The Fats and oils situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00035
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00035

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text








4%

Vm



v|
A w M-f


C T`K SMAT

44o. ,
-F4 4r

VA JL!




"Ar

























































Iag aomento rat Iao oils (1t10-14 1UUJ ...................
Right domestic fats an olls ..................................
All fate and oils (27 Ite) ...................................
Gra oedv orli I's '
E3 11irl5 -,il o.. .................................... ..
brie anI al il* ......................... ...............
Veetable oils, dowstie ..................................
Vegetable oll,. foreign ................................. ***.*
Groa ed b ui

Butter, seonally adjutd ... ...... ................
lard ..........................................................
Other food fats ................. ........... ...........
All food fats ................... ......................
s8op fat ........................ ....................
Dryin oil ............................ .....................r
Miscellaneous oils ................. ........................
All industrial fats ad oil ... ..... ........


81
116
144

TT
T6
sa

Ble
118.
113
106
11U


110

1w --11?
2. .-S i Ai
' 'U T im gS :,



" ot "s .
3., 8. .


1U.'. i. S.O.iW ;
,k 133 .

1 1*-
* bg u


Priocs compiled fro. oil. Paint a Drug Reportra, Thbe Itltl Pnoifaar8* ig' ui.0 l oft iecti
report of the Food Distribution Adlalntrtiaon ip Buriea of lab r St-ati "s. -ink. :usr a iu.
and duties where applicable. Iads sauber hr earlier per byea liing MW9 ee gi1M in sa tMl &
(1940) iad Tr rats and ol situation beginnis esember 1 O.
j/ Reflects open rkt s ales aly. Currt figures rafer nt all types of .whtla taig W W
iont. / three-eat pro eLin tn added to prim a originally qat. q toik:e, l, rV
SConaeT to presat basis of qo tataw.

*. ..-.a.i.






-OS-8L 3 -


THE JATS AND O ILS S ITUATI ON
------ -mN -- - -



i. .. Content s
: Page No.
..... : .- ; *
: Summary ......................... 3 :
3 Outlook *.........* .............* 5 :
i Recent developments .............. 9
: Recent Government actions ........ 12
: Cost of 1943-44 oilseeds program 14


; : Summary

... : National acreage goals for 1944 oilcrops, based on State goals

Recommended by State committees, were announced in early November. These

*.. goals call for 13,654,000 acres of soybeans to be harvested for beans,

S.6.,158,000 acres of peanuts to be grown alone, and 5,895,000 planted acres

of flaxseed.

SAchievement of these goals would increase soybean acreage 19 percent

and peanut acreage 23 percent over the corresponding 1943 figures, but would

result in a decline of 6 percent in flaxseed acreage. The cotton goal is

about 1 percent over the 1943 acreage.

With normal yields per acre and about the same disappearance of the

crops into noncrushing uses as in the past year, these acreages should

result in an increase of approximately 350 million pounds in production of

cottonseed, soybean, linseed, and peanut oils. If the output from other

.domestic oilseeds is about the same in 1944-45 as in 1943-44, total pro-

duction of domestic vegetable oils in 1944-45 may be somewhat more than 4.3

billion pounds, compared with about 4 billion pounds expected in 1943-44.







*:





NOVEMBER 1943 -4 -

But with a decline in output of lard likely in the next crop year, total

production of fats and oils in 1944-45 from domestic nmterials might be

slightly less than the 11.3 billion pounds that now seem likely in 1943-44.

Some mod'rption of th? recent very tight situation in frts and oils has

occurred as a result of s'aonally high output of lard, soybean oil, cotton-

seed oil, and linseed oil. IncrePsed imports of flpxs-ad and castor beans

have helped. Prices of linseed ,oil at New York declined slightly below

ceiling levels in early November. Prices of other fats "nd oils continue at

ceiling levels. With export requirements continuing larga and a prospect that

they will increase, rind with domestic civilian demand going partially uneatis-

fied under Government restriction orders, fats and oils remain in a strong

position. Demand for domestic fats and oils probably will continue strong

until the surplus-producing preas of the fostern Pacific, now under Japanese

control, are again accessible to the rest of the world.

Production of margarine declined sharply following the institution of

rationing of food fats in late March. But with a scarcity of butter in

retail stores in recent months, mprgarine output has increased again and

production for domestic civilian consumption vrobnbly is now close to the

maximum permitted under Food Distribution Order 42 (167 percent of average

production for corresponding quarters of 1940 and 1l41). Total production

for the year may reach nearly 650 million pounds, with perhaps 526 million

pounds available for domestic civilian consumption. Nearly all of the

balance is for export under lend-lease. In 1942 total output was 426 million

pounds, and in 1941, 368 million pounds.


-- November 24, 1943





FOS-81 5-

OUTLOOK

BACKGROUND.- With the entrance of the United States into the war
in December 191 and the subsequent loss of most of our imports
From the Far East-, the fats situation was transformed from one
qt "of comparative abundance to one of critical supply. Production
'of domestic oilctops.was encouraged in 1942. The total out-
S'. put of fats and oils in the 1942 crop year was about 10 percent
'": greater than in. theprevious year. Both domestic and export
S:n demands for fats albo mounted and'measures were.taken to cod-
trol prices and distribution Production was further encour-
aged in 1943; with present indication pointing to a 7 percent
Increase in the 1943 erop year over 1942-43.

Increased Acreage of Oilcrops
in 1944 Recommended

An increased acreage of oilcrops in 1944 is called for by the National
acreage goals, announced in early November on the basis of State goals recom-
mekied by State committees. The goal for soybeans is set at 13,654,000 acres
:Crvested for beans, 19 percent above the indicated acreage in 1943. The pea-
'h tt goal-is 6,15S,000 acres grown alone for all purposes, representing.an
t- inrease of 3 pcrdcnt over the 1943 acreage. A reduction of 6.percent in the
'flaxseed acreage 'o 5,895,000'planted acres is recommended. The goal for
S'cottoni 22,277,000 acres in'cultivation on July 1, is about 1 percent over the
S: areage in-'cultivation on the same date in 1943. The total of these four goals
i* i''4.0. million acres, an increase of about 7 percent over the corresponding
acreage actually planted or harvested in 1943. Compared with the pre-war
average (1937-41) the increase is about 35 percent.

