The Fats and oils situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00024
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00024

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text




- /
/ i


i UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRIC T DEP
., BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL EcoNOMICS
WASHINGTON
2' ..WA. ..O FEBRUARY 14 19


T H E F A T S AND OI LS SI TUAT I ON


DOMESTIC PRODUCTION OF FOOD FATS FROM THE FARM
S(EXCLUDING BUTTERFAT)
.*ON D S
D'..,, h.\' O.Other
S -Cottonseed
;,Lard'
Ai ,000':".


3.000





?,000





1,000
, 'f.oo0


0


- ----?


1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 +1937
STHE ANIMAL FAT PRODUCTION 15 FOR CALENDAR YEAR COMBINED WITH VEGETABLE OIL CRUSHED
DURING SEASON FROM CROP GROWN IN THE CALENDAR YEAR
*'OTHER INCLUDES SOYBEAN. PEANUT. AND CORN OILS EDIBLE TALLOW OLEO OIL.'AND OLEOSTEARINE
St PRELIMINARY INDICA TION


38


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF.AGRICULTURE


NEG 32817 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS





FOS-12


- 2-


Table 1.- Price per pound of specified fats and oils, annual, 1934-37,
January 1936-38


Fat or oil Annual : January
_: lfi 1__ 1 :io37 :1i.6 :-a37 : q38s
c: Le2.nts C n Cent QcentsCets Cents Cents..


Domestic tricgS-
Butter, 920, N.Y.
Oleomargari r,domestic veg.,Chica-go
Lard, prime steam, Chicago
Lard, refined, Chi:agn
Lard cimpo nds, Cnicago
Coconut oil, edible, N. Y.
Cottonseed oil,crudu,fob S.E. mills
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., NT.Y.
Soybean oil, refined, IT.Y.
Peanut oil, domestic, refined, IT.Y.
FB.pe oil, refined, -I.Y.
Ole0 oil, No. 1, 1I.Y.
Oleostearine, barrels, N.Y.

Corn oil, refined, 1I.Y.
Olive oil, eiitle, NT.Y.
Sunflower oil, refined, T.Y.
Teaseed oil, crude, !a-. Y.

Coconut oil, crude, Facific Coast
Tallow, inedible, Chicagn
Grease, house, 1.Y.
Palm oil, crude, 1. Y.
Olive oil fcotn, barrels, II. Y.
Palm-kernel oil, denatured, 1I.Y.
Babazsu oil, tanks, U. Y. 3j
Sardine oil, tanks, Pacific Coast

Linseed oil, raw, Minneapolis
Tung oil, drums, Atlantic Coast
Perilla oil, drums, 1!.Y.
Soybean oil, crude, fob mills
Menhaden oil, rrud e, fob Balto.
Hcmpceed oil, crude, I. Y.

Forei ir prites- i J
Cotton oil, crude, naked, Hull
Copra, Resecada, Philippines
Palm-kernel oil, crude, Hull
Whalo oil, crude, Hr. 1 Rottordam
Tallnw, beef, fair-fine, London
Linsecj oil, naked. Hull
/L Prior to Jan., 1937. prices quoted are


December. j/ Beginning February 1937,


25.7
9.1
7.7
8.8
8.6
4.8
5.6
6.5
8.2
9.7
5.4
7.9
6.9

8.0
23.1
6.4


2.6
3.8
3.8
3.5
7.1
3.7

2.7

9.0
8.9
9.0
h.0
2. 6

L- 0


1.0
3.3
2.7


for


29.8
12.6
13.8
15.1
13.1
7.0
9.2
10).4
10.6
13.3
6.3
12.9
10.8

12.1
23.1
10.8
8.4

4.4
6.2
6.1
4.7
s.6
4.5

4.6

8.8
17.0
8.2
8.1
4.0
8.2



2.0
4.5
3.8


J23.0
25.1
11.3
12.2
12.2
7.4
8.6
9.8
9.8
12.5
8.3
11.2
9.0

12.0
24.1
10.5
10.6

5.0
5.8
5.5
1.8
8.7
5.1
8.0
4.5

9.5
16.1
8.8
7.5
4.3
8.9


5.9
2.4
5.4
4.4
6.0
5. 8


nut oleomarca


prices are futures.


cents per pound at current monthly rates of exchange.


