The Fats and oils situation

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Title:
The Fats and oils situation
Physical Description:
301 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
United States -- World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
frequency varies

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Oil industries -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Oils and fats, Edible -- Economic aspects -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
FOS-1 (Mar. 1937) - FOS-301 (Oct. 1980).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service, 1954-Mar. 1961; Economic Research Service, May 1961-<Oct. 1977>; Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, <May 1978>-July 1980; Economics and Statistics Service, Oct. 1980.
General Note:
"Approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board," Oct. 1977-Oct. 1980.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Item 21-D.

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000502965
oclc - 01588232
notis - ACS2699
lccn - 46039840 //r82
issn - 0014-8865
sobekcm - AA00005305_00017
Classification:
lcc - HD9490.U5 A33
ddc - 380.1/41385/0973
System ID:
AA00005305:00017

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Succeeded by:
Fats and oils outlook & situation

Full Text



P' UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau Of Agricultural Economics
EI. Washington

0I3.13 NS*Th14, 1438


THE FATS AND I LS SITUATT I..

----.. .. -

"ij...' Sumia'r -


A preliminary estimate of apparent disappearance in the United States

of all fats and oils, both domestic and imported, for all purposes, indicates

a consLuption of 9,309 million pounds in the calendar year 1927, according

to the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. This consuinptiron is about 136

million pounds more than in 1936, and a little over 500 million pounds more

than in 1929, the peak :ear prior to 1936. But this total refers to fats

and oils collectively as a unit, whereas, in actual fact, charges with re-

spect to individual fats and oils were as significant as the increased crn-

sumptio-n.

The 400-million-pound increase in ccns'umption of cottonseed cil more

than equalled the decreased c'r.s'uption of t!'e tr-al of two imported oils,

coconut ard rape, and of l.rd and other domestically produced edible animal

fats.

An increased use cf 105 millie-r pounds of linseed oil and 30 Trillion

pounds of tung oil was not entirely, offset by the Jecre'se of 70 trillion

pounds of perilla oil and the practical elimination of hempseed oil.


Of the 140 million pounds cf pFlrm-kernel oil impcrted in 1937, com-
pared with 20 million rounds imported in 19."6, 12 millii-n pounds v.ere "edible"
and 12P million poum-ds "inedible fcr industrial ma.nuf&c-ure", Th dis-
appearance of palm-kernel. oil in 137 was more th-u.r I'10 million pcuaiis larger
than in 1936 ancd th-e ccn:umpticn of inedible tallow and Frees.: decr.ersed






PFS-13 2 -


about 6C milli,'n pounds. it seems evident, therefore, that increasing
quantities of palm-kernel oil have -cne into soap. Palm-kernel oil is
a quick lathering hard oil, while tallow and grease are slow lathering
soap materials.

The 1. 7 increase over 1936,consumption of teaseed oil amounted
to about 21 million pounds, more then offsetting the decreased consumption
of edible clive oil end sesame oil.

This issue also provides available data on foreign production of
ccccnut, palm and palm-kernel oils, olive oil, and whale oil.

1938 prospects

As reported last month, it is still expected that lard production
rmay show a definite increase in 19,8. lard stocks on February 1 amounted
to tout 97 million pounds, considerably smaller than the stocks on February
1 last year. They were, however, larger than the February 1 average of 91
million pounds for the 5 .yers 1930-34. The increase in lard exports since
Septer-nber 1937 probably reflects to a considerable extent the increase in
lard production during the fall and winter, arnd the largr: su plies of cot-
tonseed oil. Tt"es larger dcm,.stic supplies of lard and cottonseed oil
resulted in a greater decline in prices of both products in this country
til.hn in f'rei.:n countries. This ch.ne in price rclationshiv caused a
0'.ss,.ticin of imports of cottonseed oil and an increase in lard exports.

Factory butter production in December 1937 was about 2 percent
l rg,:r than a year -.srlier and nearly 5 percent larger than in november.
If the usual scason-il increase in oroducticn cccurs during the first half
cf 1938, prcdi., ticn will '.verg-. consider-itly high':..r than in the same period
s y: r .go. C.li :.tor;:.ge st:ecks of butter on Fr-brur:..' 1 were lower than a
v:.ar earlier, and lower tnrn th-. Febru-.ry 1 av-ragc cf the 5 preceding
ears.

