world demand
for fats was greatly veasened by the closing of important
European markets.

Prices again advanced from August 1940 to February
1941, &hLen they were restored to about the same level as in
the early part of 1940. Improvement in domestic demand,
decreased output of lard and greases, and rising shipping
costs for imported oilseeds and oils were mainly responsible
for this advance. A further gain of 6 percent in the general
price level occurred in March and an even sharper gain took
place in April.

Prices of fats and oils in April
highest since 1937

In April, prices of fats and oils were at the highest level since 1937,
a year in which domestic demand was strong and supplies of lard and greases
were unusually small. Average prices of domestic fats and oils in April were
roughly 8 to 50 percent higher than in February, and prices of most imported
vegetable oils were 3 to 33 percent higher. Prices of perilla oil and rape
oil have remained about unchanged since February, while the price of oiticica
oil has shown a moderate decline.






.B S.. 1 5 .
5

The most striking gains from February to April occurred in prices of
tir"allow and greases (up 50 percent), cottonseed oil, lard, peanut oil, soybean
S oil, oleo oil and oleostearine, palm oil, coconut oil, olive oil, corn oil,
Sand fish oi.is (up 20-45 percent). The price of linseed oil advanced about
10 percent during this period, tung oil 9 percent, and butter 8 percent. The
Increase in the price of butter was contraseasonal.

Prices of domestic oilseeds also advanced, with a gain of 26 percent
i :being recorded for Yo. 2 Yellow soybeans at Chicago and one of 10 percent for
faXseed at Iinneanolis, Prices of cottonseed and peanuts, on the other
,i h and, were only moderately higher in April than in February. The price o2
m .ported copra at Pacific Coast markets scored a gain of 65 percent between
S.Iebruary and April, while prices of Brazilian castor beans advanced 15 per-
lI.-. cent during the same- period.

i;:: Pri~es of food and soap fats and oils were, in general, 20 to 50 per-
cent higher in April this year than last.. Prices of drying oils, except
t ung oil, however, were lower than the relatively high prices that prevailed
for such oils last spring. The price of edible olive oil in April this year
was more than double that of a year earlier, while the price of cod-liver
oil was more than 60 percent higher. Supplies of these two oils, together
with tung oil, have become increasingly difficult to obtain as a result of
the wars in Europe and China.

Among the oilseeds, copra prices have showing a gain of about 75 percent
r during the past year. Prices of soybeans at Chicago in April were about 10
percent higher than a year earlier, and farm prices of peanuts were about 3
percent higher. Prices of cottonseed, flaxseed, and castor beans, on the
other hand, vere 5 to 16 percent lower in April this year than last.

Despite the recent sharp advances, prices of most fats and oils are
still at comparatively low levels. The general level of prices in /.ril was
moderately higher than the 1910-14 average but was more than 20 percent below
the 1924-29 average.

Several factors contribute to
price advances

A number of factors have contributed to the recent price gains. The
demand for fats and oils in recent months has been materially strengthened by
increases in. industrial production and consumer incomes, a sharp rise in
building activity, and Government purchases of lard for shipment to the
United Kingdom. The sharp rise in shipping rates for imported vegetable oils
and oilseeds resulting from the scarcity of shipping space has been an ad-
ditional price-supporting factor. Production of domestic fats and oils has
shown little net change. Decreased output of lard and greases so far this
year has been about offset by increased factory production of butter and
vegetable oils of domestic origin.

Although supplies of domestic fats and oils are, in the aggregate,
about as large as they were a year earlier, increasing difficulty has been
experienced in obtaining supplies from abroad. To the current domestic short-
age of tung oil, olive oil, and cod-liver oil, resulting from war conditions,







MAY 1H41 6 -

and the shortage of perilla oil reAl ti ,qgAro reduced production of perilla
seed in Manchuria, has been added the 'rrovi difficulty of securing oargo
space for shipments of such commodities as eppra and coconut oil from the
Philippines. A number of British ship already have been withdrawn from
American service, particularly from Pacific Ocean routes* The recent move
ta divert American shipping to British use undoubtedly will result in further
difficulties in obtaining supplies of foreign oilseeds and oils, not only
from surplus-producing areas in the Far East but possibly from Latin America
as well.

Both imports and exports reduced
in first aarter

Imports of tung oil, perilla oil, and copra vere somewhat larger in
March than in February. But reductions in imports of other vegetable oil-
seeds and oils resulted in a decrease in the total volume of imports in
March. Total eznorts also were reduced in March, despite an increase in ex-
ports of lard with t!e unusual shipment of 10 million pounds to Japan.

For the first 3 months of 1941, imports of fats, oils, and oilseeds
in terms of crude oil totaled 406 million pounds compared with 491 million
pounds in the corresponding period a year earlier. The most pronounced re-
ductions from the preceding year occurred in imports of coconut oil and
copra (down 26 percent), tung oil (down 84 percent), and flaxseed (down 17
percent). These reductions were partly offset by increased imports of palm
oil (up 60 percent) and castor bears (up 67 percent).

