The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00033
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00033

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text















In this issue:
i, LAD. AID THEIR SHORTENIN G
1942: ... .. .. a. 1 a d 494

:. .


Ai T.DC MESTIC DISAPPEARANCE PER CAPITAL OF LARD
i': OT H ER SHORTENING. UNITED STATES, 1922-42



Total




..,. ..d...


Lard
2 -a!.:;:,.. :"- ":-."_.... ,/ Lard__


!:.' *: : : ":* :. : : .

;".;,":ii ;:"':. "



:''"-";'J; -,Other shortening
7.^ j' ;4:* *
4 .. .. .. : .
S,;',i.,, :.;' .i .:. .. .
. :. .... ,l I "I


-I--


S':: 5 1928 1931 1934 1937 1940 1943

UR NEG. 43082 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


pev1; doesl.metic disappearance of shortening fluctuates inversely
nce.t a -cof 'lard. The decrease in apparent disappearance of
d:se .largibly' t a liquidation of dealers' excess inventories
|,0 .r..d vprobtb4y does not accurately reflect the change in actual
w;iu::.')sntic consumption of cooking fats in 1943 includingg
t. 'be ..ar 1 the same as in 1942.


E,





I.
a.' -
* !;




.





Table .1- Wholesale price per pound of rate ad oils at specified markets, ad index
numbers of prices, lay 1941 and 1942, Llarh-'M, 1945


PRICaS

Item

Butter, 92-saora Chicago ............................ ...........
Butter, 92-score. New York .......................................
Oleomargarine, dom. veg., Chicago ................................
Compound (animal and veE. cooking fats), Chicago ................
Lard, loose, Chonea o .............................................
Lard, prim team, tieroes, Chicago ..............................
Lard, refined, cartons, Chicago ..................................
Oleo oil, No. 1, barrels, New York ..............................I
Oleostearine, bbl., Y. .........................................
Tallow, edible, Chicago ..........................................

Corn oil, crude, tanks, -.o.b. nills .............................
Corn oil, refined, bbl., N. Y. ...................................
Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. S.E. mills ..................
Cottonseqd oil, p.s.y., tank cars, 1. Y. .......................
Peanut oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mill ...........................
Peanut oil, don., refined, bbl., N. Y. .................... ......
Soybean oil, rude, tank oars, midweetern mills ..................

Coconut oil. ?'anila, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Pacific Coast 2/ .......
Coconut oil, I:anila, crude, bulk, c.i.f. i. Y. 2/ ................
Coconut oil, Lanile, refined, edible, tank cars, f.o.b. N.Y. 2/ ..
Olive oil. edible, druns, K. Y. ..................................
Olive oil, inedible, drums, N. Y. ................................
Olive-oll foots, prime, drums, N. Y. .............................
Palm oil, Niger, crude, drums, N. Y. 2/ ..........................
Rape oil, refined, denatured, drums, Y. ........................
Sunflower oil, tank cars, f.o.b. i.. ...........................
Teaseed oil, crude, drums. N. Y. .................................

Tallow, No. 1, inedible, Chicago .................................
Grease, A White, Chicago .........................................
Menhaden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore .....................
Sardine oil, crude, tanks, Pacific Coast .........................
Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, drums, i. Y. ................

Linseed oil, raw, tank cars, Minneapolis .........................
Linseed oil, raw, drums, carlote, N. Y. ..........................
Perllla oil, crude, drums, N. Y. .................................
Oltcicae oil, drums, h. Y. .......................................
Tung oil, drums, NI. Y. ..........................................

Castor oil, Io. 3, bbl., N. Y. ...................................
Csstpr oil, Io. 1, tanks, N. Y. ..................................
Castor oil, dehydrated, drums, carlots, 1. Y. .....................
Cod-liver oil, med. U.S.P. bbl., N. Y. ...........................
Cod oil, Newfoundland, drums, I. Y. ..............................


1941
Cents
34.7
35.5
14.5
13.0
8.6
9.5
9.8
11.3
9.6
8.2

9.9
12.6
9.2
10.5
9.5
12.5
8.7

9.4
/ 9.9

63.7
47.5
14.8
9.0
12.2

18.6

7.5
.,6
6.7
7.3
9.9

9.9
a-10.6
18.6
19.2
31.0

11.0
10.5
15.0
M5.8
10.0


Lay


I


I


--


IlDtiX I3iBERMS (1924-29 = 100)


Light domestic fats and oils (1910-14 = 100) .....................
Eight domestic rate end oils .....................................

All frts and oils L27 items) .....................................
Grouped by origin
Animal fate ....................................................
Marine animal oils .........................................
Vegetable oils, domestic ......................................
Vegetable oils, foirign .......................................
Grouped b use.
Butter ......... ..................................
Butter, seasonally adjusted ...................................
Lard .........................................................
Other food fate ................................................
All food fate ...................................... .......
Soap fats ......................................................
Drying oll .................................................
Miscellaneous oil ...........................................
All industrial fats and oils ................................


IlS 13S
80 94

87 102

79 89
107 126
98 1S0
125 160

79 85
86 93
72 96
111 142
84 96
101 128
107 140
93 114
10S 132


162
108

114

105
IS2
153
157

105
114
10B
139
111
IlI
120
152
117
153


Prices compiled front Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, The National Provilsoner, The Journal of Commerce (New York), ad
reports of the Pood Distribution Administration and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Prices quoted include ezeise takes
and duties where applicable. Tndex numbers for earlier years beginning 1910 are given in Technical Bulletin No. 715
(1940) and The Fats ard Oils Situation beginning December 1940.
I/ Reflects all types of wholesale trading for cash or short-tie credit. Previous quotations refer to open market
sales only. !arch sales mostly of less than carload lots to individual retailers and large cousamers such as hotels.
2/ Three-cent processing tax added to prire as originally quoted. f Tanks, 11. Y. / Quoted in druma. 5 Converted
to new basis of quotation.


.. .*. .