Undcr the terms of the Agricultur.al Adjustmar.t !rt of 1978, the
S,.?r-:tary of Agr-iculture procllinrd a !'.tion. 1 allotmer.t rf 10,750,000
bales of rc.tt.n fcr this ycar's erop, 'ompE.r-d w'.ith th-. record production
of S1,74.-,0C'1 b.ale in 1937. If ty- -rco is h.l wVithlin the allotment it
wvruld mes.n a r-d..cdticn cf cabc.t 40 to 45 p'-rcrnt in the amount rf cotton-
s-:-c cil prceduced.

Te.- -r-babl :-ier:~-ge planted to flars.-.d, scybeL r rtrd -ean'.its
t..i ..r .' b3 ir.dic t.:d in the Crcp Pr;.,orting Board' ~- .." -o-
S t-i-:. P ....ing.: i r 1L 9'", to be releas bd by th.e Bar -, :-i I 1 8.









Table 1.-Apparent disappearance of fats and oils, 1929-37

: : : : : : : : : 1937
Item : 1929 l'i3J0 1951 1932 1933 1934 1933 1936 : 1/
:M i. lb.Mil.lb.Mil.lb.I .l.l l.Mil.b Mi I. lb.Mil.lb.Dillb Iil.lb.


Cotton oil
Coconut oil
Palm oil
Soybean oil
Corn oil
Peanut oil
Rape oil
Olive oil,edible
Castor oil
Sesame oil
Palm-kernel oil
Babassu oil
Olive foots
Sunflower oil
Olive oil,
inedible
Teaseed oil 2/
Other 3/

Linseed oil
Tung oil
Perilla oil
Hempseed oil

Butter
Lard
Tallow,inedible4/
Marine animal
oil 5/
Grease
Edible fat 6/
Inedible fat 7/


1,585
657
228
13
537
137
13
17
95
69
?0
72
i43
4.3


1,594
655
246
18
12'
25
16
93
53
33
45

43


10 7

10 10


789
110
6


2,117
1,572
515

222
201
161
23


544
100
9


2,174




294
b--c

1435
20


1,315
587
261
35
106
21
12
76
46
53
45

56
28

12
1
1

479
91
12


2,247
1,671
566

217
2?8
168
14


1,240
554
223
39
107
15
9
74
538
14
18

41
10

12
1


355
75
12


2,282
1,776
536

190
27,
112
12


1,295
574
257
32
123
14
11
72
44
14
15

43
22

11
1
136

3014
104
27
-


2,254
1,737


2321
235
136
14


1,566
597
184
31
132,
26
10
62
44
10
24

31


11
2
3

417
120
25
(2)

2,312
1,619
717

2C7
304
172
19


1,441
630
305
103
131
122
68
70
51
57
55
10
32
37

19
7
3

470
123
64
(9)

2,L 07
1,201
713

320
254
183
21


1,340
640
315
225
151
120
67
64
60
54
50
36
28
26

12
6
6

985
125
112
(20)

2,135
1,431
726

?66
299
253
20


1,752
493
347
183
166
111
15
52
62
50
153
32
21
1

6
27
11

590
155
40
(2)

2,158
1,330
676

375
283
202
16


Total 8,901
l/ Preliminary estimate,
/ Iirports.


8,'43 8,400 8,075 3,206


8,688 8,721 9,173 9,309


N3


Includes vaer.table tallow, kz:pok, mustard,
unnamed n.micellaneous items.
Factory c onsui option.
.Marine marrval, fish, and fish-liver oils.


ind oiticic oils. Does not include


Includes edille t-Illow, oleo oil, ?nd oleosttarine,
SIncludes wool grease and neatsfoot oil.

Computations are based on production from domestic rnd imported materials, net
trade in fats and oils, and stocks.
Figures are rounded to millions without adjustment to totals.
Leaders (---) indicate less than half a million pounds, or not separately reported.


- -----~


FOS-13


- 3 -









Table 2.-Price per pound of specified fats and oils, Jan.-Feb., 1937-38

: 1937 1938
Fat or oil
Fat or oilJan. Feb. Jan. Feb.

: Cents Cents : Cents Cents


Domestic prices-
Butter, 92-score, II. Y.
Oleomargarine, domestic veg., Chicagn
Lard, prime stesa, Chicago
Lard refined, Chic.,go
Lard compounds, C-iicago
Ccconut oil, edible, IH. i.
Cottonseed oil, crude, f.o.b. S.E. mi
Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., N. Y.
Soybean oil, refined, II.Y.
Peanut oil, domestic, refined, I.Y.
Rape oil, refined, N.Y.
Oleo oil, Ieo. 1, I.Y.
Oleostearine bar-els, II.Y.