Total exports also were reduced in the first 3 months this year com-
pared with last, mainly as a result of reduced shipments of lard and soybeans
to European markets. Exports, including reexports of items imported free of
tax or duty, totaled 133 million pounds in the first quarter this year com-
pared with 146 million pounds a year earlier.

With a decrease of 85 million pounds in imports and 13 million pounds
in exports, net imports were 72 million pounds smaller in the January-March
period this year than last. This was a reduction of 21 percent.

Consumption of fats scores mar-ed gain

The total domestic disappearance or consumption of primary fats and
oils, excluding farnr butter and farm lard, is estimated to have been 2,382
million pounds in the first quarter of 1941 compared with 2,058 million
pounds in the first quarter of 1940. 1/ Consumption thus was 324 million
pounds or 16 percent larger in the fiFst 3 months this year than last. The
increase in consumption was accounted for largely by greater use of cotton-
seed oil (up 102 million pounds), inedible tallow and greases (up 69 million
pounds), and linseed oil, palm oil, lard, soybean oil, and peanut oil (up
23-38 million pounds). Several other items also showed increases. Part of
the increase in utilization of primary fats may have resulted from an in-
crease in storage demand for finished products such as soap and paints.

I/ Computed from quarterly data on factory production and stocks, Bureau of the
Census, and monthly data on foreign trade, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic
Commerce






FBs-51 7 -.

Relatively sharp declines occurred in consumption of perilla oil
(down 10 million pounds) and fish-liver oils (down 8 million pounds). Less
than 2 million pounds of perilla oil were consumed domestically in thd first
quarter this year compared with 12 million pounds in the corresponding
period a year earlier and 15 million pounds 2 years earlier. Primary con-
sumption of fish-liver oils also was at a low level, amounting only to 6
million pounds in the first 3 months of 1941 compared with 14 and 19 million
pounds respectively in the corresponding periods of 1 and 2 years ago.

PRICE OUTLOOK CHANGED BY TIGHTNESS IN SHIPPING SITUATION

In the September 1940 issue of The Fats and Oils Situation, it was
stated that the domestic demand for food and soap fats, and for drying oils,
probably would be stronger in 1940-41 than in 1939-40. But it was pointed
out that if the British blockade of continental Europe were continued, ab-
normally large supplies of such foreign items as coconut oil and copra, palm
oil, palm kernels, and flaxseed would remain available for shipment to the
'.United States. Under srch circumstances, it was stated, any rise in-prices
for domestic fats would be limited by increased imports. Nevertheless,
some improvement in prices for lard, tallow, and greases seemed to be indi-
cated on the basis of the probable domestic supply and demand situation.

At the time the above forecast was prepared, the full extent of world
shipping losses was not foreseen. Only about one-fourth of the foreign trade
of the United States in recent years has been carried in United States
vessels. Hence, as world shipping was depleted, and as foreign vessels were
withdrawn from American service, the ability of importers to obtain supplies
of foreign oilseeds and oils was reduced. Shipping space is now difficult
to obtain, and probably will become more limited in the next several months.
The scarcity of shipping space, in most instances, has prevented any in-
crease in imports of oilseeds and oils. And it seems probable that prices
of domestic fats and oils, which are now somewhat higher than they were a
year ago, will continue strong during the remainder of this year.

Prices for domestic oilseeds in the 1941-42 marketing year are ex-
pected to average higher than in 1940-41, even if production should be in-
creased. The growing strength in domestic demand plus the probability that
imports will be reduced will more than offset the effect on prices of any
increase in domestic production that may take place this year. Normally,
10 to 15 percent of our total fat supply is imported, mostly in the form of
vegetable oilseeds and oils.

UTILIZATION OF FATS AID OILS Ii! T;E DRYIIIG INDUSTRIES

As indicated in tables 2 and 3, approximately 706 million pounds of
fats and oils were used in paints, varnishes, linoleum, oilcloth, and print-
ing inks in 194C. This was a reduction of 17 million pounds (2 percent) from
the total consumption of fats in the drying industries in 193S. Consumption
of tung oil, pcrilla oil, and oiticica oil was reduced. On the other hand,
the use of linseed oil from domestic flaxseed, castor oil, soybean oil, and
Fish oils was increased.







MAY 1941 8 -

Approximately 56 percent of the total volume of fats and oils used in
the drying industries in 1940 was of domestic origin compared with 39 per-
cent of the total a year earlier and 27 percent of the total, on the average,
for the preceding 5 years. Increased donmstic output and decreased imports
of flaxseed, together with sharply reduced supplies of Chinese tung oil and
Japanese perilla oil, were mainly responsible for the marked gain in the
proportion of domestic oils used for drying purposes during the past 2 years.