34.4:
15.8:
11.3:
12.7:
12.4:
8.5:
8.0:
9.2:
10.9:
12.1:
12.3:
13.1:
9.7:

11.5:
31.9:

10.8:

6.0:
7.5:
7.4:
5.6:
11.1:
6.0:
8.9:
6.0:

10.3:
15.7:
12.1:
8.1:
5.2:



5.8:
3.0:
6.0:
4.7:
65.:
6. 5


34.6
11.5
11.1
12.2
12.4
6.9
8.9
10.1
10.3
13.2
7.4
13.4
9.5

12.6
23.5
10. 8
9.6

4.6
5.7
5.7
4.6
8.7
4.6

4.9

9.5
14.1
7.4
7.6
4.8
8.5


5.7
2.1
5.6
4.9
7.5
6.1


34.2
16.5
13.6
14.0
13.7
11.6
10.4
11.4
12.2
13.4
11.3
14.4
12.0

12.9
28.8
12.6
14.7

9.0
8.8
8.7
6.8
10.9
8.5
11.4
6.4

9.8
14.6
11.7
9.8
4.8


6. 8
4.8
8.2
5.3
6.8
6.0


33.7
15.4
8.4
10.1
10.2
6.5
6.2
7.8
8.6
10.0
12.1
9.8
7.6

9.3
31.3

8.8

3.8
512
5.0
4.2
9.3
4.2
6.9
5.5

10.0
15.6
11.3
5.
5.0


4.5

4.9
3.8
4.8
6.4


rine. 2j Average April-
4h Converted to U.S.


" -- -~


-- -






FO6-12


THE FATS AND OILS SITUATION



This issue of the Fats and Oils Situation presents a preliminary summary

of statistics of production, imports, exports and stocks of primary fats and

oils for the calendar ,eai' 1937.

The large cotton crop in 1937 contributed materially to a record dom-

estic production of vegetable fats and oils. The large supplies, together with

the recession in business, have resulted in generally lower prices for fats and

oils. Imports for the year 1937 were the largest or! record. Arid stocks of fats

and oils and of the raw. materials for th;'ir production Dn hand at the end of

December were the largest on record excepting in 1923.


Cottonseed oil

The 1937 record cotton crop of 1,746,000 biles would produce more than
8 million tons of cottonseed, whicn would yield about 2 billion pounds of cotton-
seed oil. The cotton crop of 1936 proiu-?ed only about 5,500,000 tons of seed,
which yielded about 1,760,000,000 pounds of oil. The rrosre t of this increase
in the supply of cottonseed, from such a large increase in the cotton crop, has
naturally resulted in a material decline in ti-e price of cottonseed from the
level of a year ago. in January 1918 the price far'-.rs were receiving for cot-
tonseed throughout the South averagedd about -1I..0 per ton as comrrared with
$36.80 a year ago.

The decline in the price of cottonseed was due both to increased pro-
duction of fe :dstuffs and to the prospective increase in the supply of fats and
oils. The price of cottonseed oil in Januarv 1938 at South--ast-rn mills averaged
6.2 cents a pound, compared with 10.4 cents in January 19U7. The average price
of cottonseed meal at MImphis in Jenuary 1935 was $34.66 p r ton, aJnd in
January 1953 the price had dropped to $23.25. This drop in the price of meal
reflects the great increase in the f.,d supply from a fairly good-sized crop
of corn and 3 good crop of soybeans.

The prospect of a large production of cottonseed oil is also a factor
of some importance in determining the price of lard, ard consequently the
price of hogs. Cottonseed oil is used txtcnsively in the manufacture of cook-
ing fats which are substituted for lard. For three ye-frs, 1955, 1936 and 1937,
the consumption in the United States of compounds and vegetable shortening
exceeded the consumption of lard, and n. y do so again in 1938 because of the
plentiful supply and ch-apness of the oils wvnich are used in the manufacture
of compounds. Cottonseed oil is by far the most important oil used in the


- 3 -









production of these compounds and vegetable shortening. In 1936 it consti-
tuted 57 percent and in 1934, 87 percent of all the oils used. Under these
conditions the price of lard and the price of cottonseed oil are closely re-
lated. In January the price of refined lard in Chicago averaged 10.1 cents
per pound, compared with 14 cents a year ago. Cottonseed oil is also dis-
placing to a considerable extent other fats and oils in the manufacture of
oleomargarine. In 1937 it constituted 57 percent of the fats used, whereas
a few years ago it was used to only a very limited extent. This oil, to-
gether with soybean oil, has largely displaced coconut oil in the manufacture
of oleomargarine. (See table 8.)

