The Fats and oils situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00018
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00018

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text







FOS-I



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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BuREAU oF AnRICULTURAL ECNOMi iS
SWASHINGTON
AUGUST IE5, 1938


T,.HE FATS. AND 0I I LS S I.TU A T I ON
* -!cinflb ------cae- a as- mm -- "-"-- -- cccini


.THIS ISSUE IS DEVOTED LARGELY TO A DISCUSSION OF THE
SUPPLY AND PRICE SITUATION FOR FLAXSEED, L NEiE
OP COMPETING OILS, AT THE BEGINNING OF THNE EI9j
HARVESTING SEASON IN THIS COUNTRY. I


U. S. STOCKS OF DRYING OILS AS OF JUNE 30, 1930-38

rOUNDS
r" (THOUSANDS)
THOUSANDS Hempseed oil
Perilla oil
200 Tung oil
Linseed oil


150



100 ---



50 -



0
1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938
U.S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEC. 34520 BUREAU OF AGRICULTUiRAL ECONOMICS


11-1 r7JL.17:iJ1


v


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Table 1.- Price per pound of specified fats and cils, June-July, 1937-58

: 1937 : 1938
Fat or oil : :
: June July June July


Domestic prices
Butter, 92 score, N. Y.
Oleomargarine, domestic vegetable, Chicago
Lard, prime steam, Chicago
Lard, refined, Chicago
Lard compounds, Chicago
Coconut oil, edible, N. Y.
Cottonseed oil, crude, f.o.b, S. E. mills
Cottonseed oil, prime summer yellow, N. Y.
Soybean oil, refined, N. Y.
Peanut oil, domestic refined, N. Y.
Rape oil, refined, N. Y.
Oleo oil, No. 1, N. Y.
Oleostenrine, barrels, N. Y.

Corn oil, refined, N. Y.
Olive oil, edible, N. Y.
Teaseed cil, crude, I. Y.

Coconut oil, crude, Pacific Coast
Tallow, inedible, Chicago
Grease, house, U. Y.
Palm cil, crude, N. Y.
Olive oil foots, barrels, F. Y.
Palm-kernel oil, denatured, N. Y.
Babassu oil, tanks, N. Y.
Sardine cil, tanks, Pacific Coast

Linseed oil, raw, Minneapolis
Tung cil, drums, Atlantic Coast
Perilla oil, drums, N. Y.
Soybsan oil, crude, f.o.b, mills
Menhaden oil, crude, f.o.b. Baltimore

Foreign prices 2/
Cotton oil, crude, naked, Hull
Copra, Resecada, Philippines
Palm-kernel oil, crude, Hull
Whale oil, crude, No. 1, Rotterdam
Tallow beef, fair-fine, London
Linseed oil, naked, Hull


:Cents

: 30.9
:15.4
:11.9
: 13.2
: 13,4
8.1
S8.2n
:10.0
: 11.4

: 12.7
:12.8
S9.5

: 12.0
: 32,0n
9.6

5.6
S8.2
8.1
6.0
: 1.2n
S5.8
:1/8.9
6:9n

:10.6
:13.1
: 11.3
8.2
5.8n


6.1
2.8
S5.6
4.8
S5.8
6.6


Cents


31.6
15.0
12,2
13.6
13.2
7,6
8 .On
9.2
11.3
12.2
12.8
13.0
9.7


10.9
32,0n
9.4

5.1
8.2
8.0
5.7
11.2n
5.5
1_8.4
5.9n

10.5
12,9
11.6
7.8
5,3n


6.2
2,5
5.7
4.7
5.8
6.8


Cents

26.2
16.2
8.9
9.7
103.
8.2
7,3


/Futures.
Converted to U.S. cents per pound at current monthly rates of exchange.
Preliminary.