Linseed oil accounted for approximately 72 percent of the total
utilization of fats and oils in the drying industries in 194t., well maintain-
ing the lead which it has held in this field for many years. Tung oil con-
tinued in second place, in terms of volume, although accounting for only 8
percent of the total utilization in 1940 compared with 13 percent in 1939
and an average of 16 percent in the preceding 5 years. Perilla oil, how-
ever, dropped from third to sixth place in importance in 1940, with fish
oils, soybean oil, arid castor oil (chiefly dehydrated) moving up the scale.
About 2 percent of the total fats and oils used in the drying industries in
1940 was oiticica oil, and 1 percent miscellaneous fats and oils, (Table 7.)

Paint and varnish industry principal
consumer of dryin[ oils

The paint and varnish industry accounted for 83 percent of the total
utilization of drying oils in 1940, with an estimated consumption, including
the use of oils by painters and others in mixing or thinning paints on the
job, of 663 million pounds. Approximately 112 million pounds, or 14 percent
of the total for all drying industries, were used in the manufacture of
linoleum and oilcloth, and 21 million pounds, or 3 percent of the total,
were used in the manufacture of printing inks.

Consumption of fats and oils in the paint and varnish industry was
about 20 million pounds smaller in 1940 than in 1939. Use in printing inks
also was less than a year earlier. Fov.tver, a gain of about 4 million pounds
in utilization was reported by linoleum and oilcloth manufacturers.
(Tables 4-6.)

Increased consumption of paint oils
indicated for 1941

Industrial production is now at a record level and building activity
has reached the highest peak in more than 10 years. Both industrial produc-
tion and building activity are expected to continue at high levels at least
through 1941. As a result, consumption of drying oils probably will be con-
siderably larger this year than last. Supplies of tung and perilla oils,
however, are likely to be smaller than they vere a year ago; hence, the in-
crease in use of drying oils probably will come largely in linseed oil.
Increased utilizatior. of dehydrated castor oil, soybean oil, and fish oils
for drying purposes also is indicated.

During the first quarter of 1941, the total apparent disappearance of
tung oil was 19 million pounds, 14 percent more than in the first quarter of
1940. But 14 million pounds of this total were derived from stocks, which on







F. .-51


-9 -


[









I.. "
LI I
....


As indicated in table 8, production of flaxseed in Argentina and
Uruguay in 1940-41 is officially estimated at about 64 million bushels com-
pared with 45 million bushels a year earlier. Because of the loss of im-
portant European markets, and the large crop in this country in 1940, only
about 10 percent of the 1941 exportable surplus of flaxseed in South America
has been.exported to date.

The United States now has sufficient flaxseed on hand to meet crush-
ing requirements until the new.domestic crop becomes available. But some
flaxseed probably will be imported through the balance of the year to meet
the needs of eastern mills and part of the crushing requirements in the first
half of 1942. The volume of imports during the next 12 months will depend
on at least three factors: (1) The size of the domestic crop in 1941; (2)
the rate of crushing activity; and (3) the availability of ocean shipping
space. Impprts during the first 3 months of 1941 totaled nearly 4 million
bushels. However, such imports probably will not be maintained at as high
a rate in coming months.


.. r j "-
Maroh 31 were reported. at only .435:.mi:.l;on..pounds. With much smaller imports
of tung oil i "-prospebt this year than last, and with comparatively little
being produced domestically, th'Trate of consumption for tung oil established
in'the first quarter probably cannot be maintained throughout the year un-
less. stocks are to be almost entirely depleted.

S Impor6i and consumption .of perilla oil and oiticica oil in the first
carterr this year were at very low levels. On the other hand, total disap-
pearance of linseed oil, amounting to 156.million pounds, was 32 percent
a:sater than 'a year earlier. And consumpti-on of castor oil, totaling 33
A-lion pounds, was 38 percent greater than a year earlier. Although no
'-eaikdown of total use of fats and oils by- industries for 1941 is now avail-
able,-most of the increase in castor-oil consumption in the first quarter
probably occurred in the drying industries, -where dehydrated castor oil is.
being used as a tung-oil substitute.