Table 2.- Oilcrops: Acreage goals for 1944, with comparative data

Item :Average: 194, : 193 : 193 ; 19
___ 1 937-4: goal : actual: goal
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: acres acres acres acres acres

Cotton in cultivation July 1 ........: 26,358 23,302 22,500 21,995 22,277
Flaxseed planted ...................:. 2,307 4,.691 5,500 6,289 5,895
Peanuts grown alone for all purposes : 2,361 4,384 1/ 5,002 6,158
Soybeans harvested for beans ........: 4,121 10,-762 12,000 11,480 13,654
Total .........................: 35,17 43,139 --- h4,766 47,9
;" 17 e 1943 goal for peanuts was 5,500,000 acres,picked and threshed. On the
basis of 1942 and 1943 experience,, this would be equivalent to 6,300,000 or
!'" 6, 00,000 acres'grown alone for all purposes.

;aTotal Production of Fats from Domestic.
: '": Materials May Decline n_ 1944-45

Achievement of the 1944 acreage goals would result in an increase of
about 350 million pounds in vegetable oil production in 1944-45, assuming
average yields per acre and about the same disappearance of oilseeds in non-
Crushing uses as in the last year. Total production of vegetable oils from





NOVEMBER 1943


domestic materials would exceed 4.3 billion pounds, compared with an expected
output of approximately 4 billion pounds in 1943-E4.

Offsetting the prospective increase in vegetable oil production in
1944-45 is the likelihood of a decline in lard production. Total lard output
(including noninspected production) in 1943-44 may reach 3.2 billion pounds,
over 450 million pounds more than a year earlier. But with a less favorable
hog-corn ratio and a smaller supply of feed concentrates per animal in 1944
than in 1943, a substantial reduction is expected in the 1944 pig crop. This
in turn would result in a material decline in lard production in the year
beginning October 1944. Present prospects, therefore, indicate that the
decline in animal fat production in 1944-45 may more than offset the projected
increase in vegetable oil output.

Butter Production Estimate for 1943-44 Reduced

Partly as a result of a deterioration in the outlook for butter produc-
tion, total output of fats and oils from domestic materials in the crop year
1943-44 is now expected to amount to about 11.3 billion pounds, 200 million
pounds less than forecast a month ago. The estimated quantity of .soybeans
available for crushing also has been reduced. Production of, creamery butter in
April-June 1943 was nearly the same as in the corresponding months of 1942, but
in July-September it was about 6 percent below a year earlier. In October and
early November a further decline from the 1942 level occurred. This declining
trend has resulted from a greater than seasonal decline in total milk produc-
tion and from an increasing demand for fluid milk and cream in city markets,
which has diverted milk from manufactured products such as butter.

It is estimated that total milk output in 1944 will be slightly less
than in 1943 if feed supplies are distributed among the several classes of live-
stock in 1944 as in 1943. Also fluid milk and cream consumption probably will
continue higher than a year earlier -- even though the upward trend is checked
under recent Government orders restricting monthly sales of fluid milk and
cream in important fluid milk markets to 100 percent and 75 percent,
respectively, of June 1943 sales. Butter production (including farm butter) in
the 12 months beginning October 1943 is now expected to total about 1,960
million pounds, 7 percent less than a year earlier.

Little Change Expected in Civilian Food Fat
Supplies Despite Increased Supplies
of Fats and Oils

Total supplies of fats and oils in the 12 months beginning October 1943,
including imports, may be about 1 billion pounds greater than a year earlier,
chiefly as a result of increased production from domestic materials, Lard out-
put may increase about 450 million pounds, and soybean and linseed oil produc-
tion will increase substantially. An increase of perhaps 300 million pounds in
imports also is expected. The supply of food fats for domestic civilian con-
sumption, however, probably will not rise from the present level under
rationing of approximately 44 pounds per capital annually. A large part of the
increase in lard production is expected to be required for soap. Supplies of
inedible tallow and greases, coconut oil, and palm oil, the principal fate
normally used in soap, are not sufficient to meet soap makers' needs, even at
the present restricted rate of soap production. Increases in supplies of fats


- 6 -





fOs-s81 7-

and oils other than lard will be used to ipeej expanded military and lend-lease
requirements and to rebuild stocks to normal working levels,

:S*::jeas Butter-but.More Margarine for.Oivilians.
Probable. in,' 194 Total Table Fat.May .
.Decrease Slightly .

: .'.. Apparent civilian consumption pf but.tr and margarine in 1943 may total
t about 17 pounds per capita comparo with.approximately 18.5 pounds.in 1942 and
-"an average of- 19.7 pounds.annpally, in 1935-39. A slight reduction from the
1943 level is likely also in 1944, assuming continuation of present quotas for
margarine manufacture.

Civilian butter consumption apparently was slightly lower in the third
_quarter of 1943 (July-September) than in the preceding 3-month period, largely
as a result of a seasonal decline in production and continued accumulation of
... .:stocks by Government agencies to meet lend-lease and military requirements in
h.:.' 'h fall andwinter months. Government purchases of butter,. other than butter
i ": 'previously set aside, were discontinued in October, and it was announced that
purchases would not be. resumed until April 1944. As n result, supplies avail-
able 'for civilians probably will increase somewhat in the fourth quarter of
S' .;'i43 (October-Docember.). 'Total' civilian consumption of butter in 1943 mey be
slightly over 13 pounds per capital compared with 15.7 pounds: in 1942 and an
average of..i6,8 pounds in '1935-39. I 1944, war requirements for butter --
consisting mainly of the needs of the United States armed forces but also
including shipments to the Russian Army -- will continue large. Hence, with
.:: a decline in production expected, the supply of butter for civilians may be .
about 1 pound per capital smaller in 1944 than in 1943. :_-.

Use of fats and oils in margarine for civilian consumption has been
restricted'since September 1942 by the provisions of Food Distribution Order 42
In the first 6 months of 1943, manufacturers were allowed 180 percent of
a' averag use in corresponding quarters of 1940 and 1941. This percentage was
reduced to 167 percent for thp second 6 months of the year. Production for
civilians was close to the maxinum permissible" rate in the first quarter of
the year, but a substantial decline, occurred in the second quarter, reflecting
in part the institution of food fat rationing in late March. During the third
quarter (July-September), with butter scarce in retail stores in many areas
of the country, particularly in the Eastern States, consumption of margarine
increased rapidly and in September approached manufacturers' maximum rate of
output.