Preliinnary estimates of disappearance of refined cottonseed oil in
all uses during the calenda: year 1937 placed the figure at 1,600,000,000
pounds, compared with 1,246,OCO,000 in 1936 and 1,735,000,000 pounds in 1935.
It is estimated that about 815 million pounds of refined oil were consumed
from August 1 to December .1, 1937, compared with 582 million pounds in the
same rjonths of 1936.

Soybean oil

The 1977 soybean crop wasr estimatedd in the December Crop Report at
approximately 4 :anillion bushels whic- is t.e second largest crop on record.
The 1935 crop amounted to s little cv'.r -14 i:illion bushels. The price is
low because of plentiful supr.lie; o0 leedstuffs that compete with soybean
meal and because of t:-e low prices of cils in rcneral.

Domestic produ-tion of oil from the 1937 crop is likely to be between
200 and 250 million pounds, defending on th- proportion of the crop which is
crushed. Stocks of soybean oil on hand at the beginning of the current
market ing season for roybeaen .ancunted to a little over 36 trillion pounds,
compared wit!: 39 million pounds Cctob.r 1, 1936, and 14 million pounds on
the same date in 19 ?5.

Both production and consumption of soybean oil in the United States
have been e6pntndl'nri in r'-cent y sar. In the 1C years prior to 1934, annual
domestic dis.po- 3P :--rancc. ran-ed from:- 10 to 37 r.illion pounds. In the year
from October 19'4 through Sernt.:mb..,r 19l'5, about 89 million pounds were ap-
parently consumed, .and this was increased to 199 and 211 million pounds in
1935-36 and 1976-37, respectively. All but a small part of this utilization
has been of" oil domestically produced.

Soybean oil is -daptable to a wide variety of uses, but since 1934,
as a result of the short supplies of other edible oils, it has been used
chiefly in food products. In 1936 approximately 61 percent of the soybean
oil consumed went into c-onpounds and vegetable shortenings and 20 percent
into oleomargarine and other food products. This year increased production
of edible oils, toogkthL.r vnth the wid. spread between the price of linseed
oil and the rice of soyb-an oil, may cause some shift in the consumption
of soybean oil from food products to paints and other drying-oil products.


FOS-12


- 4 -






FOS-12


Peanut oil

The December 1 Crop Report places 1937 peanut production at nearly
1.3 billion pounds, slightly under 1935 and 19'3.

Prices of farmers' stock peanuts and cleaned and shelled goods have
not dropped as sharply as market prices of peanut oil, cake and meal, due to
the generally prevailing low prices of competing edible oils and high protein
feeds. Millers appear to be limiting their crushings to low-grade oil-stocks,
although apparent yield of crude oil per ton of peanuts crushed remains close
to 1937 levels.

Both domestic production and imports of peanut oil have beer high in
the last three marketing seasons. In the 1936 season domestic production
was 78 million pounds, net imports 'C-.re 6 million pounds, and apparent dis-
appearance was 129 Irillion pounds.

Production of crude peanut oil in the October-December quarter of the
current season was 8 million pounds, compared with 35 million pounds in the
same period in 19.6 and 29 million pounds in 1935. In the 1934-36 seasons,
crushing were higher in the October-Dc.:.mber quarter than in any other
quarter, and if this precedent holds, supplies of domc-stic peanut oil in
1938 will be sharply reduced below 1937. Imports are not likely to be large
at current price levels in view of the tariff rate of 4 cents per pound. Un-
less there is a marked shift in price relationships or a large volume of
crushing under a crop diversion program of the Agricultural Adjustment Admin-
istration, consumption of peanut oil in 195i will probably be at the lowest
level since 1935, when apparent disapTr-arance was only 12 million pounds. From
83 to 85 percent of the peanut oil used in 1935 and 1936 was in compounds and
vegetable shortening, only 4 percent going into oleomargarine.

Factory and warehouse stocks of peanut oil Icrude basis) at the be-
ginning of 1938 were 25 million pounds, compared with 29 million pounds a
year earlier.