Large supply of flaxseed available
in South America









Table 2.- Estimated consumption of principal oils in the drying industries
according to origin'of raw materials, United States, 1931-40

SLinseed oiTl7 : Tung oil : Perilla: Fish : SoybeanF6diticiOca
Year :Domestic oloil oil, : oil, :oil, mn-
lmported Domestic Impprted.
Yr Imported .Domestic Imported: 2/ .:imported:.domestic:domestic:ported 5/
: 1 illion ilon Mn Million Million lion million millionn
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds. .pounds pounds

1931 : 239 232 90 --- -11 27 9
1932 : 158 196 74 --- .11 20 11
1933 : 242 134 102 4/ 25 22 14'-
1934 : 304 105 112 --- 24 25 13
1935 : 312 153 124 -4/ 60 33 18 -
1936 : 305 173 115 -- 105 40 17 3
1937 : 471 1 0 141 -2 39 44 17 4
1938 : 325 155 86 1 41 30 19 5
1939 : 305 244 100 3 51 42 28 19
1940 5/: 216 359 66 1 19 46 37 16

SCastor : OdtherafaT's : i : Imports as
oil, : and oils : All fats ar. oils : percentage
:imported :Imrported :Domestic :Imported :Domestic : Tqtal. : of total
: Million Million Million Million million Million
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds Percent

1931 : 2 1 1 343 269 612 56.0
1932 :. 2 1 1 246 228 474 51.9
1933 : 2 1 373 171 544 68.6
1934 : 2 3 1 445 144 589 75.6
1935 : 4 3 1 503 205 708 71.0
1936 : 5 12 1 545 231 776 70.2
1937 : 8 3 1 666 164 830.. 80.2
1938 : 7 3 1 467 206 673 69.4
1939 : 12 8 1 495 318 813 60.9
1940 5/: 25 10 1 352 444 796 44.2

Compiled as follows:
Linseed, tung, and perilla oils -
Total domestic disappearance, excluding small quantities reported by the
Bureau of the Census as used in soap, shortenings, and miscellaneous
products.
Oiticica oil -
Imports for consumption, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce,
All other fats and oils -
Factory consumption in paints, varnishes, linoleum, oilcloth, and print-
ing inks, Bureau of the Census.
1/ Net airports of flaxseed vere taken as a percentage of total domestic crush-
ings to obtain an indication of the proportion of linseed oil consumption al-
located to irmports.
2/ Estimates of domestic production.
SNot separately reported prior to 1936.
SLess than 500,000 pounds.
5 Preliminary.


MY 1941l


- 10 -







'/lil n11-

Table 3.- Estimated total consumption of fats and
drying industries, United States, 1936-44


.T4am 1QR : 1Q7 1 QA


oils in the
0


1 -*L
T 1,00 rb f,O00O lb. id,00 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.

I'r indeed oil 2/ ..............: 478,026 570,788 479,813 548,876 575,416
;:ang oil 2/ ................: 115,125 143,470 87,405 103;051 66,886
t.: irilla oil 2/ ..............: 105,260 38,776 41,487 50,960 19,011
i. jih oil .................. : 39,636 44,340 2V,781 42,570 45,967
Soybean oil ........ .........: 17,419 17,157 18,847 28,220 37,164
M Motor oil .................: 4,794 7,722 6,043 11,844 24,857
I: Ottioica oil / ............. 2,892 3,631 5,301 18,867 15,537
Coconut oil .................: 772 1,126 424 710 1,263
Cottonseed oil ..............: 49 210 352 243 217
SRape oil ....................: 181 139 134.' 79 68
Corn oil .....................: 123 89 118 155 174
Palm oil ........... .....: 3 3 In- l 6 4
Olive oil, inedible .......: --- 6 14 7
Sunflower oil ..............: 97 4/ 4/ 4/ 4/
Other vegetable oil 5/ ......: 11,372 1,5E4 2,;33 7,T58 9,062


Grease ... ............. ...:
Tallow, inedible ........;..:
Marine mammal oil ...........:
Neatsfoot oil .............:
Tallow, edible *............:
Lard ........................:
Oleo oil ............. ..
Oleostearine ...............:


562
142
28
8
2
5


565
121
S33-
11
:'" 2
2
2-
2.


497
102
40
28
1
2
2
2


Total .................. 776,496 829,831 672,590 813,425 796,411

Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census, except as otherwise noted.
Data for earlier years beginning 1931 are given in The Fats and Oils Situation
for May 1939.

V/ Preliminary.
jr/ Since drying oils are used directly as -ell as in factory consumption,
these figures represent total domestic disappearance excluding small quan-
tities reported by the Bureau of the Census as used in soap, shortening, and
miscellaneous products.
3/ Imports for consumption from official records of the Bureau of Foreign
and Domestic Comnerce.
4/ If any, included vith "other vegetable oil,"
/ May include some oiticica oil; hence some duplication.


: 1939 : 1940 J


504
155
55
28
1
9

6


I -- -








Table 4.- Estimated consumption of fats and oils in paints and
varnishes, United States, 1936-40


Item 1936 1937 1938 1939 : 1940 l]
:1,000 Ib. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib.