- 2 -


FOS-18


: Cents

: 25.9
: 15,4
S8.4n
9.4
: 10.2
S5,2
S6.8n
8.0
8.5
S9.9
: 10.4
a 8.5
S6.1

S9.6
: 25.3
S6.6

2.9
S4.6
4.0
S4.0
S7.9
S4.2
S6.3n
S4.8

S8.2
* 10.9
S9.9
S5.2
S4.ln


S3.9
:3/1.2
: 3.9
: 3.1
: 4.3
: 5.0


8,5
10.2
10.3
9.2
7.4

9.9
25.1
8.0

3.1
5.3
4.9
4.1
8.0
4.2
6.5n
4.2n

8.2
13.0
10,5
5.9
3.7


4.3

3.9
3.0
4.2
5.2







Flaxseed and linseed. oil, and comipiting oa1s, at the
beginning of the flaxsecd harvesting season, 1938

Lowered industrial activity during the fir-t 6 months of 1958 has

been reflected in declining prices of flarseed and of drying oils, reduced

demand for oils, and incunting stocks.

Supplies of domestic and imported flarsecd

.On the basis of conditions about Au.ust 1, the United States Depart-

ment of Agriculture estimated the 1938 flnxseed crop to be about 8,185,000

bushels, compared with a harvest of 6,974,000 bushols from the 1937 crop.

Domestic production of flaxseed in 1956 amounted to only about one-sixth

of our domestic requirements, and the 1937 crop supplied a little more than

one-fourth of the flaxsoed crushed in the 12 months beginning July 1937.

Growing conditions for flaxseed have been much more favorable this season

than in most other recent years. On the basis of August 1 conditions,

yields in the United States are expected to be the highest since 1927. The

1935 flaxseed harvest amounted to 14-1/2 million bushels, but in the other

5 years of the 1933-38 period, the h.rvcsts aver.:ged only 6-1/2 million

bushels, compared with an average of 21 million bushels in the years 1923-30.

Drought conditions existing in most of the years 1931 to date have been

largely responsible for thle sh.rp reduction in flaxseed acre te.

Stocks of flaxsc.:d in the h.nds of crus.hers on June 30, 1938, 'vere

lower than for any date reported since Jun,: :30, 1935. Stocks of drying

oils in the United States were lirg,-r on A7-ril 1, 1'ju8, than on any reported

date in the past 10 years. Crushin;s of flizxsecd from April through June

1938, amounting to slightly under 4 rnillior bush-'ls, wr-1e smaller than the

crushings in -any corresponding period of .:ny year since 1932, and compare


FOS-18


- 3 -










with crushings of over 10 million bushels in the corresponding quarter of

1937. Imports of flixse.d into the United States amounted to only about

2,663,000 bushels in the period April through June 1938, compared with

imports of 8,604,000 buIChels in the corresponding period of 1937. Total

imports for the crop year 1937-38 (beginning July 1), amounted to 17,860,000

bushels compared with 26,096,000 bushels in 1936-37. (See table 2.)

Supplies of foreign flaxseed

Preliminary estimates of the total world crop of flaxseed in 1937-38
are now placed at between 133 and 136 million bushels, a reduction of 11 to
14 million bushels under the estimated harvest of 1936-37. Most of this
decrease is the result of a reduction in the size of the crop in Argentina,
which amounted to only about 61 million bushels compared with 76 million in
1936-37. (Sec table 6.)

Unofficial estimates place total exports of flaxsend from India,
Argentina, and Uruguay during the first 6 months of 1938 at almost 38 million
bushels compared with about 53 million in the corresponding months of 1937.
The balance available for shipment from Argentina, Uruguay, and India during
the remainder of 1938 are unofficially estimated at around 29 million bushels
compared with about 32 million bushels shipped from these three countries
during the last half of 1937.

There is quite a possibility thit the world production of flaxseed
in 1938-39 may be somwvrhat larger than in 1937-38. The crop in India is
already harvested. It has been estirmatd at 18,280,000 bushels compared with
17,800,000 bushels a year ago, and is the largest crop in more than 10 years.
As stated previously, the United States harvest is estimated (August 1) to be
about 17 percent larger than the very small 1937 crop. It is too early in
the season to have authentic estimates of the acreage now being seeded for
the crops of Argentina and Uruguay that will be harvested in the last months
of 1938 and the beginning of 1939. Scattred reports from various parts of
the country confirm earlier indications of incre-ases in flaxsced acreages
in certain sections. The weather is reported as being favor-Tble for the flax
crop in Argentina. But little information is wavilnble regarding prospects
for the crop of 1938-39 in other countries.

