The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00020
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00020

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASH I NGTON
o08-27. .... 9*- 15; i939

mm-----mm----mm me---------------------me
THE FATS AND O I LS S I T U Oi N

--------------- ----------- -- t -- -






ESTIMATED CONSUMPTION OF PRIMARY FATS
AND OILS IN FOODS AND FOOD PRODUCTS,
UNITED STATES, 1938


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE





FnS-27


Table 1.- Price. per pound of specified fats and oils, March-April, 1938-39
St i .I- -I1 J '. : 1939
Fat or oil .199
Mar. Apr Mar. Apr.
Cents Cents Cents Cnts
Don ts1 priCt.s -
Butter, 92 score, N. Y. : 3.33 27.74 24.30 23,11
Oleomargarine, domestic vegetable, Chicago: 15.12 15.50 14.50 14.50
Lard, prime steam, Chicago : 8.76n 8.21n 6.53n 6.33
Lard, refined, Chicago : 9.95 9.35 7.52 7.28
Lard conoound, Chicago : 10.20 10.34 9.25 9.25
Coconut oil, edible, i. Y. : 6.06 5.55 4.38 4.38
Cottonseed oil, crude, f.o.b. S. E. mills : 7.03n 6.93 5.78 5.53n
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., N. Y. 8.20 8,20 6.90
Soybean oil, refined, N. Y. : 9.25 8,75 7.50 7,50
Peanut oil, donastic refined, N. Y. :10.24 10.14 9.12 8.98
Raoe oil, refined, N. Y. : 11.96 11.60 10.80 10.80
Oleo oil, No. 1, N. Y. 9.19 8.90 8.19 8.10
Oleostearine, barrels, N, Y. : 7.56 6.72 6.62 6.22

Corn oil, refined, N. Y. 10.16 9.68 8.88 8.88
live oil, edible, N. Y. :26.00 25.73 25.07 25.07
Teasned oil, crude, N. Y. : .38 7.65 8,94 9.48

Coconut oil, crude, Pacific Coast 3.62 3,10 2.89 2.79
Tallow, inedible, Chicago : 5.03 4.65 5.14 5.:e
Grease, house, N. Y. 4.60 4.05 4.94 4.84
Palm oil, crude, N. Y. : 4.14 3.83 3.82 3.82
Ilive oil foots, barrels, N. Y. 8.94 8.60 7.03 6.99
Palm-kernel oil, denatured, N. Y. 4.12n 3.97 3.45n 3.43n
Babassu oil, tanks, N. Y. : 6.68 6.45n 6.12n 6.12n
Sardine oil, tanks, Pacific Coast : 6.20 5.44 4.07n 4.45n

Linseed oil, raw, Minnraoolis 9.57 9.30 8.58 8.70
Tung oil, druns, N. Y. : 13.28 12.50 15.16 16.05n
Perilla oil, druns, N. Y. :10.62 10.62 9.67 9,68
Soybean oil, crude, f.o.b. mills 6.40 5.92 4.91 4.72
Menhaden oil, crude, f.o.b. Baltimore 4.92n 4.67n 4.07n 4.21.

Foreign prices li
Cotton oil, crude, naked, Hull : 4.23 3.82 3.67 2/3.59
Copra, Resecada, Philippine Islands : 1.58 1.24 2/1.29
Palm-kernel oil, crude, Hull : 4.34 4.14 3.72 2/3.66
Whale oil, crude, No. 1, Rotterdam ./ : .14 3.r3 3.16 2/3.20
Tallow, beef fair-fine, London : 4.51 4.39 3.87 2/3.99
Linseed oil, naked, Hull 6.04 5.61 5.10 2/5.08


Converted to U. S. cents p.r pound at current monthly rats of exchange.
Preliminary,
, Beginning March 1, 1939, prices are for "crude, No. 1, ex, tank, Rotterdam,
minimum 500 ton lots."


- 2 -






OS-7 3 -

THE FATS AND OILS SITUATION



During the past 3 calendar years, the estimated disappear-

ance of 35 primary fats and oils in the United States has totaled

more than 9 billion pounds annually. About 67 percent of this

total was used for food purposes, either directly as butter and

lard and salad oils, or in manufactured products such as vegetable

cooking fats, oleomargarine, mayonnaise and many other commodities.

The soap industry utilized about 18 percent of the total

fats and oils consumed. Paints, varnishes, linoleum, oilcloth, etc.,

probably accounted for at least 7 percent. This leaves about 8 per-

cent distributed among all the other consuming outlets.

The chart on the cover page shows the estimated percentages

contributed by the various fats used as food in 1938. The tables

appearing in this issue show total quantities and percentages of

individual fats and oils reported as used in factory manufacture of

cooking fats, oleomargarine, soap, paint, varnish, linoleum, and

oilcloth.

In the April 1939 issue of the Fats and Oils Situation, data

were presented showing factory consumption and total disappearance

of the major individual fats and oils, by classes of products.


: Flaxsend Prices and the Tariff is the title of :
:a report prepared by the Bureau of Agricultural Eco- :
:nomics for the United States Senate. This report, :
:published as Senate Document No. 62, 76th Congress, t
:lst Session, was made in response to Senate Resolution!
:No. 167. 75th Congress.





FOS-27


RECENT CHANGES IN DOMESTIC PRODUCTION AMD
CONSUMPTION OF FATS AND OILS

Significant changos in the domestic production and consumption
of fats and oils in recent years have included: (1) a marked reduction
in lard production and an increased production of compounds and vege-
table cooking fats, (2) a marked decrease in the proportion of coconut
oil used in the manufacture of margarine and a corresponding increase
in the proportion of cottonseed oil so used, and (3) marked increases
in the production and consumption of soybean oil.