Lard

Lard prot-uction under inspection in the calendar yar r 1957 is reported
at 787 million pounds or a rcarked reduction from tht 1936 figure of 992
million. Estimates of production other thin federally inspected w'-ill not
be available for some w.eks but on the basis of past relationships a total
production of somewhere near 1.4 billion pounds may be reasonably assumed.

It now se-ems probable that the total live weight of inspected hog
slaughter in 1938 will be larger thrn that of 1937 and the average weights
of hogs will bt heavier. Thus, lard production may be expected to show a
definite increase in 1938.

Butter

Preliminary reports of factory production of butter in 1937 indi-
cate an output somewhat under that of any calendar year since 1930. This







FOS-12


total production, factory and farm, for the year may be estirated at some-
where around Z.1 billion pounds. Final etilrates will not be available for
some weeks. The prospects for 1938 are for a higher production than in 1937.

Marine animal oils

Domestic production of fish oils was lover in 1931 tnen for several
previous years b.t increased st..'adily thereafter, mcunting from 64 million
pounds in 1931 tc 267 million in 1)36, but dropped to 183 million pounds in
1937.

Vfhale oil rendered on a floating whale oil factory of American registry
has been considered domesticc prod action" and permitted entry free of duty.
At the ;resent time an issue is being made regarding the entry of vhale oil
prodded on the Ulysses. In tt-. mnantirrn the Bureau of Fisheries has in-
.luied this cargo in the rr-port cf domestic production of whale oil in 1937,
bringing tiie total up to 70 million pounds, ?ompar.rd .rith the largest pre-
vious rr-ortcd prc.uction cf F1 .ll rouns 16 T -six millioouns in 1 T ty-six million
pounds w"ere r,-.ported as hanriL b.:en produceA in the calendar year 1920,while
the 15-year (1921-2') uvcra-c rroduLction was only 9 million pounds.

Imports for consumption of mr.rnr.c r-arnal oil for 1Ci,7 have totaled 55
million pounds -cn:par:' 'vith f? -.illion in. 136. In .931, after the enormous
world production cf marine mnarLrnil n11s. in the 1920-31 -eason, vhEn burdensome
stocks of whale oil Tiltd up t.rrcuii-;nict tL:e world, stocks in tihe United States
amounted to I0 million punr]ds. Te ;r rcsr.nt stocks arr large.r than total
consum-ntiorn nvcr estimated i ii inn one year. Estimngt-d total disappearance
of whale oil in the Unit-d S:.t as re-acl-.d a high mark of 74 million pounds in
the calendar ,' ar 1929, dLclinrd st..adily for 6 yea-rs, was 33 million pounds
in 1935, and 55 trillion pounds in 1.936; and factory consumption fcr 19Z7 is
report.-d to .:av- 0.rn tout 70' -illion pounds.

The us,. of marine :inirll oils is being changed significnntly. Prior
to 1936, nractic lly ail t re r.-port-d factor. :onsirption of whale and fish
oils was in souar. In 1936, towcveur, only nalf t :. fisn oil wais so used.
Compounds u&rd 37 riillicn poundr:?s a'no nts -,rd other dry.ing uses absorbed
52 million pounds.

LrOleCstic production of wi.-il oil for t ?alcndar .y'ar 1937 has al-
ready bcon rr..-ortecd at about 70 nilli n pounds, but tuei Ulysses is reported
to thv- gorn to tri- Antarcti,: for the Frec.- nmbr ].5G''-March 198'' whaling sea-
son. The world .:-tcn during thi prser:nt season may have an important bearing
on the oil an.: oils1 ,is rrmrk.t. It i=. reported that tncre ar'. ?1 floating
factories op-rating this season with 257 catchers compar.-d with 30 factories
and 195 critc., rs lact c _ason. Four J;apar.crc *Tpoeditions w.-re sent to the
fisnirn grounds r-arly,. The fC e- citc'. reports at ihnd s-.em to indicate sat-
isfactory results so f:r.

Imports ?and exports

A considerable, :. ua-ntity' of fPuts was import-~d in the past y.:er. Im-
ports have incr-'.se-d from r:round 1. h3billion Fournis in 1932 to over 2.7


- 6 -





FOS-12


billion in 1937. This increase has been due in part to reduced production
in this country and the reduction in accumulated stocks, and in part to an
improvement in demand resulting in increased consuruption as well as in higher
prices. It is quite likely that in vi-w of larger roncuction, increased
stocks, and lower prices, imports in 1998 will be materially less than in
1937.