Production of margarine for civilians in the fourth quarter could be
increased about 40 percent over the third-quarter level without exceeding
m:. manufacturers' quo.tas. If civilian demand, continues strong andf this increase
occurs, civilian disappearance in '1943 would total about 4.1 pounds per, capital
(actual weight) compared with 2S' pounds in 1942 and an average of 2.9 pounds
in 1935-39, With a continuation of the present quota percentage of 167 per-
S cent of base-period use, manufacturers could produce a maximum of about, 4.9
... pounds of margarine per capital for civilian consumption in 1944.





NOVEMBER 1943 ;j

Margarine Production Expec to Approach
650 Million Pounds in 1943

In addition to the civilian output, a substantial quantity of margarine
has been produced in 1943 for export, mainly under lend-lease. Total 1943
production for noncivilian uses probably will reach about 125 million pounds.
The civilian output may total 520 million pounds, assuming a near-maximum
level of output in October-December. Hence, total output for the year would
reach nearly 650 million pounds compared with 426 million pounds in 194g. Iq
1941, when output was almost exclusively for domestic civilian consumption,
the total was 368 million pounds.

Table 3.- Margarine: Estimated maximum permissible production
and actual production, by quarters, 1943

:Eatimt~cd- -~~
Estimated :-- --__ __--- --- --^S. -- -- r,-- t-4
Estate estimated civilian e ctua-
base. Allocation'
period : production quota to exempt E estimated : production
Perio 'production: Percentage :s m. :a reported
Pifor : of base : uses maximum- : rejon
lfor f bae : (mainly permissible' by Bureau
civilian : period quantity lend-lease) production: of
S use : permitted : 1/ : Internal
: under FDO-42: Revenue
Mil. lb. Pet. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. Ib.

Jan.-Mar. 93 180 167 2/ 31 198 195
Apr.-June : 82 180 1i8 24 172 110
July-Sept.: 82 167 137 39 176 149
Oct.-Dec. S 98 167 164 30 194 -

Year ; 355 --- 6-- 12 740 --

~J Converted from fat content to finished weight basis by dividing the allocation
of fats and oils by .80. Margarine, like butter, contains approximately 80
percent fat.
V/ Estimated: no allocations were made in the first quarter of 1943.

Same Production of Olive Oil Expected This
Year as Last; Stocks at Low Level

"/ith 61 percent of a full crop of California olives indicated
November 1 -- the same figure as a year earlier -- 1943 olive production
probably will not differ greatly from production in 1942, when 58,000 tons
were harvested. As the percentage of the crop to be crushed also is expected
to be about the same as last year, the output of olive oil in the 1944.45 erop
year probably will not be greatly different from the 10 million pounds
produced in 1943-44.

Prices at New York for edible olive oil rose to ceiling levels in early
1943 and those for the California oil are now about 14 percent higher than a
year ago, With demand strong and supplies limited, factory and warehouse
stocks of edible olive oil declined to 2.6 million pounds on October 1, 1943,
compared with 7.1 million pounds a year earlier. Consumption of olive oil,
unlike that of other food fats, is not limited by rationing. Disappearance





OS-81 9- '

in either 1943:or 1944 probably..ill..not greatly exceed the 1942 figure of 16
Mialioen ponds,. -onsump.tion of edible olive.oil ih the pre-war years (1935-39)
averaged about.:65 million pounds,annually., Most of this quantity was imported,

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
.' ..
'eduction Indicated in 1943 Peanut Crop

':.:. The a1943: poant cr9 p: was indicdtted November 1 to be about 2,682 million
pounds (picked and threshed) compared with 2,769 million pounds indicated a
month earlier. Assuming a disappearance of 500 million pounds into non-
commercial uses -- -such as seed, feed, home use, and local sales by farmers --
and ::the: ale of 1,.400 million pounds to cleaners and shellers -- which amount
i ,athe: maximum porm.ittQd under Commodity Credit Corporation Order No. 4 -- less
than.800 million pounds. will.remain for crushing. Production of oil from this
pet'ity of farmers' stock peanuts, together with output from oilstock peanuts
(inferior kernels produced as a byproduct of. shelling operations), probr.bly
Swould-not amount to more than 240 million pounds.

There was little change in November in the indicated production of
other oilorops. The figure for soybeans is now 206 milli-n bushels, for flax-
Aeed-51,5 million bushels, and for cottonseed (calculated on the basis of
.11,442,000 bales) 5,079,000 tons.

Large Carry-Over of Soybeans on October 1

Stocks of soybeans in all positions on October 1, 1943, amounted to
12.9 million bushels About 4.9 million bushels of this total were on farms
and about 4.8 million bushels at crushing plants. Total stocks a year
earlier were estimated at 6 million bushels. Comparable figures for the
years before 1942 are not available, but, in view of the much smaller crnps
in those years than'now, the October 1 carry-overs probably were very small.

With total stocks on July 1, 1943, reported .t 4503 million bushels,
apparent disappearance of soybeans in July-September was 32.4 million bushels.
Orushings in.the sane.perio4 were 28.7 million bushels. This would leave
3.7 million bushels for export, feeding to livestock, and processing for
Human consumption.

Production of Fats and Oils Increased in September;
Factory and Warehouse Stocks Reduced

"rctory. production nf primary fats and oils in September mounted to
837 million pounds, 99 million pounds more than a nonth earlier. Seasonal
declines in butter and lard production, amounting to 25 and 24 million pounds,
respectively, were more than offset by increases of 113 and 37 million pounds
in the output of cottonseed and linseed oils, Fish oil production also
increased substantially in September, but the output of soybean oil
declined. (Table 5.)

Factory and warehouse stocks of fats and oils on September 30 totaled
1,888 million pounds (crude basis), 43 million pounds less than a month
earlier. This probably is the seasonal low point for the year. Stocks of
lard declined 65 million pounds in September, reflecting seasonally small





NOVEMBEa 1943 10 -

production, use of lard in snap, and a reduction of 23 million pounds in
Government-held stocks. Material declines also occurred in stocks of soy-
bean oil, peanut oil, and greases. There was a seasonal increase of 34
million pounds in holdings of cottonseed oil, (Table 6.)

Included in the September 30 total were 115 million pounds of lard
and rendered pork fat and 164 million pounds of butter held in cold storage
by Government agencies and the Dairy Products Marketing Association.
Government-held stocks of other fate and oils, including linseed oil, fish
oil, and imported oils, are a part of the reported total.