:
:
:
:
:
:
lls:
:
:
:
:
:
:


Corn oil, refined, N:.Y.
Olive oil, edible, N.Y.
Sunflovwer oil, refined, I,.Y.
Teaseed oil, crude, I1.Y.

Coconut oil, crude, Pacific Coast
Tallow, inedible, Chicag;o
Grease, house, 1l.Y.
Palm oil, crude, II.Y.
Olive oil foots, barrels, I1.Y.
PaLm-l:ernel oil, denatured, N.Y.
Babassu oil, t-i.':s, II.Y. (futures)
Sardine oil, tanks, Pacific Coost


LiLseed oil, raw, .Lnineapolis
Tung oil, runs, Atlantic Coast
Perills oil, dri ns, N.! Y.
Soybean oil, cruie, f.o.b. mills
L:erhaden oil, crude, f.o.b. Baltimore

Foreign prices- 1/
C.:tton oil, ?rude, naked, Hull
Ccr.ra, Res-.'re a, Ihlllipbines
P-lim-.-:rnel oil, crude, H;ull
VWiale oil, ; ide, Io. 1, Rctterdam
Tallor,, bef, fair-fine, London
Linse'd oil, naked, Hull


34.2
16.5
13.6
15.0
14.0
11.6
10.4
11.4
12.2
13.4n
11.3
14.4
12.0

12.9n
23.9n
12.6
14.7

9.On
8.8
9.7
6.8
10.9
9.5
11.4
6.4

9.8
14. 6n
11.7
9.8
4,8


6.9
4.8
8.2
5.3
6.8
6.0


34.3 :
16.5
12.4
14.1
14.0
11.2
9.9 :
11.0
12.2
13.5n:
11.4 :
13.9 :
10.4 :

12.9n:
31.3n:
12.3n:
14. 7n:

9.2n:
3.8
8.5 :
6.9n:
12.5 :
7.4n:
10.9 :
6.9


15.4
11.6
9.9
5.1


6.5
4.3
7.1 :
5.5 :
6.4
5.9


33.7
15.5
9.3
10.5
10.1
6.5
6.2
7.4
8.6
10.On
12.1
9.8
7.6

9.3
31.3n

9.8

3.8
5.3
5.1
4.2
9.3
4.2
6.9
5.5

10.0
15.6
11.3
5.8
5.On


4.4
2/ 1.8
4.9
3.8
4.8
6.4


1/ Corv, rtir to U.S. cents pwr pound at
2/ Prelimirnary. Aversae for 2 weeks.


current monthly rates of exchange.


31.1
15.0
8.6
10.1
10.3
6.1
6.7

9.1
10.On
12.1
9.5
7.4

9.7
27.9n

8.5

3.6
5.3
4.9
4.2
9.2
4.2
6.8n
6.0

9.8
15.3
11.1
6.1
5.On


2/ 4.0

2/ 4.7
2/ 5.8
2/ 4.7
/ 6.2


FOS-13


- 4 -





FOS-13 5-

Foreign production

In this issue of the Fats and Oils Situation available data on foreign
production of coconut, pala and palm-karnel oils, and 3f olive zil, and whale
oil are presented. It is planned to present the foreign production data for
additional commodities next month.

Available reports indicate that the consumption of fats and oils in the
United Kingdo:, Germany, France, Italy, and the Netherlands was, as in the
United States, larger in 1937 than in 1936. The United Kingdon reports a
marked increase in imports of oilseeds, the total for 1937 being 3,636 million
pounds compared with 3,30o million pounds in 1936. The principal increase was
in peanuts, with same gain in cottonseed and soybeans. On the other hand there
was a sharp decline in copra imports.

Germany was the largest individual importer cf cilseeds in Europe. Total
imports for 1937 were only slightly larger than for 1936; the increase was
accounted for by larger imports of soybeans, imports of other oilseeds being
smaller. German imports of animal fats, including whale and fish oil also
were larger in 1937 than in the preceding year.