--


1942
Cants
37.5
37.5
57.5
19.0
17.0
11.4
12.6
14.6
15.2
10.5


12.8
15.0
12.7
14.1
13.0
17.0
11.8




72.7
58.3
19.5
12.0
15.5



9.3
9.5
8.9
8.9
11.1

13.1
5/ 13.7
24.6
25.2
40.2

13.8
13.0
18.6
36.5
11.5


i Narch
Cents

S/46.5
19.0
17.0
12.8
13.8
15.6
13.8
10.6
9.9

12.8
15.5
12.8
14.0
153.0
16.5
11.0

11.0
11.4
4 12.8
68.5
51.7
19.0
12.1
16.0
14.5
29.0

B.4
8,9
8.8
B.9
8.9
11.1

14.7
15.5
24.5
25.0
39.0

15.0
13.0
18.6
36.5
12.0


1945

cants

1 47.6
19.B
17.0
12.8

18.8
16.6

10.5
9.9

12.8
15.5
11.0
14.0
11.0
16.6
* 11.8

11.0
11.4
/ 12.8
71.2
54.7
19.0
12.1
16.0
14.3


8.4
8.9
8.8
8.9
11.1

15.1
15.7
24.5
25.0
39.0

15.8
15.0
18.6
56.5
12.0


a -y
I Nay
Cat.


19.0
17.0
12 S
11.B
15.5




18.6
10,5
9.9

12.8

12.8
14.0
18.0
16.5
11.8

11.0
11.4
2/ 12.6
71.6

19.0
12.1
16.0
14.5


8.4
8.9
8.8
8.9
12.S

14.9
15.5
24.5
25.0
39.0

13.8
15.0
18.6
16.5
12.0







... '.. .. .

I' R:::: ,'E. AND 0 I L SI T UA T I ON


Summary
-.: -------. --------- --:--

Apparent production of inedible tallow and greases declined from

March to April, contrary to expectations. Indications now point. to a total

: oatput this year in the neighborhood of 1,600 million pounds compared with

,, 740 million pounds in 1942. Tallow is derived mostly from cattle and

S.... greases from hogs and meat scraps: Cattle slaughter was considerably smaller

i... .i, 'April this year than last and was .also down in May. Hog slaughter was

larger in both months, but it apparently has less direct effect on inedible

at production than cattle slaughter.

SOther factors adversely affecting production of tallow and, greases

include (1) the tendency of packers and butchers to leave as much fat on meat

autjp as possible and to.gritd'large quantities of fat into sausage, hamburger,

and similar products, (2) increased slaughter outside pacing plants with loss

of byproduct fats in some cases, and (3) a shortage of meat scraps for

rendering, particularly in Eastern areas. Recently, an agreement was signed

between "'W Food Admitistration and the Office of Price Administration whereby

federal"meat inspector 'and graders would report persistent violations of

iMPB 148, which cdnthins provisions limiting the amount of fat that may be left

on pork cuts* This- would affect lard and grease production but not tallow.

,Mal~inm..prices-for linseed oil.and flaxseed were established on
'- ,. .*
May 21. lhe ceiling price for. linseed oil, tank cars, delivered Minneapolis,

S is 14i 5 O'nts per pound, .he '=naimum price for No. 1 flaxseed at Minneapolis

Sa $3.05 per'bushel.




."




... .. ...

JTUE 1943 -

Government purchases of fats, oils, and soap in terms of fat -

totaled 662 million pounds in the first 5 months of 1943, 60 percent more

than in the corre-ponnj r.- period a year earlier. The quantity purchased

was equivalent to abo-i '4 percent of estimated production of fats and ails

from domestic materials during the same period.

Apnarr-nt domestic disappearance of lard and rendered pork fat

decline .r- :c.'t 5 percent from 1941 to 1942, chiefly because of large lend-

lease purchases. Disappearance of shortening other than lard also declined-

in 1942, apparently as a result of a reduction of excess stocks accumulated

by dealers and large users in 1941. Per capital domestic disappearance of

lard and other shortening (civilian and military) totaled 23 pounds in 1942

compared with nearly 25 pounds in 1941 and an average of a little more than

23 pounds in 1936-40. Total disappearance of lard and shortening in the

first quarter of 1943 was 9 percent greater than a year earlier, but in

April, the first month of consumer rationing was slightly below that in

April last year.

-- June 14, 1943

REVIEW OP RECENT DEVELOPL ETS

BACKGDROUND.- With the entrance of the United States into the
war in December 1941 and the subsequent loss of most of our
imports from the Far East, the fats situation was trans-
formed from one of comparative abundance to one of tight
supply. Production of fats and oils was increased about 10
percent in the 1942 crop year, but requirements mounted even
more sharply uvrier the stimulus of war needs and rising
incomes In S.~rte:cbr 1942 a ge-eral order was issued
limiting manufz-.ct'.cr,.s' use of fazs and oils to conserve
supp-i-s, and -ir late March 1943 direct consumer rationing
of f:.. 'A :ts and oils began. Price ceilings on fats and oils.
insti-.':-d in December 1941, were revised upward on several
occasions during 1942. Prices of all fats and oils' are now
covered by specific ceiling orders.





























P. ,nan changes in cattle slaughter, Decause greases are produce. to a large
S.,:. xtent in the rendering industry from. fallen animals and meat. scraps.

dr, o dution and Stocks of Primary Fats
anid Oils Also Down in April
' ,:; .. .. .
Factory production of all primary fats and oils in April amounted to
'.74 "':O'Billion pounds, 22 million pounds less than a month Warlier, largely as
a. result of a seasonal decline of 37 million pounds in the production of
::; ottonseed oil. Creamery butter production increased seasonally by 10 million
:. pounds. Crushings of soybeans and output of soybean oil advanced again in
April to' new peaks of l149 million bushels and 132 million pounds, respec-
tively. (See table -14.)

Factory and warehouse stocks of primary fats and oils declined 32
:; million pounds in April to 2,013. million pounds (table 15)- Increases in
S stocks of butter, lard, masine'Tf aial, cosenut-, and-soybean oils were more
than off'st by declines in stocks of cottonseed, linseed, and fish oils and
'" ed 1eiS-eble -.Iallow and. grases. Stocks normally decline seasonally f4om the end
"r .. of March .btb tEe 'end of .September,-.and it is likely that stocks on September 30
:.. will -be. m1ef' iallyy lower 'this year than last, when some users reported
; ,i:. diffi cul. %'- i* maintaining operations.

,; overnm:et Piirchadea.of Fats and Oils
t a.:: X ge in
i. Purchases .of fats, oils, and soap by the Food Distribution
Ai::"nistration in May, totaling 178 million pounds in terms of fat content,
ware nearly as large as in April, the peak month to date. May purchases

i ., ". .. : .






UNE 1943 6- '

included 130 million pounds of lard and rendered pork fat compared.. iSM.: 'i
average of 45 million pounds in the first 4 months of 1943 and witil'f
million pounds in April 1942, the previous peak month. Other purdabesa eR
listed of 26 million pounds of vegetable oils and smaller quantities of but'
edible beef fats, margarine, shortening, fish-liver oils, and soup;!.'