Compared with a year earlier, September 30 factory and warehouse
stocks showed an increase of 80 million pounds. As a result of Government
accumulations in the spring and summer of 1943, total cold-storage holdings
of lard were 133 million pounds greater than a year earlier and total
holdings of butter were up 109 million pounds. An increase of 89 million
pounds occurred in soybean oil stocks. The principal decreases from a
year earlier were in inedible tallow and greases (126 million pounds),
cottonseed oil (63 million pounds), and linseed oil (60 million pounds).

Factory production of fats and oils in the third quarter of 1943
(July-September) totaled 2,327 million pounds, 10 percent more than a year
earlier. There were large increases in the output of lard and soybean oil,
partially offset by substantial declines in production of butter and
inedible tallow. The output of greases and fish oils was greater than-a
year earlier. Among the relatively minor items, production of oleo oil
and olecstearine showed a large percentage decline, but the output of
edible tallow increased slightly.

Government Purchases of Fats and Oils
Small in October

Purchases of fats and oils by the WPr Food Administration in the 4
weeks ended October 30 amounted to 21 million pounds, the smallest monthly
figure since December 1941. Included in the total were 10 million pounds
of butter, 5 million pounds of lard and rendered pork fat, and 4 million
pounds of vegetable oils. The butter was acquired from stocks accumulated
before October by the Dairy Products Marketing Association or by authorized
receivers under the set-aside order. Wr Food Administration purchased
1,356 million pounds of fats and oils in the first 10 months of 1943
compared with 1,027 million pounds in the full year 1942. Lard purchases
by the War Food Administration in early November were at a record level.





2O8-81 .-* 11 -

l: able 4.- Purchases of fats and oils by thi WaTr ood Administration, 1941-43
.0 "; .. ""..........
... 19- "
Item : 1941 a 1942 : : :Jan.-Oct.
Sept. Oct. I/* -
:Milj lb. Mil. lb. il. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.
I
Autter .........Jl..a..a;:.,..: 34 29 10 91
lard 'and rendered pork fat ....: 326 54 2 5 591
Other animal fate and oils / ..: 2 30 3 1 57
Vegetable oils ......... ..... --- 170 23 4 485
Shortening ..................... -- 6 1 62
Margarine (fat content) 5/ .....: 1 77 1 3F 50
Soap (fat content) / .......... --- 1 1 20
Total fat equivalent ......: 329 1,027 59 21 1,356-

!ompiled from reports of the War Food Administration.
1/ rw weeks ended October 30, 1943.
SComputed from unrounded numbers.
3 Less than 500,000 pounds.
! Included fish-liver and fish oils.
/ Fat content estimated at 80 percent for margarine, 55 percent for soap.
Soag Sales Increased In July-Septenber

Sales of soap other than liquid soap by '65 manufacturers, representing
approximately 90 percent of the total volume of nonliquid soap produced and
sold in the United States, were reported by the Association of Soap and
Gl erine Producers to have been 699 million pounds in the third quarter of
9i43 (July-September). This was about 7 percent more than in the second
quarter but 6 percent less than in the third quarter last year. Sales in the
first 9 months of 1943 amounted to 2,069 million pounds, 8 percent less than a
year earlier and 9 percent under the average for the corresponding periods of
1940 and 1941.

Third-quarter sales of liquid soap by 41 manufacturers totaled about
897,000 gallons, 25 percent more than in the preceding quarter and 66 percent
more than in the third quarter of 1942. A marked upward trend in liquid soap
saies i apparent. The total for the first 9 months of 1943, about 2,370,000
gallons, is 27 percent greater than for the corresponding period of 1942 and
42 percent above the average for the first 9 months of 1940 and 1941.

Fats and Oils Prices Lower Than A Year Ao

'With prices of fats and oils unchanged in October, the index number of
wholesale prices of 27 major fats and oils remained at 108 percent of the
1924-29 average for the fourth successive month. Reflecting the reduction last
June in maximum prices for butter, the October index number was 3 points lower
than a year earlier. This is the first time since January 1941 that the index
has indicated a lower level for prices of fats and oils than a year earlier.

Prices of linseed oil at New York declined slightly below ceiling levels
in early November, reflecting increased crushing of imported flaxseed at
:' astermrnilla in. recent. yeeks. Prices of Nn. 1 flaxseed at Minnearpolie which





NOVEMBER 1943 12 .,

had returned to the ceiling lev.'l of $3.05 per bushel in late Octnb.er, showed
no tendency to decline in :Nive-'ber. With expert nr.d nilitnry reouiroments for
linseed oil expected to continue large, a:najor decline in flmxsoed and lin-
seed oil prices is not likely in.tho 1943W44 sorson, even though a record
crush:of flpxseed'is expected.

"Prides :rof shelled S3pnish nopnuts at couiitry shipping points in the
Southeastern and Southwestern rea.s, v ich had been 'Sli'gh5tly '\ider coiling
levels in October, were ouotod in nid-iov3nber mostly at the ceilings.

RECENT GOVMRlT'ET ACTIONS .

Cottonseed, Pepnut, Soybean, and Corn Oils:
Again Prohibited in Pnry Industrial Usas

Food Distribution Order 29, which restricts the use pnd distribution
of cottonseed, cofnut, soybei;j, and corn oils, was Pronded effective..
November 23 to prohibit the use of these oils in the n.nufacture of the
following products: Son-, piint, varnish, lacquer, nnd other protective
co.tings; linoleun includingz frlt-base florr coverings), oilclotb, andc c6.ted
fabrics; printinr inks; n.ninal and poultry feeds; and core oil. Exemptions
were nado, hpovver, for use in soap. for nodicinal puroases or soft.soap for
Arry use, -nd for the use of soybe!i' oil in synthetic resins or as a plas-
ticizcr in lacouers or coated frbrics other thsn linolcu: and oilcloth.
Provisions similar to th.:so had been in fnrce under Food Distribution Order 42
beginning Jpnu.ry 1, 1943. The ban s.-inst soyborr. oil. hd b on.rpemoved,
however, effective July 10, .nd r.llocntions after th-t date under Ordqr 29
had included. substar.til quantities of' oybePn oil' to sopp ,pkers. Effective
October 14, all restrictions on uscs of i.Ldividupl fts or oils vere clini-
n.tcd front Order 42. Restrictions of this- type ro nno included in Food
Distribution orders (such as No. 29) dealing with specific fats or oils.