Both France and th? Netherlands report imports of oilseeds for 1937
somewhat abuve those for 1936. Peanuts constituted about 62 percent of'the
total imports of oilseeds into France. The Netherlands imported, hydrogenated
and reexportsd large quantities of whale and fish oils. Italy reports imports
of oilseeds in 1937 more than double thcse in.1936.

Peanuts

Prospective supplies from India are reported to be greater than for
last year, but the crwps in Africa are reported to be smaller, so that ship-
ments from that origin may offset the large shipments from India.

The United Stp.tes, with a 1937 crop of peanuts estimated at 1,292,000
pounds-, remains in fourth position in peanut production, being surpassed by
British India, China, and Africa.

Domestic crushings reached record le';.ls in the three seasons, 1934-36,
but even then less than 23 percent of the a-r'.ilable supply was crushed, by far
the largest share being consumed in food products. In the rest of the world,
on the other hand, the peanut is -f primary significance as an oilseed, and
much the larger portion of tne annual -,'orld production of from 15 to 20 billion
pounds is crushed and marketed as peanut _il jand peanut cak.a or etal.

Of the producing countries, only China and Ietherland India export
significant quantities of peanut oil. The bulk of the large European demand
is supplied by EuropeAu crushers of ianorted peanuts, more than 20 percent of
which come from British India, Scnegal, Ilig-:ria, and China.

The character of local consu:..ption of pur.nuts in the producing countries
varies greatly, but a considerable share of the supply retained is crushed.
British India is retaining an increasingly larger share of the annual crop,
only about 20 percent of available supplies being exported in 1932-36. Exports
of peanut cake and meal indicate that domestic crushings and consumption of
peanut -oil were large.






Table 3.- Peanuts: Production in specified countries, and estimated total,
average 1924-27 and 192F-31, annual 1932-36


S Average :
:1924-27:1928-31: 1932
* : :


1933
*


1934
*


1
1935 : 1936
1/


Asia -
British India
China
Netherland India /
Japanese Enpire 3/
Indo-China & French


*



India
*


Africe (also see b'lo'w)
Seer.gal
French Sudan 4/
I-*.-." C ast
0 .. :'s. ich 7Jest 4/ 5/
N- a
O I.a
EgLpt & Anglo-LEgptiani
Ludan
Other Africa J/

Nor.h America -
L' ited S.ates
Larico

Europe -
Spain
Other 8/


4,202 : 5,697

477 : 51
190: 254 :
(52) : 42 1
: I*

994 : 951
9 : 194
55 : 10 :
(90) : 210
(355) (46):
(12S) : (153):

(4): 5:
(52) : (60):


824 : 923
14 : 13


49 55
(3) (3):


6,713:

534:
292:
39:


1,OS7:
274:
56:
175.

(54)

65:
45:


1,041:
11:


45:
7:


: 1924-25:192-29 ::
: to : to l1932-33:1


South Auerica -
Argentina
Other 9/

Africa -
Belgian Congo 10/
Mozambique
British South 1/
Angola
Madagascar

Australia

Philippine Islands l/
Estimated tot.i -
Including China
Excluding China


7,459:
6,571:
532:
30o:
32:


1,257:

11 :
1.- 7:

(1y.

3:
67:


968:
11:


44:
6:


933-34:


!
4,220:
5, 30:
494:
327:
39:


1,047:
243:
91:


(i ;])

47:
69:


1,123:
16:


47:
5:


1934-35:
:*


4,991 :
4,957 :
475 :
326
42


1,257
265
7 :
265
(Ei.):
(101):

40 :
45


1,303
18


47
11


1,422



(732)
(113)


1935-36:1936-37
**


:1927-2.:19,31- 2:


: 132
S 21


:170
(sE)
: (5 )
1
, 33
I
: 2

* 9

I
:S,132


131 1
19 1


233 :
(39):
71
15
13 a

6 .

10 .


t

110,336
I


173:
21:


242:
(45)
78:
17:
14:

2:

91


11,703:
:*


229:
21:


248:.
(52)
96s
65:
6:

3:

5:


19,409:
12,838:
:*


205:
221


254:
(1.01)
63:
13:
5:

9:

7:


15,516,
9,687:
:


250o
21


(250)
(124)
106:
34,
6.

6:

81


10,6943
1


Continued -


Country


,


.


