The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00034
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00034

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text























































..: l I I I I l I I I I I l
1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943
L.'tIDING WODL ORBA6B
'a" lFGTION S'I .iOBofauMPTiON FOR APRIL-JUNE 1941 BASED ON MONTHLY PATE FOR APRIL ArD MAY
t ;| a1 ;rsroKSs
B ITN T'. OF A.. ICULtiiF E N EG. 4315B BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

a s wirhroose stocks of inedible tallow and greases declined materially in t
,of 4Q2 and in the first months of 1943. On May 31 stocks were the smallest sit
i ag Factory consumption continued at a high level through May 19943. The upwi
i:ipiiq, been reversed, temporarily at least, chiefly as a result of a decline
inspected plants and in rendererst receipts of shop fat.
..~ :EE"H'Ii. i ,. ..~. ..~E~i~"








Table 1.- Wholesale price per pound of fate and oils at specified riarket, and index
numbers of prices, June 1941 and 1942, April-June 1943
PRICES
S: June 1943
Item 1 1941 1942l : Aril Mafy n June '
I Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


Butter, 92-score, Chicago ........................................
Butter, 92-score. New York .......................................
Oleomargarine, dom. veg., Chicago .................................
Compounds (animal and veg. cooking fats), Chiago .................
Lard, loose, Chicago .............................................:
Lard, prime steam, tiarces, Chicago ..............................
Lard, refined. cartons, Ihicago ..................................
Oleo oil, No. I, barrels, New York ...............................
Oleaostearine bbl., Y. ........................................
Tallow, edible, Chicago ..........................................

Corn oil, cru e, tanks, f.o.b. mills .............................
Corn .:11 refined, bbl., N. Y ...................................
Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. S.E. mills ...................
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., tank cars, II. Y. .........................
Peanut oil. crude, tanks, t.o.b. mills ...........................
Feanut oil, don.. refined, bbl., N. Y. ...........................
Soybean oil, crude, tank cars, midwestern mills ......... ...I....

Coconut oil, 'lanila, crude, tanks. f.o.b. Pacific Coast 2/ .......
Coconut oil, Aanlla, crude, bulk, c.l.f. N. Y. ...............
Coconut oil, Aanils, refined, edible, tank cars, f.o.b. J.Y. 2 ..
Olive oil, edible, drums, ;.Y. ...................................
Olive oil, inedible, drums, TI. Y. ................................
Olive-oil foots, prime, drums, N. Y. .............................
Palm oil, Niger. crude, drums, N. Y. 2/ .........................:
Rape oil, refined, denatured, bulk, c.l.f., N. Y. ................
Sunflower oil, tank cars, f.o.b. N. Y. ...........................

Tallow, No. 1, inedible, Chicago .................................
Grease, A White, Chicago .........................................
Uenhaden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore .....................:
Sardine oil, crude, tanks, Pacific Coast .........................:
Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, drums, N. Y. ................

Linseed oil, raw, tank cars, Minneapolis ........................
Linseed oil, raw, drums, carlots, N. Y. ...........................
Perilla oil, crude, drums, N. Y. .................................a
Ditirica oil, drums, I.. Y. .......................................
Tung oil, drums, II. Y. ...........................................

Castor oil, No. 3, bbl., I. Y. ....................................
Castor oil, No. 1, tarl., 1. Y. ...................................
Castor oil, dehydrated, drums, carlots, N. Y. ....................
Cod-liver oil, med. U.S.P. bbl., N. Y. ............................
Cod oil, Newfoundland, drums, N.Y. ...............................


35.4
35.6
16.0
13.8
9.2
10.1
10.6
11.6
9.9
8.2

11.3
13.3
10.4
11.5
10.3
13.9
9.6

9.1
3/10.0

62.8
45.1
16.8
9.0
9/13.3


7.5
7.6
7.1
7.5
9.9

9.S
510.6
18.9
20.2
32.0

11.1
10.8
15.5
35.8
10.0


INDEX NUUIBERS (1924-29 = 100)


30.Z
36.8
19.0
17.0
11.9
12.6
14.5
13.2
10.6


12.7
15.0
12.8
13.8
15.0
17.0
11.6

10.5


66.3
56.7
19.5
12.0
Y15.5



9.6
8.9
8.9
11.1

12.8
/135.5
24.6
25.2
40.2

13.8
13.0
18.6
36.5
12.0


1/ 45.9
47.6
19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
13.8
10.5
9.9

12.8
15.5
12.8
14.0
13.0
16.5
11.8

11.0
11.4
' 12.8
71.2
54.7
19.0
12.1
16.0
14.3

8.4
8.9
8.8
8.9
11.1

15.1
15.7
24.5
25.0
39.0

13.8
13.0
18.6
36.5
12.0


47.5
19.0
17.0
12.9
13.0
15.6
13.8
10.5
9.9

12.6
15.5
12.8
14.0
13.0
18.5
11.8

11.0
11.4
4/ 12.8
71.5
55.5
19.0
12.1
16.0
14.3

8.4
8.9
8.8
8.9
12.3

14.9
15.5
24.5
25.0
39.0

13.8
13.0
18.6
36.5
12.0


Eight domestic fats and oils (1913-14 = 100) .....................:
Eight domestic fats and oils .....................................

All fats and oils (27 items) .......................................
Grouped by origin:
Animal fats ....................................................
marine e animal oils ............................................. :
Vegetable oils, domestic .......................................
Vegetable oils, foreign ........................................
Grouped by use:
Butter .........................................................
3utter,seasonally adjusted ......................................:
Larn .......................................... ... .............. I
Other food fats ................................................
All food fats ...............................................
Soap fate ......................................................
Drying oils ...................................................
Miscellaneous oils .............................................
All industrial fats and oils .................................


116 130 152
83 92 106

90 100 114

81 87 105
108 127 127
106 128 133
131 156 158

81 83 105
88 90 110
77 96 105
118 138 139
87 94 111
105 128 120
108 138 153
96 116 117
106 131 133


Prices compiled from Oil, Faint and L'rug Reporter, The National Provisioner. The Journal of Commerce (New York), uad
reports of the Food Distribution Administration and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Prices quoted include excise taxes
and duties where applicable. Index numbers for earlier years beginning 1910 are given in Teonnical Bulletin No. 737
(1940) ani rne Fats and Oils Situation beginning December 1940.
'/ Reflects all types of wholesale tracing for cash or short-time credit. Previous quotations refer to open arket
sales only. 2/ Three-cent processing tax added to price as originally quoted. 3/ Tanks. N. Y. / Quoted in drums.
5/ Converted to present basis of quotation.