Linseed oil 2/ ........: 412,982 482,295 407,614 463,327 474,046
Tung oil 2/ ............: 105,663 133,510 81,190 97,183 63,094
Perilla oil 2/ ........: 85,603 28,971 32,773 38,287 15,516
Fish oil ..............: 23,166 27,277 15,679 24,91 30,787
Soybean oil ..........: 14,471 16,143 15,183. 21,720 29,828
Castor oil ............: 4,118 7,192 5,792 11,439 24,368
Oiticica oil 3/ .......: 2,892 3,631 5,301 18,867 15,537
Coconut oil ...........: 771 1,124 422 .707 1,261
Cottonseed oil ........: 34 43 184 51 65
Rape oil ..............: 168 138 131 79 88
Corn oil ..............: 123 89 118 155 174
Palm oil ..............: 1 --- 1 1 2
Olive oil, inedible ...: --- 6 14 7
Sunflower oil .........: 97 4/ 4/ 4/ 4/
Other vegetable oil 5/.: 4,614 1,498 1,912 5,816 8,336

Grease ..............: 94 150 144 47 .94
Tallow, inedible ......: 135 151 117 97 141
Marine mammal oil .....: 17 11 28 36 48
Neatsfoot oil .........: 7 15 9 24 28
Oleo oil ..............: ---2--- 2--

Total ...............: 654,956 702,238 566,606 682,831 663.420
Compiled from reports of the Burenu of the Census, except as otherwise noted.

1/ Preliminary.
2/ Since linseed, tung, and perilla oils are used directly as well as in
factoryconsumrition, these figures represent total domestic disappearance
excluding quantities reported by the Bureau of the Census as factory con-
sumption in linoleum, oilcloth, and printing ink, and small quantities used
in soap, shortening, and miscellaneous products.
3/ Imports for consumption, from official records of the Bureau of Foreign
and Domestic Commerce.
4/ If any, included with "other vegetable oil".
5/ May include some oiticica oil; hence, some duplication.


MAY 1941


- 12 -






13 --
Table 5.- Factory consumption of fats and oils in the manufacture of
linoleum and oilcloth, United States, 1936-40


Item


: 936
: 1,000 lb.


Linseed oil ........:
Fish oil ...........:
: Perilla oil ........:
Tung oil ...........:
FSoyeean'oil ........:
.Castor oil ........:
'ape oil ............:
Other vegetable oil.:


50,076
16,235
17,717
7,131
2,886
518
13
6,758


1937
1,000 lb.

68,151
16,765
,053
7,198
934'
270

-9


1938
1,000 lb.

55,395
13,842
6,952
4,131
3,605
51
2
115


1939
1,.000 lb.

68,023
17,385
10,758
3,763
6,438
88
-1 -
1, 46 "


194o 1/
1,000 Ib.

84,262
15,001
2,387
2,064
7,254
137

706


Grease .............: -
Tallow, inedible ...: -- --.


1 ---
1 2


Total ............: 101,334 101,380 84,100
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census.
1/ Preliminary.


107,721


Table 6.- Factory consumption of fats and oils in the manufacture of
printing inks, United States, 1936-40


-Item 1936
: 1 000 lb.


Linseed oil ........:
Tung oil ...........:
Perilla oil ........:
Fish oil ............:
Castor oil .........:
Cottonseed oil .....:
Soybean oil ........:
Palm oil ...........:
Rape oil ...........:
Coconut oil ........:
Other vegetable oil.:

Grease .............
Marine mammal oil ..:
Tallow, inedible ...:
Tallow, edible .....:
Lard ...............:
SNeat's-foot oil ....:
SOleostearine .......


14,968
2,331
1,940
235
158
15
62
2

1


1937
1,000 lb.

20,342
2,762
1,752
298
260
167
GO
3
1
2
17


468
11
7
2
5
1


1938
1,000 lb.

1.6,o4
2,0o4
1,762
254
200
168
59
9
1
2
106


509
7
7
2
3
1


5

2
2
2


1939
1,000 lb.

17,526
2,105
1,915
204
317
192
62
5.

3
7r


449
4
4
1
2
4
2


20.206


the Bureau


26.213


of the Census.


21. SS4


111,813


1940 1/
1,000 lb.

17,108
1,728
1,108
179
352
152
82
2

2
20


410
7
12
1
9

6


Total ............:
Compiled from reports of
I/ Preliminary.


22,873


21,178


__


"- "" --2 --& "








Table 7.- Percentage contribution of principal items.to the total.
weight of fat.s and oils used in the drying industries, Unit'ed
States, 1931-40

Total drying industries


Item


:1931 :1932 :1933 :1934 :1935 :1936 :1937 :1938 :1939 :19.40

: Pct. Pct. Pct. Pct. Pct. Pct. Pct. Pet.'' Pct. Pct.