Lard production on the increase

Lard production was reduced sharply by the drastic curtailment
in hog slaughter from 1934 to 1937. Over a period of years the per
capital consumption of lard and of compounds and vegetable cooking fats,
taken together, has remained nearly constant at about 22 pounds. With
the drop in lard production, the quantity of other fats and oils used
in the manufacture of compounds and vegetable cooking fats, which totaled
1,215 million pounds in 1934, increased to i,614 million pounds in 1936,
and in 1938 totaled 1,512 million pounds.

Production of lard under Federal inspection in 1938 reached
1,076 million pounds, the largest since 1934. Both the number of hogs
slaughtered and average yield of lard per hog for 1939 are expected to
be greater than in 1938, and it seems likely that inspected lard pro-
duction this year will total close to 1,300 million pounds. This would
compare with 662 million pounds in 1935, the smallest in many years,
and a 5-year (1929-33) average of 1,618 million pounds.

Storage holdings of lard on January 1 this year, totaling 107 mil-
lion pounds, were the second largest for that date since 1934, and were
considerably larger than the 1929-33 average holdings for January 1 of
62 million pounds. Net exports of lard, including shipments to non-
contiguous territories of the tUited States, are expected to be somewhat
larger this year than the 234 million pounds exported in 1938. They
probably will continue much below the 1929-33 average net exports of 666
million pounds, however, chiefly because of the sharp reduction in tak-
ings by Germany since that period. If exports of lard total no more than
300 million pounds this year, supplies of lard for domestic consumption
are likely to be about 100 million pounds in excess of those in the
1929-33 period and about 200 million pounds larger than those of 1938.
And domestic lard supplies in 1940 are likely to be even larger than
those in 1939.

With increased lard supplies this year and next compared with
those of the past few years, it is probable that the use of fats and oils
other than lard for compounds and vegetable cooking fats, particularly
cottonseed oil, will be reduced,


- 4-





7Os-27


- 5-.


More cottonseed oil used in margarine

A sharp decrease in the proportion of coconut oil used in the
manufacture of margarine has taken place in recent years, chiefly be-
cause of excise taxes levied in various States on margarine containing
imported oils, and because of the imposition in 1934 of a Federal excise
tax of 3 cents per pound on coconut oil from the Philippines. In 1933,
coconut oil made up 75 percent of the total fats and oils used in the
manufacture of margarine, but the percentage of coconut oil in margarine
was reduced to 57 percent in 1934 and to 29 percent in 1938. The per-
centage of cottonseed oil used in making margarine, on the other hand,
increased from 9 percent in 1933 to 25 percent in 1934, and to 46 percent
in 1938.

Soybean oil also has been substituted, in part, for coconut oil in
margarine. Until 1936, only negligible quantities of soybean oil were
used in making margarine. But in 1938, soybean oil made up 13 percent of
the total fats and oils so used.

Production of cottonseed oil in the calendar year 1938 was the
largest in 11 years. With cotton production in 1938 much smaller than
the record crop of 1937, however, the quantity of cottonseed available
for crushing front January through July 1939 is considerably smaller than
in the corresponding period of 1938. Hence it is probable that the pro-
duction of cottonseed oil in 1939 will be smaller than in 1938, even if
cotton production this year should prove to be larger than that of last
year. Stocks of cottonseed oil on January 1, 1939, were reported to be
almost 100 million pounds larger than a year earlier. Factory production
of crude cottonseed oil for the first quarter of 1939 was reported to be
391 million pounds, compared with 595 million pounds for the first quarter
of 1938.

Although supplies of cottonseed oil this year are somewhat smaller
than a year ago, the demand for cottonseed oil for use in vegetable cook-
ing fats is weaker because of the increased amount of lard available for
domestic consumption. Prices of both lard and cottonseed oil thus far in
1939 have been lower than those of corresponding months in 1938. (See
table 1.)

Marked increase in soybean oil production

With increased plantings and crushings of soybeans, the production
of soybean oil in the United States increased from 11 million pounds in
1929 to 322 million pounds in 1938, with most of the increase occurring
after 1934. Domestic soybean production in 1938 was the largest on record,
with 58 million bushels of beans harvested compared with 45 million bushels
in 1937 and 9 million bushels in 1929. A further increase in soybean pro-
duction is in prospect this year. Production of soybean oil in 1939 prob-
ably will total considerably more than the record oil production of 1938,
and production may increase again in 1940. Prices of soybean oil have been
lower than those of a year earlier thus far in 1939.




FOS-27 6-

Table 2.- Oleomargarine: Production and materials
United States, February and March, 1938-39


used in manufacture,


Item 1938 : 1939 9I
: Feb. : Mar. : Feb. : Mar.


:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.


1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.