J;


42.7
'3.4
19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
13.8
10.5
9.9

12.8
15.5
12.9
14.0
13.0
16.5
11.8

11.4
11.4
/ 12.8
71.5
55.3

12.1
16.0
14.3

8.4
5.9
8.8
8.9
12.5

14.5
15.3
24.5
25.0
39.0

13.8
13.0
18.6
36.5
12.0


144
' 102

109

98
132
132
157

96
105
105
139
104
120
150
117
132


-- -








THE FATS AND OILS SIT UAT ON
S----------------- ----------------------------------,---

.if-- i : .... Summary

T otal production of oil from cottonseed,,. peanuts, soybeans, and flax-

: ..... deed rayb' somewhat greater in 193-44. than a year earlier* An increase of

Sli.. 4 aiflle is indicated in the acreage of flaxseed for harvest in 1943, with

production forecast at 53 million bushels compared with 4o.7 million bushels

la4t iear. The quantity of linseed oil produced from domestic seed in 1943-

44 may exceed that of a year earlier by more than 200 million pounds. Soybean

acreage is indicated to be 8*5 percent larger this year than last. But it

: 4.:uncertain whether oil production will be increased in the same proportions

since the acreage to be harvest for beans and the yield of beans per acre

rwe till unknown .Production of peanut oil may increase somewhat, assuming

an average yield of peanuts per acre and the same utilization of peanuts

for seed and food as a year earlier The acreage of cotton in cultivation

on July 1 was 1.3 million smaller this year than last. With an average yield

of cottonseed per acre in 1943, production of cottonseed oil would be about

200 million pounds less in 1943-44 than in 1942-43,

Utilization of fats and oils, including "foots,n by the United States

soap industry in 1942 totaled 1,987 million pounds, 12 percent less than

in 1941, the peak year to date. A substantial accumulation of stocks of soap

by dealers and consumers occurred in 1941 under the stimulus of rising

prices and incomes. Actual consumption may have increased in 1942 as a result

of the continued rise in consumer incomes. Because of curtailed imports,

u.tilization.of coconut and palm oils declined 418 million pounds in 1942.

use of inedible tallow and greases, which were in relatively plentiful

Bpplye, increased 160 million pounds.





JtTY 1943 al 4 .

Allied occupation of Italy apparently.would create.little additional

demand for food fats and oils. Roughly 85 percent of total consumption

of food fats in Italy in pro-war years was furnished from domestic materials

About 30 percent of the fate and oils used for industrial purposes was

of domestic origin. In 1934-38, Italy had a net import balance of 400 millioG

pounds annually, of which approximately 40 percent was for food and about 60

percent for industrial purposes.


- July 19, 1943


OUTLOOK

Oilcrop Acreage Increased in 1943


The acreage of cotton in cultivation on July 1 and the prospective
1943 harvested acreages of flaxseed, soybeans for beans, and peanuts picked
and threshed total 43.4 million acres, an increase of 1.3 million acres
(3 percent) over 1942. Production of oil from these four crops in 1943-44
may be somewhat greater than the estimated output of about 3.5 biJlion
pounds in 1942-43.

Crop condition on July 1 indicated a yield of 9.1 bushels of flax-
seed per harvested acro in 1943 compared with 9.2 bushels last year.
Harvested acreage is expected to total 5.8 million acres, the largest on
record and considerably in excess of the goal of 5.5 million planted acres
(equivalent to about 5-3 million acres on a harvested basis). Production of
flaxseed is forecast at 53 million bushels compared with 40.7 million bushels
last year. Output of linseed oil from domestic seed would be in the neighbor-
hood of 900 million pounds, more than 200 million pounds in excess of the
output from the 1942 crop.

No official indications of the probable yields of cottonseed, peanuts,
and soybeans are available at this time. Approximately 22 million acres of
cotton were reported in cultivation July 1 compared with 23.3 million acres
last year. With an average yield per acre for cotton and cottonseed, output
of cottonseed oil in 1943-44 would be approximately 1,200 million pounds,
or about 200 million pounds less than in 1942-43.

Reported intentions of soybean growers in the principal soybean States
on July 1 indicate that 11*5 million acres of soybeans may be harvested for
beans in 1943. This would be less than the goal of 12 million acres, but
would be about 7 percent more than the acreage harvested for beans in 1942.
Output of oil may not increase in the same proportion, however. Yields per
acre may be lower than last year. Also,utilization of harvested beans for
purposes other than crushing may be increased.

About 4.1 million acres of peanuts picked and threshed might be expected
in 1943 on the basis of usual relationships with acreage grown alone for all






O.77 5-
".purpomes Acreage for all purposes- (excluding acreage interplented with
Other crops) is indicated at 5 million for 1943, .up 14 percent from last
years The acreage actually picked and threshed will be affected by factors
such as weather condition, -labor supply, availability of picking and
threshing machinery, and hog and feed prices. Assuming lOyyear average
S yields of peanuts per acre and the same non-crushing utiluation of peanuts
a in 1941-143 the output of peanut oil in 1943-44 would be moderately greater
; than in the preceding season. The 1943 goal for peanuts picked and threshed
is 5.5 million acres.
Factor Disappearance of Wood Pate Above Ration
Level in April-Ma "rimary ats and Oils
tll in Tight s uppl
With the exception of margarine, disappearance of the principal food
fats from factories and farms for civilian consumption was somewhat above
ration levels in April and May, the first 2 months of rationing. Stock
building by wholesale and retail distributors probably accounts for most of
the excess disappearance. Factory sales are likely to decline to ration
-levels as dealers become better supplied.

Sales of margarine at a record level in the first quarter of the
year declined sharply in April and May. The large sales in January-March
resulted chiefly from a shortage of butter and uncertain outlook for new
supplies in that period% Consumption of butter under rationing has been
maintained at a high level in relation to supplies, but with point values for
butter and margarine set at 8 and 5, respectively, consumption of margarine
declined. Butter normally sells at a price about double that of margarine.
Recently the point value for margarine was lowered from 5 to 4.

The point value for lard also was lowered from 5 to 4 in early July.
pointt values for shortening and cooking and salad oils remain unchanged at 5.
More lard than shortening is available for civilian consumption, but the lard
price is now relatively high in relation to prices of shortening.

Table 26' Estimated factory and farm disappearance of principal food fats
for civilian consumption, monthly averages 1940-41, 1942,
and January-May 1943

Item I Average 9 1942 -1 i
-:- -94 l ____ Jan.-Mar, a Apr.-May
a Mil. Ib Mi. lb, Mil. lb, Mil. lb.

matter, including farm ,...... 11 171 146 147
Margarine (actual weight) ...I 28 30 54 27
Lard and rendered pork fat V/1 159 1 166 152
Shortening ..................u 107 a98 120 100
Total, four items ....,. 1 475 447 45 -
Basio data compiled from reports of Bureau of the Oonsus, Bureau of Internal
Revenue, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, and Food Distribution
., Administration.
" j( Preliminary. Consumer rationing for these items and for cooking and salad
oils (not shown) was instituted March 29, 1943, 2/ Excludes lard and
rendered pork fat used in manufacture of shortening, margarine, etc,.





I
JULY 1943 6-

Despite the apparent abundance of finished fate and oils under ration--
ing, the raw material situation remains tight. Factory and warehouse stocks
of animal and vegetable fats and oils were about 125 million pounds (6 per-
cent) smaller on June 1 this year than last, and stocks will be drawn down
during the summer months as production of vegetable oils from 1942.cryp oil-
seeds declines seasonally. Production of both animal fats and vegetable oils
in 1943-44 is likely to be larger than in 1942-43, although the increase in
the coming crop year will be less marked than in the 1942 crop year,. But
military and lend-lease requirements also may be greater, particularly if
important areas of Europe are reoccupied.

REVIEW 07 REC39T DEREOPCMETS :" *

BACKGROUNDV- With the entrance of the United States into the
war in December 1941 and the subsequent loss of most of our
imports from the Far East, the fats situation was transformed
from one of comparative abundance to one of tight supply.
Production of fats and oils was increased about 10 percent
in the 1942 crop year, but requirements mounted even more
sharply under the stimulus of war needs and rising incomes.
In September 1942 a general order was issued limiting manu-
facturerst use of fats and oils to conserve supplies, and in
late March 1943 direct consumer rationing of food fats and
oils began. Price ceilings on fats and oils, instituted, in
December 1941, were revised upward on several occasions during
1942. Prices of all fats and oils are now covered by specific
ceiling orders.