Preliminary estimates of imports of fats and oils in the calendar
year 1937 indicate that nt imports of all vegetable oils plus average oil
equivalent of imported oleaginous raw materials amounted to about 2,550,000,000
pounds, or nearly 100 million pounds nmoe tian in ].935, the highest previous
year. Exports and s:'ip1r.nts cf lard amiournted to only 163 million pounds, and
imports of other animal fats vrerc of considerable volume, therefore het ex-
ports of all animal fats totaled only about 29 million pounds. This makes a
grand total of about ,500,0:0,000 pounds of n.t imports cf all vegetable
and animal fats and oils and oil equi.ivalnt of raw M:terials, compared with
about 2,000,000,000 pounds in 1936. The major part of the incrupas is made
up of larger imports of fl-xsEed, copra, palm-kernr-l, palm ard cottonseed
oils, and marine animal oils. Small decreases were Ehovr in imports of
sesame seed, rcrilla, rape and sunfiowLr oils, and tallow. Imports of flax-
seed in 1937 were lir~1 r than ever before totaling 29 million busncls. Im-
ports of coconut oil in 132? were- larger than in any year since 1929 and of
copra larger than in any ye-ir since 1933. Imports of palm oil were larger
in 1937 than ever before :ir.ounting to 411 million pounds compared with 339
million in 1936.

The year 1937 mnaks the third consecutive year that total net imports
have passed the 2 billion-pound mark, whereas in the diprcession year of 1932,
total net imoorts amounted to a little over -500 million pounds and in the
boom year of 1929 uamounted to 1,068,000,000 pounds. Going- back to 1924,
when njt exports and shipments of' i,rd Plone- amounted to 986 million pounds,
the total net exports of animal fsts -.xceeded total net imports of vegetable
oils and oil equivalent by 82 million pounds.


- 7 -






FOS-12 -

Table 2.- Production of fats and oils from domestic and imported
materials, average 1930-33, annual 1929, 1934-37

Item : 199 : ra: -- --Eve"
Item 19 1930-3f 1934 1935 1936 I: 1937 1i
al: 1 I. ~ia1k. M1_i lb. MiL. lb Mi. lb. Mil. lb.

Cottonseed oil .......: 1,584 1,501 1,224 '1,181 1,247 1,629
Coconut oil ..........: 353 318 297 253 258 266
Scybean oil ..........: 11 30 35 105 225 194
Corn oil ..............: 134 117 115 100 127 126
Peanut oil ...........: 16 16 47 45 70 51
Castor oil ...........: 76 45 42 47 65 69
Sesame oil ...........: g 26 9 65 51 5
Babassu oil ............ -- -- 2/ 10 39 33
Palm-kernel oil ..: -- 11 23 12 40
Other 3/ ............: 1 2 7 28 26 2

Linseed oil ..........: 764 442 371 502 456 665

Butter ...............: 2,140 2,242 2,253 2,184 2,152 (2,134)
Lard .................: 2,405 2,311 2,063 1,250 1,661 (1,400)
Tallow, inedible h/..: 535 601 745 442 o60 625
Grease ....... ...... 387 341 343 259 308 302
Marine animal oili T 116 100 226 240 301 255
Edible fat ........ 235 202 197 194 249 198
Inedible fat I_ .....: 16 12 12 16 13 12


Total .............: S,810 8,317 7,939 6,944 7,868 (8,005)
Total, excluding
lard and butter : 4,234 3,764 3,673 3,510 4,0514 4,471

j Preliminary.
SOil equivalent of imported seed.
jj Includes rape, olive edible, kapok, hem seed, perilla, and mustard oils when
reported. Does not include unnamed miscellaneous items.
/ Estimates, based on factory consumption, .rade, and stocks.
Marine mammal, fish, and fish-liver oils.
SIncludes oleo oil, oleostearine, oleo stock, and edible tallow.
7J In-ludes wool grease and neatsfoot oil.

Factory Frnduction, Bureau of the Census, Animal and Vegetable Fats and Oils,
except as otherwise noted.

Leaders (---) indicate less than half a million pounds or not separately reported.