Linseed oil ..........:
Tung oil .............:
Perilla ..............:
Fish oil .............:
Soybean oil ..........:
Castor oil ...........:
Oiticica oil .........
Other fats and oils ..:


77.1 74.6 69.0 69.4
14.7 15.7 18.8 18.9
1.8 2.4 4.6 4.0
4.4 4.1 4.1 4.2
1.5 2.4 2.6 2.3
.3 .3 .5 .5

.2 .5 .4 .7


65.7
17.5
8.5
4.6
2.5
.5
.7
.7


61.6
14.S
13.6
5.1
2.2
.6
.4
1.7


68.8
.17.3
. 4.7
'5.3
2.1
.9
';4


71.'3 67.5 72.3
'3.0 12.7 8.4
6.2 6.3 2.4
S4.- 5.2 5.8
2.8 3.5 4.7
.9 1.5 3.1
S. 2.3 2.0
.6 1.0 1.3


Total ............:100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1000 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Paint and varnish


Linseed oil ..........: y8.4 76.9 72.0 72.0 67.2 63.1 58.7
Tung oil .............: 15.6 16.3 19.3 19.2 1S.4 16.1 19.0
Perilla oil ..........: 2.0 2.3 4.1 3.7 8.2 13.1 4.1
Fish oil ............: 2.3 1.9 1.9 2.3 3.0 3.5 3.9
Soybean oil ..........: 1.2 1.8 1.9 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.3
Castor oil ...........: .3 .4 .4 .5 .6 .6 : 1.0
Oiticica oil .........: -- -- --- --- -- .4 .5
Other fats and oils ..: .2 .4 .4 .2 .5 1.0 .5


71.9 67.9 71.5
14.3 14.2 9.5
5.8 5.6 2.3
2.8 3.7 4.6
2.7 3.2 4.5
1.0 1.7 3.7
.9 2.8 2.3
.6 .9 1.6


Total ..............:100.0 00100 100.0 10 100.000.0 0.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


Linseed oil ..........:
Fish oil .............:
Perilla oil ..........:
Tung oil .............
Soybein oil ..........:
Other fats and oils ..:


Li
65.2 56.3 47.2 47.3
20.2 20.8 1S.9 19.6
1.0 2.9 8.3 6.6
9.9 12.7 16.0 19.0
3.6 7.1 -.1 1.2
.1 .2 .7 T.3


loleum and oilcloth
51.7 49.4 67.2 "
17.2 16.0 16.5
11.9 17.5 7.9
12.9 7.0 7.1
6.0 2.8 .9
S.3 7.3 .4


65.9- 63.1 75.4
16.5 16.1 13.4
8.3 10.0 2.1
4.9 3.5 1.8
4.3 6.0 6.5
.1 1.3 .8


Total .............. :100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Printing inks
Linseed oil ..........: 3.7 87.0 Sl.0 V1.1 79.3 74.1 77.6 76.8 76.6 no.8
Tung oil ...........: 7.3 6.g 11.3 10.7 11.2 11.5 i0.5 9.5 9.2 8.2
Perilla oil ..........: 1.4 3.1 3.7 4.6 9.6 6.7 U.1 8.4 5.2
Other fats and oils ..: 3-. 4.5 4.6 4.5 4.9 4.8 5.2 5.6 '5.'8 5.8

Total ............... :100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Computed from dpta shown in preceding tables and from similar data given in The
Fats and Oils Situation for May 1939.
1/ Preliminary.


_


I~


MAY 1941


- 14 -






FOS-51


- 15 -


Table 8.- Flaxseed: Production in specified countries and estimated
world total excluding U.S.S.R. and China, 1925-40

: Estimated : : : : :
Year world total,: gentina: British : United :Uru y
:exol.U.S.S.;R: : India 1/: States :Ur :
: and China : :
: 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu.

1925 : 137,000 75,113 21,160 22,334 2,030 6,237
1926 : 133,000 80,783 17,080 18,531 1,970 5,995
1927 : 140,000 82,672 17,440 25,174 1,954 4,885
1928 :126,000 78,377 15,080 19,118 2,030 3,614
S1929 : 96,000 50,004 14,080 15,924 3,216 2,060
1930 : 136,000 78,342 16,840 21,673 5,056 4,399
1931 : 132,000 89,067 16,640 11,755 4,841 2,465
S 1932 : 101,000 62,006 18,160 L1,511- 1,475 2,719
1933 : 97,000 62,595 17,600 6,-04 2,876 632
1934 : 113,000 79,720 16,080 5,661 3,402 910
1935 : 106,000 59,445 17,920 14,520 3,007 1,667
1936 : 115,000 77,864 16,640 5,273 3,011 1,795
1937 : 101,000 61,013 17,800 7,089 3,728 775
1938 : 98,000 55,509 19,480 8,152 4,427 1,253
1939 : 96,000 39,935 18,760 20,152 4,694 2,169
1940 2/ : 61,689 18,680 31,127 2,638 3,189
Compiled from official sources and. reports of the International Institute
of Agriculture. Available data for most fl'axseed-producing countries
for years beginning 1909 are given in The Fats and Oils Situation for
January 1940.
i/ Reported production plus Indian official estimates for unreported
tracts.
2/ Preliminary.