Wholesale Price Index Declines With
"Roll-Back' of Butter Prices

Wholesale prices of butter were reduced 5 cents per pound on June 6
in connection with the "roll-back" of butter prices in early June. This re-
duction is reflected in a decline in the index number of wholesale prices of.
27 major fats and oils from the May level of 114 percent of the 1924-29
average to 109 percent in June. Prices of other fats and oils were unchanged
at ceiling levels in June.

Specific Maximum Price Established
for Cold-Pressed Fish Oil;
Other Price Orders

On July 12 a maximum price of 12.25 cents per pound was established
by Amendment 36 to Revised Price Schedule 53 for light, cold-pressed fish
oil (menhaden and sardine), fair average quality, tank cars, delivered. This
ceiling is somewhat higher than the individual sellers' ceilings which it
replaces. The action was taken to permit processors a small profit. Under
the former ceilings production of this grade of oil "ad declined.

The exemption of linseed-oil shortening from price ceilings, which
had expired on July 11, was extended to September 1 or until specific prices
were fixed, whichever came first. This action was taken' in Amendment 37 to
Revised Price Schedule 53, issued July 14. In Amendment 38 effective July 1




w


(fl-fl


-.7-


specific maximum prices were established for domestic and imported olive oil
i, in tin and glass containers holding less than 7 gallofi and more than 1 gallon
Government Purchases of Fate and Oils
at 4t Peak in Jine
-L -w LL
P rchases of fats and oils by the Food Distribution Administration were
much greater in the 5 weeks ended July 3 than in any previous monthly period*
The total of 302 million pounds (in terms of fat content) compares with the
preticus peaks of 189 million pounds in April 1943 and 126 million pounds in
.prit 1942. Purchases in the 5 weeks ended July 3 included 147 million pounds
of lUrd and rendered pork fat, and 103 million pounds of vegetable oils, both
.re o2d qizantitieso. Included in the vegetable oil figure are 87 million pounds
tf lihseed oil purchased in the week ended July 3, largely under the pro-
visions of bTood Distribution Ordses 56 and 57 requiring crushers to offer
25 perceht of their inventories of oil June 24 and 45 percent of their pro-
duction of linseed oil after July 1.

The June purchases of fats, oils, and soap brought the total for the
first half of 1943 to 969 million pounds in terms of fat content. This quan-
tity is '86 percent greater than for the corresponding period of 1942 and
within 6 percent of the total for the satire year 1942.
a Table 3-- Purchases of fats and oils by the Food
Distribution Administration, 1941-43


S1941
S Item : 1941 :
a


: Mil.
: lb.


- ir--
1942 : June Jan.-
S May :: ,, o/


Mil.
lb.


Butter .......................: 1/ 34
Lard and:rendered pork fat ...: 326 654
Other animal fats and oils 4/ : 2 30
Vegetable oils .............: -- 175
Shrtenig ...................: --46
Margarine (fat content) V/ ...: 1 77
Soap (fat content) V/ ....... 16
Total, fat equivalent ...: 329 1,032


Milb.
lb.


* Mil. Mil.
lb. lb.


7 6 29
130 147 459
6 6 29
26 103 323
1 17 61
3 22 49
16 193
179 302 9b9


Compiled from reports of the Food Distribution Administration.
1 i/ive weeks ended July J. 1943.
'/ Computed from unrounded numbers.
3/Less than 500,000 pounds.
j Includes fish-liver oils.
Sat content estimated at 80 percent for margarine. 55 percent for soap.

Production of Fats and Oils Increased in May;
Factary and Warehouse Stocks
4 Down seasonally

Factory production of fats and oils totaled 786 million pounds in May,
46 million pounds more than in April. Production of vegetable oils declined







48 million pounds, reflecting a diminishing rate of crusetg. with the apfnts
of the end of the crop year. But output of animal fats and oils InQreaaed
94 million pounds. With a large hog slaughter in May, prodlutien:eof latr
and rendered pork fat in federally inspected plants was 45. illi =i poatds
greater than a month earlier. Creamery butter production was up seaaCsla y
by 40 million pounds. There also were slight increases in production of
edible beef fats and inedible tallow and greases, (Table 8.)

Production of federally inspected lard undoubtedly continued at a
high level in June and early July. The number of hogs slaughtered VAder
Federal inspection in June was 5 percent greater than n IMay and 24 percent
greater than a year earlier. Receipts of hogs in principal markets In early
July continued at a high rate* .Total production of lard under deal in-
spection in the first 6 months of 1943 may be tentatively.estimatel at 950
million pounds, 8 percent more than a year earlier. The yield at: lard per
animal increased sharply in May to 33.2 pounds. The average, fog :the first
5 months of 1943, however, was 31*5 pounds compared with 32.4 pounds a year
earlier.

Factory and warehouse stocks of fats and oils, including stocks held
by the Government, continued to decline seasonally in May. Stocka totaled
1,992 million pounds (crude basis) at the end of the month, 22 million pounds
less than at the end of April. Butter stocks rose 53 million pounds during
May, reflecting an accumulation of supplies by Government agencies to be
drawn upon in the season of low production. Stocks of lard, soybean oil,
coconut oil, and edible beef fats and oils rose moderately. !hef e increases
were more than offset by decreases of 59 million pounds in cottonseed oil,
35 million pounds in linseed oil, 15 million pounds in fish oils, and 14
million pounds in inedible tallow and greases. (Table 9.)

Manufacturers General Limitation
Order Amended

Food Distribution Order 42, limiting manufacturers' over-all use of
fats and oils, was reissued in amended form by the War Food Administration
effective July 10. Under the new order, the permitted use of fate and oils
in the manufacture of oleomargarine and soap for civilian consumption was
reduced. In the case of oleomargarine the permitted use was reduced from
180 percent to 167 percent of the base-period (194o0-41 average) us, lan
the case of soap, the permitted use of fats and oils other than domestic
vegetable oil foots and fatty acids from such foots was reduced from 84
percent to 80 percent of base period use. The'permitted use of foots and
their fatty acids was reduced from 100 to 80 percent of base..eriod use,
with the proviso that foots may be substituted pound for pound for fats
and oils within the quota limits. The consumption of fats and oils in the
manufacture of enamels and coatings.for metal food containers, metal food
closures, and food closure liners for civilian use is permitted at the rate
of 100 percent of base-period use compared with 50 percent previously.

The amended order also removed the prohibition against the use of
lard and rendered pork fat, oleostearine, edible tallow, soybean ll, and


JULY 1943


- 8 -






Q: &.7 -9-

.:: w-heIa- i the :asaMA nature of soap, protective coatings floor coverings,
.;-:- ilot.:. Ol oI t:d oeoatwtdfabrics for civilian use, The ban on use of sardine,
p r::.: ai.. p ard :and. hearipg, oils in soap.also was removed. Use of.oleo oil,
:edible oives otl p-eanut oil, sunflower oil, sesame seed oil, raisin seed
'i V.;: .i.: toito seed. il, cottonseed oil, corn oil, and butter is still pro-
-, bited an the manufacture of these products, except for exempt uses.

:.: : t'o, he restrictions deliveries of linseed oil contained in the pre-
!:,i:viou-rversion of.thi- ordew-are omitted.from the amended order, but are
ioav- ".-cdati...d in.effect tnder Food Diatribution Order 63, also effective July 10.

erceat of Linseed Oil Reserved for Government
Purchase! Oil Conteat of Paints _a
|. M..: ::R .rniihes Restricted.
V'.*,V 3:; rty *a"... .. u .
i :".,.: ..:: ..rty-five percent of the liaseed oil produced after July 1 is
:.. :eqired to be set aside for offer to the Government under Food Distribution
Order 57, issued June 22. Crushers mach report their expected production
fbr each month by the 23rd of the prefdtang month. Adjustments are pro-
*:. ided if'adctual production ex9ced-s tr lla short of expected production.
':,. C sherstare permitted, however, to sasL to others any oil not accepted by
::;'.he Government within 7 days aftef the effer is made.
,t^ :'. .:* .. .*,
.. '". ..All persons holding 240,00W pOands or more of linseed oil on June 24
were required.by Food Distribution.Order 56 to report their holdings within
10 days to the.Government and to offer to sell 25 percent of their inven-
tories or all of the raw oil held, whichever was smaller. These offers
were subject to acceptance in whole or in part within 7 days of the date of
offer.