In the first 5 months of 1943 purchases totaled 662 million iia&s
(fat content basis). This figure is 60 percent greater than purdbeii as inM
corresponding period a year earlier and represents roughly 14 peri&Fa of
production from domestic materials.

Table 2.- Purchases of fats and oils by the
Food Distribution Administration, 1941-43


Item :1941 : 1942 : : M .
Mar. Apr ,I
Mil. Mil. Mil. Mil. IK57' Mil.
: lb. lb. lb. lb. I; lb.

Butter ....................: I/ 34 / 12 7 22
Lard and rendered pork fat ...: 326 654 53 58 130 311
Other animal fats and oils / : 2 30 2 8 6 22
Vegetable oils ..............: --- /175 20 91 26 221
Shortening ................... --- 46 31 2/ 1
Margarine (fat content) 6 ...: 1 77 1 20 3 27
Soap (fat content) 6/ ....... : --- 15 6 S.16
Total, fat equivalent ...: 329 1,031 113 189 17 b

Compiled from reports of the Food Distribution Administration.
SFour weeks ended May 29, 1943.
SComputed from unrounded numbers.
W Loss than 500,000 pounds.
Includes fish-liver oils.
SRevised.
Fat content estimated at 80 percent for margarine; 50 percent for isoap

Domestic Disappearance of Finished Food Fats :
Reduced in First Month of Rationing

Jenuzry-April 1943 production of creamery butter, margari federally
inspected lErd amnd rendered pork fat, and shortening other than'2rd- was 13
percent greater than in the corresponding period a year ago. Domestic
disappearance, however, w.s only 4 percent greater. Governmerntl ~urohases of
these fats were substantially larger this year than last, and reported stocks
increased in the 1943 period instead of decreasing as in 1942 Thel-greatest
increases occurred in production and disappearance of margarine. ProdUction
and consumption of shortening other than lard also increased materially.
ThBre .was a slight increase in production of creamery butter and a slight


-'H. I







































..ea orom rxpor.s po.i~_e ur..u.o, at.e Lensus, bureau or .4-ternaL revenue,
an of Agricrl tural Economics, and Food Distribution Administrption.
;'lT-paid withdrawals for use in the United Statesi Use in Federal institutions
3.,included.
-ft.beptthird of April-June production used for April. :'

a ~ei Produ ctibtn Uf P *;Percent :In
SC ifria ar d Ard izo.na.. ... ..'t -

.Recent reports of the Arizona and California-arop Reporting Boards
I. indicate that-1943 flaxseed production in these two States will total about
S.i o~:S :z-lioa .bushele .compared tith 3.9 million bushels. in 1942. The increase
S'' :.d. ue' it an r i.creae. in acreage. Yields per acre are about the same as
~!:it s ar.r In.'1942..Qiifornia.and Arizona accounted..fei slightly less than
.Opearbncg6t 'of 'tot'gL' flaxseed : production in the United States. First pro-
.I.'. it... 'estiin.at.es or all States will be available i'nJuly.



i : .iE 1 l ": : ..' ." ; : i.."..




w


JUNE 1943 -

Cash Farm Income from Oilseeds
Increased in 1S2 :
**,*".: t:" ..
Cash farm income in 1942 from cottonseed, peanats., aeybee.
flaxseed totaled 612 million dollars compared with 413 million d bL t .1
1941 and 210 million dollars in 1940. Nearly half of the increase 0t I10
came from soybeans. Income from oilseeds accounted in 1942 for 3J,:i a
of the total national cash farm income from crops and livestock ef *i. Ib
3.5 percent in 1941 and 2.3 percent in 1940. The\rising percent Ae
the growing need for domestic fats and oils as imported oils be-aiM2 sad
more difficult to obtain, and as domestic and export demand incresf

Another increase in cash farm income from oilseeds will 9Qs0t iot i511
as a considerable part of the record 1942 soybean and peanut crope was Sat
in farmers' hands on January 1, and the 1943 oilseed crops will be largest
Also, prices to growers for oilseeds will average much more in If %thus w 91i

Table 4.- Cash farm income from oilseeds and
from..all crops and livestock, 1940-42


-.. ------------- -- -


Item 1940
a Million
: dollars

Cottonseed .......................: 83
Peanuts ............... ......... ...:
Soybeans .........................t
Flaxseed *.......... .......... ... ..: _34
Total, four oilseeds ........: 210
All crops and livestock (including :
Government payments) ............: 9,106


S 1941.
Million
dollars


3-
;; P ...-
102"s-a--
I- ; fB .,


179
.64. .
117 3
- : 52
4Y1~


11.754


S' "'
-1 ~S


Maximum Prices Established for
Flaxseed Pnd Linseed Oil


Maximum prices for flaxseed and linseed oil became effective aF7 21i"
under Maximum Price Regulation 397 and Amendment 33 to Revised Pfri .S!fhed a '
53, respectively laxseed and Its products oil and meal arEall o
subject to price ceilings. Also, with maximums for linseed ail prices, prile
of all fats and oils are now under ceilings.

The maximum prices for flaxseed are based on a price of $3b pS bu msL
delivered at Minneapolis* Specific maximum prices are stated t!' 17 other
basing points in Midwestern and Pacific Coast States and in Texze: Ma~d a
prices per bushel at interior points (country stations), except in. i4ifornia,
Arizona, Texas, and Kansas, are determined from the Minneapolis rQ #*wis basit
point price by deducting rail freight rates and 8 cents for country elevator
and terminal handling charges. At Eastern processing points the celliags are
the maximum price at Minneapolis plus transportation costs. The maeximPa o




H, nu. Ad %.::Ad


l6.l33s


. ,. .. : .




























aaee& prices recovered rapidly in early, May from the decline .that


....f f .r. .o: .... .... ..
S6. 1' *'. t anbOun "oem.t. of:. aia-nm prices for linseed
01WMipAZI1s 9everaged $3.23- peraushale ?. .iid-May
Vzf.1 .4, iliig *panoe for Ilaiseed -became effective.
.n June .- ,' .
m i ; ,-?;- -'.,, :: .. ... .. ** W -* .. -, .:...,, ^... *. .. .
".'..a'.' la'...'': ." 6 'eats. per p iund "in .etai pieces of b utt er,
o;:i llpanouimed to become effective Jme 1, was deftere.t.-. ..., *
: l...ealors to avyid invanteor losses on hutter. n hand, prnetesaoir
e-tte .eMs:ne pvpanat&ctive June 6.

sratflbeaeirantian ^ 1anafce:





-e$ for rade So.beo oliat tf .. ten4wd, qua-4, l abreu ,.b-- those

~J~:li|i)4: tid l .."..fl f:' t tNSibsan Pr nducers:
a .. Ofcr .t

-,"if....., tr'-n.'t !,2 1 Riv.seld o Sc, le .53, effeotive May'.19,

'.A f' .!by get.a "" "".. th ="- 2."e previously :. ". -..q A It. ij;.eii'- 75
110. S. t P" 97"". i -: "-: ,:"."",n .ae r s- -





JUNE 1943 10 -

Specific maximum prices were established, effective June 10, :r, : '
Amendment 34 to Rovised Price Schedule 53 for. two intainrmediate .
refined cottonseed, soybean, and peanut oils namely, 'bleached but
and deodorized but unbleached.