Oleo oil
Oleostearine
Lard neutral.
Oleo stock
Total animal

Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Peanut oil
Corn oil


Total domestic

Coconut oil
Babassu oil
Palm-kernel oil
Rice oil 3/


911
248
146
72


S 1,377


16,792
2,756
318
41


vegetable g/


1,353
264
155
109


1,881


16,327
2, 514
525
*4


1,289
228
115
132


1,764


9,412
4,395
194
62


1,326
271
112
95


1,804


9,678
5,452
203
51


19,907 19,370 14,063 15,384


: 6,431
S 1,099
528
: --


9.555
1,145
1,238
17


5,295
1,168
44


4,729
1,596
173


Total foreign vegetable 4/


Total fats and oils


Milk .
Salt and other miscellaneous


Production of oleomargarine


S,05S 11,955 6,507 6,498

29,342 33,206 22,334 23,686

6,949 7,605 5,422 5,861
1,644 1,773 1,256 1,316


36,201 40,961


27,701


29,417


I/. Preliminary.
?/ Ordinarily domestically produced.
SBureau of the Census; probably oil imported from Japan.
SNot domestically produced.



Compiled and computed from Bureau of Internal Revenue records and Internal
Revenue Bulletin.


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- 11 -


Table 4.-Compounds and vegetable cooking fats: Factory consumption
expressed in percentages, of fats and oils used in production
of these foods, United States, 1912-38


Item


Vegetable -
Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Peanut oil
Corn oil
Total domestic

Coconut oil
Other 1/
Total foreign

AnImal
Tallow, edible
Oleostearine
Lard /
Oleo oil
Total animal
oils


1912 1914
Pct. Poct.
I U
91.7 a 92.2
I .1
.2 .2


1916
Pot.


1.4
1.7


1917
Pet.

87.5
2.8
1.0


1918 1920
Pet. : Pet.

83.0 : 30.1
4.6 : 2.3
2.3 6.4


1921
Pet.

06.6
i.0
1.9
I,


1922
Pot.

84.7

1.3


.
-2 I: e .9 .4 1.0 .*
S91.9 _9_2.5 : 92.5 91.6 90.1 : 89. 89.9 87.8 86.0

.5 1.1-: 1.3 .4 2.1 2.
.7 .5 : 1.8 2.5 3.2 .9 .9 1.1 1.1
: .7 ~ .5 1.8. 3.0 4.3 2.2 1.3 3.2 3.9



G 6.1 : 5.6 4.5 4.5 : 5.5 5.7 5.7 5.7
* .2 .1 : .1 .1 .2 : 1.3 1.8 1.5 .9
S .1 .4 .4

: 7.4 7.o0 3 5.6 8.1 8.S 9.0 10.1
1 I ;


Total fats and oils:100.0 :100.0 :100.0 100.0
; 6 3


100.0 :100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
!


I/ Includes vegetable stearine, miscellaneous vegetable oils, including sesame,
sunflower, and hydrogenated oils, when reported. Palm oil is included in
this group, 1912-23. Beginning 1931, includes unnamed vegetable oils
reported as "other".
2/ Quoted as "pork fat and lard", 1912-29.
3/ Less than one-tenth of one percent.



Computed from table 3. See that table for explanatory notes.


Continued -


08o-27






FOS-27


Table 4.-Compounds and vegetable cooking fatst Factory consumption,
expressed in percentages, of fats and oils used in production


of these foods, United States,


1912-38 Contd


Item

Vegetable -
Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Peanut oil
Corn oil
Linseed oil
Total domestic

Palm oil
Coconut oil
Seseme oil
Rape oil
Babassu oil
Palm-kernel oil
Sunflower oil
Perilla oil
Other 1/
Total foreign

Animal and marine -
Tallow, edible
Oleostearino
Lard
Oleo oil

Marine animal
oils
Total animal
and marine
oils


1929 1931
SPet. a Pet.

* 88.s8 76.9
i .9
3 a .5
I I .5


1932


Pot.

86.1
.5
.4
.3


I -_ -
a 8.8 : 78.8 87.3


1933


Pot.

87.7
.1
.3
.1


88.2


1934


Pet.

87.2
.2
.7
.2


1935
Pot.

63
3.4
5.9
.2


S,
SS.) 7).4


* 1936 '
Pot.


1937
Pot.


56.9 72.5
7.1 5.7
5.5 3.6
/ .1
-6q. .1
69.5 820n


1938
Pot.

6s.s
68.8
9.5
3.4

3/
81.7


I I
S .1 : 2.9 2.3 2.2 1.4 7.6 10.5 7.7 7.6
, 1.6 2.8 .9 .7 .7 2.8 2.4 .8 1.7
g 2.8 .8 .6 .4 2.2 2.0 1.8 .4
S / 1.0 1.9 .3 3/
* -. .3 3/ .1
, -- .1 3/ 3/ 3/
S : .3 .1 .7 -
S 3/- -
S .1 : 1.5 .1 .1 .8 1.0 .1
S1.8 10.0 4.1 4.0 2.7 15.2 18.1 10.6 9.9


: 2.1 :
I 3.6
: 1.9
2 .6 :
I :


5.8
2.3
.7
.8


4.7
1.8
.6
.1


S1.2
I 1.2 i 1.6


4.8
1.8
.3


6.0
1.8
.2
.1


7.8 7.3
1.7 2.3
.1 .3
L/ .1


4.2
1.9
3/.
3/


4.9
2.2
.2
3


.9 .9 1.8 2.5 1.3 1.1


S9.4 11.2 s.6 7-8 9.0


11.4 12.4


7.4 8.4


Total fats and oilslO00.0 :100.0 100.0 100.0 .00.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


I


I .I


--


--


- 12 -





- 13 -


Table 5.- Oleomargarine: Materials used in manufacture, United States,
calendar years, 1922-38

Item 1922 1923 1924 1925 : 1926 1927
:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1.000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 1b. 1.000 lb


Oleo oil
Oleostearine
Lard neutral
Oleo stock
Butter
Edible tallow
Total animal

Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Pearnt oil
Corn oil
Mustard oil
Vegetable stearine P/
Misc. vegetable oil 2/
Total domestic
vegetable 3]

Coconut oil
Palm-kernel oil
Palm oil
sesamee oil
Sunflower oil
Total foreign
vegetable h_

Total fats and oils


Milk
Salt and
Total


other misc.