Items have been rounded to "million pounds" without adjustment to totals.




FOS-12
ii


Table 3.- Imports of fats and oils and oilseeds (oil equivalent)
imported for crushirng, 1929-7


Item


: Mil.
Animal: : lb.
Marine anim l 2/ ..........: 133
Tallow 3,. .................: 17
Butter ....................: 3
Wool grease ...............: 11
Oleostearine 4... ............ 2
Total animal ............: 171
Vegetable oils:
Palm oil ..................: 262
Coconut oil ...............: 412
Copra (oil equivalent) ....: 360
Coconut oil 'nd copra ...: 772
Cottonseed oil ............: ---
Rape oil ......... ...... : 19
Rapeseed (oil equivalent)..:
Rapeseed oil and rape-
seed s/ .............. : 19
Olive oil, edible ......... : 97


Peanut oil ................
Corn oil ..................
Sesame oil ................
Sesame seed(oil equivalent)
Sesame oil and sesai.e see
Babaseu nuts(oil equiva-
lent) 9/ ................
Soybean oil ...............
Teaseed oil ...............
Sunflower oil .............
Palm-kernel oil ...........
Palm-kernels(oil equivalent
Palm-kernel oil and palm
kernels .................
Castor oil ................
Castor beans(oil equivalent
Castor oil nrd pastor bea
Olive oil, inedible .......
Olive oil foots ...........
Linseed oil ...............
Flaxseed(oil equivalent)...
Linseed oil and flaxs- ed.
Tung oil ..................
Perilla oil 10/ ..........
Hempseed(oil equivalent)
9/ 11/ .................
Other vegetale oils and
oilseeds 12/ ............
Total vegetable oils .......
Total oil equivalent of
oilseeds .................
Grand total ................


M 1.
lb.
127
1
2
8
1


1931: 1932:


Mil1.
iu.
144
1
2
5
2


Mil.
lb.
95
1
1
4
1


1936-; 1937
1933: 194: 195 19 193
bTil. Ii]. Mii MRi 1. Mil.
lb. lb. ib. lb. lb.
96 59 79 94 123
43 246 78 15
1 1 23 10 11
4 5 6 7
2 11 5 4


140 151 IC1 1C2 110 364 194 157

237 253 217 297 156 298 339 411
218 325 249 316 315 353 322 337
275 289 286 416 252 286 229 339


693

16


16


614 535 732 567 639 551 676


11 7


5/9 6/177 6/136 6/207
12 7/(20) 60 63 6
(7) (6) ---


11 7 12 7/(20)


93 70
16 15


: 5


6-i
t)--


(67) (69) 6


74 72
1 1

9 19
9 19


d 30 36 63 9 19 10 66 56 44

:(10) 36 35
: 19 5 --- 4 3 14 7 22
7 6 27
S--- 28 12 28 18 77 25 ---
S 70 39 23 2 13 13 59 20 139
--- 7 16 13 7 4 2' 12 40

: 70 46 39 15 20 17 1 33 179
: --- --- --- 1 I --- ---. --- 1
74 43 13 35 48 .9 32 69 62
ns 74 43 43 36 43 39 33 69 62
1 0 1 1 1 13 10 20 12 5
S 46 63 37 46 40 6 34 17 22
: 0 2 --- --- 11 3 2 1
S448 23- 6P 116 255 262 325 284 518
: 458 236 268 146 L67 265 327 285 518
: 120 12 79 76 119 110 120 125 175
: 9 13 17 23 26 73 119 44

: (2) (17) (14) ---

: 1 --- 1 --- 3 6 13
:1,107 1,005 378 716 951 799 1,432 1,350 1,585

: 890 685 679 489 746 572 768 704 998
:2,169 1,827 1,710 1,306 1,799 1,471 2,564 2,248 2,739