During the ylars 1929-36, Argentin:- und Uruguay together supplied
more than half the world crop of flaxseed, th(: Russian crop averaged about
20 percent of the world crop, the crop of India averaged about 12 percent
of the total and the United States crop averg-Gcd about 7 percent. Other
countries, principally Poland, China, Lithuania, Germany and France, supplied
the balance of 8 to 10 percent.


FOS-18


- 4 -






FOS-18


Supplies of drying oils

United States stocks of the three major drying oils, namely, linseed,
tung, and perilla, which amounted to 293 million pounds at the close of
March 1958 and were larger thaei on any reported dete in the past 10 years,
were reduced to 221 million pounds by the end of June 1933. But this figure
is still larger than reported stocks on the same date in any preceding year
(see chart on cover page and table 10). The reduction in stocks resulted
from a drastic cut in the crushings of flassecd, some reduction in imports
during the quarter April to June and increased consumption. Estimated
disappearance of linseed oil for the quarter April to June 1923 amounted to
154 million pounds compared with 94 million pounds January to March, and
compared with 202 million pounds April to June 1937. Imports of tung oil
dropped off slightly in the April-June quarter; apparent disappearance also
dropped slightly and thus stocks of tung oil were somewhat increased.

It is believed that there will he some carry-over of tung oil in
China to add to the new crop whichh normally is harvested late in the year
and comes on the market in the early months of the following year.

Due to war conditions in China it is impossible to make any estimate
of supplies of this oil that will be available for the coming season.

Imports of perilla oil, which h,:ve been negligible since it became
subject to an excise tax of 4-1/2 cents per pound in August 1936, were
slightly lower in the April to June 1918 quarter than in the preceding
quarter. Practically no perilla seed has been imported since the excise
tax of 2 cents per pound was pl.iccd on imported pcrilla reed in August 1936.
The Revenue Act of 1938, however, provides for i reduction of the import
tax on perilla sued down to 1.38 counts per pound. This reduction will change
the rate on the oil equivalent of perilla seed from about 5.4 cents to about
3.7 cents per pound and will probably cnc'ouraae imports of perilla seed for
crushing. Practically all the world crop of p.rilla seed is produced in
Manchuria and there are at present no available estimates of the probable
size of the 1938 crop.

Total disappearance of the three, drying oils linsee:d, tung, and
perilla in the 3 months April to June 1938 was considerably above disap-
pearance in the preceding 3 months, amounting- to 184 million pounds compared
with only 127 million pounds in the January-March quarter. But the April-
June disappearance is still markedly belov th.it of 257 million pounds in the
corresponding quarter of 1937.

Fish oils and soybean oil also compete with linsord oil to a limited
extent. Stocks of fish oils on hand June 30 amounted to 55 million pounds
compared with 68 million a year earlier and with 109 million pounds on June
30, 1936. There is no way of determining available supplies of fish oil
during the coming months.







FOS-18


Stocks of soybean oil, in terms of crude oil, on hand June 30
were very large, amountinC to 78 million pounds, compared with 48 million
on the same date a year ago and 58 million pounds in 1936. Crop Board
reports indicate that the harvested acreage of soybeans grown alone for
all purposes will be 9.8 percent higher in 1938 than in 1937.

For a full discussion of the utilization of drying oils see FOS-15,
May 17, 1938, and FOS-:, May 1937.

Linseed cake and meal

Large production of high protein feeds and a comparatively small
production of linseed cake and meal for domestic utilization will probably
continue in the 1938-39 marketing year. During the past marketing year
the unusually large cotton crop, together with the large quantity of soy-
beans crushed, resulted in the largest total supply of high protein feeds
ever reported. The supply of linseed cake and meal available for domestic
consumption, however, was comparatively small as a result of the small
flaxseed crop and heavy exportation of linseed cake and meal produced from
flaxseod imports.