Grand total


:41,523 50,222 49,369
: 4,621 5,015 5,335
: 26,952 31-205 29,836
: 1,987 2,557 3,048
:1,187 1,751 1,764
: --- 40 32
76,270 90,790 89,384

: 14,869 20,457 20,338
: --- --- 1
: 8,164 5955 5,096
: --- 232 413
: --- 62 25
: --- --- 1
861 52 --

:23,894 26,758 25,873

53,763 75,914 83,258
: --- 46
: -- -- 15
: --- 195 422


S53,763 76,155 83,695

:153,927 193,703 198,952


: 65,109 66,766
_: -- 19,6n7 19,572

8!,s8o6 86,338

7: 275,509 285,290


45,582 46,797 49,508
5,281 5,169 5,387
25,199 24,168 24,960
3.375 2,678 2,082
1,701 2,265 2,326
156___ 46 __219
81,294 81,123 s4,482


24,_26 23,448 24,621
33 --
4,823 5,239 4,682
51 274 82
29 38 45
13 -


29,242 29,032 29,430

90,914 97,642 122,576
165 165 67
794 748 602
--- 277 51
68

91.873 98,>00 123,296

202,409 209,055 237,208


68,879 71,172 76,235
20,277 20,520 23,637

89,156 91,692 99,87;

291,565 300,747 337,080


Continued -





- 14 -


FOS-27


Table 5.-Oleomargarine: Materials used in manufacture, United States,
calendar years, 1922-38 Cont'd

Item 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933
:1,000 1b. 1.000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.


Oleo oil
Oleostearine
Lard neutral
Oleo stock
Butter
Edible tallow
Whale oil
Total animal

Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Peanut oil
Corn oil
Mustard oil
Total domestic
vegetable 3/

Coconut oil
Palm-kernel oil
Palm oil
Sesame oil
TotrJ foreign
vogotoablo 4/

Total fats and oils


44,795
5,658
25,722
1,440
2,566
61

80,242


48,226
6,134
22,628
1,168
2,996
22


38,916
6,024
14,905
1,275
1,687
6


18,786
4,884
9,665
814
330
-


12,145
3,684
9,415
470
39


15,095
3,120
8,959
829
7


I- 1 1/
81,174 62,813 34,480 26,061 28,01


0


, 26,931 30,173 27,448 16,028 15,098 17,997
S1/ 11 2,255 622 3 7
: 6,329 6,307 5,787 4,598 2,511 2,635
S 21 159 51 54 341
S 28 28 37 37 1/ -

S33.309 36.519 35.686 21.336 17.666 20.980
1


: 159,852

S 1,169
: 5


185,507
1
1,523


177,990
3
861
52


133,118

2,428
253


123,219

261


150,096

544


178,906 135,799 12),480 100,640


: 161,112 187,031

: 274,663 304,724


277,405 191,615 167,207 199,630


Milk : 93,493
Salt and other misc.: 26.604


Total


' 120,097 1


Grand total


: 394,760


98,84o 90,201 61,519 49,044
29.320 27,640 17.549 12.991
L28,160 117,841 79,068 62,035


432,884 395,246 270,683 229,242 272,893


Continued -


58,417
14.806
73,223


--------




- 15 -


Table 5.-Oleomargarine:


Materials used in manufacture, United States,


calendar years, 1922-38 Cont'd


Item : 1934 : 1935 : 1936 : 1937 '1938 Prel.


1,000 lb.


1,000 lb.


1,000 lb.


Oleo oil
Oleostearine
Lard neutral
Oleo stock
Butter
Total animal

Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Peanut oil
Corn oil
Soybean stearine
Vegetable stearine 2/
Total domestic
vegetable V/

Coconut oil
Babassu oil
Palm-kernel oil
Palm oil
Sesame oil
Sunflower oil
Ouricuri oil
Rape oil
Rice oil 8/
Total foreign
vegetable 4/

Total fats and oils


Milk
Salt and other misc.
Total

Grand total


21,872
3,478
7,486
1,454
11


18,227
2,612
3,005
2,390
1


18,330
3,550
2,199
1,930
-


12,278
3,375
1,748
1,318
-


13,411
3,282
1,464
1,532


S 34,301 26,235 26,009 18,719 19,689

i 54,778 99,504 108,106 173,617 142,858
S 24 1,740 14,261 31,791 39,885
: 2,744 4,369 4,140 2,880 3,593
: 4 32 1,238 1,796 566
- 18
: __ 9
:9

: 6/57.551 7/105.685 127.745 210.084 186.929

: 123,678 174,315 150,465 73,806 89,520
:- 1,838 16,114 14,607 11,547
S- 425 2,401 7,946 4,746
: 66 3 1,400 1,063 l/
: 77 58 1
: 100 5 -
: 442 -
; 9 -
:- 69

: 12 J I 176.758 170.894 97.423 105.882

:6/215,596 1/308,678 324,648 326,226 312,500


: 61,903 83,307 76,386 72,?46 73,169
: 16,619 22,520 21,386 19.073 18,235
78,522 105,827 3/97,772 91,919 91,404


: 294,118


414,505 2/422,420


418,145 385,020


Continued -


OS-27


1,000 lb.