Conservation Order M-332, issued June 17, limits the quantity of
fats and oils (excluding mineral oil and tall oil) that may be used per
.gallon in paints and varnishes. Maximum oil contents are specified, vary-
: :: tg according-to ;type of. fiiish,: .from;.l12 pounas:.in flat paints to 3.75
p:': pnds in exterior pants;.;anda.stnrcra :steel finishes. This order also
forbids rushers, manufacturers, or wholesalers to deliver any linseed oil
.: or fish oil with a non-volatile content .of more than 70 percent, except to
other crashers, manufacturers, or;wholesaler.s Bxemnption.is made for. oil
delivered for medicinal or pharmaceutical use or for human or animal con-
.sumption, or in containers of 1 pint or less, or to the armed forces, the
M;. aritime Commission, o the War Shipping Administration, or for lend-lease.

U: see of Fish Oilj Limited; One-Sixth
S.f' Certain Oils to be Offered
t Government .

Under Food Distribution Order 60, effective July 1, manufacturers
may use California sardine oil, Oregon and Washington pilchard oil,
menhaden oil, Alaska herring oil, West Coast mackerel oil, tuna oil, and
-e salmon. ofl during the period July 1943-June 1944 only as directed by the
'l.order or:as specifically authorized by the Director of Food Administration,






JULY 1943 10 -

Salmon oil may be used without specific authorisatioan t li. iT patck
ing salmon, Alaska herring oil aay be so used oly in processing leather im e
manufacturing cutting oils. Other oils may be uned without spesift1 saithort*
station in the preparation of vitamin oile meeting a minimum standard ftop
vitamin D content and in certain industrial uses. including the as iiatureM
of alkyd resine, terneplating and galvanizing, and processing leathWe.
Specific authorization is not required for use not exceeding 40 percent of
1940-41 consumption in shortening, water-soluble soap, protective coatings
(except alkyd resins), floor coverings, printing inks, oilcloth, o o&ated.
fabrics* Processors may not prepare fish oils for any user without-4btain-
ing a certificate stating in effect that the oil is to be used in accordance
with Food Distribution Order 60Q .

Persons who use 4,000 pounds or less from July 1943 to Jue 1944 and
who use 1,000 pounds or less for any restricted purpose in any (pqrter are
exempted from the order. The order does not cover crude oil produced before
June 1 or crude oil produced after June 1 but refined or processed before
July 1.

To insure an adequate supply of fish oils for military, leamdleasee
and essential civilian requirements, Food Distribution Order 59 was issued
effective July 1, requiring producers of certain crude fish oila to offer
to the Government the second and sixth tank cars of oil produced, and every
sixth car thereafter. A tank car is equivalent to 60,000 pounds The oils
covered by the order are California sardine, Oregon and Washingtnn pilchard,
menhaden, and Alaska herring. Oil that has not been accepted within 7 days
after its offer has been received by the Food Distribution Administration
or other proper agency will no longer be subject to the order&

Additional Fats Made Available to
Soap Makers and Fat Splitters

Several million pounds of soybean oil, restricted mainly to edible
products from January 1 to July 1. will be made available to soap makers
and fat splitters in July and August to help relieve a short supply of soap
fats. On July 2 the Food Distribution Administration invited such users to
submit requests for crude soybean oil, which is under allocation control*
Under the recent amendments to Food Distribution Order 42 the use of soybean
oil in soap is no longer prohibited.

The Food Distribution Administration announced June 28 that release
of palm oil and imported inedible tallow from Government stoekg might soon
be possible. Manufacturers desiring imported tallow or palm oil were in~
vited to submit certain informatten about their consumption as well as about
their stocks of fats and oils Soap manufacturers and fat splitters will be:
the principal beneficiaries of any distribution to be made

UTILIZATION OF FATS A S IN SOAP, 1942 (U 1941

Utilization of fate, oils, and 'footse by the soap industry in a942
totaled 1,987 million pounds. This was exceeded only by the unusually high
consumption of fats in soap of 2,270 million pounds in 1941 In the first
quarter of 1943 consumption was at the annual rate of 1,832 million pounds,
equal to 92 percent pf total 1942 use and 90 percent of 1940-41 average use,






tm q fats 0i sqap vaas reduced in the.second half of 1942 and in
first part of 1943 as .q result (1) of overstocking ofsoajp by dealers in
*3:i and early i9f and (2) of the liitation on soap .akers' use of fats
: naugirated in the fourth quarter of 1942. Excess stocks of soap held by
1". Eauifacturers and dealers are. now .lrgely. worked off and use of fats in soap
during the remainder of 194y will be governed largely by the Governnent
S etflictior.and. the availability of primary fats and oils.

i: ngathe various soap fate, consumption of coconut oil and palm oil
p ft..i aecl:-tnpl from)a.4 million pounds in 1941 to 196 million pounds in
19 2i19S i il lieon pounds in the first quarter of 1943. These drastic
: otts iBere brought about chiefly bythe less of imports from the Par
i t,4M': '.thi reservation of certain quantities of these oils for essential
A. t di tri.es. Reduced.use of coConut and palm oils was partly offset by
a ustabe of inedible tallow and .greases. Consumption of these fats in
Lm p setwsed f rom .1,3 million punAds in 1941 to 1,528 million pounds in
S"In the first quarter of 1943, consumption of inedible tallow and
greases in soap amounted to 378 million pounds, almost equal to the rate of
"C ut. option in ,1942.

Improvement in the soap fat situation has occurred recently with the
S a.ease of some Government stocks of coconut and palm oils to the soap in-
at. i.' Sweeral million-pounds of soybean oil will be made available to
.: akers.,in July and August. And some imported palm oil and inedible
1 w^ar. .J.abe made available in future months if the import situation makes
itjS action possible~. The domestic supply of tallow and greases continues
.:;,.itt, .although improvement in this situation is likely to occur in the fall
*Aen.. cattle marketing are expected to increase.

Production of inedible tallow and greases in May totaled 131 million
pounds, up 6 million pounds from April but 3 million pounds under the average
for the first 3 months of the year. For the first 5 months of 1943 production
16talted 659 million pounds, equivalent on an annual basis to about 1,580
m eion pounds. Last year, 1,740 million pounds of inedible tallo4 and
greases (excluding wool grease) were produced. Inspected cattle slaughter so
,ar this year has run considerably under. last..year1s high level. But with
h.' .':6.number of cattle on farms at an-all-time. high, and with a reduced feed
Supply in prospect, marketing this fall and winter are likely to be heavy.
Inedible tallow is produced mainly from cattle slaughtered. Hog slaughter
also will be large this fall and winter. Production of greases may not in-
crease in the same proportion, however, since much of the grease is recovered
in the rendering industry from fat scraps, and collections of such material
hae fallen off.sharply .. Illegal slaughter.of livestock in the country or in
sm~ll. plants also may serve to hold production of inedible tallow and greases
42, .a.s .tha bhyppoducts in such laughter frequently are wasted.