- 6 -


FOS-13


:~il. Itr. :Ilil. Ib, IPdil. Ib .:bdil. Ib. ;131l.lb.!Mil. Ib, rMi 1. Ib


:t
ft
*
ft
:*









Table 3.- Peanuts: Proluctioa in specified countries, nnd estimated total,
average F 1924-'7 ani 192g-51, r.nnual, i932-36 Cont'd.


I_/ Preliminary.

2/ i.tive crops only of Jayv eand Marinra.

j/ Ir.l.'.ds iwanLtun-, Taiwan, Cnosen, and Japan proper. Does not include
ta.,c uria.

./ U :,er ..'lta inclClu.el: ',itho Ivory Cost 19 30-32, divided between I;-ory
C-at:, lHicor, arir. Frer. i SudLan, '1373.

5/ Includec :7iger, Frsnrch C-w rlon, Frenci, Equitorial Afric:-, Dehjmey,
Frr :.ch Guin -a, Mauritani., -an.. To 7.

6/ Inclu.-s the r.n.arttz territory of r.nj-rJon which is attached to
lli.. -ie. f :r Ir:inisrt i'- a .cosco. 2~-prts fror. Carnroon are not
separ-te3l ri:oJrtr' sinc.- 1'2'5.

_/ Includr. rt.guesE Gulrie-., Italic'n Sr'r.ililand, Eritrer., Kenya.' and
Si.rr& L.,on "

/ Includes U.S.S.R., Bu.l2,rir, Cyprus, It-.l;', nnd Turkey.,

/ I Includes Para-u.ny a.nd Uru.-uaay.

10 Includes the 3eljiani mandate Ruandi-Urundi for IS30-32 and probably for
all sears but source d.atr are not clear.

1I/ Prior t, 1936 thoze data include T:L'rin'yi!:. a, Union of South Africa,
ITorthiern Rihodesia, Southern iRhodes.io, Ny.as.aland (Europern plantation
cr_:s only as native crris are not r~crrted'., end Mauritius.
1936 includ,..s :.nl-, Tan.tn.-yyika ra Uni:. of South Africa.

L2/ Years ended Jar, 'ij.


Compiled front official sources anl Int-rnnti:'nal Institute :f AFric lture.
Fiigres in pirentneses ?re interp ,lati: n on'ed, on tr'nd of production
cr on .xrmjrts if no produicti:rin ata. are -vailable. Dfta.ile: explanations
of intertjnlated dat. .re ron fill. in thl ".i.-ision of Statistical and
Historic. Resc.rcn. Int,:rp':.iations a.n estin-Ates included in total.
Fi.uires rox1nde.d to millions v.:ithout ad.iuztnnt t totol.


FP'S-L3


- 7 -







FOS-13


Copra

Exports of coconut oil and coora, in terms of oil, passed the
2-billion-cound mark in 192q, droc-ed below it in the next 3 y=ars, and
has been over 2 billion pounds in each -"ar since 1Q32. There are no
accurate data showing world proliction of copra, for a very. large proportion
of production is from native holdings. The Imperial Economic Committep
reports that .t in bplievpd a connsiderable increase in ,'orld acreage
occurred b-tLPrn 1'20 and 13'O, but that extension in plantings has boon
slielt since that dgt=. The spm, so trc astimnatps that local consumption
of coconuts and coconut products in the producin.- countries accounts for
probably. two-fifths of the world output.

Th. Philiocin, Islands, CV'lon.a-nd British Malava ar- th- principal
Pxportprs of coconut oil, thp Philic,-.ines alonc orovidin- nearly half of the
oil entrrin? into international trade. The 'Jnited Stat'-s imports much more
co.-mnut oil than Ianv oth-r country, scm- tij7.s taking nz=rlv half of world
expo.rts. ;'lth-rland India exports mor- copr' tnan any other producing
colintrv, ac'oantinL for over tvo-fifths of th. world's total in rocpnt
v=-rs. The United Statsas us''i-ly inoorts mor- corora than any other
coAr.try, but. was ,xxc-rd'-d by:, G many in 1934 and 1936. (SP Do. 10.)

Palm oil and palm-kernel oil

The friit of thp oil pilm oroduic' two kinds of oil, palm oil from
th- ocricaro or flpsh'. racrt aid onlm-k-rn-~l oil from the k rnl or seed.
The oils ar- ouit- diff.-rnt in characteristics. both ar4 used in food
and in soarn, but palm-k'rn 1 oil has th.- sam- ouick lath-rine oualitins
as coconut oil, and is th-rrform a onrticularly dpsirabl= soap inrrrdi nt.
The oil palm is nativ- of tropical Africa: Ili-pria is the most important
exoortPr, acco intinr for n=-rly one-half of th; oalm korn'ls Fntorin-
wecrld trade. Larep estat- clantinrs b?an in Netherland India and British
Malava as parly as 1"10, and production of both kinds of oil has increased
rapidly in those countri.-s as nPw areas have comr into bparinc.