Price Ceilins Temporarily Removed from
E>Jrogenated Linseed Margarine Oil .

Sales of hydrogenated linseed margarine oil for use in the
of margarine for sale to t he.eood Distributioa.Administration ye ,t. i ;te
from price ceilings by Amendment 35 to Revised. Price Schedule 53aes,' f~?
June 16. This exemption is good only until September .1, 1943 &r' li,
specific-ceilings are-established, .whichever is earlier. Like tiep i e
exemption in the case of linseed oil shortening, this measure i'a "6i gnd to
help remove price obstacles to the use of linseed oil in the miaufactizre t
food products for lend-lease exports

Commodity Gredit orporatiot to be, Sole
Purchaser of 19J-Srop Peanuts

'Marketing quotas and acrpage allotments for 1943-crop ppean*t:a .re
revoked June 12 by the iWar'-ood Administration. On the same date l od
Order NIo. 4,'Commodity Credit Corporation was constituted the sole puroaser
of 1943-crop farmers' stock peanuts other than..those used for plai4g %n 19
or processed by growers-on the farm where produced and sold .direely U'
consumers.

Commodity Credit-Corporation will operate the.purchase program. through
contracts with handlers, including producer cooperative associatlonej
crushers, and sellers. Growers will receive prices averaging 140 ter iton
for Spanish.and Virginia types and $130 per ton for the Runner type. with
differentials for grade. These are -the support prices announced Ar1 A fbr
S 1943-crop peanuts. Prices for peanuts of like-type-and grade wifl bd unifofr
in all areas. There will.be'.no "quota" and "excess'i peanuts in,thi 194344'
marketing year.

Farmers' stock peanuts purchased by the Corporation will bjist both
for crushing and-for cleaning and. shelling. Prices received for q. s. for
crushing will average in the neighborhood..of $80 per ton, reTleeiAI the,
v~lue of peanut oil and real -at the ceiling prices for these crus1iD product
Peanuts for cleaning and shelling will be sold in line with ceili j'rcese,
which range from $154 to $176 per, ton, depending on type and gra4di Pi:ofits
from sales from cleaning and shellthg'will be used to cover losses fromN sales
for crushing and other costs of operating the program such as in"pe~ati0n,
handling, and storage. .... -T .

Industrial Animal Oils Placed Under
Allocation Control

Monthly allocation control of certain industrial animal oilWi Ql
become effective July 1, under Food Distribution Order 53, iduue 8. .25
i*

*<,.,:





















































































, ... *.. .
pm *:irl i~:~ .-




i" 'U



,I,.,


.- .' '. :. : '
: i:e aoof...ard ea1. rem dere4 pprk- .fat in .1942, including
. (iti abiel,4 taty s year earlier. a At apareml domesticc
(e ( cil llan and military), estimated at i,878 million pounds,




JUiE 1943 12 :

was about 90 million pounds less (table 61 The reduction in domestic ..:
principally due to large Government purchases, chiefly for lmnd-le'as'e 4'.
which totaled 654 million pounds compared. with 326 million pounds a
earlier.

High consumer demand for lard arisieg from the record level Of ."amU
income in 1942, the large Government purchases, and price ceilings o sail
prices of lard beginning in May combined to create a tight supply sftiifon,
which was reflected in local shortages of lard in retail stores in.'Ie early.
fall of .1942. Machinery for controlling civilian purchases of lard in 943
exists in-the point rationing of food fats, meat, cheese, and canz..fish
.begun on March 29. ::,:: :

..Production and EDiappearane of Other
Shortening Reduced in 192

Daomrstic disappearance of compounds and vegetable cookingf~ts decline
100 million pounds.-in 1942, with a decline of 110 million pound in.prod uotie
being partly offset by a .reduction of approximately 10 million puns in
stocks. (See table 7.) In must years disappearance of shortening other than
lard fluctuates in the opposite direction from domestic disappearance of
lard. The decline in disappearance of shortening in 1942 apparently was
chiefly due to a reduction in excess stocks accumulated by dealers and large
users in 1941. Retail sales may have increased, since consumer indome waste a
a very high level in 1942 and lard was difficult or impossible to obtain in
some localities in the early fall months.

Government purchases of shortening other than lard were, fairly small
until the fourth.quarter of 1942,. when 36 million pounds were ordered. In
1943 these purchases will be greatly increased. "A total of approximately
43 million pounds was purchased in the first 5 months of the year compared
with 46 million pounds in the entire year 1942. -

Manufacturerst quarterly use of fats and oils for production of
compounds and cooking frts for civilian consumption has been limited since
September 1942 to 88 percent of the average use in the corresponding, quarters
of 1140 and 1941. Civilian consumption of compounds and vegetable cW oking
fats, along with other food fats, has been subject to point rationiM since
March 29, 1943.

Little .hange.Exected. in' Total Domestic Disappearance
pf Lard and Other Shortening

Total domestic'disappearance of lard and other shortening, on a per
capital bas-s, is not expected to be greatly different in 1943 from the 1942
figure of 23 pounds. This quantity has been provisionally allocated for
United States civilian "nd military use*. At the vary high level of consumer
.income prevailing in 1943 and with large military requirements, the full
allocation of lard and other shortening. undoubtedly will be purchased, With
civilian purchases of fats subject to point rationing, point values c~n be
altered from time to time to adjust consumption to desired levelsU




*. I .






































































































F~i.;:





; : i: Jc. I

J'nE 1943 4 .

amounted to less than 3 percent of the total compared with nearly "8 iis6t:.
in 1941 and an average of 9 percent in 1936-0. (See tables 9 mnd. t :.