,.; Alth.ugh reduced in quantity, a slightly larger proportion of rosin was
use in the.manufaoture of soap in 1942 than in 1941. Considerably greater
..quantites could be used.. There is no restriction on the use of rosin for
soap-making purposes. In 1942-43, production and imports of rosin exceeded
consumption and exports by 170,609 barrels, equivalent to about 70 million
,,, ds. net. weights Consumption of rosin in paper and paper size, ester gum
iand synthetic resins, paint, varnish and lacquer, linoleum and floor covering,
and soap was reduced in 1942-43. Among large consumers an increase was shown




JULY 1943 12 -.

only in chemicals and pharmaceuticals. -Stocks of res an April 1 this yea9s.
were large. 1/ Production may be somewhat smaller this season than ai84, but
there should be 100 to 200 million pounds of rosin available for soap in
addition to the 98 million pounds used in 1942-43.

Government Restrictions on the Use of Soa, 7a te

Government control over the utilization of soap fats begas in AW&h
1942 with the issuance of General Preference Orders 59 and 60, since reissued
as Tood Distribution Orders 38 and 43* These limit the use of palm oil and
oils of high lauric-acid content, principally coconut and bLbassu, to S-
cesses in which a high percentage of the glycerin content is recovsrea,
except that first priority for palm oil is reserved for the mainfai.tdir at
tin and terneplate and certain quantities of dcoonut oil are reserve fo'
use in essential war industries. The effect is to reserve high lanio-ac&a
oils and palm oil for use by soap makers and fat splitters after othqr
essential war requirements are met. ,The use of these oils for fd4 :products
is practically eliminated.

Issuance in September 1942 of General Preference Order M-71 restricted
total utilization of fats and oils in the manufacture of soap as well as
other end products for domestic civilian consumption. This was reissued. in
April 1943 as Food Distribution Order 42. The original limitation, iffetoive
October 1, 1942, restricted quarterly use of fats and oils in soap for
domestic civilian consumption to 88 percent of average use in correonding
quarters of 1940 and 1941. Effective January 1, 1943, this percent e was
reduced to 84 percent and, effective July 10, 1943, to 80 percent. U'"e of
"foots" of domestic vegetable oils and fatty acids of such foots i l1iitted
to 150 percent of the base-period use in the fourth quarter of 192 *nhd the
first quarter of 1943, 100 percent in the second quarter of 1943, and 80
percent in the third quarter.

In the first half of 1943 use of domestic edible fats and oils,. in-
cluding whale, sardine, pilchard, and herring oils but excluding linseed
oil, was prohibited in making soap. Effective July 10, the prohibition on
use of lard and rendered pork fat, edible tallow, soybean oil, whale oil,
and fish oils was removed. Soybean oil and imported soap fats and:oils are
now subject to direct allocation to manufacturers by the Food Distribution
Administration.

Price Changes and Regulations

Ceiling prices were first established for soap fats, together with
other fats, on December 13, 1941. A general upward revision in ceilings
was effective January 2, 1942. Under these ceilings, wholesale prices of
lending soap fats, as indicated by the index number published regularly in
The Fpts and Oils Situation, advanced from 121 percent of the 1924-29 average
in December 1941 to a high of 128 percent in February 1942. In July 19)2
prices of inedible tallow and greases were 'rolled back" 1 cent per poin&"
to permit normal manufacturing and merchandising margins under the naaimusa


I 1942-43 Annual Naval Stores Report, United States Department of Arioulture.
Bureau of Agricultural and Industriel Chemistry, May 24, 1943.












,* M S. .t :. -


k-.l:t;. aIdS^ ^ Wg e '^ X smeff *' A nn 4t09on, in the pi ewr years.
b ra 2 m rle potsd o tfieibsle tallssow asd ossresand: nd 35 ilio



i totaleg roughly 0;,Q.iBtl9Si ga;spiat-< thq^ yeara 5nmediatqiy preceding.the
.;:i, ", .. *,e .. ---- 4f b s.-: ,, .. ,. ...n.a,, (as .hir .a l, a lA ns
i : t ajea ve,+:o. o the 'i3ee1 rtno; w y.e e ,..-atal ,also includes alwit
3 i lloa; taE of .l8d .. a.n .arentSar d porl .fat; O...a.llion p.ound of
.batter, 0 mlion pounds of inedible tallow and reases, and 35 million
llaudns of oil.from grapeseed, .gnoq germs, castaqr beaas, flaxa-a coftoppeed.,
heiifpseed, reposeed, peanate, toabaoo6 hed and a few other minor saeureBs
JAppanrs d qponaumptio of .tfata pod. ols of domesticc .and foreign origin
ar .,foaod.and ua;4uutsrial uses I estimated .in table T:he dpta indicate
that .ta.ly'wis 85 to 90 percent sgl.,gufficitep t in food fats before the vwr.
Gonsuo tion.s per :caita va. low, however,. The total of about 27 pounded per
cgtta i:n- 1? 5431. opares with :48 pounds per cqpita, exclusive of unrendereA
pial fat, In the United States in the same period. Production from domaesti
. i.teXiale..: urnihed sought g ,yonewthird of the fats used for industrial purposes,
..n$ .ing themanaxfacture of soaep, The use of fats and oils other than police
oil for nonfood uses in 19fI3. apparently amounted to 8 or 9 pounds per
ciptta compared with nearly 22 pounds per capital in the United States,
,b ,a e Apparent d is perance of fats and oils in pre-war Italy,
1: .- 'by origin and. use

a a a a aqq ga -
a" "s:..w eean' o" t1 aL l (_.s ~ sP earancS gr ..ss of use
I -' el oI o~o Doesti aTorei -- tl. --- t oa
So rig oreig in total a i Pr I OQther
a:**-.9*fMt rn with ,.per cz exlusitse o
S. .. $i lb... i. lb. ai i.lb. Po.i. l..o. b. I

S.. *** 111 1 112 112 2.6
eiat pork ,fat ...,,.. .,s 32 .. 4 46 346 8.0 -
a stmal fats, a
Aing fish oil ..,,,.o.s 21 29 50 4 0.1 46
oe oil, including oil o
awpreue-aoce residues .. 6~00 19 619 535 12.5 S8
Saeetable otii .....O wka m. .3,. 158 3.7. 122
bt.sal .....,..*.,,*.... 1,109 398 1,507 1.155 9
on official Italian sources, including foreign trade statistics, agricultural
o n statistics, the Industrial Census of 193740, and a study of food con
-residues "- An 611552y.




JULY 19143 JE 1 &

Italy h'.sipplj of edible fats *ad oils apj arenti has not beena
greatly aff6tfed by the war.: Production of dlite,oir presumably has been
but -ittle- affbted. Some decline in do gstic dilmal&fat prodoution may have
resulted rom changes in feeding practoild mada nooesbarj by lses of grain
formerly imported and other wartime conditions On the other hand -'med '
of the butterfat in Sheese formerly expboted probably has entered domestic
consumption in the form of butters

Production of oil from oilseeds grown-domestically may.have-'iu'eabed
considerably during the war. Byproducts such as-rices-bran, grape-.eedis and
tomato seeds, though partially utilized before the war, constituted a poten-.
tial source for a substantial increase in production of oils from domesti.
materials. Production of flaxseed and castor beans may have oontiaea. the
rapid upward trend of the years 'immediately preceding the war. '1As6,. pro-
duotion of soybeans could have been considerably expanded. Production from
domestic oilseeds may havo increased sufficiently to help ease the situation
in food fats, but could not have been great enough to offset more than a
fraction of the loss of fats formerly imported chiefly for industrial
purposes. A tight situation in soap fates at loaset is indicated by a karge-
scale wartime production of glycerin floe starch. Some diversion ofP. fntr
from food to industrial uses may have been necessary in the war fears. -*

Peanuts, Palm Oil, and Copra Chief Import Items .