Continued -


--


1929 1930


- 9 -






FOS-12


- 10 -


Table 3.- Imports of fats and oils and oilseeds (oil equivalent) imported for
crushing, 1929-37 Continued




i] Preliminary.
2/ !.!arine animal, fish, and fish-liver oils.
Edible and inedible not separately reported prior to April 1936.
Includes oleo oil.
Reported as edible.
bCrude and refined converted to crude basis.
j Estimated imports of rapeseed oil, based on stocks in bonded warehouses.
Imported seed have been mostly used for planting. No crushings of rapeseed
have been reported, but it is known that some was crushed in 1935 and 1936.
Estimates of 7 million pounds in 1935 and 6 million 'ourids in 1936 are based
on the excess of imports over previous averages.
/ Includes less than 50z0, OC0 rounds imported oil.
J Includes 1 million *ourds oil equivalent of imported perilla seed in 1934,
1935, and 1936.
uJ Reported factory consurition. Prior to 193h hempseed was used largely for
pur-oses other than crushing,. See Statistical BRlletin To. '9.
/ Includes oiticica, kapok, and cashew nut shell oils, vegetable tallow, and
kapok seed and oil equivalents of crushings of mustard seed. Does not in-
clude miscellaneous unnamed itens. It is believed that imported poppy seed
is not crushed in the United States. Im-orts of cottonseed are negligible.

Leaders (---) indicate less than 500,000 pounds or not separately reported.

Items have been rounded to "million pounds" without adjustment as to totals.

Oilseeds have been converted into oil equivalents, using the following conversion
factors: copra 63 percent, rapeseed 5 percent, palm kernels 5 percent,
flaxseedi J percent, castor beans 42 percent, sesame seed 5 percent, babassu
nuts 63 percent, hempseed 4 percent, kapok seed 1_ percent, perilla seed
Z percent, and mustard seed 2 percent.

Imports for consumption beginning 1934. Prior to 1953 general imports or imports
for 'onsiswption as available. See Statistical Bulletin No. 59.

Compiled from Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States, and Monthly
Summary of Foreign Commerce.







- 11 -


Table 4.- Exports of fats and oils, 1929-37


Item 1929 1930: 1931; 193? 1933 3: 19 : 1935 :19367J:l937I
: Mill lA.il Mi." Mi.i..i l.2 Mi... ..


Cocorut oil ./
Soybean oil
Cottonseed oil 2_
Other 3/

Total

Lard 4/
Inedible fat 5j
Edible fat _
Butter 4/


Total


S 67 61 49 S5 66 45 23 27 24

866 674 601 576 612 hgS 115 137 163
S 66 72 7T 59 77 b3 19 17 7
: 0 69 65 00 56 3S 14 15 11
7 7 7 6 7 7 6 6 6


: 1,020 22 750 7l1 751 566 155 175 186


Grand tootl


8s4 799


786 s17 611 17E 202 210


I/ Preliminary.
j Crude plus refined in terms of crude.
3 Includes corn, castor and linseed oils.
SExnorts, including shipments to noncontiguous territory.
Grease, inedible tallow, nentsfoot oil and marine animal oil.
Oleo oil, oleostearine, oleo stock ani edible tallow.

Table 5.- Exrorrs of soybeans as beans and in terms
of oil eq.iivalent. 1931-37

Item : Unit : 1'1 : 192 133 19: 3' .1 5. i9 1937
______ s __ l __ \ __ '" '_ __-___, _.


Soybeans


Oil equivalent


: Thou. bu.

Mil. lb. :


133 4,223 256 19 1,570 1,920 1,271


1 35 2 2/ -


13 16 11


Lj Preliminary.
2j Lees than 500,0001.


FOS-12






FOS-12 12 -


Table 6.- Imrorts and expor's of primary fats and bils, United States, 1934-37

(Net exports are indicated by a minus sicn)

Imports and exports : 1934 : 1935 : 1936 1J 1937 I]


Imports
Animal .....................
Vegetable
Oil .....................
Oil equivalent of raw
material ...... .......

Total imports ..............

Exports
Animal .....................
Vegetable
Oil .....................
Oil equivalent of raw
material ..............

Total exports ..............

ITet imports or net exports
Animal .....................
Vegetable
Oil ....................
Oil equivalent of raw
material ..............

Total net imports ..........


I/ Preliminary.


It should be noted that
oils reported separately and do
Commerce as "other".


fil. lb.
110

799

572


1,471


h44

572


i b. i.l _a. Mil. lb.

64 194 157

1,432 1,350 1,585


768


2,564


155


1,410

755

2,?73


70o4


998


2,739


175

27

16

218


1,323

6S

2,030


24

11

220


-29

1,560

987

2,519


the above totals are for primary fats and
not include items reported by the Bureau of


For earlier years see table 9 in United States Department of Agri-
culture Statistical Bulletin, No. 59.