In 1943, linseect oil will,be used- in substantial quantities. in -
shortening for the first time. Satisfactory methods for processing. .tht Oil
into shortening have been developed. In May the Food Distribution
Administration accepted bids on linseed oil shortening for export

REGENT )ASA -0N. O.IL YIELDS FM0 COTOLSZEED0,. SOYTSIL '
S."AN.D -'PLXSEED,, BY STATES *

Data, recently made available by the Bureau of the Census on B' il eli
per 100 pounds of cottonseed, -soybeana,. and .flaxseed.are shown Li table 5
together with 'earlier fires for comparison. 2This information is presented
as a supplement to the data in the March 1943 issue of this repor :"

'.he average yield of crude oil per 100 pounds of cottonseed crushed
in ;he United Statep in .the year beginning August 1941 was 15.6 pounds. this
-" compares with 16.2 pounds in,the preceding crop year. State yields also
showed a reduction,. except in North Carolina, Alabama, and Arizona. However :
the 5-year average yields were slightly higher in 1937-41 than In.1936-40
both-for the United States and for all States .but one, reflecting higher
yields in 1941 than in 1936. On the basis of crashing to April' 1, 1943,
yields of oil in 1942-43 will be slightly lower than in 1941-42.. .

Yields'of oil Cfom soybeans crushed in the calendar year 1942.were the
sama as or higher than in 1941 for all States except Pennsylvania The
national average wds.fractionally higher, but in rounded numbers remained at
15 pounds per 100 pounds qf beans crushed. Some State yields maybe reduced,
in 1943 because many beans .of the 1942 crop crushed in 1943 had 4 eteriorated1
from lodging and from standing in the fields during winter. "

Little change occurred from 1941 to 1942 in yields of linseed oll, aMn
the national average for domestic seed remained at 31'pounds per 100 ,pounds.
of flaxseed crushed. -Yields from imported seed, -as indicated by..the averagPe
for New York, Eew Jersey,'-and Pennsylvania, are 1 or 2 pounds higher thn
from domestic seed. -California flaxseed yields considerably more. oil-than
other domestic seed. -

SYields of oil from crushings of farmers' stock peanuts in 1940-41,
published in The Fatse and Oils Situation for March 1943, are the" latest
available. Sizable quantities of all'important types and grades of.farmers''
stock peanuts were crushed in that year, and the yields obtained bould
give a r-asonably accurate indication of normal expectations.








*^,-A




























































LUg S A.a .vm. AVus M :a 4Rj ucA no-.uJ. AU.,& iALLLuiu. .u sr.au Ureax ne uensusT
|^ n ad fflaudee, e-tpubiished figures furnished:~on request 'byth-e Bueau of

iA 3i1f 6thailr.imiported iaed.
ti se iraithda' ifn'States irMt separately reported.
iig &ee e hed, ien ew yaor fi ew Jersey, amd Petlnsylvakiia.


:rtr
~PjX.:iV..;:
.4.1*;. I
J;ek':
~


I'C`


11.


W.:iI


* I


!."





JUSE 1943


- is -


Table 6.- Lard. including -readered pork fat,; -.Praduatioa l,' tmeM
socks DecmLter 31, and apparent domestic dsapea3ranc1e, aLnd191
d" ?.. .dct-ion i : a ':
mente ,tal -


:inspected: : : State al peroe of
S:sa : te nrri- e S S s
tories: :
Mil. 2l l11.1b. iT ill.lb. .l iblflr b.l r ..
1912 699 53 4- 556 1,685;3 ..t5ostl
1913 945 708 1:65 55 590 -- 1,b ;
1914 S 800 1, 654 5 464 -- 1,1 ^)Di
1915 a 956 733 .1,689 487 5 492 63 1'gt:
1916 : 966 740 1,706 454 6 460 M81 1 22 :
1917 : 738 713 1,451 382 4 386 55 1,91 1i
1918 : 1,140 759 1.899 555 558 1 129. ,;2
1919 1.155 765 1,920 784 4 788 63 l1,174 ),.
1920 : 1,207 751 1,958 635 7 642 59 1.319
1921 1,379 729 2,108 893 10 903 48 1,217 3
1922 : 1,575 727 2,302 787 10 797 49 1,50 1
1923 1,971 747 2.718 .1, o6o 14 1,074 9 1.W"
1924 1,923 737 2,660 971 14 986 61 1.6Q. 1 ,6 T
1925 1.452 701 2,153 708 11 719 42 1,1s tr5
1926 1,513 693 2,206 717 16 733 50 1,465" 1
1927 : 1.557 706 2,263 702 16 717 55 1.54i1 150
1928 1.750 708 2,458 783 18 801 85 1.626 I,5t.
1929 1,763 698 2,461 848 19 866- 82 1,59' 1
1930 1.521 706 2,227 656 18 674 51 1,5-3 5 I
1931 1.554 753 2,307 578. 23 6o 51 1,70b 1,
1932 : 1.573 807 2,380 552. 2 576 41 ,.14 1,,
1933 1,679 796 2475 584, 28 612 133 1.772 1 .
1934 : 1,341 750 2,091 435, 23 458 118 1i,64r
1935 662 614 1.276 97. 18 115 53 1,226 L ..
1936 992 687 1,679 112, 25 137 14 1,449 : "
1937 759 672 1,431 137. 26 162 54 1,3.
1938 1,034 694 1,728 205 .29 234 107 1,4409 ',1 0
1939 1,272 765 2,0o7 277 34 311 162 1671
190 1,527 816 2,33 201 31 232 .294 1.979
1941 1,526 755 2281 2 187 1,966 1,8
192 3/.c' 1,16 731 2.455r 2/ U13 2. 1
Corpi.'.ed es fo.- *:i..
Production I'.c-rally inspected, Tood Distribution Administration oth bure i l
of Agricultu-al Eccnomics. .
Foreign trade -. iorAin Comm6rco and Navigation of the United States.
Stocks Food Distribution Administration.
Total apparent disappearance computed from data on production, trade, and stocks
Disappearance of lard as lard, total apparent disappearance less quantities of
lard reported or estimated Ps used in the manufacture of margarine, shortening,
soap, printing inks, and for nther edible and miscellaneous products.
Totals computed from unroundod numbers.
If Includes rendered pork fat, not saparrtely reported prior to November 1940, in
millions of pounds as follows: Production, 1940, 35; 1941, 159; 1942, 184. Stocks,
1940, 7; 1941, 5; 1942, 8, 2 Not available f.r publication. / Preliminary.
"A? f, :!
19 o : 1/. ,52 el6 P.,[ 3 2Ol 31 2 1/29 1,79 !:.117:::P.'



