Details of Italy's pre-war net foreign trade in fats and,otls are
shown in table 7, The chief items imported were peanutaU palm 6il,"and
copra. Substantial quantities of flaxseed, sesame seed, .rapeseed, casqr, .
beans, and inedible tallow and greases "also were imported.. Net' imports
of oil-bearing materials amounted to approximately 250 million pounds
annually, in terms of oil. Net imports of vegetable oils, exclusive of
olive oil, amounted to about 110 million pounds, and not imports, of animal
fats .to roughly 30 million pounds* Although' importing fairly large qantitiesi
of a low grale of olive oil, Italy had a small net export balance in terms
of refined oil. -

Over 65 percent of Italy's net import balance in fats and oils in
19314-38 was obtained from countries now neutral or from territory now cono
trolled by the United Nations. Another 20 percent came from territory
now held or b J.rc.Aee by Japan. .The remaining 10 to 15 percent came from .._"
areas in Euroopo _now under:Axis domination. Most of the imported peanuts
and part of..he .cator. boans originated in India. British colonies in
-Africa fu-r, shed-most of the palm 611 and some of the peanuts. Copra was
obtained prfncp4lly from the. Dtch -East Indies and 6ther areas noV domi-
nqted by Jqpdnh Argentina was. th. principal source of flaxseed, and
mania the chief supplier of rapeseed. With fate and oils in short supply
in.Zurope and with Italian overseas trade suspended, 87ly 'mall '4uatiies
of imported.fats and oils probably are now available to Italy




.- .. -. s 1 '* -. -

. -- *. "

!"''" ^'""T?






f~ abe',.- Soasp, ats, o
United States. 1939

S Item 1939
.J."='.` 1,000 lb.
bils ('tallow class);:
ow lathering -
Sallow, inedible ......: 785,0o4
an fish oils /. ..: 166,483
p se.,s .................. 120,856
oil *t.....,........i 102,146

tb marine .........

.?::" 3 $alL .. .*-...........1l. lT5.272
litdk ltatbheriig .':
Soconiut oil 3..........: 388,912
Palm-kertel oil' .......: 3,657'
SBabassu dil ............. 37,633
: .otil ..............: 43C.202
ft oils:
Cottonseed-oil foots
Sand other foos 0 .....: 119,000
Olive oil, sulphured
and inedible .........: 20,507
.Soybean oil ............. 11,177
SCottonseed oil *..........: 1,061
in oil ................ 4,441
Oastor oil ............: 946
,Liiseed oil .............: 1.780
Peatrut oil ........... 805
Sesame oil ..............: :
01eo oil ...............: 67
Rape oil ................: 2
|Olye ;oil, edible ......: 54
e~lt's -foot oil .........: 11
iQer-ila oil ..,............ 1
Other ................ 7,364J
T total .-......... .. 16723
Total fats and oils ..:1.772.704
aosih 51 ...............: 96.356
Total saponifieble a
materials .......:1,869,060

Compiled as follows: Fats and oils,
vegetable Pats and Oils; rosin, Naval
ricultural and Industrial Chemistry
Includes whale oil, and herring,
Includes rendered pork fat.
Estimated; includes approximately
Sin foots", as reported by the Bur
Reported as "other vegetable oils
SThe rosin season extends from Apr
Data are placed in the calendar
1 figures revised to net weight
Preliuinaay.


ils, and rosin used in manufacture,
|-42 and January-March, 1943

: 1940. 1941 1942 193
: l : Jan0-Mar.
1,000 Ib. 1.000 lb. 1.000 lb. 1,000 lb.


786,456
107,911
256,886
84,934
6 7
9. 9


1,057,303
76,12
310,487
129,871
4,826
70


1,188,923
72,402
S338.975
55,865
4634
483


267,457
10,676
110,690 /
4,:77.7
10
14


645 21 89 2/ 96 --;
1.238.038 1,578.958 1.657.378 393.624

396,857 484,124 14,487 16,121
197 1,113 1.353 110
41.221 29.753 19.105 2,457
438,275 514.990 1 60.945 1.,688


99,000 126,000 116,000 41,900
16,585 10,584 5,189 1,291
17,612 24,737 31,510 851
2,971 3,010 2,863 209
3,638 4,948 4,102 242
1,225 1,976 1,599 9
1,489 2,278 4,o19 492
37 597 455 82
38 34 190 ---
127 189 205
49g --- 1
130 84 27
19 35 19 14

2.051 1.162 2.162 140
145,321 175.909 168,370 45.231-
1.821,634 2269 857 1 986 69 457 4
78, 19 103,061 6 97,850 6/16,693


1,900,053


2,372,918


2,0os4543 474,236'


Bureau of the Census, Animal and
Stores Research Division, Bureau of
, United St.tes Department of Agriculture.
sardine, menhRden, and other fish oils.

S67 percent of the item "loss, including
eau of the Census.
I."
ii of one year through March of the next
r year in which most of the season occurs.
basis of 410 pounds per barrel.


r




~ltT 1943 16 -
Table 6.- Soap: Fats, oils, and rosin as a percentage of total
saponifiable materials used in manufacture, United States,
1934-42, and January-March 1943

Item : 1934: 1935: 1936: 1937: 19385 1939: 1940: 1941; 142 J-

---Pt. Pct. Pct. t. 3 ePt. Pet. Pct. Pet. Pat. P


Hard oils (tallow class)::
Slow lathering :
Tallow inedible o....: 39.0 42.2
thale and fish oils .: 5.8 8.8
Grease ............. .: 8.4 6.2
Palm oil ............: 9.1 5.6
Other ...............: .1
Total 7 1E.2
Quick lathering *
Coconut oils.........: 20.1 14.6
Palm-kernel oil ,.....: 1.0 2.4
Babassu oil ........ -- -
Total ............: 21.1 17.0
Soft oils:
Cottonseed-oil foots :
and other foots ......: 6.3 9.2
Olive oil sulphured :
and inedible .........: 1.9 2.1
Soybean oil ...........: .1 .2
Cottonseed oil ........: .2 .1
Other .......e.....,.... 1.2 1.2
Total ..............: 9.7 12.8
Total fats and oils : 93.2 92.7
Rosin ......... ......... 6 7.3
Total saponifiable :
materials .........:100.0 100.0


39.9
9.7
6.0
4.7
60.3

18.6
1.6

20.7


35*5 1 o.s 42.0
10.9 8.5 8.9
5.5 5.6 6.5
8.2 5.3 5.5
1- 1-L 1
9.MW


41.4
5.7


14.6 19.9 20.8 20.9
6.5 1.7 .2
2.5 2.6 2.1
21.9 22.1 23.0 23.1


44.6. 57.0
3.2 3-5
13.1 16.3
5.5 2.7


20.4 6;7
.1 .1


8.4 8.1 9.2 6.4 5.2 5.3 5.6


1.5
.3

.92

7.4


1.1 1.0 1.1 ,9
.6 .6 .6 .9
.5 .2 .1 .2
1.2 'l. .7 -5
11.5 12.1 8. 7.7
iF.t


S *.3
1.0 1.5
.1 .1
. .6
7.3 8.1


100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.


1939-43, based on data in table 5; earlier years based on data given in gust 3
and August 1940 issues of The Fats and Oils Situation, except for foots and rosin.
Estimate of foots decreased from 88 percent to 67 percent of "loss, including oil ais
foots' as reported by the Bureau of the Census. Figures for rosin revised on the
basis of 410 pounds net weight per barrel,
I/ Less than 0.05 percent.