World o-odiction data are not available. and trad fimjrrs are in-
compIl=ot, but th- best available =stimates indicate world -xrcorts of calm
karnpls in trms- of ralm-kmrnpl oil for 1,'l at abo t 527 million pounds.
The total incr-,sod to 321 million pounds in 10T6, but preliminary estimates
indicate some reduction in 1937. Palm oil rntprinr into world Pxnorts in
1931 is estimatPd at abp.ut 5770 million pounds. Total estimates for 1937
are not vet available, for 193g the .stimate is iclacd at sorwhat over a
billion pounds. (S-c table 5.)


- 9 -







FOS-13


Olive oil

Preliminary esti-mates of iliVc oil rouction 1337-33 reason, show
a total of 2, 1?i million pounds compared ritn 1,692 million pounds the
previous year And 2,056 million pounds in 1935-36. In general, olive oil
has na close competitor, but cjDppratively s.tll amounts of corn oil, sesame
oil, teaseed oil, PId so-. otir-r rinor oilc are used to supplement or
adulJterate olive oil. (Se'. table 7.)

Whale oil

The final report for whale oil production for thc 1937-38 season
will not be available for scme weeks, but the latest reports indicate that
the catch will be larger than that of the preceding se,.--.sn, but not as large
as was expected at the beginning of the sea.son. Production fir the Antarctic
season 1530-37 and the 1937 surmer catch in Northern waters totaled
1,102 million pounds, which was lirg.er th-n returns for any other season
except 1930-31, m.ountinr to 1,353 million pounds of oil. Whale oil is
bein.; used in incre-ssinq quantities in the manufacture of cleor'nr 7arine in
European countries. (See table o,)


- 9 -







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FP'S-L3 11 -

Table 5,- Palm kernels in terms of paln-kernel oil, pnd pal :,il: Exports
from principal producins- countries, 1I3:1-37


Count Ir

Africa -
British West
.French Wes.t
Belgian Conqg
Porttugese West
Anglo-Egypti. r: Sud
Other Africa
Total Africa

Asia -
Netherland India
British Malgra,

South America -
Brazil
Gran!. t3ota


PALMI KERNELS INI TERiiS r'F PALM-KEPJEIL f'IL

1931 : 1932 1933 1: 74 1935 193C 1 1937 1/
:Mil.lb. il. L. Mil.b il.Lb. Mil.lb. b. Mil.lb. Mil.lb.

314 355 323 3t62 4c,: 4,G
: lo 127 105 1-3 139 ibo
47 57 62 .9 64 67
17 IS 19 17 13 I1
S 5 3 7 9 9
: 3 7 _74 5 ___ 5)_
S500 607 523 573 635 749 55


12
1


ih


527


18
1

Q


1 '2/


10 31 (0j)


821 731


635


FAL:.1 'IL


Africa -
British West
Belgian Conmg
French West
Portuzese West
Other Africa
Total Africa

Asia -
Netherland India
British Malayra
Grind total.


31
62
10

)I C


265

51
)

i1, s


292

52
9
4
h7g


257
99
56

2
4?-1


372
134
102
(S)
(42


-CU T-I' .


135 137 256 267 316 31l
I0 13 28 36_ 55 66


.919 1 .o7


571


I/ Preliminary.


2/ Less th-.n o.,-.' J oDunds..


Compiled from official sources, Internatioral Yearbook of Agricultural Statis-
tics, and H.M.F. Faure aid Ccmpany. Figures in parentheses are interpolated
estimates, 1937 estimates fr,-m Frank Fehr / Ccmpany.
Season: The fruit frcm which palm oil is extracted is produced ccntinucusly
throughout the year, but it is not always evenly distributed over the months
bf the year. It is reported that in ?Tetherland India the yield is greatest in
August-Ni-vember and lightest in January-February and May-June.