Table 9.- Perilla seed: Production in iianchuria and Chosen, 1935-40


Year Manchuria Chosen
1,000 lb. i00 o O 6.

1933 : 110,230 12,297
1934 : 139,685 11,204
1935 : 400,433 10,508
1936 : 323,708 10,550
1937 : 265,151 11,080
1938 : 203,293 10,255
1939 : 143,299 //
1940 : 2/ 83,000 1/
Compiled from official sources. In addition to the above, production in
Japan is reported to total about 400,000 pounds annually. Production in
other countries is negligible.
V Not available.
Z Preliminary, trade estimate.






MAY 1941


Table 10.- Tung oil: Exports from China, by
countries of destination, 1925-40 1/

Year : Total : United : Hong : :United :Nether- Jaan
To :States_ 2/ Kong :ermay :Kingdon a : lands :
:1,000 lb.1,000 lb.1,000 lb.1,000 1b.1,000 bb.1,000 lb.1,000 lb.1,000 1b.


210 94,146 3,871
758 72,002 7,138
173 76,309 17,824
907 98,699 18,449
320 98,033 16,649
334 116,534 7,390
315 73,280 11,144
)36 66,106 10,985
?46 117,213 1.1,951
924 90,475 19,080
390 108,466 19,286
?23 137,317 13,265
)27 141,343 46,818
591 12,538 123,039
358 1,538 66,284
551 9,215 33,837


8,463 5,145
6,134 6,488
7,253 5,957
5,718 13,316
3-192 11,205
4,809 12,564
3,673 13,284
2,578 11,471
3,169 10,115
4,959 6,902
6,379 8,058
9,470 8,344
9,438 8,119
3,264 4,467
626 1,375
2,244


1,897
2,671
1,825
2,294
3,339
4,106
2,127
2,304
4,950
7,021
6,868
8,144
8,190
2,380
11
163


1,388
2,075
7,680
3,443
4,419
4,908
6,062
7,914
9,070
6,848
4,543
3,621
1,323
774
233


801
1,024
877
1,061
2,634
1,437
1,143
919
1,319
2,047
1,740
2,231
1,646
123
63
69


1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940






1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
19-10


350
322
452
745
646
960
1,588
1,437
1,443
1,665
1,755
1,922
1,098
377
26E
22


90
181
254
356
269
668
5017
810
795
1,218
1,009
1,506
1,072
66
4


129
201
321
370
347
392
562
364-
327
657
957
1,377
1,043
320
207
22


388
196
6
136
235
257
292
431
493
547
791
1,364
1,25.1
123
2


355
413

459
303



459
898
841
633
1,016
740
340
53
5


594
504
733
751
903
845
735
528
583
736
1,187
306
1,148
250
240
212


12
34
88
278
297
219
56
7


1,593
379
- 223
266
749
764
918
718
886
840
935
1,043
3,576
5,269
2,946
5,462


Compiled fromr Trade of China lannualf, 1925-39; Monthly Trade of China, 1940.
1/ Includes :'anchuria prior to July 1, 1932. 2/ Includes Hawaii prior to 1932.
3/ Includes Taiwan. 4/ Freliminary. ,/ Includes New Zealand.
6/ Includes British Itndia,Finland, French Indochina, Kwantung, Danzig, Poland,
Car.ad-, Spain, Netherlands Indies, Straits Settlement, Union of South Africa,
Macao, and ;v:Nn.-gchowwan Leased Territory.
// If any, included in other cowitries.


119,
99,
120,
145,
142,(
155,6
115,;
107,C
166,;
143,
162,E
191,2
227,0
153,3
73,
51,2


:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
4/:


S : : Aus- : : Other
Den-
mak : rway : Sweden : tralia :Belgium : Italy :Argentina;countries
: rk 5/ : : : 6/
:1,000 lb.1,000 1b.1,000 Ib.1,000 lb.1,000 lb.1,000 lb.1,000 lb.1,000 lb.


- 16 -





S-51


Table 11.- Wholesale prices of fats and oils:
Index numbers, April 1939 and 1940,
February April 1941


Group


(1924-29 = 100)
: April :
1 QiCj M nl Mb


:-7J7 7L'J 1e i U


;i ,

Eight domestic fats and oils 1/ ....:
Eight domestic fats and oils .......:

SAl.ats knd oils (27 items) .......:
a"'d by origin
L al fats ......................:
i rine animal oils ................
vegetableble oils, domestic .........:
'Vegtable oils, foreign ..........:
Grapted by use
Butter, unadjusted ...............:
Butter, adjusted 2/ ..............:
Lard ..................... ........:
Food fats, other .................:
Soap fats ........................:
Drying oils ......................:
Miscellaneous oils ...............:


1y 1910-14 = 100. 2/ Adjusted for typical


seasonal variation.