Table -.7i Italys Net tiaSle in fit. oils, and oil.bearing materials
:in E. laa oef oil, total and by regions, average 1934-38


|- -. -* ^ i" "s r o
-. U*** '* .. actionss -
S a' Wi th



Sor held byby y the adith
Sg mnd with 3



ata and oila iancding 4.
ot. r ... s.... e.....s...I: -v- h.5o -h 1,182
M~ir.a1..*.Z.i..3..a.3***ne t l,31 2,101
... k4t ..... ss.........; i ,1s68 236 1,40
:Othba eible ....., ...... 2819 8a4o 126 3.53
T 'S a greases, Inedible : .1, 16 5.22 12.159 1,005
Other inedible .............: 163 290 25 70
Stare andmal oils .. ........ 488 4 29 o591
Sotal, anise ...............e S. 6 _-- 002 I%7b2 395
able fats and oils :
ive oil 6 ..................: 37 5.289 13,298 18.550
.'live oil "footes .............: 1.131 6.207 7,338
7alm oil ......................: 18,770 897 70,728 90,395
Soybe7n oil 1..................: 1,618 4,002 41 5,961
Zanseed oil ............. ..... 1 1,898 488 2,387
Socoait oil 1/ ..............: 108 1,020 1,247 2,375
SQael oil e..u................. 169 6 205 380
aem oI.al ....................: 74 488 215 347
pastor oil ...................: 30 I 174
0 -0 S1 ,.. .............. ..... .. 19 ____. 118 4 5 011
o Cats.6, vegetable *..........: 22_ __15.557 799 117,94
1 aetAble oil-bearing materials: :
F sauts (shelleu~ 40 percent; :
'a shelled. 30 percent) .......: 6,759 2 54,648 91,379
Copra (63 percent) ............: 31.971 379 19.664 a5,01
Fleameed (33 percent) .. ....: 7 1,117 46,272 7396
Sesame seed (45 percent) ....: 12,104 177 8,919 21,200
Sapeseed (35 percent) *.......: 8 9,752 3,665 13,425
Sastor beans (42 percent) *..... 1,197 42 11.545 12,78
Sunflower seed (25 percent) ...1 30 4,745 24 4,799
Soybeans (14 percent) .........: 4.302 21 77 4,400
Other (24 percent) e...... ......s 60 __ 9 __ 3 1.342
Total, vegetable o1.. ..
Searing materials .........:s 56,38 17,102 .17199 24739
ctal fates, oils, and oil- :
bearing materials ....... .....: 83712 46.661 .26.6 4oo2
i11cake and meal ........... : 1.306 -67,362 13810 -79,866
SContinued





JULY 1943


NA;-


- 18-.


Table 7.- Italys Net trade in fate, o$1s, and oi-bearing material,
in terse of oil, total" nd by regions, average 1934-38 Contimned

Compiled. from official' ItaliAi trade statistics.
1/ Japan, China, Manchria, Hong Kong, Kwangtung, Chosen, Formosa, French Indochina,
Thailand, Britisq Malaya, Dutch East Indies, Timor, Philippine Islands, Japanese
Mandated Islandas Australia in the case of imports of copra or tropical oilsq
/ IFrance, Belg~vn, Holland, Norver, lenmark, Germany, Finland, Esthonia, Latvia,
Lithuania, Polan4, U.S.S.R. (included because large agricultural areas are ooupied
by German forces, Austria, Hungary,- Cfech6slovakia, Bumania, Yugoslavia, Albania,
Greece, Bulgaria.
/ Less than 500 pounds.
SIncludes oleomargarine and artificial butter.
w/ tIle oil apparently is not reported &lre but with other edible animal fats
iten 4 above).
/ Imports consist chiefly of "olio lahpante,' a low-grade oil with free fatty-aoid
content in excess of 4 or 5 percent. exports are mostly.refined oil. With imports
converted to a refined basis, the net trade balances in oalunns 2, 3, and 4
would become, respectively, in pounds, 37,000, 3,466,000, 552,000, and 3,981,000.
It Includes palm-kernel oil and shea bitter.

















a,
~ *






able 8.- PaioVry proA& Jon of Lata and oils, May 1941 and 1942,
MarchMay Ml943 LW i heated mropasear potnotion
...... fgr specified items. 19140-.42 :
I Monthly reduction
: Ma a19 __

.. 1941 194 Mar. pr. May
Mil. .lb. Mile. lb. Mil lb. Mil. lb. Mil. Ib
| *^.L.^e. jad, nl a-
ateray butter .................... 214.2 203.4 140.1 .150.2 190.5
eted lard. and rendered pork fat: 139.7 135.1 136.4 12.8 177.7
aes eluding wool grease ......: N.A. NA. 43.7 4.8 46.5
Ias-foot oil ............-..... .
o oil *.7 ........ .......... 6.6 7.6
b arine, 3.3 3.1 3.6
marine, animal, edible ..........., 3.3 3.1 3.6
M ov, edile .... ...........: w n 10.5 13.0 15.1
lov, inedible ...... .......... 66.0 66.4 68.4
ffio grease ......... ....... ...... n 1.4 1.2 1.3
s-liver 'oil ...................: .3 .8 .6
MiM oil ..........................4, w a.0
: o tal, animal .......... 9.8 4198 51
|Aoeable oila, crude basis
tor oil ........ .............. .. N.. N.A. 9.7 9.3 8.5
;"0oodemt oil ....... ............. 17.7 15.0 14.7
Corn oil .................. ... 21.7 20.9 20.1
Octtonseed oil ........o..........: 65.5 46.0 104.8 68.2 47.2
Linseed oil ..................: N.A. N.A. 63.2 62.3 50.7
live .oil, edible .................. n 2.0 5 --
)peanut oil, ..... ............ 17.5 2.1 15.2 11.1 6.6
SBoybean oil ...................... N.A. .A. J. 15.3, 131.8 122.7
Tang oil .............. ............. 1.2 1.1 .6
Other vegetable oils ........,,....:... ..2 _, 1.7
1otal, vegetable ...... .... .7 20. 272.8
SGrand total .................=-- __.... "l2 7. 78b'-
Indicated crop-year proCtin ._
} Year .
S19 .41 .1941-2 j 194.43j
: Mil. lb. Mil. b3. Mil. lb.
tter, including farm ..............* a July 2,21 2,182 2,180
Sand rendered pork fat, total ....: Oct. : 2,275 2,440 2,700
C in- ble tallow and greases, total ...: Oct. : 1,492 1,732 1,600
be. tallow, oleosterine, :
MLed stock, and oleo oil ........,...: Oct. 218 277 280
riat. animal oils ..................: July : 175 215 140
mrn oil ..........1............ 8,. Oct. : 185 242 250
sttonsedd oil ....,...................: Aug. : 1,425 1,250 1,415
need oil f........................: July : 707 988 840
T4e6 oil ...................... .... Oct. : 11 8 10
!eamt oil .................... Oct. : 174 76 120
Iybean oil ......................: Oct. 564 707 .3/1,250
_oil .. ...... ,.................: Dec. 5 3/ 5
Wild from reports of the Bureau of the Census and the Department of Agriculture.
abnthly reports do not show total production of butter, lard, inedible tallow, and

SBased on most recent indications, subject to change.
cludes production from imported flaxseed.
| raised.