The total production of linseed cake and meal in the period October
to June 1937-38 amounted to 339,000 tons compared v.ith 474,000 tons last
year and 388,000 tons in 1935-36. In this period last ycar exports totaled
228,000 tons, leaving 246,000 tons for domestic consumption. During the
first 9 months of this marketing year net exports totaled about 182,000
tons, leaving only about 157,000 tons for domestic consumption.

Prices of flaxseed

Both domestic and foreign flaxseed price. have been declining since
early February. The price of No. 1 Flaxseed at Minneapolis declined from
$2.18 per bushel for the week ended February 5 to $1.75 per bushel for the
week ended June 4. Since early rune domestic flaxsccd prices have advanced
and for the week ended July 30 the average .jas 2 1.80 per bushel. The price
of flaxseed at Buenos Aires declinr-d somew:h-.t less than domestic prices
during this period, resulting in a narrower margin between these prices.
For the week ended July 30 the price of lo. 1 Flaxsc, d %t Minneapolis was
61 cents per bushel above the price t Buenos Aires. This compares with
a margin of around 80 cents during most of Frbruary ind is 4 cents
below the tariff of 65 cents per bushel The Tc1aknress in flaxseed prices
during the period Fcbruary to June wv-s apparently largely due to a falling
off of demand and to favorable pro-p-"ts for the crop of India.

Although flaxseed prices h.ve bcen relatively high as compared with
wheat prices, the total returns from flaixscid h ve becn low because of
unusually low yields Larger yir]ds this year, together with the compara-
tively favorable prices will probably result in rclativLly hihhcr per acre
returns from flaxseed than wheat.


- 6 -







The price per bushel received by farmers during the 1937-38 market-
ing year was about $1.88 per bushel or slightly below prices received during
the previous marketing year. Prices in each of the past 2 years were higher
than in any of the years from 1950 to 1935.

Prices of drying oils

Price of raw linseed oil at Minneapolis has held at 8.2 cents per
pound throughout June and July 1938. This is the lowest average price
reported at any time since September 1935. Perilla oil prices declined to
9.9 cents in June but were up again to 10.5 cents in July. Tung oil averaged
10.9 cents in June, the lowest reported monthly average since February 1935,
but was higher in July, averaging 13.0 cents per pound for the month.

Prices of linseed cake and meal

The prices of linseed cake and meal were much lower at the beginning
of the present marketing year than for the previous year as a result of the
larger supplies of all cakes and meals, Prices have advanced during the
marketing year, however, and in July the price of linseed meal at Minneapolis
was $41.40 a ton compared with $34.62 a ton in July last year. Linsced cake
and meal prices are now relatively high as compared with prices of cottonseed
and soybean cak-es and meal. Thi's relationship may be expected to continue
during the next few months in view of the small United States production of
flaxseed and the prospective small supplies of linseed cake and meal that
will be available for dc:n'.stic consu mtion.

Outlook for consumption of drying oils

Consumption of drying oils, which was comparatively high in 1937,
has declined considerably in rcc-ent months. Consumption from April to June,
however, sho'red a marked upturn compared with tro first 3 months of the
calendar year. Continued but moderate imLrovemnint in demand during the next
few months is anticipated. Ac-cording to the Federal Reserve Board Index the
total value of building cont-rcts awarded in July 1937 amounted to 67 percent
of the 1922-25 average. The awards for Ilarch 1938 amounted to only about 46
percent of the 1923-25 avc-rae, and .h..is since increased to 54 percent in June,
It seems probable tiit some further increases mray occur, in view of the
Government's steps to increase, residential building and the present more
favorable outlook for private building in business. Available information
suggests that total construction this year may not be greatly different from
that in 1926, which would be less than 10 percent under 1937.

The total value of building permits in 215 cities for the first half
of 1938 amounted to $527,550,065, compared with $586,182,362 in the first 6
months of 1937 and $463,642,535 in 1936.