..,..; .. ... .X..71 6,.235 1,623 4,612 44,932 1,586,311
9 1 ,~ 929 .1,909 1, 723, / 186 46,031 1,594,016
It V .4,o02a 1,i924 2,255. 331 55,662 1,504,066
r 1 ..43,551 1,245 3,237 1,992 56,621 1,4oo,6oo
: f .. :" .: ,
.. 1,19022 05 3,805 3, 00 53,7 41 1,1s9,90g
,, 40s. 01 / 4 53.Y 1407,585
lp. 153. 9_ 421 :,648 1.307,957
St t lo I:.a- Ift .- a' .. ..
r t:,.. ? u.tion 1912, 1914, 1916-18,. Supplement to. United States Department of
..rig ultr Bullet i'. o, 769; 1913 and 1915, interpolated; 1919, estimate by
::. beran Aleheerg! tt he. Ame. ca e e.Vegetale Shortening Industry, p. 330; 1920
Aid 1921,AUnited States Tariff Commission, Report to Congress on Certain. -
ig ,t ....;:. et .0s. O E ort..,No. 41, Second Series 1932) pp. 159-60; 1922-42,
S:t: ,Sfi ithe Cae~ia, AimaL anLd egetable~at. and On s. ..
l,~ .tigi nt4s.. e Reporte of the.United States Departmen. of. :Commerpa..
:St.ocks ., B iu,..of: th Census, Animal-.and Vegetable Fats and. Oils.., .Data.ot
available for years prior to 1922.... ..
S ta. apparent disappearance ..coputed from data. on production, trade, and

S $'1h ia2-1 luclte, emall percentage, of lard, Not reported prior to .October
O. ctob6 '-ecember. 3/ Net imports. 4 Not available for publication.




JUNE 1943 18 -

Table 8.- Domestic disappearance of lard, compbinde and vegetable bcookim
fats, butter, and margarine, per capital, 1912-42 -


(Civilian and militaryr ) ,.
: : : aTotal, :
::Co DoundBs: lard ands a .t r .Tta
l: ard and compounds: Btter M: .tal'
'consumed btte,
Year a consumedavegetable: and : am (actual: fo ur.
: as lard : cooking :vegetable: ,as I weiht) ad i ts.


S: fats a

Pounds Pounds
0
1912 : .3 8.4
1913 : 10.8 9.6
1914 : 11.7 10.8
1915 : 11.6 10.1
1916 : 11.6 9.6
1917 : 10.1 10.9
1918 : U.9 10.5
1919 : 10.7 11.7

1920 : 11.9 6.7
1921 : 10.8 7.0
1922 13.3 6.7
1923 : 14.3 6.6.
1924 : 14.2 7.1
1925 : 12.2 9.7
1926 : 12.2 9.6
1927 1: 2.6 9.7
192 : 13.2 9.4
1929 : 12.7 9.9

1930 : 12.6 9.8
1931 13.6 9.4
1932 14.4 7.5
1933 14.0 7.6
1934 12.9 9.5-
1935 : 9.6 12.1
1936 : 11.3 12.4
1937 : 10.5 12.4
1938 : 11.0 11.6
1939 : 12.7 10.7


14.8
134.2
'13.3


9.0
10.6
9.7


cooking : : .
fats ; :
Pou Ps Pounds Pounds

19.7 16.6 1.5
20.4 16.5 1.5
22.5 17.0 1.4
21.7 17.2 1.4
21.2 17.3 1.8
21.0 15.7 2.7
22.4 13.7 3.3
22.4 15.2 3.4


18.6
17.8
20.0
20.9
21.3
21.9
21.8
22.3
22.6
22.6

22.4
23.0
21.9
21.6
22.4
21.7
23.7
22.9
22.6
23.4

2)3.80
24.8
23.0


14.8
16.2
17.1
17.8
18.0
18.0
-18.5
18.1
17.5
17.4


18.1
18*2
17.9
18.3
17.2
16.5
16.5
16.5

17.0
170
16.4
16.5


3.4
2.0
1.7
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2..3
2.6
2.9

2.6
1.9
1.6
1.9
2.1
3.0
3.1
3.1
3.0
2.3

2.4
2.7.
2.7


*'- t-


Pounds Pouads

1861 37.8
18.0 is.4
18.4 : .9.'
18.6 40.3
19.1 < 31
18.4 39
17.0 39.1
18.6 41.


18.2
18.S

19.8
20.00
20.0
20.e

20.1
20.3
20,1


19.9
20.0
19.8
1985
20.4
20.2
19.6
.19.6
.'. 19.5.
19.7
19.4
19.1
19.2


* 36.8
364

S40.7
* 41i.3
4 1.9
a_.3
42.7








43.9
142.1
420.
4343
41 .
41,0



43.1


43.2
43-9
42.2


Computed as follows,'using population figures as of July 1l Lard and coa-
pounds and vegetable cooking fats from data shown in preceding tables; butter
and oleomargarine from data shown in the April 1942, April 1943, and February
1943 issues of The Fats and Oils Situation.


*" .^ l
*..... ...


1940
1941
1942


:;


m











em ; 1938 : 1939 1940 1941 : 1942



; .

S1 .. ..... 137133 201599 212317 215,967 335555
*1 oi 0.......:,950 923,359 ,733 694-,13$






util ,...ol ... 26,199 20,659 17,576 22,06967 335,55
i ..: 5,435 51,724 24 226,905 37,
S297 37 --- ...
u oil ......... 950 506 381 50



P knel oil.......: 614 266 1,146 4 35
otj ..........: 695_ 988 32 23 25 6
Iot .foreign .....: 19.223 1 52.383 108,8 5970
gnial eM^ marine
Tallow edible.......: 74,251 56,6,1 39595 41,227 55.777
SOlebtearine .,......... 32,845 25,574 16,94o 23,103 30,700
r Lard, ineuding
ren rea: pork'fat ...: 2,825, 7,398 16,786 2/50,787 61,632
S.eo &1i ..............: 291 _____ 7_ 880 1,282 .66
totall 'land 4imal a 110.22 90,113 74 201 116,95" T7,772
ish oil: ...- ........: 16,529 20,321 10,902 6,15 5,750
.Marine aimal oils ...: 4g 12 --- ---
!. tal fats and oils: 1,517,299 1,4T6,318 1,196, 24 1,418,109 ,1,285,831


-_ -
mpiiedfroi7 Buieau of the Qezsus, Animal and Vegetable Fats and Oils. Data for
earlier years beginning 1912 given in The Fats and Oils Situation, May 1939.
L Inli odes inanaed vegetable oils' reported as "other." A small percentage may be
(amesalc arbitrarily placed in foreign group. In 1942, "other" consisted mostly of
mffi P ir oil,
? 5iA37,p000 pounds of lard and 45,550,000 pounds of rendered.pork fat. Rendered
k f"at not reported separately in other years.