Reduced Percentage qf Lirseed Oil Rescrvod
for GovernCent Purchase

In AM'nd-ent. 1 to Food Distribution Order 56, offn'ctivo October 25,
the Wpr Fond Ad-iiiistrp.tion roducad fro. 45 to 25 th.- oercrnt-age of li.iseed
o)il producti-,n th-t crus.i:.rs ar'. roouired to offer to Govcrnrcnt agencies.
The original order had be-;c issued i-. lpt~ Jane to p.ssur .. .n adoquate supply
of linscJd oil t5 ncet lo:d-lc-,sc conmitnconts, mostly for shipnont to Russia.
Purchases of linseed oil by the Wpr Food Adiniistration (including contracts
for forward delivery) tit.lcd -nr.-: thi.i 100 mill.ior. pounds in both June Pnd
:ul;.- but have bceon relatively s-Ill iii nor- rccnnt months.

Food Distribution Order 57 wais terni cited n.s of October 26. This order
had reouircd holders of lp.rgc ouatiti-en, of li.Insod oil nn June 24 to offer
25 percent of their invr.ntorics to the Govcrnnent.

Inventories of F.tty Acids Li;titod

With stroan? wrrtinc dc.-.p..d for fatty Pcids "nd with total stocks no,
r record lwr l.'vel, the War Fiod Administration issued regulations designed
to restrict the purchased inventory of pn:a user to about P A0-dpys' supply.
Food Distribution Order, 87. ffective rov~crber 1, prohibits any user of fatty





- 13-


adida from acceptihg.delivery of a .quantity that would cause his inventory,
excluding fatty acids produced by himself, to exceed one-,third of-his.total
use of fatty acids in the base period (January-June 1943), plus a quantity
iiqujia. to' the mnximtn unit or 1pt-'(suoh as -a tank car br a certain number of
* tse ) .he'"; chaeOidduring that period. Userre whose' inventofies do not
*dtid ',LOOWpoUide 'at a`ry time and who accept delivery of not more than 500
pounds in 1 month are-exempted from thesg restrictions.

seatrictions Eased on Users' Inventbries .
nf -nedIble Tallow and Greases '

S ,Under Ameenment 1 to' food Distribution Otder 67; effective:November 20,
:. s:f~i invefltdories of inedible tallow and greases may not exceed a quantity
tis'e: abdut a 60-day 'supply.- Th maximum uhder thd original ,order Was a
Uera'iuppty. Podnbers' and dealers "inventories remain limited to a 15-day
t Y'F *- '. Under 'the amendment, 'inventories of -mixed fatty acids'from tallow or
gi e8 are hO'longer. subject' to the provisions of this order. However, such
Wt!'l terts -are limited, along with those of other fatty acids by Fodd
Uf: t:iitlatin Order 87. .

Private Importers to Resume Trade in
ta t-ft, Ovils, and Seeds

,_. Since July 1942 all fats; oils, and oil-bearing materials imported. into
the United States have been purchased by Commodity Credit Corporation. A
wartime importers'! association was 6rganized.in September 1942 to act as
exclusive importing agent for the Corporation. The War Food Administration
AEdthe Vr' Production Board announced on November 11, 1943, however, that,
'atbjet t6 the provisions eof General Imports Order M-63, private importers
-vwuld'-e pe:mittted in the future to purchase the following items abroad:
Ca0&itoand oitioica bils tcashew shell liquid.from Brazil; sesame seed tucum
and murumnru kernels and oils: glycerin from Argentina and Canada; oleic acid,
steario acid, and corn oil. The use and distribution of these commodities
after importation will be subject to the provisions of applicable Food
Distr tWtioen orders.

": Food Distribution Order 46, which required 25 percent of imports of
"oabdut, babassu' 'and palm-kernel oils to be set aside for war uses, was
terminated Obtober 27 by the War Food Administration. The order, originally
Sissued in September 1942, had.beoome unnecessary because imports and distri-
bution of these oils are now controlled under other Government regulations.

feianut Butter Prices Reduced

In accordance with a plan announced in early October, a reduction of
1:;.l/2f:cnts 'per poutd was made effective Novemberr 1, in maximum prices to be
ihaged &'by'manufaeturers for peanut butter sold in containers of 2 pounds or
-,* los todisttlbutore for civilian consumption in the United'States. Maximum
"riceif*itralea to 6the buyers, including institutions and Government
agenedies were.not changed. This action was'taken in Amendment 4 to Maximum
SPrce Rega9Ution 335, At the name time, Cnmmodit Credit it corporation. made an
"-offer to'santifateturer to p P.4-1/2. dents per pound on all sales subject to
* the reEductioin saxrimUp prices In this way, manufacturers margine will
mA.,Z". f. ...'





NOVEMBER 1943


-not be affected by the price reduction, nor will.a reduction in prtee f.t-
peahuts be necessary. *. ...

Maximum wholesalers' and retailers'.mark-ups on peanut butter 09 ,fixed
percentages of the cost price. Hence, the 4-1/2 cent reduction in thbawnu-
facturers' price is expected-to result in a 6 to 7 cent reducti1on.tnurtail
prices of peanut butter, .

Maximum Price Regulation for Fats Amended ..
in Minor Particulars

Effective November 17, persons who sell edible pork fat or lard but
who prior to January 1, 1943, customarily sold more than 75 percent af'their
output of this product for inedible use, were required to use the sqhedn4e
of maximum prices for inedible greases when the product is tq be aqed4 for
inedible purposes. This regulation, issued in Amendment 8 to Maximn2 Price
Regulation 53, was designed to correct the practice among some eellers of.
pigskin grease.of asserting that the product .is edible and therefoleosubject
to maximum prices for lard and edible pork fat, which are considerably higher
than maximum prices for greases.

Amendment 9 to Maximum Price Regulation 53, effective Noveiber 22,
requires sellers of linseed oil to deduct their customary discounts for
prompt delivery in calculating their.maximum prices under the Regulation.

SUBSIDIES ON OILSEEDS AND THEIR PRODUCTS, 1943-44 .