FOS-27


- 16 -


Table 5.-Oleomargarine: Materials used in manufacture, United States,
calendar years, 1922-38 Cont'd



1/ Not over 500 pounds.

2/ Source does not state whether domestic or foreign. Arbitrarily used as
domestic.

3/ Ordinarily domestically produced.

4/ Not' domestically produced.

5/ Total not computed owing to fact that milk and salt were not reported
for months February-April.

6/ Includes 1,000 pounds vegetable oil unnamedd). Arbitrarily used as
domestic.

7] Includes 40,000 pounds vegetable oil (unnamed). Arbitrarily used as
domestic.

8/ Bureau of the Census; probably oil imported from Jnpan.

2/ Includes 2,000 pounds color. Lss than 500 pounds for each month.



December 1921 is the first month for which monthly data are published
in the Bureau of Internal Revenue publications.

Annual totals on the calendar year basis are not published by the
Bureau of Internal Revenue but are computed by the Bureau of Agricultural
Economics from the monthly data published in the semi-annual cumulations of
the Internal Revenue Bulletin. Totals for the year ending June 30 are pub-
lished in the annual report of the Commiscionor of Internal Revenue.





M B-27


1 *'17 -


Table 6.-l1eomargar~ie Percentage contributed by important items to
the weight of fatal and oils (excluding milk) used in manufacture,
United States, calendar years, 1922-38

Item 1922 : 1923 1924 1925 1926: 1927 : 1928 1929 1930
.. I
: Pect _t. Pe0gt. Pot. Pct. Pct. Pet. Pct. Pct.
Animal
Oleo oil : 27.0 25.9 24.8 22.5 22.4 20.9 16.3 15.8 14.0
Oleostearine : 3.0 2.6 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.3 2.1 2.0 2.2
Lard neutral : 17.5 16,1 15.0 12.5 11.6 10.5 9.4 7.4 5.4
Oleo stock :1.3 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.3 .9 .5 .4 .4
Butter .8 .9 .9 .8 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 .6
Total animal : 9.6 46.8 44,9 40,2 33.9 35.7 29.3 26.6 22.6
Vegetable
Cottonseed oil : 9.7 10.6 10.2 12.0 11.2 10.4 9.8 9.9 9.9
Soybean oil : -- -- / 1 I --- I/ 1 ,8
Peanut oil : 5.3 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.5 2.0 2.3 2.1 2.1
Corn oil -- .1 .2 1/ .1 l/ 1/ -- .1
Total domestic/: 15.5 13.9 13.Q .4 13.8 12.4 12.1 12.0 12.9

Coconut oil : 34.9 39.2 n1.9 4.9 46.7 51.7 58.2 60.9 64.2
Palm-kernel oil : --- i -- .1 1/ IV I/ 1!
Palm oil : --- 1/ .4 .4 .2 .4 .5 .3
Total foreign 39 39. ,1 4.4 .3 51.9 58.6 61. 64.5
Total fats and oils 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

1931 : 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 : 1937 : 1938
: Pot. Pct. Pot. Pet. Pct. Pct. Pot. Pct.
Animal
Oleo oil : 9.8 7.5 7.5 10.1 5.9 5.6 3.8 4.3
Oleostearine : 2.6 2.2 1.6 1.6 .9 1.1 1.0 1.0
Lard neutral 5.0 5.6 4.5 3.5 1.0 .7 -5 .5
Oleo stock .4 .3 .4 .7 .8 .6 .4 .5
Butter .2 1/ 11 1/ l/ ---
Total animal : 18.0 15.6 14.0 15.9 8.6 8.0 5.7 6.3
Vegetable
Cottonseed oil : 8.4 9.0 9.0 25.4 32.2 33.3 53.2 45.7
Soybean oil : .3 1. 6 4.4 9.8 12,8
Peanut oil :2.4 1.5 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.3 .9 1.2
Corn oil I1/ 1/ .2 1/ I/ .4 .6 .2
Total domestic/: 11.1 10.5 10.5 26.7 34.2 39.4 64.5 59.9

Coconut oil : 69.5 73.7 75.2 57.4 56.5 46.4 22.6 28.6
Babassu oil -- --- ---- --- .6 5.0 4.5 3.7
Palm-kernel oil : -- --- --- .1 .7 2.4 1.5
Palm oil : 1.3 .2 .3 1/ 1/ .4 ,3 ---
Total foreign 3]: 70.9 73.9 75.5 57.4 57.2 52.6 29.8 33.8
Total fats and oils :100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 10C.O 100.0 100.0


1/ Less than .05 of one percent.
3 Not domestically produced.


To


2/ Ordinarily domestically produced.


itals include .5 of one percent or less of edible tallow, whale oil, mustard oil,
vegetable stearine, miscellaneous vegetable oil, sesame oil, sunflower oil,
ouricuri oil, rape oil, and rice oil, in certain years. See table 5.





- 18 -


Sa a
n toV)-
000 C
10 CM.




,-- oD (0 ,-,
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- 19 -


Table 8.- Soap:


Fats, oils, and rosin used in manufacture, United States,
specified years, 1912-38


Pat or oil : 1912 : 1914 : 1916 : 1917 : 1919
.


:1,000 lb. 1.000 Ib, 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.