7 '' .
i .' .


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t.


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i ...
lir? ..
....;..... ... ';





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a e a 8 e e a a e e g a
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a'HLf


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l |i o C c' 'nrlri


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* 4 U U *
.q 0
0 g 'd 4....... .....
*4* *


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Ho *H 0 *H0

400.- 0 0 0I 0
H- o ) 0 a D0 0 a m

Q w N c r0A U m *pf
nowPjor: P|Uoo -iq
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I1 H 14 0

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JUxr 1943


I'. I


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"* 0*

















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0 u0 I Fd 0
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0 2
r I l l


0 5E-aOa--
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a, r la.'.;: A.r : Aune'!ly: Au;.:Sept: Oct. Nov.: Dec.; Av.
twaiiib .eai4 seniSsi OMts Oents g C sents Cents Cents cents Cents
i i2.. 2.S.e 11,9 11. 11.2 11.2 12.0 12.7 12.E8 12.5 12.6 .13.2 12.2
7 13..S ;313.7 13.7 .13.2 13,4 13.2 12.2 11,0 o1.2 10.4 10.4 12.4
.:2 10.3 ) 10.2 10.3: 102 10.2 10. 3 10,6 10.2 10.0 9.8 9.6 10.2
._ 9.2 9.2 9.2. 92 9.0 8.8 .8.8 9.7 9.7 9.5 9. 9.3
? 59 9.5 9.6 9.4 9.5 9.2 .2 9.0. 8s. 8.4, 8.2 8 9.1
,5 10.5 .11.1 12.4 .13.0 13.8 14.8 15.1 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.3 13.8
76. 7.1 17..0 17.0 17.0 17.0 17.0. 17.0 17.0 17.0 17.0 17.0 17.0
I0T 17.0 J17.0 17.0 17,0

i nion Ada*waintration. Reported in tubs prior to July 1940.
: Table 12.- Lard, prime steam: Wholesale price
per pound, tierces, CMicago, 1936-43

.. .Mar.: Apr. May unai July Aug.'Sept.; Oct.: Nov.: Dec.: Av.
ge CnEts Cents dents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Centa

3:6 o.s .10.8 11.o 10i.4 10.3 11.0 12.1 11.7 11.5 11.8 13.1 11.3
3f ::- -`;:l2.4 12.5 11.6 11.9 11.9 12.2 11.3 11.0 10.0 9.5 8.3 11.3
938 '..i.!. 8.6 .8 8.2 8.1 8.4 8.9 8.1 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 8.0
is 4 6 6.6 6.5 6.3 6.5 6.1 5.7 5.6 7. 6.6 6.1 6.2 6.4
:'6 .61.. 5.9 6.1 5.6 5.5 5.8 .9 .8 4.7 4.7 4.4 5.4
.1 .: 6.2 7.0 8.6 9.5 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.7 9.8 9.8 10.0 8.9
14et.z, 12.2 12.7 12.7 12.6 12.6 12.3 12.9 12.9 13.5 13. 13.8 12.8
'It3 *3.8g .13.8 13.8 13.8
the JOAt .PrqgVjeionesr.

:.;. able 13.- Lard, refined: hVbleeale price
per pound-, cartons, Chicago, 1936-43

an. ;eb. mar.: Apr.: May June uly Aug..Sept.: Oct. Nov.: Dec.: Av.
Ce t* :; S a D.O e.s "eWts. .Cents Cets Cents Cents
a:," t.: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cets Cents Cents Cents _Cents Cents


1 12.12 3,1.1: 11.9
' :14,0 1 3.3 13.2
201,1 10.1 -10.0
: ; .7.7 7.5- 7.5
.t 8 '6.7 6.5
: 6.E 6.a .7.3
: 12.9 13.4 13.5
-.19.6 15.6 35.6


11.9
12,6
9.4
7.3
.6,4
9.0
15.0
15.6


11.1. 11.3
12.9 13.2
9.2 9.4
7.5 7.1
6.4 6.2
9.8 10.6
14.6 14.5
15.6 .


-.., ,-------- ....----------------------- ---- -
1.4 DiStribtuloA administration. Reported in tubs prior to July 1940.


: .. '. .. ,


12.1
135.
9.7.
6.6.
6,2
10.9
14.5


12.8
13.0
9.0
.6.4
.6.1
11.1
14.5


12.5
13.0
8.9
9.6
6.5
12.4
14.5


12.4
12.0
8.5
8.0
6.2
12.0
15.3


12.7
11.4
8.3
7.2
6.4
11.6
15.6


13.6
9.8
7.9
7.1
6.2
12.5
15.6


12.2
12.7
9.2

10.1
14.5






Table 14.- Factory production of fats and oils, April 1941 and 19142, :, l
February-April 1943, and indicated crop-gear production
__f___ f. specified items l 26"
t 1-3 y .ro Hcdion M.43

1 A 19"2 Mar.
:Mil. lb. Mile. l. Mil. Ib' M. Ib.'Ib.

Animal fats and oils :
Creamery butter ....... .............: 162.5 149.6 122.0 140.1' 50.0I
Inspected lard and rendered pork fat : "125.7 126.9 137.3 136.4i,: -12 :.
Greases excluding wool grease *.......: A. N.A. 4.0 43'.i
NReat I s-foot oil ................. : I t .43
Oleo oil ............................: n g9. 74
Stearine, animal, edible ...........: 3 4.3 ,.
Tallow, edible .;....................: 10.7 10.5
Tallow, inedible ....................: 70.3 66.o
Wool grease .......... ........ ff 1.1 d .: ....
Fish-liver oil .......................: f .4 *3 .8
Fish oil ............................: 3.9 ,
Marine mammal oil .....................: a n --- .- 1/
Total, animal ....................: 2
Vegetable oils, crude basis : r
Castor oil .................. .......: N.A. LA. 7.5 9a' '
Coconut oil .......... ...............: n ." 8.9 .17 *7.. ..
Corn oil ..............................: 19.8 21.7 20.9
Cottonseed oil ........................ : 102.2 71.9 123.1 104.8 652
Linseed oil ........................ : N.A.; T.A. 69.3 .63.2 6
Olive oil, edible ...................: .. 3.5 -2Q
Peanut oil ..........................: 15.2 2.9 16.9 15.2t .0.9 :
Soyboan oil ...........................: N.A. N.A. 107.7 115.3 l .
Tung oil ............................: 1.1 :. 2 1
Other vegt able oils e.......... ....- it._