Commitments by Commodity Credit Corporation-made in cone6tion with
the programs for oilseeds and their products in the 1943-44 marketing year
involve contingent liabilities to the Corporation totaling aboutr60gmlllion
dollars. This is in addition to the roll-back subsidy on butter which is
financed by Reconstruction .Finance Corporation. ; .

Arrangements with oilseed crushers have been made to support prices to
producers for soybeans, flaxseed, and peanuts at the increased levels- .
announced in early 1943 to encourage an expanded production of these crops.
In addition, minimum cottonseed prices are being supported throughan offer,
which was available to crushers, to purchase cottonseed oil and megl and part
of the linter production under certain conditions. The Corporation will.
sustain a loss in carrying out the soybean and peanut programs.- Little loss
is likely under the programs for flaxseed and cottonseed.

Soybeans. The schedule of minimum prices to producers for 1943-crop
soybeans is based on $1.8OnPr bushel for No. 1 or 2 green or yellow beans of
14 percent moisture content and $1.60 per bushel for No. 1 or 2 black, brown,
or mixed. beans, 14 percent moisture. Crushing mills, all operating .under con-
tract with Commodity Credit Corporation, must pay producers these minimum
prices or better, or buy from country elevators which have done so. :Soybeans
purchased by crushers must be sold to Commodity Credit Corporation at .$1.q0 or
$1.60 per bushel, depending on color of the beans, and-repurchase4 fr.o .the
Corporation at prices. determined by the size of the crusher's plant type.of
equipment used, and oil content of the beans. The Corporation makes a profit
on the beans crushed in the more efficient, mills, but this profit will be.more
than offset by a loss on beans crushed in less efficient plants. The plan is


- 14 -





708-81


- 15 -


deesipe to, provide. ,a .iprgin sufficient tp enable the old-type plants in the
main soybea-.proaucing area to operate.

E...... ven with full utilization of all available crushing capacity in the
main s*ybsan-producing area, a'part-of the crop will have to be moved else-
w,' here fqr.'cushing. The surplus, amounting to 20 to 25 million bushels, will
'be-:shipped, costly to Southern mills, with some going to -the Pacific Coast.'
ia.::~~.ihe 'etra .. pranoeltation chargesiei titf(ng from this movement will be paid by
" 'Commodity Credit Corporation.

~ : Pc .Peauts. ,Shellers,-crishers, and cooperative producer associations will
: act s 'agents 6f"Commodity Credit Corporation in the marketing of.the 1943 cror
of peanuts, Famers y11ilbe paid support prices mostly between 6.25 cents
':: '*and'7.5 cents per pound' depending on the type and quality of the goods
!,'W.delivered. The peanuts.will then be dold to cleaners and sellers at prices
aroundd 1.5 cents per pdiaud over the price to farmers, and to-crushers at
S-prides in the neighborhood- of.25 ceiits lower. .If present crop indications
are "borne out, 'nearnly2,200 milliodr pounds f farne.asr stock peanuts may be
Available for cleaning shelling, and crushing" .'Commodity Credit Corporation
'..' :OQrder .No ...4 liits- the use of farmers "stock peanuts in cleaning and shelling
..' o.'1,400 million pounds. This would leaved nearly. 800. million pounds for
crushing. If the indicated proportions between cleaning and shelling, on the
Sone hand, and crushing'on the other, are realized,.some profit will accrue
S*"to tie Corporation from this part of the program..,

SPeanut Butteg. Commodity Credit Corporation will make'payments of 4.5
;t cents per pound on peanut butter shipe'd by manufacturers after October 31
for consumer use in continental Unit'ed states excluding use by industrial,
'. institutional, or Government agenciess.' Manufacturere' ceiling prices for such
., ...alaes''were reduced by- the sane amount effective November 1. With wholesalers'
.nd r-tailers.-. maximum mark-ups on a'percentage basis, a decline of 6.5 to 7
'.... d it.s'per. pound is expected-in retail prices of'peanut butter. These steps
A. -Vdre taken as part of a more general program, announced in August, to "roll-
'backi .retail prices of a number of food products.

..latseed; and Cottonseed. With' present ceiling prices for -linseed oil
and meal and with a strong demand for these products, market prices.'of flaxseed
probably; will remain well above the support level of $2.85 per bushel for No. 1
seed, Minneapolis. 'Cottonseed prices are being supported at'.a- level comparable
With prices of other oilseeds ($56.600' r'ton at shipping points.in Oklahoma
and Texas and $55.00 per ton-in othki Sfatest'. .Commodity Credit Corporation
offers to purchase linseed oil and meal and cottonseed oil and meal at
i. specifiJed prices from mills that have' pid support prices or -higher for flax-
':seed and cottonseed. Little loss to the Corporation appears likely to result
: 'from either nf these program, as prices o'f all vegetable oils and high-protein
feeds are'expected to be at or neat ceiling levels.without Commodity Credit
Corporation support throughout 194 -44' 4;'.

1942-43 Piogram. Somewhat similar programs for supporting oilseed
prices were carried on by Commodity Credit Corpnration in 1942-43. In
addition,-a .subsidy of 1/2 cent per pound on refined cottonseed, soybean, and
..peanut .oitsfor utsein food products was paid to refiners in compensation for
a :boll-back" of' wholesale prices of cooking and salad oils and manufactured
shortening. This subsidy was discontinued at the end of the 1942-43 season.