JULY 1943 20 -s..
Table 9.- Factory and warehouse stocks of specified fate and oils, crume basii,
Ma 31, 191-43, March 31 and April 30, 1943

Item MayINEW 1 3MaY37 0 19
-. tn -24 19 1h 3i a nil a MAY
: MXi. Ib, il. l. Mil. l. i. Milb i
Animal fats and oils .
Batter ....................... 56.8 64,7 16.7- 30.2 82.8
Lard and rendered pork fat ....3 373.8 118.0 128.3 149.1 166.1
Greases, excluding wool grease.: N.A. Nj.. 93.5 77.5 1s7.
Neat's-foot oil ..............: 2.1 2.2 o0
Oleo oil ...................... 4.9 4,7 6.7
Stearine, animal, edible..... ,.* 3 .1 2.7 J,7
Tallow, edible ................: 8.8 11.7 .7
Tallow, inedible ..............: 152.2 136.6 121.8
Wool grease ................... 6 4.0 3.6 3.5
Cod and cod-liver oil ......... 13.0 12.6 12.8
Other fish-liver oil ,,......... 2.4 2.0 2.1
Fish oil .....................: 125.2 114.5 99.5
l;arine mammal oil.............. 56.4 66.4 62.8
Total, animal ............ 00.6 1.9 65.7
Vegetable oils, crude basis /
Babassu oil ................. N.A. N.A. 10.2 10.0 8.3
Castor oil .................. a 27.0 30.9 35.5
Coconut oil ............... ..*.: 166.2 179.2 193.2
Corn oil ..1.................. 30.7 33.9 32.9
Cottonseed oil ...............: 550.0 506.1 458.9 411.9 352.5
Linseed oil ................ .. N.A. N.A. 258.6 263.6 228.8
Oiticica oil ..................: a 7.3 7.1 6.7
Olive oil, edible .......* ....: 5.3 5.1 3-9
Olive oil, inedible and foots 9.6 9.3 8.6
Palm-kernel oil *.........*...* : 1.5 1.5 1.5
Palm oil ...................: f 87.8 7 87 5.1
Peanut oil ......... : 47.3 50.7 49.6
Perilla oil ...........1.7... .: 1.7 1 1.3
Rape oil ... ............... 19.2 19. 23.
Sesame oil ...................: 1.5 1.6 1.6
Soybean oil ................... 205.0 215.9 231.4
Tung oil ....... s ee 30.7 29.9 28.7
Other vegetable oils ....... 6.0 404
Total, vegetable .1... .. 1 9
Grand total ..... 2 2 01
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census; except butter and lard, Food
Distribution Administration, Totas computed from unrounded numbers.
I/ Crude plus refined converted to crude basis by dividing by the following factors:
3abassu, corn, cottonseed, palm-kernel, and palm oils 0.93; coconut, peanut, and
soybean oils 0.94.


,,
r







S. ae 1941 and 1942, ApriltJi ue 18F


a -4 Apri I.. ..MaJtS lA!.nm. June,
SDoars o Dollar a Dolars Dollaa.
o -Jt --e 8 -
bealn 3rsiian. a I
.#.b. Draisila ports .... Long ton sl:/71.5 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.0
seed, United States I,
pice q ...w........ Short ton a ,8 43.87. 5.89 46,11 46.
1, 1., .&ina e olis : ..sushel. 1.87 5 3. 3.2 3.6 3
ed, United St,-.tes
price......... 1.6 2.35 2.98 2.97 2T8
o' (for wcasa ani- oil), ,
t d States -arn trice ..a 100 pounds: 4.01 5.51 6.98 7.01 7.0
bneana,aU Unite,, States
ga 1rio* ...,t o......, BBashel 1.23 1. 1.67 1.72 1i7
f1 Trom Oil, Faint and Drug Reporter, -Daily Trade Bulletin (Chicago Chicagg
tu'rnal of Commeoe, -Daily Market Record (Minneapolis), and reports of the Burea of
.ricultural Ecoo~oiomcs.
S, a.d f., iew York,

Table 11.- Price per ton of sbecified oilseed meals,
S',June 1941 and 1942, April-June 1943

S June 1943
Item I .--
-: aL 19U'2 % j d.1 2 AM June'
ar oL-ar DolL.Ls Dol1ari Dollars.
a _-- -:-


or meal, Los AngelRea ...,......*..me 35.80 .
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent protein, t
Me mphs ,...,,......,...,0.,.....:, 26,50 .340.30
SCottonBeed mealt-41 percent protein,
S o~ ai ..,,.. ,.,...,,...............: 32.40. .40.55
I:'nseed. eal, 34 percent protein,
Mia ieolis .,.,. ......*...,.....s. 28,20 35.20
Laisea'e.al, .32. percent. prp.oin, .
:.." k ..0 .*..i..... ............ 25e.45*. 31.7T
winatteal,- LI5 bpercant protein,
f.* Southeastern mills ...,.....t: 24.88 37.30
r'Soyea moeal, 41. percent protein,
SChicago ...............,..,..****** 29.70; 37.90


53.'o0


a -

1.


51.50 51.50

38,50 38.50


W~


-9-


43.50 43.50


46,35 45.00 45.90

3s.00 38.00 3s.00

40.60 40.55 40.40


m.llej o from records of the lood Distribution Administration.
f 'agge4 carlots.


Cr ;...,
* 4
r





JULY 1943 -22- -

Table 12.- Oleomargarinet Produdti oh witldrawae for conpuuption,.
and materials used in manufacture5 United States,
May 19i41 and 1942, Marc May 1943

Item U L
,i000 Ib. ,000 0. s b.'
Production: : .
Colored ....................I 1388 5,482 1368 7.18
Unc6ored ...,. .............. 6 22 29. .
Total ./ ...............'; 27. 27.1.f To. .1


Tax-paid withdrawals for
United States consumption 3/ .: 26,857


23,081


57,482 32,s363 zoj


Materials used: :
Oleo oil *..................... 1.439 1,738 2,311 1.614
Oleostearine .**.... ....... 257 236 0 39 3
Lard stearine ... ... ......... -- --
Lard, neutral ................: 635 446 1,500 702
Oleo stock ..................., 78 277 319 149
Tallow ....................... -- -- 8. a
Monostearine ..9................ : 13 60 6
Total, animal ........ 2.46.74.65 251- l.
Cottonseed oil ............... 11,444 10,235 25.187 15,624 9,.
Soybean oil ................ 6,898 9,277 25 983 16,092 .13A.
Peanut oil .................. 167 70 658 46
Corn oil ....................: 39 117 618 24
Cottonseed stearine ......... 5 -- 5 5
Soybean stearine ............i 1 --
Soya flabs ....*..*.o..o.... ---
Total domestic vegetable .19554... 1.9 i E .
Oocomt oil ................. 1,468 .. -. -
Babassu oil ..o.. me ,.ee. -- -- -
Palm oil *...... ...r......... -- -- .. --
Palm flakes ....***.......... -
Pala.-k-rnal oil .............. ----
Sunflower oil .......... ..... -- ----
Total, foreign vegetable .C 1.47 --- --r
Total, fats and oils ..... 2. 22.119 3.311.

Milk .......................... 5102 919 986 .7,393 5,
Salt ............. ........ 957. ... 358 1,241 .1.342
Derivative of glycerin .......: 65 46 110 62
Lecithin ..................... 1 17 52 39
Soda (bensoate of) ........... 12 11 39 26
Vitamin concentrate ..........: 1 13
Color ...................... 1 10 4
Miscellaneous ............. 1 1 2
Total, other materials ... 615-2 5 --,I S
Total, all material .. ...;2 04 2,6 71.591 W44 3
Compiled from Internal Revenue records and Internal Revenue Bulletin.
/ Preliminary. 3/ Total of unrounded numbers, 1 Ezcludes withdrawn free of
for use in Federal institutions, and withdrawn for export,













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