There seems to..be'an improvement in demand for building materials in
general, especially common brick an-id lumber. The National Lumber Manufactur-
ers' Association reports that new lumber orders by mills in the week ended
July 16 reached their highest point since April 1937. Lumber production in
the week ended July 23 was the highLrst of any week in the year to date, and
shipments were the second heaviest.


FOS-18


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FOS-18


Table 3.- Flaxseed crushed in the United States, 1930-38


Year ;
Year : beginning : Jan,-Mar. : Apr,-June : July-Sopt,: Oct,-Dec.
: July : :
1,000 bu : 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu.

1930 : 27,054 : 7,966 7,270 5,887 7,391
1931 : 23,700 : 6,571 7,205 7,610 7,113
1932 : 17,370 : 5,393 3,584 3,739 4,998
1933 : 23,006 : 5,365 4,268 6,074 6,760
1934 : 20,720 : 5,156 5,016 4,293 4,569
1935 : 26,544 : 5,754 6,104 5,998 8,284
1936 : 30,340 7,094 5,168 4,862 6,931
1937 :/ 25,870 8,175 10,372 7,666 7,754
1938/ 6,461 3,989




3/ Preliminary.

Computed from Bureau of the Census, Animal and-Vegotable Fats and Oils.


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- B1 -


Table 6,- Flaxseod: Production in specified countries, and estimated
world total, annual, 1933-38

SAnnual
Country : : : 93 : 31936 : 19s
1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1 .1938 1
:i~


North America -
United States
Canada
Mexico 2

Europe and Asia -
India
U.S.S.R.
Poland
China
Lithuania 5
Germany
France
Be l gium
Latvia
Rumania
Estonia
Netherlands
Turkey
Czechoslovakia
Hungary
Japan
Italy
Bulgaria
Yugoslavia


:1,000 bu.

: 6,904
: 632
s 71


17,600
29,307
1,774

823
125
183
239
485
420
244
138
272
105
202
147
87
8
39


1,000 hu. 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu. 1,000 bu.


5,661
910
65


16,080
27,019
2,179

1,014
249
429
286
597
365
290
190
109
168
251
181
80
14
33


14,520
1,667
69


17,920
29,133
2,793
2,400
1,487
654
855
.389
811
S450
369
273
240
225
210
147
80
46
36


5,273
1,795


16,640
29,526
2,820
3,200
1,4-44
1,276
1,006
773
725
534
440
428
339
288
240
151
150
68
60


6,974
698


(7,631)


17,800 4/18,280

2,964
2,200
1,401
1,626

539
866
288
396


356
209

200
67


Africa 6/
Iorceco
Tunisia
Egypt
Eritrca

New Zealand


Other countries 7/


South America /
Argentina
Uruguay


(113)


(139).


(143)


(111)


8/(111)


: 1933-34 : 1934-35 : 1935-36 : 1936-37 : 1937-38 : 1938-39


: 62,595 79,720 59,445 76,200 60,587
: 2,876 3,402 3,007 3,011 .,120


Estimated wcrld
tctal 7/ :120,000 142,000 138,000 147,000 10/
Mil. lb. il. lb. Mil. M.il. lb. Mile Ib. Mil. Ib.
Linseed oil
equivalent _l/ 2,359 2,623 2,545 2,719


Continued -


FOS-18


326
8
74
43

34


243
7
64
24

23


330
5
7E
82


399
5
82


197






FOS-18


Table 6.- Flaxseed: Production in specified countries, and estimated
world total, annual, 193Z-3C Ccrtd


/ Preliminary.

2 Harvested in March, April, or May cf year shown. Planted late in
preceding year. .

SHarvested January April of year shcwn. Planted August October
of preceding year. The data aruj reported estimates for British
India and native states plus estimates -*f the Government for mis-
cellanecus provinces nct rep: rating, or about 5 percent*

/ Production of "ether tracts" are net yet available.

SFlax and hemp.

6/ In Nexthcrn Africa, flaxseed planted in fall and winter is harvested
March tc June of the year shown.