Hard oils (tallow class):
Slow lathering -
Tallow, inedible
Whale and fish oils i/
Grease
Palm oil
Total

Quick lathering -
Coconut oil
Palm-kernel oil
Total

Soft oils:
Cottonseed oil foots
Olive oil, foots and
inedible
Red oil
Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Corn oil
Peanut oil
Miscellaneous soap stodc
Other 2/
Total

Total fats and oils

Rosin
Total saponifiable
materials


I 238,683
: 11,030
: 76,470
S 7,546
2 333,729


78, 616
20.579
99,195


270,713
15,876
84.573
10,000
381,162


77,959
31,376
109.335


338,931
12,852
102,134
14,938
468, 55


111,084
5,804
116,888


362,297
13,308
114,616
27,345
517,566


168, 602
4,762
173,364


326,587
13,555
33,871
17,268
391,281


182,613
4,551
187,164


89,127 108,141 112,178 115,042 108,389


6,147
8,723
132,312
1,182
9,822
31
25,000
35,883


8,046
10,275
119,254
4.499
11,368
76
25,000
41.517


10,595
10,230
194,916
57,373
12,821
1,181
25,000
48,758


12,231
12,812
126,390
124,058
15,997
15,126
25,000
64,094


4,899
24,205
56,130
58,401
2,235
3,055
60, 653
41,111


: 308,227 328,176 473,052 510,750 359,078

: 741,151 818,673 1,058,795 1,201,680 937,523

: (200,000) 185,310 (175,000) (150,000) 119,529

: 941,151 1,003,983 1,233,795 1,351,680 1,057,052


Continued -


>DS-27






0OS-27


- 20 -


Table 8.- Soap: Fats,


oils, and rosin used in manufacture, United States,
specified years, 1912-38 Cont'd


Fat or oil : 1921 : 1922 : 1923 : 1924 : 1925


Hard oils (tallow class):
Slow lathering -
Tallow, inedible
Whale and fish oils Ij/
Grease
Palm oil
Vegetable tallow
Total


1,000 lb.


S373,223
: 37,613
:136,322
: 24,386


1.000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1000 lb.


429,966
90,505
161,985
30,389


412,749
73,269
160,167
102,323
8,5hS


428,881
67,781
292,123
82,250
5,198


390,789
98,940
242,466
119,400
6,424


: 571,544 712,845 777,056 876,233 858,019


Quick lathering -
Coconut oil
Palm-kernel oil
Total


194,.17
593


237,702 267,982
685 3,287


195,010 238,387 271,269


260,000
4,440


286,000
45,037


264,440 331,037


Soft oils:
Cottonseed oil foots
Olive oil, foots and
inedible
Red oil
Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Corn oil
Peanut oil


Miscellaneous
Other 2/


soap stock


76,018 61,966 52,676 77,214 109,824


16,609
13,149
47,935
10,756
2,405

22,104
24,048


21,735
10,431
19,759
2,307
4,941
6,711
21,130
19,169


28,641
12,233
10,824
3,266
5,617
6,900
24,753
22,334


32,024
14,000
10,000
2,500
5,000
5,000
15,000
20,000


49,083
14,000
8,000
2,250
5,000

18,000
20,000


Total

Total fats and oils

Rosin 5/

Total saponifiable
materials


S224,007 168,149 167,244 180,738 226,157

: 990,561 1,119,381 1,195,569 1,321,411 1,415,213

: (oo00,oo) 141,350 143,378 104,956 140,615


: 1,090,561 1,260,731 1,338,947 1,426,367 1,555,828


Continued -





0OS-27


- 21 -


Table 8.- Soap:


Fats, oils, and rosin used in manufacture, United States,
specified years, 1912-38 Cont'd


Fat or oil : 1926 : 1927 : 1928 : 1929 : 1930
___________________, ___ ___ _________________ _______"_______


Hard oils (tallow class):
Slow lathering -
Tallow, inedible
Whale and fish oils 1/
Grease
Palm oil
Vegetable tallow
Total


:1.000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.


430,886
111,673
242,424
100,960
2,477


484,029
135, 549
242,712
112,46o0
5, 6s8


440,943
142,220
261,454
142,363
7,262


434,755
134,107
245,516
192,331
10,211


442,610
113,829
243,944
191,956
6,042


: 888,420 980,438 994,242 1,016,920 998,381


Quick lathering -
Coconut oil
Palm-kernel oil
Total


Soft oils:
Cottonseed oil foots
Olive oil, foots and
inedible
Red oil
Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Corn oil
Peanut oil


Castor oil
Linseed oil
Miscellaneous
Other 2/
Total


soap stock


118,727 147,511 105,206 108,904 103,360


52,206
15,000
5,000
2,500
5,000
3,000


22,000
20,000
243,.433


43,190
15,ooo
7,500
2,500
5,000
2,000


32,000
20,000
279,701


48,060
15,000
20,000
2,500

3,000
3,ooo
----
35,660
20,000
254,426


53,629
15,000
12,000
6,400
5,000
1,700
4,835
1,916
35,112
20,000
264,496


49,842
12,000
7,500
5,000
4,000
1,500
---
---
30,415
15,000
228,617


Total fats and oils


1, 45, 712 1,626,152 1, 634,663 1,68s3, 541 1,559,700


Rosin


Total saponifiable
materials


: 118,257

:1,603,969


100,227


91,269 114,300 109,484


1,726,379 1,725,932 1,802,841 1,669,184


Continued -


270,206
83,653
353,859


334,765
31,248
366,013


335,417
50,578
335,995


334,205
72,920
407,125


303,271
29,431
332,702





FOS-27


- 22 -


Table 8.- Soap: Fats, oils, and rosin used in manufacture, United States,
specified years, 1912-38 Cont'd

Fat or oil 3 1931 : 1932 : 1933 : 1934 : 1935

:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1.000 lb.