Grand to t.al .................. ;__ __ ___ 7 5,
S-:- Inc.. r Ig r-year_ -rod ;.on

:begi sr : 194;o-4i 1941-42 3 2
:beginitn: :. -
: : 1 .,'. Mil. lbt). Mil. lb.
Animal fats and oils : .
Butter, including farm ...............: July : 2.281 2,142 lB8Q'
Lard and rendered pork fat, total ...: Oct. : 2,275 t/ 2,4o 2,~700
Inedible tallow and greanns, total ..: Oct. : 1,492 1,732, 1,600
Edible tallow, oleostea::ine, : :
oleo stocks, and oleo oil ...........: Oct. : 218 :277 200
Marine animal oil s ................:. July : 175 21.5 1+0
Corn oil ............................:' Oct. : 135 24- 250
Cottonseed oil .......................: Aug. : 1,425 1,20 ,4
Linseed oil / ......................: July : 701 988 .g
Olive oil .............................: Oct. o 11 .8 .
Peanut oil ..........................: Oct. : 174 76 3- '
Soybean oil .........................: 0Ot.. : .564 7 7 1.24.
Tung oil ......... -. ................. 5 -
Compiled fro:a reports of the Bureau of the Census and the Department of Agril.ture1'
Monthly reports do not show total production of butter, lard, inedible tallow, and
greases. .
j Less than 50,000 pounds. 2/ Based on most recent indications; subject to eagi..
3/ Revised. 4/ Includes production from imported flaxseed.
'4 H





























'a 'Mhme 48,
S .... .. N.s NI.A. 11 10 10
eaB.::ii 1 .*i .** *.* ,e *,..',, .. .24 27 31
'c Oqc ia .. *;,,.,........, 152 166 179
*Cfl. r: t.8i..g ..*. e t. .'. 32 31 34
-..*,,.. 638 535 43 459 412
1 .er'"......... #".N. LA. 279 289 261
.i **.*. : 7 7 7
Q !" "-'." i ;.. .**' .7" 2 .." 5
:q) k e ..eea.d e.m... .I 10 ,0 9
-"al tJ. ... ....n.., .., .. .. :51


aci ......i~..... ....... 0 -19 .9
0""" l.. a 183 VS


.,41 v..ejs..it..oq.. 1. .. 31 1
i... ..egetabt, o..ls .-.. ... __ ."
W.
S otl, Sgetable ..... ,

id frao reports o *tho Bursea of the GOasus; except butter and lard, fdoL
1 .io*oAAin.lstra $on. ,tLtas. comqputbed from unronded, 0umbe.ra
JRPao plus rdflod odaortseadto an.e baets bY dividing bi the following fa'torfo






iI conr, eottoneeed, pal~a-kernel, and palm oils 0a93; cpconut, peanut aend
.:... ea oils o9 .







Table 16.- Prices of specified Qil--bearng materials,.
May 1941 ad 1942, March-May 1943
S. .. .

Item : Unit 194. a 4
SDolla olla ......ol
*___.__l ______D .


Castor beans, Brazilian,


f.o.b. Brazilian ports ....: Long ton I
Cottonseed, United States :
farm price ...............:Short ton :
Flaxseed, No. 1 Minneapolis .: Bushel ;


1
LI

--S


65.60 / 99-31

27.67 43.99
1.ST7 .2.58


75.00 75.00

45.73 3
3.17'... .3'aL"


Flaxseed, United States :
farm price ................... :I', n 1.68 2.43 2.83 '. 9 :.^ g
Peanuts (for nuts and oil), :
United States farm price ..:100 pounds: 3.65 '"6.30 6.83' 6 -0.
Peanuts for oil, delivered : :
designated agencies .......: -4..'* .11 3. 82 .
Soybeans, United States : ...
farm price ................: Bushel 1.19.* -1r73 1.65 .
.. .. .. .
0 : *"*" '-'- --" 4* ,.
Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, Dai-y Trade -iBl'etin. .(i
Journal of Commerce, Daily Market Record (Minnehpo.lis-).h.eand. eporte of0 lhe':B.ir.
Agricultural Economics. ......
SC. and f., New York. ....... .

Table 17.- Price per ton of specified oilseed meals,
May 1941 and 1942, March-May 1943.

Item 1941 1942 Mar. : .:

: Dollars Dollars Dollar .
Copra meal, Los Angeles ...............: 35.70 49.94 52.30 51
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent protein, :- "..
Memphis .............................: 25.10- --34.31 38.75 3
Cottonseed meal, 41 percent protein, :
Chicago ...........,................... 30.8 ..-40.50 -- --
Linseed meal, 34 percent protein,
Minneapolis ..........................: 27.10----36.00 54-70 .5WLi:'h +-S34
Linseed meal, 32 percent protein, : ....
New York .............................: 24.55- .31.50.. .46.25 4 5 k5
Peanut meal, 45 percent protein, .: ...
f.o.b. Southeastern mila............: 23.28 .. 46.19 38.0Q. j38.0 381o00
Soybean meal, 41 percent protein, ... ....
Chicago ................,............: 28.10 38.30 40.60 40.60 .s

Compiled from records of the Food Distribution Administration.
I/ Bagged carlots.


-:, ./ "






Why14 1sn as rontin ithdrarals for. ons-Wti


'd 10.
..2..0.... l4?. 1F6b 1 .815 ..... ,





Ap rl .... 1 0,1:4.1 63600 1 ,246 1,9000 1471000 2b

413 ... ..... ... .. I:l4 1306 7# f 168

b andol ....w. ..... W,2 0,9 0482 2a a8 41.109
oil~~~0 9..9........ k159 &M 18 64

Atnee team O.........: 1 -P--,6 5 lo4 57 3236



emea ei ............: 1,4o2 2,192 2 -----
abn't .........3.6-21 153 329--
abs~~9 636 1...19.;...., 3150 702---- -
0lake foe.. ... a.1*&: 454 341 319 149**
makernel- oil 21......
Whal freg vgeabe : 1 4i 10 .6o-- -



Oftoed oi l yearin .i.j gg: 26,6 i 11 2519701 624
Ob il 8'0..422 7..495 20,. 25,993 1652092
baiif o) ......: 159 97 19 59 476
=011 39strt 15....:25 216 61g 24
voj a pt.a.li..flakes .:. 32- 2 1
Ju ldakesu, ..d ..a.W ........0 0-4 a a-- 1 2

total, Wth O'seial ...t_ 211 5380 114@ 8


9Ne San laterInl Bvegeabe 1ec-v 6n24 era evneBultn




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