_/ In computing the totals, arbitrary estimates have been interpolated
for yeors where data are unavailable.

8/ Includes Algeria, Austria, Australia, Chile, Chosen, Cyprus, Kenya,
Southern Rhodesia, Spain, and Sweden.

_/ Planting extends from May to October, depending cr. latitude and
altitude. Harvest usually begins in November and may extend
into February.

10/ Production in countries for which estimates are not yet available
probably will, according to preliminary indications, make a total
world crop of between 133 and 136 million bushels,

11/ Using 0.33 as oil yield factor.


Compiled from official sources and the International Institute of
Agriculture.


- 13.




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FOS-18


- 17 -


Table 10,- Stocks of specified drying oils, United States,
June 30, 1529-38


Year Linseed T "oil Perilla Hepseed: Total Scybean
-il oil cil oil
: Mile lb. il. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. mil. Ib,: Mil. lb.

1929 : 123.5 18.6 -- -- 142.1 : 12.0
1930 : 108.8 34.1 1.3 --- 144.2 : 15.6
1931 72.2 34.2 1.2 --- 107.6 : 18.6
1932 : 117.0 29.3 5.2 --- 152.5 : 23.0
1933 : 86.5 29.2 -5.2 --- 120.9 : 11.4
1934 : 128.4 26.7 11.0 -- .166.1 16.6
1935 : 104.9 12.9 18.3 -- 136.1 : 22,8
1936 140.8 38.5 33.7 7.5 220.5 : 57.6
1937 142.5 43.7 14.4 2 200.6 : 48.1
1938 145.9 54.7 20.4 -- 221.0 : 78.1

1/ Crude and refined converted to crude, using 0.94.
/ Less than 500,000 pounds.

Compiled from Bureau cf the Census, Animal and Vegctable Fats and
Oils,


Tanle 11.- Apparent disappearance of important
drying oils, 1933-37


Year :Linseed : Perilla
beginning oil : Tung cil : oil Total
July ::::
S1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib. 1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib.

1933 : 410,851 122,320 28,186 561,357
1934 : 429,80c 126,213 35,727 591,748
1935 : 469,864 124,263 99,290 693,417
1936 584,741 142,385 74,799 801,925
1937 8300,785 118,298 34,337 654,020


= Perccntage cf total
: Percent Percent Percent Percent

1933 : 73.2 21. 5.0 100.0
1934 : 72.6 21.3 6.1 100.0
1935 g 67.8 17.9 14.3 100.0
1936 : 72.9 17.6 9.3 100.0
1937 _/ 76.6 10.1 5.3 100.0

yl Preliminary.

Apparent disappearance computed from official scurccs.







FOS-18 18 -

Table 12.- Imports if specified drying oils and oilseeds, by quarters, 1936-38


Item and date : Unit : Jan.-Mar. : Apr.-June : July-Sept.: Octe-Dec. : Total .
.. ..__ m ., .. ..


Linseed cil -
1930
1937 I
1938

Flaxseed -
1936
1937
19318


Perilla
193G
1937
1938


oil -


: Lb.
* I


:
: Bu.

II



: Lb.


Perilla seed
1936 2/
1937
1938 _

Tung oil -

1937 1/


Oitinica ..il
I'JS,3
1937 ./
1930 /


Thousands


97
51
50


3,796
8,950
4,719


30,696
2,211
8,121


2,200
0
2


42,123
44,753
2C,046


21
j93
307


Thousands


451
200
41


3-,027
8,604
2,663


50,475
15,927
7,151


150
200
0


41,194
51,244
22,417


45J
717
1,052


Thousands

169
53



2,600
5,325


36,733
18,124


Thousands

32
98



5,942
5,153


0
7,328


1,393
0


31,449
C0,187



1,904
6388


20,063
18,700



506
1,233


Thousands


760
402



15,365
28,032


117,903
43,591



3,743
200



134,830
174,885



2,892
3,631


I/ Prelisi'ri.y.
SThe excise tax cf 2-conts per pound on perilla seed
pc.unl an perilla oil became effective Aug. 21,


and 4-1/2 cents per
193,.