Hard oils (tallow class):
Slow lathering -
Tallow, inedible :523,714
Whale and fish oils I/ : 127,095
Grease : 129, 403
Palm Oil 172,228
Tallow, Idible : 1,494
Oleostoarine :53
Lard
Vegetable tallow : 3,256
Total 957,243

Quick lathering -
Coconut oil :340,503
Palm-kernel oil 28,035
Total 369, 538

Soft oils:
Cottonseed oil foots and :
other foots 3/ : 152,000
Olive oil, foots and
inedible 41,076
Soybean oil 3,816
Cottonseed oil : 1,970
Corn oil : 4,104
Castor oil : 2,829
Linseed oil : 1,38
Peanut oil : 244
Sesame oil : 8,197
Oleo oil : 446
Rope oil
Olive oil, edible : 14
Neatsfoot oil 33
Perilla oil --
Tung oil
Sunflower oil --
Other / 233
Total 216, 50
Total fats and oils :1,542,231
Rosin !/ : 119,934
Total saponifiable materials:1,662,165


549,186
98,035
143,724
168,009
1,969
374

511
961, og8


508,824
97,o63
124,743
187,962
2,389
362


662,858
98,544
142,782
154, 704
1,098
452
24


921,343 1,060,462


663,002
138,410
98,086
87,311
1.431
338
1

988,579


353,527 322,264 341,124 229,711
3,565 6,278 16,516 37,173
357,092 328,542 357,640 266,884



152,000 145,000 141,000 191,000

32,789 33,879 32,364 33,197
5,571 4,235 1.354 2,549
3,5S3 6,967 2,702 1,857
2,532. 3,638 6,268 2,828
2,408 2,090 1,786 1,056
985 980 1,022 1,196
290 529 147 754
1,871 758 466 749
260 112 8 93
s9 39 99 8,001
52 61 51 33
27 20 61 33
-16
5 35
--- 7.889 7,142 10
6,059 176 1,836 4,762
20516 206,378 .197, 13 248.227
1,527,416 1,456,263 1,615,415 1,503,690
130,675 132,o086 141,732 139,375
1,658,091 1,588,349 1,757,147 1,643,065


Continued -






- 23 -


POS-27


Table 8.- Soap:


Fats, oils, and rosin used in m.n-.facture, United States,


specified years, 1912-38


.Cont'd


Tat or oil : 1936 : 1937 : 1938


Hard oils (tallow class):
Slow lathering -
Tallow, inedible
Whale and fish oils I/
Grease
Palm oil
Tallow, edible
Oleostearine
Lard
Total

mxick lathering -
Coconut oil
Palm-kernel oil
Babassu oil
Total

Soft oils:
Cottonseed oil foots and
other foots 3/
Olive oil, foots and inedible
Soybean oil
Cottonseed oil
Corn oil
Castor oil
Linseed oil
Peanut oil
Sesame oil
Oleo oil
Rape oil
Olive oil, edible
Neatsfoot oil
Perilla oil
Tung oil
Other 4/
Total
Total fats and oils

Rosin 5/
Total saponifiable materials


1.000 lb.


660,020
160,647
98, 714
78,453
228
320
q


1,000 lb.


613.509
189,009
94,247
141,358
143
321


1,000 lb.


702,267
145,954
96,356
91,642
332
240
1


: 998,391 1,038,587 1,036,792


307,376 252,241 342,982
: 26,443 111,514 29,498
: 8,993 14,308 8,289
: 342,812 378,063 380,769



183,000 183,000 208,000
25,599 18,874 16,312
S 5,023 10,27.4 10,897
S 1,278 8,414 2,883
2,527 2,392 2,514
1,623 2,123 1,810
S 1,482 1,359 1,455
1,734 820 545
1,869 2,944 302
57 74 119
S 7,771 981 55
53 21 31
:41 16 20
8 2
2 -
4,268 10,812 14,031
236,335 242,106 258,974
: 1,577,538 1,658,756 1,676,535

: 14856 136,410 6/ 125,000
: 1,726,741 1,795,166 1,801,535


Continued -






- 24.


Table S.- Soap: Fats oils, and rosin used in manufacture, United itatas,
specified years, 1912-38 cont'd


i/ Includes whale, herring, sardine,'menhaden and other fish oils.

2/ These data are for item reported as miscellaneous (p. 127, U. S. Tariff
Commission Report No. 41), plus difference between iters reported
as domestic animal fats and oils except marine (p. 127) and domestic
tallow, inedible, grease, and red oil (p. 132), 1912-17. Beginning
1919, item reported as miscellaneous only.

3/ Estimated.

4/ Reported as "other vegetable oilsd.

/ The rosin season extends from April of one year through March of the next
year. Data are for calendar year in some cases and for season in
other cases. Data are placed, however, in the calendar year in which
most of the season occurs, i. e., 1938-39 date are placed in calendar
year 1938.

/ Preliminary.

Data for 1913, 1915, 1918 and 1920 not available.

Compiled as follows:
Fats and oils -
1912-30,U. S. Tariff Commission Report No. 41, p. 127, 130-132.
1931-38, Bureau of the Census, Anim.l anrA Veget.ble Fats and Oils.
Rosin -
Naval Stores Division, U. S. Department of Agriculture.