Table 12.- Prices of specified oil-bearing materials,
April 1939 and 1940, February Anril 1941


Item


Unit


: Anpril :
: 1 39 : 1940 :


: : Dollars
Castor beans, Brazilian,
ship't., c.&f., Jlew York :Lon: ton --
Copra, bags, f.o.b.
Pacific Coast ...........: 100 lb. : 1.79
Cottonseed, Dallas ....... Short ton: 23.00
Cottonseed, U.S.farm price: : 22.95
Flaxseed, No. 1,
Minneanolis .............: Eushel : 1.89
Flaxseed, U.S. farm price : : 1.64
Peanuts, shelled,
Runners No. 1, S.E. r:ills: 100 lb. : .88
Peanuts, U.S. farm price : 3.42
Soybeans, No. 2 Yellow,
Chicago .................: Bushel : .
Soybeans, U.S. farm price : .78


Feb. :


Dollars Dollars


70.00 51.00 55.25 58.50


1.74
26.50
27.18

2.11
1.91

5.15
3.53

1.09
1.00


1.82

24.61

1.75
1.52





.8


Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, Daily Trade Bulletin (Chicago), Daily
Market Record (Minneanolis), and reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service.


1941
iiar.


93
66

72

67
99
71
103

70
68
54
78
75
99
86


: Arr.


104
74

79

73
105
34
114

74
78
65
93
90
105
88


1941
'.Jar.
Dollars


: Apr.
Dollars


2.38

24.81

1.S0
1.53

5.30
3.46

1.04
.89


3.01

25.88

1.93
1.73

5.40
3.62

1.20
1.07


" i


- 17-








Table 13.- Price per ton of specified oilcake meals,
April 1939 and 1940, February-April, 1941



April 1941
Item / :-----:
1939 1940 February March April
:Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars

Cnpra meal, Los Angeles ...: 23.25 18.95 24.40 25.25 30.80
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent:
protein, Memphis .........: 23.20 30.30 24.45 24.45 25.20
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent:
protein, Chicago .........: 28.95 36.95 31.25 30.75 31.25
Linseed meal, 37 percent
protein, Minneapolis .....: 38.00 30.70 28.40 27.40 28.50
Linseed meal, 34 percent
protein, New York ........: 2/' 40.20 34.00 23.90 23.10 24.60
Peanut meal, 45 percent
protein,f.o.b.southeastern:
mills ....................: 20.75 30.P5 20.69 20.88 24.20
Soybean meal, 41 percent
protein, Chicago .........: 24.70 29.65 26.60 26.85 27.50


Compiled from records of the Agricultural Marketing Service.

1' Bagged, carlots, except for peanut meal.
2;' 30-32 percent protein.


buY 1941


- 18 -








Table 14.- Oleomargarine: Production and materials used in
manufacture, United States, March 1959 and 1940,
January-March 1941


March


Item


production:
Colored ..............
In colored ............
Total 3/ .........


1941 1/


E-I?


h~erials used:
Oleo oil ................: 1,326 1,317 1,788 1,161 1,561
0Oleostearine ............: 271 242 227 253 282
.Lard, neutral ........: 112 301 777 504 899
Oleo stock ..............: 95 96 158 120 133
Monostearine ...........: --- --- 16 11 15
Total animal ........ 1,804 1,956 2,966 2,049 2,890


Cottonseed oil ..........
Soybean oil ............
Peanut oil ..............
Corn oil ................
Vegetable gum ..........
Cottonseed stearine .....
Soybean stearine ........
Total domestic
vegetable ..........

Coconut oil .............
Babassu oil ..... ......
Palm-kernel oil .........
Palm oil ................
Total foreign


9,678
5,452
203
51


9,022
7,169
146
87


: 15,384 16,425


4,729
1,596
173


2,464
526


13,451
9,460
200
37


11,626
7,394
163
39


13,142
9,456
165
39


24 22 22

23,148 19,224 22,803


1,281


1,296
62


1,424
66


vegetable ..........: 6,498 2,991 1,281 1,358 1,491
Total fats and oils .: 23,636 21,372 27,395 22,631 .27,184


Milk .....................
Salt and other
miscellaneous ..........:


5,861

1,316


5,074

1,166


6,227

1,353


5,348

1,088


Compiled from Internal Revenue records and Internal Revenue Bulletin.
./ Preliminary.
2/ Includes manufacturers' returns not available for other reports.
Y Total of unrounded numbers.


1939 ; 1940 : January : February : March

:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.

..: 137 133 2/ 412 337 291
..: 29,210 26,523 33,618 27,765 33,589
...: 29,348 26,661 34,030 28,103 33,880


6,414

1,305




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Hi lllllI I iii mIi I I lililil iiIII |ll 1l
3 1262 08905 1402


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