FOS-18


Table 13.- Price per pcund
by months, January


of specified drying oils,
1936 July 1538


Linseed Tu oil,: Perill: Soybean : :Menhaden : Sardine
a :oLinseedl r l, Perilla oil, :Oiticica: oil, : oil,
Year oiln raw l drums, dil : crude., : oil ,: -.crude, : crude,
lnne- .Atlantic drums f.o y.. Y.' S f. o.b. : Pacific
apolis Cast / N. Y mills : Balto. Coast
: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


1936 -
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.


1937 :
Jan.
Feb.
SMar. :
Apr :
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept. :
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

1938 -
Jan.
Feb.
Mar :
Apr.
May
June
July :


9.5
9.1
9.3
9.2
9,0
9.0 *
9,8
10.1
9.9
9.7
9,2
9.5


9.8
9.8
10.0
'10.9
10.6

10.5
10.6
10.4
10.4
10.2
10,0


10.0
9.8

9.3
8,9
2.2
8.2


14.1
15.0
16.9
19.2
18.7
18.7
18.9
16.5
14.4
13.5
13.0
14.3


14 .Gn
15.4
15.4
13.3
13.
13.1
12.9
14.3n
21.2n
21.8n
15.6n
14.8


15,6
15.3
13.3
12.5
11.4-
10.9
13.0


7.4
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.4
8.5
9.7
9,8
9.9
C.0
9.7
10.9


11.7
11,7
11.6
11.6
11.9
11.5
11.3
11.6
12.1
13.6
13.9
12.8
11.5


11.3
11.1
10,6
10.6
10.3
9.9
10.5


7.6
7.2
6.8
6.8
6.3
6,0
7.9
8.0
8.2
8,0
8.0
3.1


9.3
9.9
9.8
9.C
9.0'
8.2
7.8.
6.5
6.2
5.8
5.6
5.2


5.C
6.1
6.4
5.9
5.7
5.2
5.9


11.2
11.2
13.4
14.9
14.2
14.7
14.8
13.2
11.6
10,4
10.2
10.9


11.6
11.8
12.0
12.1
11.5
11.2
11.0
12.5
16.1
17.6
14.6
13.0


12,9
12.4
11.3
10.7
10.1
9.4
10.4


4.8n
4.8n
4.Gn
4.5n
'4.3
4.3
3.7n
3.6n
3.Gn
3.7
4.4n
4,7n


. 4.S
5.1
5,7
6.0
5.6
5.0
5.3n
5.3n
4,9n
4.7n
4.6n
4.8n


5.On
4.On
4.7n
4.7n
3.7
3.7


4.9
5.0
4.4n
4.2n
4.0n
3,7n
4.On
4.4n
4.4n
4,6
4.9
5.5


6.4
6.9
7.2
7.2
6.9n
6.9n
5.9n
5.3
4.8n
4.7n
4.8
4.9


5.5
6.0
6.2
5.4
4.9
4.8
4.2


22, 1936, quctod at New York.


"-; 19 -


j/ Prior tc Aug.




FOS-18 ZU
Table 14,- Linseed cil and flaxsced in term of oil: Net exports or net imports,
by countries, 1934-37

(Net exports are indicated by a minus sign)
S 1934 : 1935 : 1936 : 1937 1/
:Seed in: -Seed in: :Seod in: :Seed in:
Country terms :Linsoed trs :Linseed. terms :Linseed terms Linseed
:oteroi :zcf tot: ot oil
:of oil: oil cf oil: oil of oil: oil of oil oil
:Mil. Ib.Mil. Ib:lil. lb Mil. Ib:Mil, Ib Mil. Ib:Mil. Ib Mil. lb
EXPORTING SEED- : : I :
Argentina :-1,000 --- : -1,293 --- : -1,02 --- -1,311 --
British India : -197 1 -85 1 : -219 --- -156 -1
Uruguay : -52 --- -51 --- -54 --- : -54 --
Other : -32 4 : -37 6 : -52 5