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0
&




FOS-27


TablI 13.- Total drying industries: Estimated consumption, erorEassed in
percentages, of frts and oils, Unitid Statt.s, 1931-38

: Tot.al dryifri. industri.-s I/
:It 1931 : 1932 1933 : 1934 :1935 : 1936 : 1937 : 1938
S. _*


Linsefd oil
Tung oil
Pe-rillu oil
Fish oil
Soybean oil
Castor oil
Other 2/
Total


: P t.

:77.0
:14.7
: l.8
4.4
S1.5
: .
:10.
:1I00.0


Pet. Pct. Pet. Pet. Pet. Pet. Pot.


74.6
15.7
2.4
4.1
2.4
.3
100
I00-.0


69.0
IS.
4.6
4.1
2.6
.4
.5
10.0


6G.3
19.7
4. n
4.2
2.2
.4
.10
10 0


65.2 61.3
18.1 15.5
8.5 13.5
4.6 5.1
2.5 2.2
.6 .6
.5 1.8
100.0 100-0


Paint and varnish


Linseo.d oil
Tung oil
Perills oil
Fish oil
Soybean oil
Castor oil!
Oth er J2
Total



Linseed oil
Fish oil
PE-rill.- oil
Tung oil
Soybt-an oil
Castor oil:
Other 2/
Total


78.4
: 15.6
2.0
2.3
: 1.2
.3
.2


76.9
16.3
2.3
1.9
1.8
.4
.4


72.0
19.3
4.1
1.9
1.9
.4
.4


71.2
20.0
3.6
2.3
2.0
.4
-5


66.6
19.o
8.1
3. 0
2.1
.6
-6


62.8
17.0
13.0
3.5
2.2
.6
.9


68.4
19.9
4.1
3.9
2.3
,9
-5


72.1
15.1
5.8
2.8
2.7
.9
-6


:100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
: Linoleum, oilcloth, and printing ink

68.s 61.0 52.6 53.6 56.6 53.2 6g.6 67.3
:17.2 17.7 16.0 16.1 14.4 13.6 13,2 13.2
: .9 2. 7.5 6.1 10.6 16.1 7.6 8.1
: 9.5 11. 15.3 17.4 12.5 7.8 7.7 5,8
3.0 6.0 b.S 3.5 4.9 2.4 .8 3.4
.2 .2 ..5 5 .6 1. 1.5 1.4
: .4 .7 .7 2.8 .U 5.9 .6 .8
:100.0 10.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


1/ Paint, varnish, linoleum, oilcloth and printing ink.

2/ Includes cottrnsten.d, prdm, rapt., cottonsc.ed, olivo, sunflowt.r, corn, pe.anit,
and pilm-kLrnc.l oils, iten reported as "othur" vegetable oils, grease,
marine mammal cils, tallow, lard, nt.atsfoot and olco oils.when rsporttd.


68.4
18.0
4.6
5.3
2.1
1.0
.6
100.0


71.4
13.6
6.2
4.4
2.8
1.0
.6
100.0


- 30 -




- 31 -


Table 14.- Estimated consumption of linsed, tung, and perillA oils,
United Statt.s, year beginning July, 1889-1910
calendar y..ar, 1912-30


Year i Lis Tung oil' Perill
. beginning: oil oil .


iM00" b. :


,CalendarzLinsbtd : Tung oil: Perilla
Year oil : :oil
: I. a-;'


July ;
:1000 b.- 1,0o Ib.

1889 : 21S,370 2,325
1890 : 360,364 2,597
1891 : 233,738 2,469
1892 : 173,603 2,892
1893 : 151.518 4,107
1894 : 252,119 2,900
1895 : 389,026 2,484
1896 : 228,857 2,763
1897 : 224,079 2,305
1898 : 271,173 2,683
1899 : 293,301 2,705
1900 : 245,434 2,743
1301 : 409,854 3,038
1902 : 562,624 2,998
1903 : 436,898 9,161
1904 : 399,053 10,274
1905 : 394,702 14,173
1906 : 367,013 18,308
1907 : 337,095 13,935
1908 : 354,786 21,794
1909 : 428,170 43,142

1910 : 4o6,o63 52,715


460,639
603,259
509.777
502,206
526,117
471,347
69.8 42
457,752
492,400
519,875
64o0,112
677,700
706,968
726,0s5
714,188
75,.516
785,482
788,506

544,292


42,707
42,405
30,031
33,867
57,517
40,847
41,613
51,360

59,440o
37.623
67,6914
82,491
78,036
86.705
92,278
84,668
95,367
109,530

99,581


41 76
42
79
168
976
922
4,743

7,582
652
2,208
6,441
3,016
6,017
7,401
5,358
2,011
5,574

8,838


1I 1889-90 to 1910-11, oil equivalent of flaxsr.,ed available for crushing, plus
net imports of oil and flaxsi.td in terms of oil (see table 47 in Statistical
Bulletin 59); 1912-30, domt.stic disapne.rance of oil (sw. tablt 45 in Statis-
tical Bulletin 59).
2/ 1889-90 to 1905-06, imports for consumption; 1906-07 to 1910-11, general
imports ninus reexnorts; 1912-30, domtnstic disappearance of oil.

3] Cornuted doms.stic disanpnarance.
'. hI October 1 December 31, net previously reported.


I


L


1912 :
1913 :
1914 :
1915 :
1916 :
1917 :
1918 :
1919 :

1920 :
1921 :
1922 :
1923 :
1924 :
1925 :
1926 :
1927 :
1928 :
1929 :

193o




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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