Table 5.- Factory production of fats and oils, third quarter 1941-43,
September 1942, August and September 1943, and indicated crop-year -
production from domestic materials, 1940-43
: july-Sept. S 94
Item 1941 1942 19 2 Aug. Sept, t Juy-
: : Sept.
Animal fats and oils :Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. Ib, Mil lb.
Creamery butter ................: 509.8 491.3 137.- 151 126.5 459.7
Inspected lard and rendered
:oork fat ............, .,.,..... 298.7 363.9 118.2 165.4 14i.0 506*5
Greases excluding woolgrear e : 11.1 125.4 40.5 46.6 4j.5 138.3
goat's-foot oil .......,...,....: 1.2 1.1 .3 ,2 .2 .6
Oleo oil ..........7..r,......... 21.7 27.1 8.0 7.7 5.7 21.2
Stearine, animal, edibie s.......: 10.4 13.1 3.9 3.9 3,0 10.1
tallow, edible ............. ....: 24.7 31.0 '10.2 11.5 108. 32*5
Tallow, inedible ..... ........: 207.2 244.6 80.9 68.5 70.5 204.3
Wool grease .... .... .,........: 3.0 4.2 1.6 1.2 1.3, 3.7
Fish-liver oil ......... ......:1/ .6 1.4 .5 .8 .8 2.5
Fish oil ...................'... 984 64. 26. 233 45.1. 82.2
Total, animal ............ 66 428.2 481.60 $.4 1,61.
Vegetable oils, crude basis'
Pastor oil ........ .... .......: 39.7 29.3 7.0 10.3 11,8 28.0
Coconut oil ....................: 70.4 26.1 95 11. 16 34.4
Corn oil .......................: 53.6 61.9 20.6 19.5 20.4 57.4
Oottonseed oil .................: 190.2 212.4 161.7 40.0 152.9 212.6
Linseod oil ..,................: 236.7 225.1 72.0 68.0 105.0 234.0
Peanut oil .....................: 7.3 21.4 1.8 13.6 4,7 27.2
Soybean oil ....................: 115.6 172.6 55.4 91.2 76,3 263.9
Other vegetable oils ............ '10.0 3.1 1.7 3 1;4 8.0
Total, vegetable ............ 723:5 51.9 329.7 251.5 .388..- 655
Grand total ............:2,020.3 2,119.5 757.9 738.5__!8J.2 2327 *1
: Indicated production from domestic materials
Year : 1940-41 1941-42 :.1942-43 1943-
:beginning: -
: Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. b. Mil. lb.
Butter, including farm ...........: Oct. : /2,287 3/2,142 2,112 1,960
Lard and rendered pork fat, total : Oct. : 2/2,285 2,440 2,739 3,200
Inedible tallow and greases, total: Oct. : 1,492 /1,733 2/1,600 1,650


Edible tallow, oleostearino,
oleo stock, and oleo oil ........: Oct. : 218 277 271 295
leatis-foot oil ..................: Oct, : 5 3
Wool grease ..................... Oct. : 14 15 15 15
Marine animal oils .............: July : 175 215 163 1O
Corn oil .........................: Oct. : / 16 242 240 240
Cottonseed oil ..................: Aug. : 1,42 1,250 1,400 1,240
Linseed oil 4/ ...................: July : 494 56 729 900
Olive oil ........................: Nov. : 11 8 10 10
Peanut oil ......................: Oct. : 174 3/ 78 133 240
Soybean oil .....................: Oct. 564 707 1,198 1,350
ung oil .... ............ De 2
Total ...... ..... ..... ...... 0 1 I 11
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census and the Departmen of Arjiulture.
Monthly reports do not show total production of butter, lard, inedible tallow1 and
greasen.
1/ Cod and cod-liver oils only. 2/ Based on most recent indications, subject to
change. I/ Revised. V/ Domestic production.


NOVEMBER 19 43
k


- 16 -





I.:Sl8 17 -
Table 6.- Factory and wa~eahuse stocks of specified fats and oils, crude basis,
September 30~ .1941-43, July 31 and August 31, 1943

S. -t Sept. 30, Sept. 30,! 194 _
;- Ite .-94 1942: J.ly i 3. :S t. 30
Mil. l. Ail. lb. il. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.
S-; f at 'and oils
: er .........................: 203.0 123.6 210.5 231.5 232.5
L~ard-and rendered pork fat ....: 219.0 62.1 241.0 260.0 195.4
*Peases, excluding rool grease ? 97,9 9S.7 972" 98.1 86.9
beat's-foot oil .............: 2.3 2.9 '23 2.4 2.8
.leo oil .. ....... .. ........: .5.0 3.5 10.9 9.3 8.0
-Btearine, animal, edible ......: 4. 23 '3.8 3.2 2.7
$allow, edible ............. ..: 6.6 10.5 16.0 114.4 12,.
...fallow, inedible ............: 271.4 235.7 118.6 118.9 122.4
'ool grease ...................: 5.1 5.3 3.2' 3.0 3.1
oad and cod-liver oil .......... 9.7 14.g 12,4 13.7 13.0
f:,t er fish-liver oil ..........: 1/ 2.4 2.1 1.9 1.8
''ish oil ................... .. 1,2 i24 .4 -'.*'g7.4 92,2 125.2
marine e mamm 4al oil .............__ 7__ 40 41.0 0.
Total, animal ...............: q. 727.7 595 9.7 s4.
Vegetable Oils, crude basis 2/
Babassu oil ...................: 2.6 11.6 --l4.a -' 10.1 11.5
.estor oil / ...............: 15.8 29.1 34.7 43.8 459
S6cpput ol ............... 204.4 136.2 170.8 157.1 155.-
Corn oil ......................: 4l.3 41.6 33.7 32.5 30.2
Cottonseed oil ................: 271.4 279.8 244,5 183.0 217.6
Linseed oil ...................: 161.2 242.9 18o0, 177.2 182.4
Oiticica oil .................. --- 9.0 6.2 6.5 6.3
Olive oil, edible ..............r 7.8 7.1 .-3.2' 3 2.6
Olive oil, inedible and foots .: 157 11.9 7.7 7.2 6.6
PalFm-hernel oil .~...... .....: 4.5 1.5 .3 4/ 4/.
- Pal *oil' .r-.......... ....... 125.0 94.6 75.4 75.3 9-5
Peanut oil ..................... 35-1 15.6 41.0 42.5 31.7
p eril.ia oil ................. 6.5 2.8 1.0 .9 .8
'ap&e oil .......................: 13.8 17.9 25.7 23.7 22,7
..esagme oil .................... .4 .1 1.7 1.5 1.1
bybbean o1 ...... .. ...... :.. 6t. 1 i1.1-1..... f223.2 217.0 200. 1
.TuI oil ...................... 32.7 32.3 29.6 2 .2 27.4
'Other vegetable oils ....... ..: 17.9 -*35-1.-i .. .3. 4. .31..4 32.
STotal., vegetable ...........: ,s024.2 1,o080.1 133.1 1,0D.l 3 1',043.3
Grand total ...............2,001.0 1,.67. -7-. l_.9923-. 1. ,.9.30- r, 1,887.7
C.oipfled from reports of the Bureau of the Ceasus;, except butter and lard, Food
fstr'ibution Adminis'tration. 'Totals computcrd from nmr-ondod numbers. Includes
stocks held by Government.
If Included in fish 'oil. ....... ..
2/ Crude plus refined converted to crude basis by dividing by the follo>ring fac-
torb: Babassu, corn,' cottonseed, palm-kernel", *and -pal.m oils 0.93; coconut,. gponut,
and soybean.oils 0,94.
f1 Included-'stocks of dehydrated cPstdr oil converted to -crude.basis by dividing by
Not separately record.
4/ Not separately reported.