IMPORTING SEED AND:
EXPORTING OIL-
Netherlands : 232 -170 290 -191 : 237 -159 229 -190
France 172 -13 184 -26 205 -27 : 199 -24
Belgium : 57 -7 86 -G 76 -4: 73 -13
Sweden : 20 30 5 27 5: 35 2
Japan : 14 -1 16. -2 9 -2 : 6 -1

IMPORTIIG SEED AND:
0IL-
United.StE.tes 262 2 325 1 284 --- 518 -1
Germany 230 26 : 310 21 159 42 311 51
United Kingdom 136 44 : 190 66 202 21 2 11 58
Italy : 47 1 : 52 3: 39 2: 59 1
Norway 11 2: 1 1 16 1 18 1
Denmark :' 12 --- : 19 --- :. 15 -- : 17 --
Spain: 12 --- 1 -- :. --- -- :-
Australia' 13 2 29 --- : 24 2 26 1
Czechoslcvakia 18 --- : 2C -2 10 -1 : 20 --
Canada 14 10 11 1 21 3 : 22 4
Switzerland --- 16 --- 18 --- 14 --- 10
Austria -- 9 -- 10 --- 11 --- 10
Un. (f So. Africt --- 7 8 --- 8 --- 8
Other : 14 25 9 32 : 5 27

/ Preliminary.
Other includes Lithuania, Mcrocco, Rumania, U.S.S.R., Eritrea, and China.
Other includes Poland, Yugoslavia, Latvia, Estonia, Finland, Brazil, Eire
(Irish Free State), Philippine Islands, British Malaya, Egypt, Chosen, Chile,
Bulgaria, Hungary, New Zealand, French Africa, and Netherland India.

As shown in this table, Argentina is by far the most important of the countries
which export flaxseed and in recent years has supplied abcut 85 to 90 percent of
total world exports. The countries, shown in the second section impcrt and pro-
cess flaxseed and recxpcrt at least a part cf the linseed cil .produced. In the
last few years Netherlands has boon the most important cxporter of linseed cil.
The third grcup of countries impcrts both flaxseed and linsced cil, but in most
cases imports more seed than oil.
For earlier years see table 4 in FOS-3, May 1937.
Leaders (---) indicate less than half a million pounds or not separately reported.







FOS-18


Table 15.- Oleomargarine:


Production and materials used in manufacture,


United States, May and June, 1937 and 1938


: 1937 1/ 1938 1/
Item : : a
May June May June
1,000 Ib. 1,000 Ib. : 1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib.

Oleo oil 1,122 1,060 : 1,354 1,405
Oleostearine 275 260 : 274 299
Lard neutral 151 122 114 120
Oleo stock : 115 125 : 152 191
Total animal 1,663 1,567 : 1,894 2,015

Cottonseed oil 12,557 10,961 9,958 9,502
Soybean cil 1,490 1,581 2,053 2,629
Peanut cil 194 183 257 386
Corn oil 118 201 11 4
Total domestic vegetable 2 : 14,359 12,926 :12,279 12,521

Ccoanut oil 4,094 5,614 : 7,759 7,433
Palm-kernel oil : 834 866 470 260
Babassu cil 2,617 1,794 685 454
Palm oil 157 89 -
Rice oil : : 18 -
Total foreign vegetable 4/ :87'3: 8,3C3 : 8,9.2 8,147
Total fats and cils 23,724 22,856 23,105 29,205

Milk 5,244 5,102 : 5,509 5,292
Salt and other miscellaneous 1,346 1,333 1,267 1,230


Production of oleomargarine 28,741 27,945 : 28,500 27,938


/ Pre'-lmir.,y. 2/ Ordinarily dmustically produced.
Bureau cf the Census; probably oil imported from Japan.
4/ Not domestically produced.


Compiled and computed from reports cf the Commissioner of Internal Rovenue.


-21 -




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 1
IIII I 121 III0 26lll iiIIII IIIII IIIIIIII l I
3 1262 08904 2625

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