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- 13 -


Table 7.- Olive oil: Production in specified countries, 5-year average
1927-23 to 1931-32, annual 1932-33 to 1937-3E


:5-ear : :
:average: : : :
:1927-23:1932-33:1933-.34:1934-35:1935-36:1936-37
Sto


1:937-38
(Pral.)
!


Europe and Asia -
Spain
Italy 2/
Greece
Portugal
Turkey
Syria
France
Yugoslavia
Palestine
Cyprus
Albania

Africa -
Tunisia
Algeria
French Morocco
Tripolitania

North America -
United States 4/
Estimated world
total 5/


:Mil. lb:Mil. lb Mi

873 : 767
433 : 44s
200 : 296
120 72
46 77
25 : 9
14 : 26
11 : S
6: 3
3 :/ /



: 92 132.
51 : 30
: 22: 1
7:


S 1: 1

: 1,906 : 1,714 1


1. lb.Mil. Ib Mil. Ib Mil. lb


6s4
3s3
232
165
40
35
iO
10
9
2




132.

16
5


2


6z0
518
270
49
55
28
24
9
2
4
4


122
36
25
5


1


96s
436
194
116
51
27
13
7
20
(2)
(4)


132
29
14
6


8s60
334
160
60
55
20
20
4
7
1
4


124
14
22
1


1 4


,74o 1,?34 2,056 1,692


/ Rough estimate.
2/ Includes Italian Aegean Islands from 1927-23 through 1934-35.
Less than 500,000 pounds.
Factory production for the calendar year, i.e., 1932 shown in 1932-33.
5/ The total is summation of data in thousands and includes some minor
interpolations.

Compiled from official sources, the Internaticnal Institute of Agriculture,
and reports of the Paris office of Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

The harvesting of olives in the above countries occurs between October and
February, the exact period varying with the country. Since the finest
oil is made from fruit fully ripened on the trees, harvesting for oil
production is toward the latter part of the period. It is believed that
reported olive oil production refers in all cases to edible olive oil.


FOS-13


Country


Mil. lb.

l/ 838
495
316
198
80
so
30
15
6
22
6
4


2,134


~_


~~~




- L


FOS-13


- 14 -


Table E.- Oleomargrir.esl materials used in manufacture, United States,
1937-33


_: i3j27 : 133 : Percentage of total fatj
Item : Annual : Dc. Ja. : J1n.7 : 193
_: : : Annual : Dec. I 1
:1j 00 lb. 1,000 Ib.L,000 lb.: Percent Percent a Percent

Oleo oil 12,240 703 S 832 : 4 2 z 2
Oleostearine : 3,345 256 : 313 1 1 : 1
Lard, neutral 1,743 191 : 149 a 1 1 t 1
Oleo stock a 1,303 45 72 :1/ 1/ : I/
Total animal 13,636 1,195 r 1,366 : 6 4 4
a : *


Cottonseed oil
Soybean oil
Peanut oil
Corn oil
Tbtnl domestic
vegetable 2/

Oooonut oil
Babassu oil
Paln-kernol oil
Palm oil
Total foreign
vegetable e/


Tc


Mill
9thE



01
pi


t :
: 171,667 15,970 :21,531 :
: 31,573 2,73 6 4,429
: 2,7_7 14 : 1 :
: ,7344 161 : 261

: 207,787 22,012 *26,539


I


73,437 b,225 4,759
14,506 664 a 2,138
7,946 516 : 919
1,063 : -

97,053 7.405 7,316
!


otal fats and oilst 3j23,47'b U,o :35 ,(21


: 72,260 ,6E2 : 7,936
er miscellaneous : 1,S044 _1, 39 s 2,120

rand total 4/ : 41,l145 42,618 142,313

omargarini. : : S
reduction : 397,207 4O,72d :40,476

Less than one-half of one percent. 2/ Orlinarily
Never don-r'-ically prd.iuced; includes 1,000 pounds
These are r-vised totals based on late in.frmat ion
zf the individual items zhow. Individual i+ems
revised data become available.


62 6 60
9 12
1/ :
1 a 1 .
1
72 74
a


'3 20 a 13
5 2 t 6
2 2 3
L/ ,

30 24 : 22

100 100 : 100



I



I
U-----


domrestically produced.
sesame oil in 1937.
and are not the summation
will be corrected when


; Compiled and computed front reports of the Comzissioner of Internal Reverme.


Percentag s have been arbitrerily adjusted to equal 100.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
IIIHIIIIIIIIIIII
3 1262 08904 2617


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