NOVEMBER g193 18 -


Table 7.- Prices of specified oil-bearing materials,
October 1941 and 1942, August-October 1943


Item


Castor beans, Brazilian,
f.o.b. Brazilian ports s..:
Cottonseed, United States :
farm price ...............:
Flaxseed, No. 1, Minneapolis:
Flaxseed, United States
farm price ...............
Peanuts, No. 1 shelled
Spanish, Southeastern


I Oct. : 1
Unit .
t 1941 1942 Aug. Sept. Oct
: Dollars Dollars Dollars r Dollars Dollars


Long ton : 1/75.90


Short ton:
Bushel :

|


shipping points ..........:100 pounds:
Peanuts (for nuts and oil), :
United States farm price : :
Soybeans, United States :
farm price ...............: Bushel :


50.89
1.87

1,64


75.00

46.46
2.46

2.25


75.00 75.00 75.00


50.90
3.02

2.80


51.90
3.05

2.84


7.e5 11.78 14.25 14.25 14.00


4.41 5.77

1.42 1.58


7.17

1.68


7.15

1.69


1.80


Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, Daily Trade Bulletin (Chicago), Chicago
Journal of Commerce, Daily Market Record (Minneapolis), and reports of the Bureau of
Agricultural Economics.
I/ C-. and f., New York.

Table 8.- Price per ton of specified oilseed meals,
October 1941 and 1942, August-October 1943

: Oct. 1
Item : 1941 : 19l2 : Aug. : Sept. DOct
: Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars


Copra meal, Los Angeles ...,..........:
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent protein, :
Memphis ..o .... .......,,..... :
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent protein, :
Chicago ..........................:
Linseed meal, 34 percent protein, :
Minneapolis ,.......................**:
Linseed meal, 32 percent protein,
New York ..........................:
Peanut meal, 45 percent protein,
f.o.b. Southeastern mills ...........:
Soybean meal, 41 percent protein,
Chicago .........................a


38.55

36.00

41.45

37.50

31.25

34.00

37.95


52.90 51.50 51.50 51.50

36.25 49.00 48.50 48.50
41.90 54.47 54.47 54.45

36.45 45.50 45.50 45.50

33.75 45.00 45,00 450oo

37.75 53.00 53,00 53.00

42,70 51.90 51,90 51,90


Compiled from records of the Food Distribution Administration.
1/ Bagged carlots.




OS-81l


Table 9.- Oleomargarine: Production, withdrawals for consumption,
Sand materials used in manufacture, United States,
September 1941 and 1942, July-September 1943
Item Sept. 19_3 T/
: ___ 1:941 : 1942 : July : Aug. : Sept,
:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib.


Production:
Colored ....................: 257 9,260 2/14,977
Uncolored ..................: 32,872 30,44 2/28,97S
Total 3/ ............. .. 3129 39,0 ,95
,~~ -


15,377
38,574
531951_


4,092
46, 14
507606-


Tat-paid withdrawals for
United States consumption / :


33,097


29,537


31,082


Materials used:


Oleo oil ...................: 1,795 2,217 1,210
Oleostearine .............: 356 215 252
Oleostearine oil ...........: 131 -- --
Lard, neutral ..............: 544 735 753
Oleo stock .................: 220 335 293
Tallow .....................:24 22
Butter ....................:--- ---
Monostearine ..............: 15 10 28
Total, animal 3...........: 3061 3536 2,558


Cottonseed oil .............: 12,524 13,487 15,051
Soybean oil ................: 5,847 14,496 16,796
Linseed oil ................: --- -- 569
Peanut oil ................: 181 75 201
Corn oil .................: 43 142 191
Cottonseed stearine ........: --- 62 5
Soybean stearine ...........: 1 -- --
Soya flakes .........,......: ---
Total domestic vegetable : 18,596 282,816

Babassu oil ..............: 290 -
Coconut oil ......3......... 3,574 --
Palm oil ................... 905 -
Palm-kernel oil ...........: 499 --- ---
Total, foreign vegetable : _28 --b- --
Total, fats and oils ....: 2b,925 31, 798 35.37


38,144 46,676


1,191 1,331
272 345

809 962
315 253
23 34

2,- 2--7 _


20,650
17,498
2,641
266
214
7


23,852
12,631
638
629
285
6


7 3
6 5
41,289 38,049


z4hi31F4


IT,01l


Milk .......................: 6,044 7,143 7,352 9,063 8,768
Salt ......................: 1,133 1,274 1,431 1,758 1,662
Derivative of glycerin .....: 73 71 79 98 87
Lecithin .................: 17 24 34 44 46
Soda (benzoate of) .........: 15 23 28 34 28
Vitamin concentrate .*......: 7 8 9 11 10
Color ..................... --- --- 8 9 3
Miscellaneous ..............: 1 5 __ 2 2
Total, other materials ..: 7,290 8,548 8,9 11,019 10,6o6
Total, all materials ....: 4 ,215 40,3L6 44, 19 ~,54,953 51,6
Compiled from Internal Revenue records and Internal Revenue Bulletin.
I/ Preliminary. 2 Revised. Corrected June figures: Colored, 13,234,000
pounds; uncolored, 22,828,000 pounds. 3/ Total of unrounded numbers.
'/ Excludes withdrawn free of tax for use in Federal institutions, and with-
drawn for export.


- 19 -


I




m ---------


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

I lUIll III111111111 IIIII IIII IIII li ll
3 1262 08905 1329


Penalty for private use
payment of postage


O-F FCIA BUSINESS


UNIVERSITY OF FLA LIBRARY
REFERENCE DEPOT
F:S-X GAINESVILLE FLA


After five days return to
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL. ECONOMICS
WASHINGTON 25, D. G.


to mvc









;. "I










m:. :4.
.-i ,, : ..










je!

















t AjN


4
-" r:-:' i




















;. .. .n L'u



;." o "' i
*" "' S ... : r' .


















.. :.,








r "% ,. ;,',;:


. r