FOS-12






Table 7.-


- 13 -


Fats and oils and oil. equivTalent of raw materials:
Stocks in United States, December 71, 1930-37


Fat or oil, including:
oil equivalent : 1930
of raw material
: Mil.
: lb.

Cottonseed oil ......: 873

Coconut oil .........: 234


: 1931


lb.


192

Mil.
lb.


1933

Miil.
lb.


1934 : 1955 : 1936 : 1937

i i. bi i. Mil Mil.
Ib. Ib. Ib. lb.


1,073 1,330 1,397 989 822 985 1,133


236 171 275 202 204


90 250


Tallow, inedible,
and grease ........:


219


Marine arimal oil ...: 139

Lard, including
neutral ..........: 51

Linseed oil .........: 195

Other 1/ ........... 5333


Total .......... :2,158


254 258 352 400 360 305 271

239 197 159 242 214 216 201


51 41 133

223 180 206


53 146


149 226 170 252


352 319 394 391 496 472 590


2,433 2,4196 2,909 2,496 2,375 2,384 2,800


1
/ I
includes lm lm-k ne


. tIn n c 1 1c. n rli c.


n f. on it


I Ia ,t I I I rLl) yr, jY p -=, oUIL 1, j n o eL, I LnL, VCL yL L ,
castor, rape, sesame, and sunflower oils, vegetable tallow, oleo oil, ol-o-
stearine, neat.foot oil, lard compounds, hydrogenated oils, red oil, lard
oil, and tallow oil, .-tc; excludes butter.

In some casus reported stocks include stocks in bonded warehouses not yet
reported in imports for consumption.







FOS-12


- 14 -


Table 8.- Oleomargarine: Mate.rials used in manufacture, United States,
annual, 1934-37


: Ana : Percentage of
: _total fats
Item
1934 1975 1936 1937 1935 1936 1937
:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.:Percent Percent Percent


Ol o cil .........: 21,A72 18,227 18,330 1,748:
Lard, neutral .... 7,486 3,005 2,199 3,345:
Oleostearine .....: 3,478 2,612 3,550 12,240:
Oleo stock .......: 1,454 2,390 1,930 1,303:
Butter ...........: 11 1 -
Total animal ...: 34,301 26,255 26,0C3 19,;36:
Cottonseed oil ...: 54,773 99,-04 108,106 171,667:


Peanut oil .......: 2,"44 4,369 4,140
Soybean oil ......: 24 1,740 14,?.61
Corn oil .........: 4 52 1,3q
Total domestic
vegetable 2/..: 57,550 105,34' 1i7,745
Babassu oil ......: 1, 1,14
Coconut oil ......: 13 ,678 174,515 150,465
Palm oil .........: 66 3 1,4C0O
Palm-kernel oil ..: 4L5 2,401
Rape oil .........: 9
Sunflower oil ....: 100 5
Sesame oil .......: 7 58
Ouricuri oil .....: 442


2,797:
31,579:
1,744:

207. 97:
141. -,6:
73,-,37:
1,063:
7,946:


1-:
-:
I:
-:


6
1
1
1
1/

32
1
1/


33
1
56

1/


8


Other per-
centages z/ ...
Total foreign
vegetable /..
Total fats and
oils 5/ ......


Milk .............
Other misc. .....:


: : 1 1 1/

: 12 ,745 17f,798 1"0,:94 97,053: 58 53 30

215,596 303, 679 324,648 323,476: 100 100 100
:636 7220


. 1,903
16,. ,,19


Grand total ...: 2'-ii119


9 ,".5 76,306 72,260:
22,. .O 21,286 18,'44:


414,505 42?,4?0 393,?70:


1/ Less than onc.-.:. of one percent. 2/ Ordinar
3/ Includes corn, sunflower, scsare, palm, ouricuri, a
/ Never domr.stically prolc'l:l .
5/ Includes ve.-etabl: oil (unnraLd) in 1934 and 1935.


ily dcmr stically produced.
nd rare oils.


Compiled and corputcd from rcnorts of the Comrl-ssioner of Internal Revenue.
Percentages have been arbitrarily adjusted to iqual 100.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
S111111112I HlllllllllM
3 1262 08904 2765


1
1
4
1/
--- k
6
52
1
10
1


64
5
23
1/


--


----


1


i